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I HISTORICAL 



DULUTH F.VENING HERALD 



>nriETV, 



18 



^ 



TWENTY-SEVENTH YEAR. 



LAST EDITION. 



THURSDAY, APRIL 22, 1909. 



TWO CENTS. 



MINNESOTA LEGISUTURE 
WINDS UP ITS BUSINESS 



AND FINALLY ADJOURNS 



Club Liquor License Bill 

Was Killed By the 

Senate. 

Amendment to Anti-Pass 

Law Was Permitted 

to Die. 



DYNAMITE jDOWN GOES 

THE PRICE 



Pugh Bill en Timber 

Trespasses Vetoed by 

the Governor. 



(Fvwm a 8I«II r»rreiipoiiil«'nt > 
St Paul. Minn., April ;;2— ':■ 't. 

Tlie M,eraid.)— The Uuiistf, leir. .-t ^rily 
■ few bills unconsidered, adjourned at 
n.45 o'clock this morning and the 
••nate, with more undone at the tlnlsh, 

workcid until 3;3(' o'clock. 




ICEGORGE 

Ton of Explosive Is 

Taken to Niagara 

Falls. 



ROOSEVELT 
NEAR HUNT 



Jam Twelve Miles Long 



and 



Sixty 
Deep. 



Feet 



the Coast 
Africa. 



of 



Wheat on the Toboggan He Starts Inland From 
and Bears Press Their 
Advantage. 

At Patten's Office the 
Break Is Character- 
ized as a Flurry. 



POWERS WARN PERSIAN 
SHAH THAT CONSTITUTION 
MUST BE RECOGNIZED 



Makes Speech in English, 

French and German 

Languages. 



The rlul' "se bill, allowiniar 

' heir m* ■ " ■■ - 
-aioon IK 
ate. getting only 

31 vi 'es i»'>.r-T' It, ut-eded 3a, with 33 

votes agralrnstt it 



c 



The \ 

In tit — . - - 
cent I'H 01 lit- r 

Th€ 

c 
r 
t>. 
t 
ally. 



ax of 



;ime a iaw. 



k- 



ST.". 000 was a.»=kfil 



T': 

law 

___ 



h '■■ r i t a 1"; 
: V 1 t a \ 



1 on |»Kfie !.* tl.ird cv.'luuiu.; 



SKULL CRUSHED; 
POCKETS PICKED 

Chicago Machinist Found 

Murdered in Front of 

Church. 



ANTON BORGEN. 
Duluth Member of thi House. Who 
Worked Faithfully for the Inter- 
ests 01 His District. 



VETO MADE 
STRONG HIT 

Republican Leaders Say 

Governor's Action Was 

Master Stroke. 

They Honor Him for 

the Stand He Has 

Taken. 



Lewlston, N. Y., April 22.— There is 
a slight change for the better in the 
critical condition which for several 
days has threntt-ned the towns along 
the Niagara riv. r. The force of the 
river current, crowded with loose 
lumps of Ice, evidently has ground out 
a .«mooth subway tor Itself beneath the 
main mass of llitj floe, for the water In 
the cellars rose only five Inches during 
the night and receded arf equal dis- 
tance in the early dawn. The Ice 
plowing the ui.per banks, uprooting 
huge trees and smashing docks and 
boat hi'iip-cH, is still poised on its lofty 
level, but the middle line of the sur- 
face of the floe apparently has dropped 
u few fe«t. 

Tlie jam l.s of ,'ipp.iU in^? pr.. portions. 
It Is twelve mllcH in length and In 
mativ places sixty feet in depth, and 
I, r.s nillliona of tons and a 

i^; powerful enough to annihilate 

t a Mill villages along its border if it 
sl.nuid start to go out all at once. An- 
oth.r f'lement of terror is its pestl- 
Uiitlal nature. Mingled with the 
*f!ii.'<iiy ICf and cast high on tlie banks 
\f a week's sewage from all the cities 
along the Niagara frontier. 

The plan of Ht-nry A. Kunzie. as- 
sistant superintendent of public works, 
and fliarU-s A. Tuttle. an expert on 
high expb'slves, who yesterday after- 
noon diClded on a method of procedure 
and in the cveiiirig obtained the permis- 
sion of the state to carry It out, is 
first to blow oft the head of the ice 
pack now projecting into Lake Ontario. 
l.v an eiiurmoua charge of dynamite. 
,;, •. . .. ^.ctions will then be successively 
,1 from the whole and allowed 

t > t out into the lake. A ton of 

tiynamite was sent from Ruffulu last 
night for this purpose and is now in 
Youngstown, at the mouth of the river 
rapt. Mitchell officer in command or 
Fort Niagara. h:is offered the assistance 
of his 120 men. Capt. Nelson, In charge 
of the life saving station at Youngs- 
town, and hla crew of seven men. will 
also help in th e breaking of t he jam. 

ATTEMPT MADE 
TO FREE BOYLE 



Chicago, April 22 —"Has the bull 
campaign in wheat, »o far as the 
public is concerned, be^n abandoned?" 

"Has the bull leader. James A. Pat- 
ten, now reported on his way to visit 
the ranch of a fritnd In Colorado, 
changed his views?" 

These and other questions, ^un- 
thought of a week ago. were rife on 
the board today when the slump in 
wheat continued, prices reach ln.g a 
point 8 cents to 8% cents below the 
record price of last week, when Mr. 
Patten declared wheat was worth in- 
trinsicallv every cent being paid for It. 

Just a week ago May wheat here 
sold at |1.29'/i, and July at $1.18Ti. Re- 
peatedly asked If he had a corner In 
the two deliveries, Mr. Patten emphati- 
cally denied that h« had. a sserting. 



(Continued on page 6, fourth column.) 




WHEAT KING FLEES 
FROM THE LIMELIGHT 



Chfcp 
m :ri 

■ku., >- 
tlie Id e ' 
ren Av«- 
church 1 
to 
Cai- 
1 
t 

ti'UIlU. 



-JamcF Campbell. 



.'. of tt - 

Ey — ,r.- 

,.,1 the case 

.ii.a rr"!'-'b'r 

•• of a.L: I 

iut:. .ti a s»e<. : . .. ■ 

where the body was^ 



St Pan: -Minn., April 22. — (Special to 

Trie Heraia.i The Dispatch says: Oov- 

iiTior JolitJ-vi. --^ veto of the Bjorge ton- 
nag*' ta.x lull ^•tllI continues the topic 
of conver-S'iliun in the two lepsslativ.? 
bcdlei! and varloui* are the hh 

fii' ' - to llB effect on ii;t^' b^J^- 

t .; Hill future. 

: niajoniy of tht- hadt-rs look iiiitm 

*' :;'• a political in;'.t)ter 5lr<'ko. 

.s following a sf.-ii-ui rich 

1 rei^ourcc^, whtcli ha.s here- 

..ne of tlie chief assets of 

party. 

I. ad witli • 



CITY MAY 
OWNPLANT 

Receiver Is Asked for 

the Waterworks at 

Brainerd. 

Condemnation Action May 
Preclude Commence- 
ment of Suit. 



t '.J : - - 
ih« Itept' 
Intervi. 

h-aders of the 

favoi- th. 

of fit- 1 
run t" • 
the 1 
right 
Sf • 
of 
i 
1. 



tw 



T I. publican 
ifenerally 

.... i.,i.-i^t i.- 



'!:>-■ 



lies of 



Jail Watchman finds a 

Ladder Directly Under 

Kidnaper's Window. 

Mercer, Pa , April 22. An attempt 

to liberate Charles Tf. Hovle, charged 
with the WliiUa kl<! from the 

Mercer county Jail, was made last 
night, according to officials at the jail. 
Tliat the «lT">rt failed was due to the 
Vigilance of Night Watchman Robert 
Fruit who discovered a ladder re.^^ting 
against the jail wall, directly und»-r 
th. window of Hoyles cell. It was ap- 
,i;ii u(lv the Intention to saw the bars 
I iriHH the outside. 




Mombasa, British East Africa. April 
22. Theodore Kcosevelt and the mem- 
bers of his party left Mombasa at 2:30 
this afternoon on a special train for 
Kapitl I'lalns station, whence they 
will be conveyed to the ranch of Sir 
Alfred I'ease on the Athix river. Sir 
Alfred is already there awaiting the 
coming of his guests. The party prob- 
ably will remain at the ranch for one 
week, making it the base for shoollng 
expeditions, and then move on to 
Nalrone. 

Roosevelt, his eon Kermlt, Edmund 
Heller. F. C. Selous and R. F. Cunnlng- 
han general manager of the expedi- 
tion,' vvere ente-talned at dinner last 
nig t by the members of the Mombasa 
club The acting governor of the pro- 
tectorate K. J. Jackson, in proposing 
the health of Mr. Roosevelt, read the 

ollowing telegram froni ^ "K. ^^v^-^ard 
••1 bid vou a hearty '^•^'Itome *<^,,^,"i?,'l 
East Africa, and I. trust ^J'^t you w 1 
Imve a pleasant time and meet with 

*'7'cmtrnuTngr Jackson said Roosevelt 
had "elt the -big stick" at i^ome, anu 
after seven strenuous years as pre.-^l- 

dent of the ^'nil^'> ''^''^'^^f'^the Hde 
out to Africa to make use of the rllle. 
In conclusion, he promised the difc- 
tinguished visitor an immense variety 
of game and good sport. 

When Mr. Roos^evelt arose to replv 
he was enthusiastically received with 
full Highland musical honors. Ue be- 
Kan wiUi a tribute to the British peo- 
ple foi their energy and genius in cU- 
lllzing the uncivilized placeg of the 
earth He said he was surprised at 
gr^i_hw^j2a£ heard_ef Jh ^ progress of 
"TContinued on pa ge ■'. sl:vth column. ; 

AllTOS RACE TO 
MOUNTAIN TOP 

Climbing Contest Held on 
Sides of Famous 







Christians in Turkey Im- 
plore Sultan to Fur- 
nish Troops. 

Five American Women 

Missionaries Are in 

Peril. 



Hundred More Persons 

Killed; Five Thousand 

Without Homes. 



SHAH OF PERSIA. 



PlT^Hf tfi 9^^'W' ^ W- W- W' ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 

% 



EVERY ONE MASSACRED. 



NINE FOR 
MINNESOTA 

Census Superintendents 

to Be Appointed By 

the President 

Two Thousand Two Hun- 
dred Enumerators 
In This State. 






Lookout. 



FROM THE HERALD 
WASHINGIXJN BUREAU 



JAMES A. PATTEN, 

Hutchinson, Kan., April 22. — James 
A. Patten, the Chicago wheat bull, 
passed through this city late last night 
en route to Trinidad, Colo., to visit at 
the ranch of a friend near Trinidad. 

Patten said he is making no jiersonal 
investigation of the wheat fields, but 
is lleeing from newspaper publicity. 



Chattanooga. Tenn , April .22.— Ideal 
weather condition.- prevailed and a 
crowd of spectators numbering many 
thousands saw the Lookout mountain 
automobile climb this afternoon. Last 
nierht there was a very heavy down- 
pour o rain which washed all the 
dust and surplus dirt off the mountain 
r6ad and left it hard and ^niooth for 
the race. Business was genet ally sus- 
liended for the climb. 

Of the fifteen entrants ten are noted 
drivers, among them being Lewis 
4t aTiK Dewltt? Loui.- Chevrolet, Grein- 
er of Chicago, Harry Tuttle and Bert 
Miller ad K W. Lytic of Memphis. The 
Mart was made from an old l>lacksrnith 
shop which was the scerie of ihf/<>: 
mance of 'St Elmo" and the goal i.= 
?ht mountain house on the top of 
Lcekout. 



t 



lUivan, in speaking 

i! t<l that it was an 

leiil of tiie stand tliat li>' !tad 

led ail thmutrli t!ie ci-nsiUer- 

:i : r'.' Lit!, 'It in official 

,1 . ; i > K<{ \ii .:'. .~t-.' , -led. 

"1 a;a a Kfjiuldli-a ' ••<■<! 

iKPt stand in tlie woy > ng 

my.self r*'S«'fding our ' ''V- 

ernor. ■ .■^an.i Frank T. ik 

SI -\ I M 1, .1 unin.) 



(Coiilinueci on lai,'. 



IT MAY BE NECESSARY FOR THE OLD MAN TO DO A LITTLE RUG 

BEATING. 

.;m««*«***»*««»»'«***«*»»»*******«********''****************' '' ***************"* **' ' 



Brainerd 
to The H' 
with the < 

Cr 

11' 

CC . 

take unn.« 

!"(*, V f'' ft 11*'*^. 

Ti 

I.'-. 

of 



Mir.T.., *1 

■t-m!'!. -'^ l\i. ■- ■■■■■■ ■--'■d 

!, I k of the di.«trlct r-.,.:irt of 

inty today a.9king the 

the first mortgage of 

the waterworkB plant 

^^|t., .,..„,,♦., Waterworks 

so asked, to 

. !.'■,) !it and 

luuKht by the Central 
.♦ N'fw York aa t ma- 
Butler & Mitchell 



■ : ' the city at- 
nnatlon pro- 

j., , '• I ■■■•■• "*' 'i:at 

©fr- . '''^ 

*^The compiiilnt alleg«'S that the prop- 
erty is wi.rtl, substantial! V !rs-.<« than 
the first ■ '<^'- *»"d tli;;' rapid- 
ly deteri ^'- The t; wuh 
due Jan. 1, li"-*"?. an<S '" ""« I'*-'"" 
paid. 




OOVERXOIfS NOTK 

TO t;OVERNOR SENT 

BY MOTOR BOAT. 



m riiicliliiall. Olilo. .^pril 'Z'2. — M. 
HI B. Draii. Harry Da%%et^ ami M. 
m McLalH U'tt Chuliiiiall at » 
« o'4l(M>k this iiiornliig Kailinic in a 
« small iiiot.»r Iwiat In an effort to 

* break all water .spee<I reeordK 

* from Ihls rity to New Orleans by 

* the Ohio and Mississippi rivers. 
m Tliev will try to t-over the distance 
« of l.5.%4 miles In sixty lioai-H. 
« trtivelhiK by day only and will 
fit have to make an averajie of Ivven- 
il ty-flve miles an liour to be siu'- 
ifl e«»s»ful. Mr. Dean will earry a 
)|f letter froni tiovertutr Harmon of 

* Olilo to tiovernor Siinders of 
i Louisiana. 



t » *»**« * » »**»^ 



* 

* 
* 

* 

* 
* 

♦ 



FUEL HEAVED 
BY^FFICERS 

The Cruiser Milwaukee 

Smashes All Records 

for Coaling Ships. 

Seattle. Vi'a--h., April 22. — A special 
to the Post Intelligencer from the ii.i\ n 
yard i'uget .Sound, says: 

."Spurred on by th*- record made i>y 
the Bleu : Louis, the cruiser Mil- 

wauket- lay smashed all records 

for coaling < '!'tir> 

men ■■■■''-' --•vyi il.-vvn and ..»..,. ;i». ., -j-aI. 
In II la half hours the crew took 

abo;i - t A total of 21 IS 

meii who weighed and 

talll-a In.- V.I.. > rt in the task. 

The average tak. utl per hour 

was 1&8 tonu, and i.. : st reconl maile 
for one hour was 2t>8 tons. 

The world's record heretofo; > a. - 
held by tlie b attleship Virgi nia. 

ALICE NEILSON 
MIXED IN SUIT 

Contest on to Recover 

Money Spent in 

Starring Her. 

San Francisco. Cal.. April 22. — Alice 
Neilson. the singer; Thomas H. Wll- 
IJams. president of tlie New California 
.lockey < U.l>, and Frank L. P.rl-y, well 



^^ 



kn<' 

a V 

CIM: 
'I 



► atrical nmnaKer. figure in 
the United States district 

-t .h-veli>iirneii[ in tl.*- ca.-^e l.H 
!• ^ .iii.swer to the .suit tlied by 

OS to recover $20,000. half the 
,.,^,. -• i...i.r.>.,i in starring the prima 

I . : . .it.'S lif \va.«; not a part- 

ner in .iiur.. but was employed 

at a sa ■ SI 00 a week to manage 

Mi^^ .N%ii.s,.ns tour. He exhibits his 
cuntract with Williams to Drove the 
ubserllon. 




Washington. April 22.— (Special tv_ 
The Herald.) — The directcr f' "the cen- 
sus is anticipating the pas.=age of the 
bill providing for the taking of the 
next census by laying plans for the 
appointment of supervisors and enu- 
merator.« . 

For Minnesota there will be nine su- 
pervisors named by the president, 
whose compensation will be flSOO and 
an additional remuneration of %l per 
1.000 name.-; enumerated In their respec- 
tive districts. The supervisors will 
be appointed to follow as closely as 
possible the geographical iines ot the 
congressional districts. 

To take the thirteenth census In 
Minnesota there will be appointed 2.200 
enumerators, as against 1,700 enjployed 
in that state ten years ago. and these 
enumerator.'- will be paid a per capita 
amount for names secured. 

It is planned to complete the census 
enumeration within thirty days in the 
rural districts and to allow fifteen days 
In cities of .^.00 or over. 

PASTOR VICTIM 
OF CAPT- HAINS 

Will Testify About AttacR 

Made on Him in 

Jail. 

Flushing. N. Y.. April 22.— Five jur- 
ors for the trial of Capt. Peter C. 
Mains, Jr , charged with the murder 
of William E. Annis, had been selected 
when the court opened its fourth dai 
of the hearing today. The first pane 
of 150 talesmen having been exhausted 
with the choice of the five jurors, a 
new panel of a similar number was in 
court today. 

.John F. Mclntyre, chief counsel for 
the defense said today that wlnle he 
hoped the necessity for calling alien- 
ist witnes.^es would not arise, several 
experts for the defense had examined 
the prisoner and reported him insane. 

Rev. Charles L. Pardee, a Pi;esby- 
terian minister of Naugatuck, Conn., 
who according to the lawyers for the 
defense was attacked by Capt. Hains 
in one of his outbreaks during a visit 
of the minister to the Queen county 
jail, will be one of the wlthesses for 
the defense In its effort to establish 
the defendants Insanity. 4v,„..,v.^ 

The Impression still prevails that the 

nuestion of appointing a commisslori 

to determine the defendant's mental 

condition will arise as soon &a the 

state's case is in and the first evidence 

Introduced by the defense. The court 

! has the authority to stop the trial at 

I that point and order a commission, it 

I is said. 

TROUBLE IN GRADING 

CANAL ZONK SCHOOLS. 



^ Aleppo, Asiatic Turkey, April * 

* 20. Tuewlay — The entire popula- * 

* tion of Ivirikan. Im-attHl betwc-en * 

* lieie and AlexandretUi, even to * 
^ the last bab<N has been niai«saertxl. * 
jj^ The Kreiifh mission at Kkbaz is * 
^(^ besieged by I ana ilea I Mo.slenis. * 
^ The .'Vnnonlan village of Deurt- * 

* yul Is suri-ounileil and. acc-ortlin}? # 
^ to a messen;;er, who erawled ^(l 

* ti>rou|;h the ;\rab lines at night 

* and made his way here for help. 

* the situation iliere is hopeless. 

* The bulldins*' on '.he edge of the 
^ H»wn already were in flames * 

* wlien he eseapi'd. * 

Tehoran, April 22. — The British and 
Russian diplomatic representatives 
wtre received in audience by the sliah 
tcday and advised his majesty to pro- 
claim punishment to all political offend- 
ers, and to restore the constitution. 
The shah promised to reply will In a 
few days. 

More t'onfllelH Feared. 

(■.r.st.-intinople, April 22. — Grave neWB 
was received here this morning from 
Erzerum, the principal town of Turk- 
ish Armenia. The transports of delight 
of the people at the proclamation ot 
constitutional government are now be- 
ing supplanted by a movement in favor 
of the Sherl laws and the .sultan which, 
it is feared may lead to a conllict be- 
tween Christians and Moslems. The 
wave of fanatiols.n, which originated 
at Adana some ten days ago. apparently 
is spreading generally through the 
eastern provinces. The Christian vil- 
lages In the vilayets of Alei>po and 
.Sivias have been attacked by Kurds, 
Ciriassians and Nomads and the Inhabi- 
tants are imploring the porte to send 
troops for their protection. 

Negotiations are proceeding between 
Nazim Pasha, the commander of tha 
First army corps, wliich garrisonn Con- 
stantinople and the commanding gen- 
eral of the army of investment on tn« 
following points: 

The disbandment of 50.000 tlm« ex- 



( Continued un page 6, fifth column.) 

ONLY TWO 
COCKTAILS 

That Is Alleged to Be 

Mrs. Gould's 

Limit. 



Dustin Farnum Testifies 

That Her Character 

Is Good. 



Chicago, April 22— Dustin Farnum't 
deposition In the Gould divorce caea 
was taken today before Attorney Lewis 
C. Ehle, Mrs. Gould was represented 
by Clarence J. Shearn, and Mr. Gould 
by Archibald Watson. 

The actor was a willing witness. He 
stated that he had known Mrs. Gould 
.seven or eight years, had met her on 
an average of not mure than once a 
.year, and had never witnessed any- 
thing derogatory to her character In 
her habits. Their own relations were 
those of acquaintances only. He had 
never seen Mrs. Gould drink an intoxi- 
cant, he said. », , « 
The deposition of Mrs. Norrls H. 
Mundv. whose father was master of the 
Gould" vacht "Niagara" and who, be- 
fore her marriage, was a companion 
of Mrs. Gould on several trips, was 
also taken. She testified she had never 
seen Mrs Gould drink more than two 
cocktails at one sitting, nor had she 
observed any particular intimacy be- 
tween Mrs. Gould and Farnum. 



Washington, April 22.— Many diffi- 
culties are to be encountered, accord- 
ing to official reports from the isth- 
mian canal zone. In grading the public 
schools there. The points of view of 
people coming from hundreds of dif- 
ferent places on educational matters 
have proved one of the greatest handi- 
caps. Not only do the w-hite 'lilUlren 
alone represent over GOO different 
schools and a score or more distinct 
educational systems, but the teachers 
tliemselves represent sixteen different 
states. 

SETTLEMENT OF MINE 

TROUBLE MAY BE NEAR. 

Philadelphia. April 22.--Renewed ac- 
tivity of the national and district offi- 
cers of the mine worker.s' union and 
an unexpected conference here yester- 
dav between them and representatives 
of' the operators, leads to the belief 
that a settlement of the differences be- 
tween the mine workers and their em- 
ployers may be close at band. 



v\ikkm:ss systkm 

CHKAPKK THAN PHONF 

Olt CABLE SEKVICE. 



K VVashinjrton, .^pril 22. — Finding * 
1^ that a wireles.s telegraph system * 
He is eheaper than a telephone or a * 
)(t cable service, the Istliniian canal * 
i^ commission has decide<I U> erect a » 

* station at Porto Bello, a port on » 
^ the Caribbean sea, eighteen miles * 

* ea«t of Colon, to <ommunU'at*; * 

* with C^olon. The eruslu-<l nnk for * 

* the cortcrete work of (iatun locks m 

* and the spill way of Gatun dam is * 
^ to be ol)taincd from I*orl<» lk-llc>^ « 
^ This will amount to 2..'>00.000 * 

* cubic yards. The immense amount J 
■^ of transportation fr<im l»orto lU'l- ♦ 

* lo necessitated a rapid means of J 
eommunicatlon. * 




"^p^ ■ 



■ ' 





DEFECTIVE PAGE 





THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD » THURSDAY, APRIL 22, 1909. 



0! 



©isimli!ii|Ilini%aiiiniJ t! 



Tlic man or youno: nvdii wlio likes to look 
mctr()i)<>lii:ui without p»ini;- to a ridiculous ex- 
treme, cannot find a much better \va\ >)\ acconi- 
plisliinL: !ii^ end than Ity wearing one i)f our l)eau- 
tiful new electric i^ray suii>. Then add a h.uht- 
weight t(ip coat just a shade darker than ihe suit, 
and '■ »nd)niaunn is excellent. ^■ou've seen 
men un ^>ed like iliat— .'uid you always liked it. 
Whv not try it yourselt". W hy shouldn't you he 
one of tlie hesl dressed men in the cii}?' It 
won't cost you nearly so nuich a> you imaj:!:ine. 
You can do 'it on §15 per garment, if you cho()se 
from our hand-tailored jn-arnieiUs at that price. 
or \<ni can spend a little ni<«re and ^et tMie of 
our newot IWnch-Made Suits or Overcoats at 



SOLONS MUCH AFFECTED; 
TEARS IN MANY EYES AT 
THE THOUGHT OF PARTING 



-^,M 



#( 



iO 



Superior St. at 4th Ave. West. 



Several Resolutions for Increased Tax- 
ation of Iron Mines Are Killed. 

All Salary Increases and Gratuities Are 
Voted Down By the House. 



Our Rebuilding Sale Gathers 
More Friends as it Rolls Along 



Such exceeding values in the month of April could not do otherwise. 



<l'r«nii a !»liilf CorreMpondi'Ut.J 

Si, fa'ii, Minn. Ai'fil : :.- i Si>.-ci,il to 
i-ast ■•II'- s.i.li'>n of 

s I X I i 1 



Thi' H'lai 
rt.'Ut:*f. Til 



\.) A I 

will 1 1 

f 1 1 1 11- 1 ;. 



iMl;;.- .<i'^h of 
sv.^.-iiiii I'f tl»e 



MliiiusMla tt^islutiir.' a<ij<>iirufd sine 
die Mliortly -itU'v 1 o".-l.>< k this afler- 
noon. Tlie morninu whji s|>enl tn pit-jJ- 
enialion sixMctifS, elf., many ot lliem 
;. and teals sprung t" 
I the thoutflit of paitinj? 
lour mutitli.- .'i' ('.nae cuin- 



ver> - 
many • 
aflfi neatly 
patiion.'jhip. 



lion ' 
both 



( 1 1 1 , t j I in - 



, ul 

lilt' 






incroased .taxa- 
■ introduftMl in 
vvtre s«'nl i»ver 

... \\ ill lit' no 
1 bate 



Sp®©ial f@r FrMasf amid! SaSyrfasf 

Gimationt Per Doz. 26c Tulips Per Doz. 25o 

ALSO ALL THE PLANTS IN MY SHOW 
HOUSE AT ONE-HALF THE USUAL PRICE. 



Senator Cashinan ■•! owat.iiin:! <if- 
ferfil a re.wluti.»n In ti;.- s.-nat.- .iirt-t-t- 
InK tlie tax (•<>tnini.-<si«>n I'l laii^-j me 
mUu' valuatiuns lo f aoO.OOO.UOM. and 
.Scnat'ir [^avlxturn Rave notice ot df'- 
■ Mian moved to su.s- 
I? resolution could 
i„. I' MM i». hut ill.'* molioti 

iml :>1 ii«aiii5l. It 



dvl- 



li-l' 



t ol- 



i 



i;.'n«iix*'n offfit'd a 

iii itie hou.'se. and 

! I. Wallae** of Min- 

. .f It by a notice of 



I. (100 Easter I dies, each 

"00 Hv ^' ■■ 
ICH} Hj'.- 
I (A) Rose : 
5(Xl Fern:i. c .,;.■• • 
Palms, r:ich 



50<^ 

15f 

Z5t 

.Zat to $-2.00 
25f to $1.00 
50f t> $2.60 



A.nd hu 

Come ana 



-. of oth- 

cc what i 



n at bargain prices, as I need the roini. 



J. J. LEiO^DiyS, FLOBDST. 

921 EAST THIRD STREET. 



« • • 

,ii\.' vN.ir.' ■f N-o-thfl.>ld 
1 a f..-»oluli>>u ifh3uriu« iJovernor 
in for I'ls tonnH«je lax veto, and 
■ '\if mii»e valua- 



urfeUirf an in 

tlous lo j:{i)' 

tiv'i* Waiiace puL mat 

similarly disposed of a 

by Senator Sv. 

•*tat«- auditor i 

limber until ■' 



lid Kepresenta- 

over, too. He 

iolnl rt'.solution 

directing the 

. «ellins state 



The Ison 
lion by .- 
state tax 



V" t ' u 1 ' < I 



i , ,ir- ^. aal.' resolu- 
IWfll, asking the 
,i.jii not to disturb 



materially the prewent a-s-se-saed \ aUia- 
llons .o- ■'■.- -- .f m onler to head olt 
ll,^ p, e of all valualixns 

n, if... ictual value, as the 

*' I oigdon. in explair^- 



ing hiii vote for the firt»t time, said that 
the resolution asked the commission to 
violate the law and its oath of ufflce. 
and he wouldn't vote for It. 

Uepresentative Stuart said the leg- 
islature had ample eliance to change 
existing conditions and prevent a rise 
to l')t» per cent, but It had failed to 
do .so. and he wouUI not vote to ask 
tlie commission to disobey the law. At 
first nearly everyboily voted for it. but 
many cha'nired, so the final vote was 
tJT to 31'. 

• * • 

The rules committee of the house 
killed all proposed salary Increases and 
Kiatuities .and the house sustained its 
r»'port.<». In one case, where a young 
man had worked all winter and had 
not earned much, the house look up a 
colleitlori i>t $1 apiece fi>r him. 

Ill thp senate a numbi-r of salary 
increases were voted, and the tele- 
phone girls were given $100 apiece. 

Itepresentatives Brady. Rlnes and L. 
n. Johnson visited the governor, on 
belialf of tlie house, to ask him If he 
luul anvtiilug t.v communicate, and re- 
turned' with the reply that he had 
not, exc*>pt God>»peed to one and all. 

Senators Calhoun, Wilson and Schal- 
ler pf^rformeil a tiimiiar errand for the 
.senate, and upon their return Senator 
t'alhoun said the governor had noth- 
ing to say 'to the .senate collectively, 
but .sent blessings lo its members In- 
i.;!\ iduullj. 

* * * 

There were the usual res^olutlons 
and motion.'* .thaftking the desk forces, 
and particularly Speaker Kockne and 
Ueulenant Goveirnor Kberhart. for tlu-ir 
efficiency. Presents were given to the 
presiding officers, to the desk forces 
and others. 

4 • • 

In the house. Representative Grant, 
in belialf of the tri-county delegation, 
save .lohn O. L.enn'm Its chairman, a 
liandso.ne ring, ahd Representative Mc- 
Kenxie. In pehalf of the old members, 
gave I- H .Johnson a watch clialn. 1 lie 
presiding officers and the desk forces 
were handsomely remembered and tlie 
speeclies of presentation and accep- 
tance were very touching. Shortly aft- 
er 1 o'clock both houses, adjourned for 

*^"'^'*" STILLMAN H. BINGHAM. 



Tailored Suits 
$19.50, $25 and $35 

Regular prices $25 to $45. 

Jrotteur Dresses 

Foulard, Messaline and Serge, 

$12.50 and $19.50 

Regular values $22 50 and up. 

Linserie Waists Net Waists Messaline Waists 

Former prices 
$6.50 to $8.50. 



Separate Coats 

Coverts and Serges. 

$15.00 and $25.00 

Regular values $22.50 and $29.50. 

Black Broadcloth Coats 

Extraordinary values at 

$22.50 

Full lengths in Chiffon Broadcloth, satin-lined to 



waist. 



10* ^ r\r\ Former prices White and Coiored Q^ ^/^ Former prices 

i5o.t/U $6.50 to $10.00. CO 75 ^jj?''."^^'" PJ;^S.<'.^ <^0«0l^ $7.50 to $10.00 



Lingerie Dresses 
Reduced V4, Vz and V2 

Regular values $15 to $100. 



Messaline and Taffeta 
Petticoats at $3.75 

Black and colors; regular price^?6.50 to $7.50. 
(No 'phone ord^jr ) 




OLD 'PHONE. 2765-L. 



NEW 'PHONE, 2015. 



REBEL FLAGS TO 
BE SENT BACK 



FARMKUS PLAN MEKi lN(i 

SATlKItAV kl TAMAUAl K. 



Will Return Em- 
blems TaKen From Ala- 
bama Troops. 






:ifl. <:>„ 



•■Til 



:J 1 1 . . ( 

close 

' iU of 
.J the 

■sviUe, 

'"I !' 

ij -vie a 
ii[ Ur- 

:•' 'he 



.LjT.iWin;- 



rri-urii,', Minn 
and give Injitr 



. A jifit - \, 

■;. Many sub- 

1 It 11 re will be 

- , l.ut il is in- 

■-'•'• '-n to the 

Til ere 

in the 

A. D. 

: ianiier.s' in- 

th of Parkers 

!>'■ lu-'eling 



HAPPY END 

TO ROMANCE _ 

Stanley Michaud and Ella Most of the BroKers TaKe 
McKlttrlcK Married at Medicine and Pay 



SCOTT DEAL 
SOLE TOPIC 



One Week From Saturday We Move From the Annex—Stocks Are 
Larse and Must Be Put in **Ship-Shape*\ Hence These Reductions 

■M /f» _f y^^^.A« Box and three-quarter lengths. Reg- C ^ f\f\ 

JMlSSeS K^OatS ular prices $6.50 to $7.50; sizes 8 to 16. <>0. UU 

Small Children's Coats at Liberal Reductions 

Sizes 2 to 6 years While Serges and Worsteds, light stripes and clieck^ and plain colors. 

Misses' Suits f:^'.?'':''...$25.00 l^^nz ^^:.:i''''' 

Other Exceptional Values in Misses' Suits at $15.00 and $22.50 

Regular prices $17.50 and $25. respectively— checks and mixtures. 

Correct Drest 

for won>,n . ^/ic/ SUghtfy SoUed UndermusHns 

Reduced Vz and V2 

Chemi_.es. Drawers. Skirts. Gown^ and Ci^rset Covers; regularly 50o 
to $10.00. 

First • 

^" **: Fancy Silk Hose at Vi and 'A Off 



A 



* jifTrnAiii 




itXmmm0$m9m 



and Sup. St, 



Black and colors — some slightly soiled — regularly $1.50 to $9.00. 



l.iv. 



(all Roy's Auto 

I ICisr Mi.'liit^an str. 



N'ew 



OLD FARIKIAX DEAD. 




lyoYAL YENDES 

ARTILLERY REGIMENT 

BAND of Sweden 

LYCEUM THEATER 

Mxttnce and Klqht. 7:30 and 8:13 p. m 

SUNDAY, APRIL 25. 

TICKET SALE BE6IM9 FRIDAY. 



the Courthouse. 

Met at an Indoor Base- 
ball Game Last 
Winter. 



.Vluliaiiil 
•■^t. LxUls !; 
,i. B. Mlddh 

AicotnpaiU'-'i 
'uaiipy c'Hipif 
lilts moriiiim II 



THE PROGRESSIVE 
MEDICAL ASSOCIATION 

CURES MEN! 

VUUM % \ hl'STl. V , fU-KKCTl VK- 
,L¥, A\n TO >-I'AV Cl'RI<:i> 

In tha Quickest Possible Time 



MRS. BAMBARD 
GETS INSURANCE 

Jury Brings in Verdict 

Against the Modern 

Woodmen. 

Mrs. Ollif M. i:anit>aid, wiio wa.s 

suinij tlie Modei'n W'on.iiiirii jf Amci- 
i-a for the iii.S'i ■ ried in tlie 

iiidge by her hu this in..rn- 

ins awar<led *l.'^ lury. 

II Is said tliat mis > a>.- was but a 
test case, and tiiat ther** will now be 
s..-v<-ral more in.-tit':- ■ nlust differ- 
t-ni fralfciiial iii.-iurai.. i 

Clarence 11 H'n,H«r 



Tlie terniiuulion o( a !);-tts liltle 
romanee came thin inoniin.; ■; ilie 
, , " I M.lvi! ti M k of 

-, ; ,. , .•■ iiml .Sumley 

I l..iai'.' .Mil luju.i oC the 
.,. vv.'f iiuori'"i i'' .I'l'lse 
rr ot ti.r I""' '"■*• 

\,v i\\ .) ii !• li''-!. the 
-,.,■•11. "I ih'-ii' license 
,,1 : til- ai.s- 

tiii-i Ciiurt. and leu inm.'i-- .uU-r lUey 
litt !(.-■ iMiildinis man and wil^e. 

. thr indoor bast-bull gani^ 

I riiiird Commercial Trav- 

,-,... auu uif All Stars at tlie Armory 
Kt winter that lliey were Introduced 
by a mutual friend. Il was a ease of 
love at lir«t siKbt. This J^r^" tin- bo- 
Kiniii'"' ti'.» end came in the office ol 
til,. , his morniiiK. 

Mr- ■ :^ilU-ick ha.s i-,>i i!'-'' i'ast 
ihr.-.- muiillia be^n employed at the 
M-w.s Htand in the Hot-i Mckay. .she 
made many friends while f , * >** , ;^ e'- 
and thev wert^ all on hand this moin- 
iiB. Slie has been In the city only a 
short tlm.>. coming here with her par- 
tiita from Buffalo. , , , 

Mr. Michaud is wcl! known about 
Pulotli. where he has liv.^d th«? greater 
pari of hl-H 111'*-. 



Out Cash. 



Close Out Trades With 

Merritt at Market 

Price. 



ocoii aioci\, . w ri^: mc «x»»- 

toplcs of convet4|ition in the 
offices along .^ujerior street 



FOLLOWING WESTON 



1 . 



•- i. .1 .,f 



I'll. i;ucU!llttllSlU. 

:■'- iX'iisiat if or 
al di- ^- '■ • 
wit hoy 



1 f 

•II 



in I n i • 1 1 s 

. V\-,.. ^ ! 11. .,i 



s Ml i* u in 



PROCRESSIVE MEDICAL 
ISSOCMTION. 



( orner l.nWt- Ave., Uuliitli. 



luth in 19US. 

the Hi 
W 

f..i 

l*a.r*fcd 



!;iv "'if 



on 



Hanibard 
He was 

l'"dK' 



.■!t»ties 

di".l in I>ii- 
nber of 



MiK*- •• Modern 

:»rl(a. and Mm. liam- 
1 tlie insurance was 
ua.->t:u u.i 'lie fact that he was in 
good .standing: at the time nf \\v> death. 
Vlu- ii.ilg.' <■' ' that Ms dues for 

nii.n'tii ; t«C death iiad not 

, ; t. 1 : , ■ . . i.-d tliat 



til. 
1.1 

I i„ 

!■>■ 
ij. 



■1 : 
wa.s 

.ifter iu.- 



1 • • J I 1 1 <_M 1 



i.'d that 

by liis 
I u f iJ a y ! 



he 



BeniidJI % iHilur>i .Arrive. 

Bemidji. Minn.. April i-_', — « Special to 
The Herald. )— A. F. Chandler, a banker 
i>f FarRo. »<>.'..iiu)niiit-.I ti\ lihs son and 
ilaut:iit'.M. -int; a fore- 

■ 1 visitors 

itid Fui ks and otlier 

d the summer months 

I 1 J : i, Lake Bemidji. 

(■nuiiller wasi the last memh*>r 

sanuii ' y to leave the lak 



!!,■,: 

'.!t \. 

.Mi 

III 



l!i.M.minKt.,n. Ill . April ri.— Edwaro 
I'avMi.n Weslou will arrive in Blonm- 
Iniiton this evening after a ttlly-mlle 
hike alontf the Alton road. He will 
he met several miles from here hy a 
deleKation of admirer.s and aecmpati- 
i«.d 10 the city. He plans a sixty-mile 
jaunt tomorrow taking him into 
Spi ii.gti''!d 

IS (OLDEST SPKIMi 

IN TWEMV YEARS. 



VVinnip*'g. Man. April 22 —Western 
Canada awoke today to fin<l the Kroimd 
covered with snow and to experience 
a bit ins northwest wind. It was 7 
nhuvc lier>- at 8 o'clock, zero at Prince 
\n)ert and 4 above zero at QuAppelle. 
The cold has seriously delayed seeding. 
Tiii.s is the coldest spring in twenty 
vcar.s. 



Ui;n fall ami 
litis .si'usi.oi. 



first one to arrivi 




t 

r;i 
r; 

!.' 
t'l ■ 
is i i 
.1 1<' 



lliliwttrtii ll<>»ii«|u*r«erM. 

.Monriit-ad, .Minn.. -Vprii r.'.— «Sr-ecial 

'i-i,., U....I.1 I T(... V,,rli.,.i-n r'::i,-iflf 

li 



wortli iH I lie nvvf Nor 111 - 
tivlsion lic.id'iuarter!«. and 
<]. Tliere 
IK) dwel- 
ling house.s m : ,■ i nis num- 
ber will be dou> jrf lull. 



All Physicians 

Must prescribe some of the in- 
gredients that are contained In 
Hood's 8arsaparilla-for all trou' 
bles of the bloodj stomach, kid- 
neys and liver. 

They include parsaparilla, stilHngia, 
yellow dock, gentian, wild clierry bark, 
mandrake, dandelioa, juniper berries, 
pipsi-ssewa, etc. 

The combination and proportions are 
onr own formula and give power to cure 
i^eyond the reach of any otlier prescrip- 
tion or substitute. That's whv it is 
wise to get Hood's and only Hood's. 



The failure of^Fred H. Merritt and 
the collapse ♦! tt^ boom in Bglte-Alex 
Scott stock, 1 wfre the all-absorbing 

the brokers' 
again to- 
day, and in fart/comprised about the 
only things floiug. for the trading 
they did in local curbs stocks was not 
enough to ke.-p one broker busy . 

Brokers who compri-se Ihe gleat ma- 
jority of Mr. Merrill's creditors, held 
a meeting late yesterday afternoon and 
decided to dt»se out their trades with 
him. at the market prices, but at that 
they will sul?er 'iTeavy losses as there 
is practically no liidding for either tlie 
part paid or full paid Bulte-Alex ScoU 
stock, at any price, in spite of the fact 
that nothing de^i^imental to the mine 
it.Helf has be«»n brouglit out. 

The events of the past few days 
have scared the public and caused it to 
show an aloofness toward that issue 
and a bashfulness about trading in 
any oHiers, and the losses which many 
of the brokers su-stained have caused 
them to be suspicious of the financial 
standing of some of their fellows. 

.V majoritv of the brokers, who are 
left higli and dry with their shrunken 
Butte-.Mcx Scott .^shares by the failure 
of Mr. Merritt to take them up at the 
iilgh prices which he bid for them, are 
taking tlieir medicine and giving their 
eliecks to customers from whom they 
hought in exciiange for the certificates, 
l.ut three or four of the brokers are 
declining to take tlie certificates. The 
Merritt failure, however, fell largely 
upon the siioulders of tlie other brokers 
along the street with whom he did 
husiness. 

Although Mr. Merrltfs ofTlce did not 
hear from him today, it is supposed 
tliat he left Ptttaburg for Duluth this 
morning and should be iiome tomor- 
row. It Is almost a certainty that 
it, upon his return, he does not make 
a satisfactory adjustment of his af- 
fairs. Merrllt's creditors will apply for 
a receiver to take over his business, 
and they may do It before he gets back. 
Butte-Alex .Scott is the "deadest" Is- 
sue in a slumbering curb market to- 
dav There are no bids at all for the 
full paid Alex Scott, and It is quoted 
at $9.50 asked. At the office of Mar- 
tin rtosendahl. wlio ha« played a 
prominent part In the boosting of the 
slock, sales of $2 paid Altx Scott were 
reported today at $7.50, and at the 
office of I.ee & Co.. who have been cry- 
ing "manipulation" in the handling of 
the Issues, sales of tlie $2 paid stock 
were reported at $6.t)2Vi. Dtlier brokers 
claim thev have TSeen unable to make 
any trades whatever in either the part 
paid or tiie iJU P^d. 

Some of ih.' brokers spent their idle 
moments this niowiing issuing clial- 
lenges and statements to other brok- 
er.s Martin liostnivJahl look his chalk 
in hand and wrote a query on his 
blackboard, asking .1. H. Uobbers this: 
"T!ie last statement Butte-Ballaklava 
issued stated they had 210.000 shares 
issued. Now they claim only 25.000 
shares'in thei treasury. Ask J. H. Itob- 
l.ers what became of the remaining 
15 000 shares. Who got it. and at what 
pr'ice? Did any xirdinary stockholders 
get it cheap?" . 

The otlier brokvr.'* intimat*> in their 
conver.-^ation, and threaten to post on 
tlieir blackboards, tliat .Mr. Kosendahl 
doesn't know* tvhat lif* is talking about, 
and that he K*t ou,t with the money in 
t'le Butte-Alti^ fci;k>ff deal. 

Up to this afternoon. Mr. Robbers 



liad not posted on his board an answer 
to the Ilosendahl screed, but a merry 
war seems imminent. 

In the meantime, the public is get- 
ling it.s cash for tlie Alex Scott It sold 
to the brokers, who are paying for the 
certiflcates and cussing the brokers 
who are refusing to accept the paiiers. 

Up to date, tiie Merritt crasli ha.s 
not sent anv other brokers to the wall. 

OVERBECK 
ALL^ENIAL 

Says No to Questions Put 
in Senatorial Investi- 
gation. 

Immel Tells of Proposal 

to Get Back Cam- 

pai{^n Cash. 



\ 

* \ 



SECOND-HAND 

FURNITURE 

FOR SALE CHEAP at 

111 West First Street. 



Having purcha:>cd the entire lot of furniture of the 20-room 

rooming house at 111 West First street, consisting of Bedroom 

Suites, Carpets, Rugs, Curtains, Folding Beds, Tables, etc. Also 

Restaurant Furniture, Ranges. Gas Range, Sideboards. Kitchen 
Utensils. 

Must Be Closed Out During Next 3 Days. 









1 




' 




- 








. 


; 




















' 


' 



Madison. Wis., April 22. — Henry Over- 
beck continued his testimony before 
tlie senatorial investigation commit- 
tee today, being questioned in connec- 
tion wltii the joint ballot of March 4, 
when Isaac .Stephenson was re-elected 
United States senator, 

"Whenever the antl-Stephenson men 
stayed out, vou wanted your men in, 
didn't you?" Mr. Over beck was asked. 

"Sure; we always wanted them in." 

Overbeck added that he never had in- 
structed Mr. Wa viand to take care 
of Towne," or anybody. Asked wheth- 
er on the Tuesday preceding the final 
ballot he had telegraphed or caused 
to be telegraphed to Assemblymen 
Kam.sey and Farrell (Democrats) the 
summons to come to the chamber. Over- 
beck said: 

"Not to my knowledge. 

"Do you n-iean to say tl at you never 
talked with Kamsey or Farrell about 
what they should do with regard to 
tlie Stephenson election?" 

"Certainly." .. ,, . 

"Did you hear anybody else talk to 
them?" 

"Not to my knowledge. 

"Don't you know that during the 
deadlock certain people from the coun- 
try districts came here to influence the 
Democratic members of the legislature 
in favor of Stephenson, or to offer 
certain sums of money to them. 

"I don't know tliat." 

Overljeck said he supposed Edmonds 
was in charge of Stephenson s affairs 
during the deadlock and that he as- 
Listed him. He denied having tried to 
stifle the investigation. 

He next told of hiring a special train 
to bring Assemblyman Reader to .Madi- 
son, on March 3 in time to vote for 
Stenhenson, Witness learned after- 
wards that R. J. Shields of Superior 
h'ld arranged for the train and paid 
for it Whether Reader repaid Shields 
he did not know. Overbeck also said 
he got $600 from Mr. Edmonds for 
.services and disbursements during the 
several weeks in which joint ballot.s 
were taken for United States senator 

Deputy Game Warden E. X. Immel 
made the startling statement that 
Deputy Frank Brown asked him for 
a contribution for Governor David- 
son's campaign fund, and In doing so 
Informed him that he need be nothing 
out of pocket. "Put it In your voucher 
each month until you get your money 
back." witness alleges was the state- 
ment made to him by Brown. Immel 
said iT^ replied to Brown that he had 



less monej- than Governor Davidson 
and that he had no intention of sub- 
scribing. 

Deputy Warden G. W, Dart repeated 
some of tlie testimony. and M. J. 
Cleary and H. A. Klumb told of spend- 
ing $450 for Stephenson in tlie Six- 
teenth ward of Milwaukee. 

MINNESOT.\ (iR.4\[) 

C0MM.4\DEUY MEETING. 



Minneapolis. Minn., April 22. — fSpe- 
cial to The Herald. » — Minneapolis will 
entertain the forty-fourth annual con- 
clave of the grand commandery of 
Knights Templars of Minnesota, on 
Wednesday. April 28. While the con- 
clave does not begin properly until 
.April 28. many of the knights will ar- 
rive April 27 to participate in the lay- 
ing of the corner stone of St. iauis 
new Masonic temple, and there will in 
reality b*» two days of the celebration. 

The conclave will open with the 
parade of the commanderles at 10 a. m.. 
\t)rll 28. It is expected that nearly 
every commandery in the state will be 



represented. The parade will form at 
Hennepin avenue and Sixth street. 

The line of march will be from the 
Masonic temple. f)Ut Henneidn avenue 
lo Tentli street, tlien to Nicollet, and 
down Nicollet to Bridge square. The 
line will coutermarch on Nicollet to 
Third street. It will then cross to Hen- 
nepin avenue and return to the Masonic 
temple. 

Sir Knight A. -M. Shuey of Minne- 
apolis, past graf?d commander will be 
the grand marshal. Sir Knights E. R. 
Hazeltine. K. C. Bonniwell and J. O. 
Houghton will be his aides. All eom- 
manderies will parade in order o' se- 
niority and in columns of fours. The 
knights will be in full regalia. 



— ' 



. 



tfSi 



Temple Roller Rink 

Music every niglvt_and Saturday ma- 
tinee, excepting M onday and Thurs- 



day nights. 



DRPRicrs 

CELERIED 
WHEAT FLAKE 




• • I 



The most perfect food for growing chil- 
dren, and the muscle working classes. 



A Sale of Fine Hosiery 

Tomorrow and Saturday 

BOTH LADIES' AND GENTLEMEN'S. 

Men'.'^ Imported French and Gerinan Fancy Lisles, Silk and Lisle 

and Pure Silks; Ladies Pure Silks. only- 
Regular 50c, at 33 1-3^—3 pair ^l-OO 

Regular 75c and $1.00, per pair 5U^ 

Regular $1.25 and $1.50, per pair «. V ^S 

Regular $2.00 and $2.50, per pair IrVJI 

Regular $3.00 and $3.50, per pair Si*«^ 

Regular $4.00 and $5.00, per pair So'oS 

Regular $6.00 and $7.00, per pair ^3.J» 

It is safe to say that no retail stock anywhere of men s real 

fine Fancy Half Hose is superior to ours in point of quality, at- 
tractiveness and varied assortirients. 

^ !S. Siewert & Co 

304 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 






mm 




DEFECTIVE PAGE 



T 




r 



s 



• 






I 






THE 



•H EVENING HERALD: THURSDAY, APRIL 22, 1909. 



^^ 



\ 



MAYOR OF SUNBURY 

Says Pe-ru-na Is a Good 
Medicine. 

fT^.n r. C. Brooks, Mayor «f Sunlmry, 
01 . Attorney fur Farmers' Bank 

and Sun bury Building and Loan Co., 
write?: 

"I have the utmost confldence in the 
▼ irtneof Peruna. It is a great medii-iue. 
I have used it and I have known many 
of my friends who have obtained beno- 
fletal reeulta from its uj«e. / caaooi 
prmlse Peruna too bigbly." 




^B 



.i ■* 




STRIKE MAY 
BE AVERTED 

» ■ "" *■ " — 

Reported That the Chi- 
cago Unions Voted 
Against It. 

Local Men Have Not 

Yet TaRen any 

Action. 



Woril vvr.v i>. lived in Duluth this 
inoriiing Unit thf i.-fer.iulum vote 

takt-M hi Chi' ■■'■■ ;■ "loi-s- the members 

of til.' lake St Mid .'ouk'H unions. 

; 1^ :■ ' 'ltd in a division by buth or- 
k:. >; r.s, nol to dcclare a strike 
T;,. :ity of the mii. are tired of 

rj.. % iiu« r s enforced idU-ntsu. and ex- 
li!..->.d themselves as desirous of 
going to work as soon as the season 
permits. 

No action has as >■ t been taken by 
the local unioi.H. It i." tlie s' .'>'".iit of 
many member* that nolln i be 

lost by waiting until the ' f ■ !i"d 

Cleveland organizations have decided 
on iheir course of action. The vote, 
whi-'h was uriJfr*''!, bus tiot b*-"-n voin- 
plett-d at .i!i l;ik.- t.M.tv i,H( i u.-- a<'tioii 
of th. ■" 

have 

("■ , 

n < r 



he was not Inclined to dlscusp the 
matter at length. President Living- 
stone admitted that quick action had 
been taken upon receipt of the notifi- 
cation from Buffalo. 

It is learned that the two lines have 
been informed by wire of their sus- 
pension, wliioh la said to be for viola- 
tion of the policy and tlie resolutions 
of tln' Lake Carriers' association, witii 
the knowledge that they were so do- 
ing It is evblent that the I>ake Lar- 
ri. r.-" do not intend to tight with any 
weak spot in the ranks. 

■'We have decided for the open shop 
■ 111 we shall Mtand by that declaration 
„ . and all the time." repeated 

I'. Livingstone vesterday. 

Contrary to a general impression 
gained from printed reports from Hur- 
falo. the two lines mentioned above are 
the only ones of the four that have 
settled with their engineers that are 
members of the Lake Carriers asso- 
ciation. The Kutland line is practically 
a part of the Western Transit company 
however. The Lehigh Valley Transpor- 
tati. n cuinpany has not been a mem- 
b. r nf the u.ss..ciation for a number of 
v.ats. being kriown as a non-union line 
ana not being in sympathy with the 
course of the association in making 
«vage agreements every spring wiin ine 
vu: ;. 1" inanio- latior organizations 

WILL KAISK VESSEL. 

Stiamer Hattie Lloyd Sank at Her 
Doek in Superior. 

Kfforts will be made tomorrow morn- 
ing to raise the ft-rry steamer Hattie 
Lli'>'!. whKii <ank .n tlo T<.u-..i- bay 
slip on the Wisconsin side ff the bay. 
The Llovd is one of four vessels owned 
by the' Independent Ferry company 
and operated between Iiuluth and Supe- 
rior. She sank while tied at her dock 
and the cause of the accident cannot 
1,, t:.ii..d until she Is rai.«ed. The 

I ,;^ 1 K'"'- i"i<^' tommlHsion for 

ti u. 



BIG DULUTH, 
SAYS FOLK 

Terror of GraftJs Proph- 
esies City of 250,000 
to 300.000. 1 

"Keep on the Firing 

Line of Reform," 

tie Urges. 



spoke briefly, and he was shown about 
the city in an auto. 




Marine Notes. 



' \vi ti cold or a cough, ca- 

turrh o' »r bowel coniplaint, 

whether t t ...... •« affected or the kid- 
neys. 11. <» vtiusti Is very liublt lu be the 

*'' " ily deranges the 

f llie organs and 
i}^,'^'" re's I. ■ functional disease. 

Pern** !»»«• ltei«i»e a ■tandby In 
tkunaanclJi of Iioiiiei. fur lulawr allmeiit* 
•I tUtm mott. 



SHAHKSJNJ^STATE. 

Hotel Clerk of Iowa (it) Inherits 
$t»0,(KM* English Money. 

1,,,..., Pi.v Inwa. -\i:.r:l 2?. — J W. 



SUSPENSION FOR 
PACKAGE LINES 

The Lake Carriers Take 

Quick Action After News 

From Buffalo. 

H-jff.iio, N, v.. April •:2, — As a result 

el hiring thvir cap mi. --v^: wittiout 

requiring the i-pfM-sIn ;> '.■'■■■.ti arts 

Lake i.'arr*trs' a.'-six.ia- 

■' line and the Western 



Reports from the t^oo this mr.rtjing 
indicate that the blockade cond tions 
remain unchanged Several vest.els ar- i 
rived there t. mong t>'»'"V^'2« 

si.anur Roch< t the Western 

T r.,nipany » Ueet. It is likely 

,, i.reakers will be us* d if there 

it* no oi'.ak up within a we- k or ten 

The finishing touclies are being put 

on the Hiimonlc. the new 5. 000-ton pas- 

er and freight vessel building at 

ngwood. Ont . for the Nortiiern 

.N.ivigailon eoiripany. She will make 

her maiden trip to IHilulh in June. 

The George W. I'eavey was taken 
from her winter dock at the head ot 
file bay to the c.lobe elevator to load 

1 -n ,. ' vtf-amer Sup'-iior left Buffalo 
I !o join tlie thi i of bmek- 

is at the Soo. 



'I" ran 

fr-i:!: 



. . uouflcd by 1 : 



:.l LiV 



fii' ir. '1 lllihois citi- 

iiiia w." '■' ' ''*' '-"^ * *■"" *^'' 

tlia late I> r. J . S. Sprigs s of M o n m o u t h . 

i:m-Gm*rii«ir Hniily Leelnre^ 

raTirr,et. Mlc-h , April 3?.— <Si.. 

J 

p;o., 

upon ,,■-.. 

same - :,.„,» 

ler-turfcii lii .•',.'■..'.■. -■ -'•^ 

by a large audience. 



as 
fi 

ii 



W. :;e,l vesterdav if iie had 

. ivi-il" ofhoa! n'-'tification 
^vo lines of t lo-ir ct'urse 
■ ith the engine, rs. I'resi- 
deni i-ivKtgstone stateil tiiat he l)a<i 
heard from both lines throu>;ii tae 

■■'■,■;, at .a llieir course to be?" was 

se they pur^ 'f ho 

■ re>i to nie ' I.ake 

<■;!'■ I le !'S B^ ■ ■ ' ' 1 » I' ' l'."'I. 

It tiiey are not members.'* said 
Presideiit Livingstone grimly. While 



Salt Watrr .\s a We.il KilUr 

The Oregon Sliort Line railroad has 
been using salt water for ridding its 
i..a(lhed of weeds, a nrocess which is 
very inexpensive for that company, 
because of its exc< ptional facilities for 
getting the brine. The water of tiie 
C.reat Salt Lakes is approximately -- 
per -ent salt, and it is only necessary 
to pump thi.'s water into tank c^rs 
and haul them over the lines. The 
roadbed is sprinkled in the ordinary 
mannc • and kills gra.ss and weeds 
.satisfact-.rily The most satisfactory 
beverage of todav is Golden Grain 
P.> !t Beer. A case should be in 
ly home and served at each meal. 
.-,, . that a ease Is sent you today. 
Order of vour nearest dealer, or be 
supplied by Duluth Branch Minneap- 
olis Brewing com pany. 

Unlkeil To tr«"k»«on. 

Crookston. Minn.. April 22 - -J'"£*''^\?i 
t., Tlie Herald.)— Three Grand Folks 
young men showed their walking abU- 
Itv Sun.lay when they made the trip 
from Grand Forks to Crookston via the 
ties. Thev left Grand Forks at v 
oeloek in the forenoon and arrived 
■ * n m.. making a stop in 
It lialf an hour. Sandy 
.V. liter Hawkins and Will 
the young men wliu turned 



.\I I I r( I I ! tl Ml. 

Woods are 
the trick. 



That Uuluth will, within a compara- 
tively few years, be a city of from 
1:50,000 to 300,000 population, the pre- 
diction made by ex-Governor J. W. 
Folk at the beginning of his lecture on 
The Era of Conscience" In the First 
.Methodist church last night, was em- 
phatically repealed Just before he took 
tlie train at S;15 this morning for 
Fargo, N. D. 

Mr. Folk told his audience last night 
in his opening remarks following a 
happy introduction by Itev. J. S. Kirt- 
ley of the First Baptist eliurch, that 
God intended a great city to be where 
Duluth is located. 

It was announced that the closing 
number in the lecture course will be 
furnished May 10 by William Jenning.s 
Bryan, whose subject will be "The 
Price of a Soul.' Immense applause 
followed the announcement. 

The Missourlans talk was full of 
pithy illustrations and startling com- 
parisons. He said If Jesus Christ had 
remained on earth and drawn a hand- 
some salary daily for every day since 
He was born, He would not have near- 
ly as much as some Americans have 
amassed in a few years, and that the 
same would be true of Adam, if the 
first man had drawn a princely in- 
come since the day he hrst saw light. 
F^olk gave some interesting anec- 
dotes of his campaign for good gov- 
ernment in Missouri. His closing point 
was to urge his hearers to stay close 
to the firing line in ilie battle of the 
reformers in American politics. Ite- 
torms come and reforms go, he said, 
but this reform movement that has 
been sweeping I'ncle Sam's domains 
the last few years is to be permanent. 
He cited his own prosecutions against 
grafters and liquor law violators In 
Missouri. Governor Hughes' actions 
against race track gamblers in New- 
York the prosecution of railroads tor 
rebating, and the Introduction into 
.\merlcan political life of the Initiative 
and referndum and the primary laws, 
as samples of what the reform revolu- 
tion Is achieving. 

"They told me," he said, "that with 
the Sunday lid on the saloons, grass 
would soon be growing in the streets 
of St Louis. The Sunday lid went on 
and it stayed on. St. Louis was never 
more prosperous than now: Its real 
estate was never so booming: and Its 
business enterprises were never In so 
healthy a state. ^ ,, 

"I received many letters from moth- 
ers, wives and daughters, saying that 
after the Sunday lid went on they had 
h.id something to eat on Sundays atid 
Mondays, as the wages of the heads 
of thf'lr families were not dissipated 
in the all-night saloons Saturday 
nights. With Just one such letter 
from a good woman. I felt more than 
able to read with calmness the bitter 
attacks of the army of brewers and 
grogshop keepers." ... , 

The former governor was entertained 
at lun.b at the Kltchl Gtimml club by 
G. A. Tomlinson. A. C. Weiss and F. A. 
Patrick were also present. Mr. i-olk 
later visited the board of trade and 



WILL PROBABLY 
VETO LICENSE 

Action Expected of Mayor 

Kaven on Meier 

Application. 

It is expected that Mayor Haven will 
veto the WMlllam Meier liquor license, 
granted by the council at its meeting 
last Monday evening, in the face of 
strong opposition from the Seventh 
ward. The license came before the 
mayor yesterday, but he refuses to 
make public his action on the matter 
until the council meeting next Monday 
evening. 

For several years past certain resi- 
dents of Oneota have been trying to 
rid themselves of a saloon operated by 
Carpenter Bros. Through the sale of 
liquor to minors, the Carpenter.s lost 
their license, and when William Mtler 
applied for a license to operate a sa- 
loon m the same place, petit ons were 
clrculattd against the granting of it. 
and a large delegation of resideni.s of 
Oneota attended the council meetings 
to voice their protest. There were also 
counter petitions asking that the li- 
cense be granted. 

So many claims have been made 
about the petitions and the trend of 
nubile sentiment they express, that It Is 
hard to tell whether petitions oppos- 
ing the granting of the license, or 
those favoring it. have the most names 
for the district most affected. 1 he 
Dollce and license committee reported 
that within a radius of four blocks of 
the saloon there were twice as many 
men favoring the saloon as opposing 
it and tliat there were more men fa- 
voring it than both men and Avomen 
opposing it, according to ih.e petitions 
themselves. The side opposing the li- 
cense also elalms a majority. 

Mayor Haven has received numer- 
ous letters, telephone calls and per- 
sonal calls since Monday nights ccoin- 
cil meeting urging him to veto the 1 - 
cense. It is pretty generally undti- 
stood that he will veto it. 



Summer Favorites m 

Wasli Fabrics 



^ "Shantung," a sturdy weave that is the equal of the 
best pongee— a choice selection of the wanted shades, in- 
cluding natural— 27 inches wide— 50^ the yard. 

"Crepe Plisse" for dainty frocks, soft and clinging— 
the Pastel tones only— 27 inches wide— 50< yard. 

"Mirage," an inexpensive fabric, almost indistinguish- 
able from the silk fabric selling at almost three times the 
price— full Hue of shades— 27 inches wide— 50< the yard. 

Sec special display of these lines in our west show 
windows. 




Frid 



ay 



Sp 



eciais 



I 



^ IS^ yard for 25c White Repp, a durable fabric that 
will launder like linen, 29 inches wide, regular 25c value, 
priced for tomorrow at 18^ the yard. 

A 44-inch fine Linen Cambric, selling regularly at 
$1.25 the yard, for Friday, only 89<. 



I 




Biji Special Values 
Home Draperies 

Buy Now! 

Here i^ a BIG silc -i needed things in draperies, cnnung ju.st at 
*- the rielit time— iti-t wIrii v.>u want new window curtains, new i-.a- 

3 tiu ri^iit tun. •,,,,.,., :-..,. i, ,„,.(. Our <lr;ii'crv dci'artment is the 
ticrcs. tiew tl.iiii.;- all "vct Im h-.usc. cnir iii.iiciv ' i , 

^ lart-<M. bc^t equipped departnunt m the cil.v. Here >..u ^ '" '_" 
^ th.-usar .N . f beautiful, artistic hr.rne decorations of the luucvt a ' 
latent .. Come, if only t. ■ 11 pay you well to bu> 



NOW. 




our larKc 
ci:nipi>cd 



We have fnly the very bc^t cxp< vKiiced help in 
work room— the latest power niachiiuv \\ c are fully 

to d..> your work m an up-tu-datc. -atislaclory manner. 

\Vc are kL.cI to give you e^nnates on shade work, drapery 
work maki.iK special do-i-n.. etc. Not rmly low prices but r,nr 
work will hc"absohuely -.,i-.-f.o :• .ry. 1 cl us n,.urc with vou .m 
vour new .hades-work guaranteed an<l only the very be^t m.- 
tciiul ii-scd. 



Real eiuny Lace Ed^in^s 



Boor Panels 2V2 yds 

M ^%ng% Tli«I Formerly Sold 
EmOtii^p asHlgbasStO.OO. 

Now Only 



$2 



— s 



These Door Panel.-? 
long. We h^"-- -'■^•■■ 
H kind left — 

d 

cL .-'■ -: 

go at ."»tneB i^fJi 



are 2 '2 yards 

>ne pattern of 

priced at |10 

. at 16. iO and 

i. We want to 

es— to do it they 

rbaa f«i»»t. 



■i«»m: 



Handsome Pi^' 
ured Fish Net 



• t is- soft and lacy — 
. ,! r rings .softly and 
e window eiir- 
, ,.Mi *>... find a wide 
of very beautiful pat- 
t. i;is iiere You will be sur- 

prhsed ill tliH beauty and tiuality 



This hshi 
It diap 
makes 




1.000 yards of beautiful cUmy eflgitig 
— you generally i-ay 18 c nt.s a yard 
f,,r it — -ThiN s['e< ial bargain we otfi r 
you. 

Per Yard lOc 



Oriental Qouch Covers 



Th-se covers are frint," d all around— th-y 
are full sixtv inches wide and three yards 
long— handsoni. , dark Oriental c<dorlngs 
and patterns A new shipment of these 
covers Uist in. <'om<' and take your 

95c 



choice- of any of these. 
\aliu'>-, at eiKii 



Splendid 




iOc Extension Rods— buy theni now for _ 
38 inch by 6-foot Window Shades— complete for 
38-inch by 7-foot Window Shad es— complete for. 



5<' 



19< 
23^ 



Matting Covered 
Shirt Waist Boxes 

Thc.s<j boxes ordinarily .sell for $3 ^.-i 

Ihey are rtiver-d with fine wnite 

malting — are nicely finished inside 
and you'll fi«">d them a convenient, 
handy box in the bedroom or linen 
closet. Boxes on €|^0 9^ 
afiJ« here at %p^» Jm^ 



Special Prices on White Bed Spreads 

^^An.'ther big shipment of full size white bed 
^iifJsiireads just here. The kind you generally 



pay $1 TjO r-r These spreads have hand- 
l:l.'r\%i<me figur. ,1 i>;ittt rn borders, wa.sh well 
■ ni a white bed spread adds greatly to the 
;.,. itness and appearance of your room. 
'.^lUiy til. ni hf-rt $1.50 valu.-.s— O^C 




Beautiful New Lace 

Curtains— Prices 

Reduced 

It seems almost like being In fairy 
land to see the wonderful showing of 
handsome new Lace Curtains. In white 
and ecru — the patterns are wonderfully 
attractive— you hardly know which ones 
to select— the prices are not high eUher 
and it will astonish you to see what a 
rh h. handsome curtain you can buy tor 
little money. 

Here Are Curtains at 
Special Prices 

These were not high-priced in the first 
plat.t, — thev are extremely good values 
ynull find at the special sale prices. 

$1.25 Lace Curtains 
Per Pair 75c 

Tliree different styles and patterns to 
choose from. Ju.n think, only .5c a 
pair You can hardly afford to wash 
the old ones for that. 

94.00 l.aoe flirt alnii. per pitlr fS.WJ 

$.■{.00 l.aoe Curfnluw, p«t pair f3.U."» 

$7.60 l>«ce C urtBlnt., per pair »5.15 

iOO Pair of Ruffled 
Net Curtains— OiQ/» 
Reji. $L50, at Z^O^ 

For only 98c a pair you can buy a 
handsome, tasty Ruffled Net Curtain, 
$1 00 pair go un .sale at that price, it 
will pay you to see what your needs 
are. Buy them now. 



Special Sale Of 
Portieres 

Buy a pair of new portieres now 
while von have a good selecUi^n— 
and can save some money. Tliese 
handsome long portieres con^e with 
tapevtry borders, corded edge.s or 
plain borders. Especially attrac- 
tive, new patterns and some older 
one.s that we are closing out — 

$5.00 Portieres for only $2.95 

$6.00 Portieres for only $3.75 

$10.00 Portieres for only $7.35 

$15 00 Portieres for only $11.25 



ANMVEHSAUY. 

Odd Fellows Will Conun«'moratc 
Founding of Their Older. 

The ecming anniversary of the 
founding of the Zenith City lodge No. 
160 of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows will be held Sunday at Grace 
M 1-: church. Twenty-second avenue 
west and Third street. 

The feature of the occasion will be 
a special sermon to be delivered by 
Hev M. O, Stockland, pastor of the 
church. A special program ;•' jn,"^'^ 
is also announced. The annual gathei- 
Ings of the Odd Fellows on occasions 
ot this kind, are generally large. 
» ■ 

Quarterly Meeting. 

A quarterlv meeting of the Ladies' 
Aid slociety of the Flr.st Norwegian- 
Danish M. E. church was held this aft- 
ernoon at the church. Twenty-fourth 
avenue west and Third street. 

Rev W. Schevenius gave an address 
on the ladies' work in the church and 
Andrew Utterson talked on his recent 
western trip from which he has .lust 
returned. A string quartet will fur- 
nish a spe<ial musical program. Ue- 
freshments were served. 

Miss Larson Recovering. 

Mi«s Ituth Larson underwent an 
operathm of a very serious nature yes 
teidav afternoon at St. Mary s iiospita 
In Superior. Today It was reported 
that she is recovering. .Miss Larson re- 
sides at 2118 West Four th street. 

Will Get New luiforins. 

An important meeting of the cadets 
of the St Lukes Episcopal church was 
held last evening at St. Luke s hall. 
Several matters were taken up. among 
them being arrangements for the 
cadets to be equipped with new and 
handsome uniforms. The uniforms will 
be ready in a few days. 

West End Shortrails. 

Mr« L. A. .Johnson is at Odanah, Wis., 
at' tlie bedside of her moUier, who is 

"Tmeeting of the Ladies' Aid Society 
of the Cential Baptist church was held 
vesterday afternoon in the church. 
■ Members of the Ladies Aid .Society 
of the Zion Norwegian Lutheran church 
met ycsterdav afternoon at the home 
of Mr.s. Gust "Eriekson. 

Joseph Clayton, who was recently 
married in Western Canada, returned 
vesterday from Victoria. B. C. in com- 
i>any with his bride. They will make 
their home in the West end. 

John and Carl Anderson have re- 
turned from a fishing trip up Millers 
creek with a good catch of troiit. it is 
said that good fishing may be found In 
the creek. ,, ,. j i 

Michael McBride, John Holland and 
()le Olsen will leave Saturday on a 
fishing trip. Tliey will return 1 ues- 

Mrs George E. Nelson and children 
win ieave todav for Rockford, 111., 
where tliev will remain on a two 
months' visit with relatives and friends. 

William .McClure has returned from 
a bhori trip to Washburn. 

Matt Mattsjn. fireman for the North- 
ern Pacific out of ruiluth. has returned 
from a month's visit with relatives at 
Wllhuar, Minn. 

Emil Olsen left yesterday for Bai - 
rum Minn, where he will be em- 
ployed during the summer. 

WlUUim Nelson of St. Paul was a 
West end visitor yesterday afternoon. 

James W eldon of 2819 "West Second 
street Is confined to his home with III- 

'"^^Ml'ss Ida .Marsh of Courtland street 
Is recovering from her recent illness. 

Miss Esther Eriekson of 1926 West 
Fourth street has returned from her 
visit at Two Harbors. 

Earl LeFlair is back from a business 
trio to the ranges. 

John Anderson left today for Kelsey. 
Minn., on a visit with relatives. 

The ladies of Progress lodge. Degree 
of Honor, will entertain this evening 
at Columbia hall. Card playing will be 
the feature, and refreshments will be 
served. 

I( E LEAVESmCi IllVER. 

The Mississippi Navigable at Aitkin 
and Boat Will Run. 

Aitkin, Minn., April 22.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— The ice went out of the 
Mississippi river Monday and the 
steamer Oriole steamed .up and ran up 
river as far as the Gyde mill, where 
the ice stopped further progress. 

The boat will make the first trip of 
the season to Sandy Lake Friday and 
Rev A L. Rlchard.-on and family have 
accepted an Invitation to accompany 
her on this trip and Mr. Richardson 
will hold a service at that place in the 
evening. 

ADAM BEDE TO LEITI RE 

AT ANOKA ON APRIL 26. 

Anoka. Minn., April ^2.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— J. Adam Bede is to be in 
Anoka Monday evening, April -6. to 
lecture for the benefit of the public 
Ibrary The subject of his discourse 
will be Our Nation. Its Problems and 
Progress. " The lecture will be given 
la the city halL 





Art Work Specials 

For Friday Only 

For tomorrow we offer our entire line of Jap- 
anese drawnwork. centerpieces, scarfs, doilies, etc., 
selling from 50c to $10.00, at Half Regular Price. 

Tinted centerpieces and pillow tops, priced 
from 50c to 65c. Choice 35<. 

Our 60c cluny doilies, plate size, for tomorrow 
50^ each. 

D. C. H. S. Pillow Tops specially priced for to- 
morrow — 29^. 



—— d ,... 



For Quick Results Use Herald "Wants'' 



Spi^iaB foir Firodla^ aoidl Satordaif 

Carnations Per Doz. 25c Tulips Per Doz. 25c 

ALSO ALL THE PLANTS IN MY SHOW 
HOUSE AT ONE-HALF THE USUAL PRICE. 



1.0(10 Easter Lilies, each 

5(K> Hyacinths, each 

100 Hydrangeas, per flower 

100 Rose Bushe-s each 

5(X) Ferns, each 

Palni?, each ; • 

And hundreds of other plants at bargain price 
Come and see what I have. 

921 EAST THIRD STREET. 
OLD -PHONE, 2765-L. NEW 'PHONE, 2015 



15*^ 

■; 25<^ 

250 to $2.00 

ZS^' tr. .$1.00 
50< to $2.50 

t, a«- I need the room. 






^a^Soliant^ 



71 



Bon Ton Corsets 

Mould the Flesh As the Sculp- 
tor Does the Clay. 

The Parisian women think Bon 
Ton Corsets are well named— to 
them, Bon Ton means Beautiful 
Form ! 

Every form has its line? of beauty — 
only the proper corset is necessary to ac- 
centuate those lines and give proper 
poise and carriage— and there is one spe- 
cial model in Bon Ton Corsets, which 
will probably be adopted to the require- 
ments of your figure as no other corset 
will! 

BoTi Ton CornHs are for Women 
who leant tht best and are xpill- 
ing to pay for what they getl 
Prices range $3.00 to $12.00. 

We invite you to ^ee the new Bon Ton models. Miss Mc- 
Dowell of New York is here this week demonstrating their su- 
perLrit/ Her advice is worth whUe-there .s no charge for 
fittings — corsets may be purchased now or later. 




DEFECTIVE PAGE 




■■■■■■■Illllllli 



llllll 



' 




THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: THURSDAY, APRIL 22, 1909. 



AllTlClXS OF INCORPORATIOX 

HENRirKSEN CONSTRll'TION 
COMPANY. 





HNTS 
lia 



we. tht* 



BY THESE PRBS- 
uinlerslgned whose 
bsrrlbed. «!o hereby 
t<i«r«tlier and .i"!'>l>t 



and sign i »»*'»« 

and • 1 
»iippt>'...' ;.-,. 

b9 J') 
The r 

til. 

A! 
**■■ 

w 



for th. 



'S6 

"J 
mil 



»rat»nti nhall 



.1.1 

ill 

aiHl 

llie 

:.d 

11- 



OF TiHii nmi 






r- 

HI 

in 
w 



H I 



8- 

a: 

li 

c 

t., 

d 



.a I 

■■I" I 
-■c. 

■'V 

,1 

IJl 

■.-;*, 
at 



COMES IN 
FORJOAST 

The Legislature Criticised 

for Friendship for 

Liquor Interests. 

Methodists of Brainerd 
District Conference Take 
Whack at Lawmakers. 



'■■■ntor, Mrni.. Ai-r' 
'I'nei iU.:T;,iiil.,»~^'Tiiv 
.,t til.' Methotii'*! 



... ■.;;.! of 
Kpisiupal 



William A 1 : . 1.1 h, former agent of the 
Schlitz BruwinK company, hure. w'ho l» 
oliarKed with the embezzlenu-nt •>r JlMO 
from the company when in their em- 
ploy here last summer. French stated 
that he was wHllnR to return to W Is- 
conaln without reuulsilion papers, 
cUlmlnK that he would be able to es- 
tablish hl8 innocence without much 
trouble. ^ ^^^ 

RKACHED GREAT A(iE. 

First Wh'iU" Woman Married on 
Keweenaw Peninsula Is Dead. 

Eagle Itlver. Mich., April i:2. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — Mrs. Joseph Long, 
aged !)i>. oldest woman in Keweenaw 
peninsula, died here suddenly yester- 
day. Slie was married in ISol, and was 
tlie first white woman to be married on 
the peninsula, now known as the "Cop- 
per c.iuritiy." With one exception her 
children were the tlrst white children 
born in Keweenaw county. She took 
her first ride on the railroad when 9i 
yi'iir.s old- 

KNKiHTS TEMPLAR ELECT. 

DeVVitt ( . Moore of (Jrafton, X. I)., 
Is Elected (irand Commander. 

F'argo. X. D.. April HI'.— (Special to 



classixKirfl, « rather classwomen — by 
the fo-^s ^f the two lower cla.sses. 
The* hosto»s(J8 sent emissaries to the 
various^^alMrnlty houses of the city 
and wrffen trfe juniors and seniors ar- 
rived at tli^ function in their honor 
they wore iV-ceivcd by the lower class 
girls attired as boys. 

One of the markers afterward stole 
out of tbo *9l'. "^^^ ^ young man. and 
about the campus and 
ets. 
<f ,' <" • 



took a.'watK 
adjoining s^e 



CHEMICAL WAS FAULTY. 



\\ 



L,.-. 



biialn' 
DuJiiii 



>n- 

liiiKs. mauu- 

mts. wh art's. 

and 

I dls- 



•■ss 
. , .■ , : ,>al 
cui |»oitiUon 



a.i>- lo ai' 




lJlt>T« 3 3 i 




annual coniei • 


iL Uululh 


ber. 




The resolution 





ITS.il til I' 






Tho tmiH 

this oorpor.,1 



and 
thlr' 



a'mll 



;ii. 



Tl 

this 

■and I' 
In In I 

such lii' 
la such 



-■tit of 

, 1909. 
: >d of 



of 
• u- 



another year, at 
flcient nor vires 'i 

i; ■ ■ ■ ' 
ki!; 



a '. ' ■ 



Ms 



AKTIi'I.l-: 



[V 



The 

with ; 



s«iu an 
Rev. J 
caitun I 
Kt'v i 



Thr» nan 
9f ' 
Hon 

rtokjitjii. 
Ht*lnier 

iOtcL 



M 



Wick, 



all 



h. 



Tho g<» VBmnif:-:! '. '.'L 
Mut the inanagement ot 



ing 


Li- 


■ he 


v|. 


l,!l.,l 


t'.'kV 11> 




Kfv. C. F. I>a. 




tary and .' ' 


■Mce 


treti*»ur<'r !■-. Iv 




■ " lit. pri'Si -1 .'It 




l>r. K"ch i>r' 


1 u : 1 u 


•MlCr .■-- ' ' " 


Mtnne- 


leclur, 




Biiri'^i 




talnl-i!'. 


: •■•.: 


i:-v .\ 1 



1-ihifS- 
Mc- 

iiext 
< >cti>- 

•ling 
. .tided 

«n was 

I'l-niiit 

■ r 

1 . . ;- ^ 1' - 
■lit 

■T inHUloned to 

! bill, and the 

■ 111 for a pi'od 

..(■ it a friendly 

ini'i liitei'ests. 

adjourned tu lutet at 

r at the attnual lon- 

•.■llLTii Miini'.'3"Ui r.Hi- 

■ '1 Mil Tiiesdiiy 

.ri!" 'V'-iti Uev. 

I l>r. 

'iftTe 

jOIc to llif yuslor. 

Smith. Mrs. Br.-- 

' iMiiinii and 

.■d for Die 



ItMia. 

tley, 
St, 

1 i r i e . 
Ugll- 
other 



The Herald.) — At a meeting of the 
grand comn!;'mltry «>i" iln' Knights 
Templar of North Dakota, held here 
yesterday. Grand Forks was selected 
as the next convention place, the con- 
vention to be held In April. 1910. The 
meeting will probably be held the 
lirst Tuesday after Kaster Sunday. 

Every commandery in the state was 
represented, and yesterday afternoon 
the d« legtitea gathered and elected of- 
ficers for the coming year. Follow- 
ing are the officers eletced: 

k E. grand commander, DeWitt L. 
Moore. Grafton; V. E. deputy grand 
commander Andrew J. Stade, Devils 
Lake: E. grand g«neralis.Mlmo, William 
Spriggs, Grand 
taitt general 
E. grand 
Kkern. 



Failure of Machine Prevented Cheek- 
ing Verndale Fire. 

Verndale, Minn.. April 22. — The fail- 
ure of the chemical engine to work 
was largely responsible for the magni- 
tude of the fire which swept this vil- 
lage Tuesday night, destroying a large 
part of the business section. The work 
of the bucket brigade saved the com- 
plete destruction of the town. The 
women rendered no little assistance in 
lighting the flames. 

The loss will total 130.000 and per- 
hap.s more the losses being as follows; 
Smith Bros." store building. JlO.OOO; 
Farmers' Mercantile company stivck. 
$1S.000; ben I..alone, building. $2,000: 
Andv Lalone, saloon, .«!tock and fl.x- 
tures. 1600; Dr. Morrill, building and 
drug stock, $6,000; Gelfer & Deltz, meat 
market, $oOO; Coon Bros." building, 
$500; Louis Helnlg. building. $800; Sid 
Reynolds, stock, $500. 

The township and village records 
were burned. 

The Farmers" Mercantile company Is 
the heaviest luser. About fifteen farm- 
ers were Interested co-operatively In 
this store, and all will sustain losses 
on account of the fire, as the Insurance 
was only half the value of the stock. 




BEGIN (iRADIMi FOR 

NEW WALKER SCHOOL. 



Forks; E. grand cap- 
Sylvester J. Hill, Fargo; 
senior warden, Andrew 
Grand Forks; E. grand junior 



I <,.< 1 1 1 1" . 
and 

i 



be 
of 



vo.'st&d 

wliom 

.■■ -Vi:in 



••■i 



I'v-irty 



K (I 



rt-^3tors 

I 

I 

t 

1 



I'-ii.i l; : 



.1 



<ocre- 
Sm i I li 
-superin- 



.1 
l»i-. 

■ n 1 1 - 

and 

t of 



■.\ •■ I'f 

w W. M 

C.ret'n of 
,,•■ I. hill- 



, 1 1 ; ' i u t h e f 



l\ K. 

Rar>iils, 



Bradf 



iir<i. 



a I 

the 



tr-jai.*ir- 
Tt 



IN TV 



Ht; 

H I : 

In thr 
H.. ■!. 
H. H. 



tl'-n 



Hen- 

all of 

!r !iuc- 

.r this 

Hen- 

WJek. 

:-!cksen. 



took i».iri 

K Ornv 

alv. ■ ' ■ " ' 



in 
of 



avman of Park 
S>ind.'iv sch'»ol 

.■.■■-.' ' . .' Morn 

iotley 

\v. 

il 



warden. Lawrence C. Moultrl. ^' alley 
»Mty E. grand chaplain. Leonard W . 
tSammons. .Minot: E. grand recorder, 
Frank J. Thompson, Fargo; E. grand 
tnasurer. Alexander B. Taylor, Fargo; 
E grand standard bearer, J«>hn W. 
(.•arr..ll. Lisbon; E. grand sword bearer- 
George M. Pike. New Rockford; E. 
grand warder. Frank While, Valley 
t'lty. ^ 

DESTROY LHU OK JOINT. 

W omen of Lignite. N. D., Engage in 
Carrie Nation Stunt. 

l>., xVpril 22. — 'Vh<- w.m- 
LiKiii'i'. il snuill town "ii the 
Nurttorn road a short distance 
.southwest of Flaxton. have taken a 
strenu<>v:.s hand in the suppression of 
blind pigging. Sunday afternoon a 
dozen Lignite wives and mothers 
armed them.selves with hatchels, re- 
volveis and gasoline and after 
molishing the contents 
.suri operated by 
it with gasoline 
ground. . . 

They thei\ notified keepers of four 
other Joints to quit or a like fate would 
befall them. A do/A-n men who were 
in the place at the time .stood by and 
watched proceedings without protest. 



Walker, Minn., April 22. — (Special to 
The Hciald.'^ —Grading for the new 
Walker high scliool site commenced 
ye.sterday. and the grounds will be 
made ready for the contractors as 
rapidly as possible. 

The site is on a hill overlooking the 
entire village, as well as Leech lake, 
and is most admirably located. It is 
expected thai, fully $2,000 will be ex- 
pended in pi^paring the site for the 
building. When completed, the school 
will cost fully $30,000. The ground 
wa.^i donated to the school dl.strict by 
ex-Mayor t'barles Kinkele for a con- 
sideration of $1. This week the school 
children pre.«<ented Mr. Kinkele with 
a bap containing 100 pennies, which 
thev had raised themselves, and pre- 
sented It to him of their own free 
will. 



Flaxton. 
• n of 
Great 



'l\- gi' 



tri.-i > 
rhuri-.'' " 

TlU:- 

fd !H : 
HMi- and 
I l;iir,-h pari"' 
•dlst ch 

, , t lip niei 



.il 



iwth 
■'i.tTiy. 

t-nce 
-. md a 
siii'i'-r 



til' 

at. 

in 



i' 



;t.<iori< anil dis- 
E. Iv i'o..i„.r. gave 
membership and 

altend- 



\<,-fi> 



was tV>e 
great su'i't'^^^*. Dln- 
\vi're .siM-v-(l in the 
V ft'..- hulifs of Uie 
■ ■ ' 5.ai*iiu-s!i men 
onference a 

] n il n > > .lilitldlt'S. 



' ! * ■ K ^ '•■ \ 



:r*. 



!,!_>.>. ' .ti.^ t. ■*', 



rtsd 



iiy 
in 



.iit'i 



11. 



CRAZY BREED 
SCARES MANY 

Goes on Rampage Near 
Thief River Falls Be- 
fore Overpowered. 



de- 
of a Ikiuor re- 
Oscar Sands, baptised 
and burned il to the 



CROOKSTON MOURNS 

BASKERMLLES DEATH 

(^rookston, Minn.. April 22. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — The tragic death ot 
H. R, Baskerville at Tabrez while lead- 
ing s\ sortie in order to secure pro- 
vislon.s, has caused great sorrow here, 
from the fact that the young man was 
born In Crookston. His father, Rev. 
H. C. Baskerville, was the first minis- 
ter of the Presbvterian church in this 
city, serving from .luly, 1S82, to July 
of the following year. His career has 
been followed very closely since he 
was sent to the Orient as a missionary 
by the I'resbvterian board, and his 
tragic death is deeply regretted. 

EX-CiREAT M ESTWIN 

SLIPERINTENDENT DEAD. 



CALIMETTOBEHOST. 

Copper Country Metropolis PLin- 
ning to Entertain State Elks' Meet. 

Calutnrt. MUh.. April 22. — (Special 
Tlie Herald.)— <:ulumet lodge of 

2.000 
both 



Thief mvei 1 



(rtment of 



re 



.!■ •! 



.\-. 



Ill .M i n u> 



M. 



.\i.rii ■::. — 

• • .- oi: the 

: i.^uniiy 

til for 

halt- 



'1 



■I a! 



[ 111 



of Stat'. 



or 



within 



in- 

for 

and 



i HI t,>',.>'JK. i" 



year.-* w.;. 
breed 11 \ 

iiid vi.^i 

here that mori'ii ::i;' 
club smash* d w. 
. ,1 womt-'ii and <•) 

•d and «ia 
i ftevcfal d 

They beat 
breaking an 
in his 



In 

and 
and 
abb 

for 

m 

d. 

I !,■ ■ 



I.' li I 



t. .1 ■ K 

, v.ati 
ntt; < 



!"• 



ik\: 



Tsi.-s- 
iiouses 
vvitli a 
and ter- 
Several 
i,.l in pur- 
.Hjierate e ti- 
the 
arm 
face 



brul.sins 'H> In- 
to capture liini. 
thf Thh'f Uiv.-r 

a 

•^ ia.sl. 



il. I 
By '■■ 

Kvenlng 



H'-rald- 



-April 



lU I V. 

:;2-2^. 



ial r>la- 



E 



Plaintiff. 



T» P'f. 



to hi»< sanity. 

K a i.iujtoi.- condition, *■•■'■ 
l.a-id and foot with tlie 

liis btuken arm. whi-h w 

dangling at his sid.-. 



but were un- 

l**uia'' ! ' ■ V sent 

poll I they 

r Moiiii after a 

lid he tvas taken 

evening after an 



He was 
■■ bound 
on of 

. ide-ssly 



to 

Elks will entertain at least 
antlered brethern from all over 
peninsulas of Michigan on the occasion 
of the annual convention, to be held 
liere June L"). 10 and 17. 

Some of the biggest attractions to be 
seen in Calumet this year will be held 
during the convention of the state 
Elks The entertainment cominlttee 
ai.pointed by the local lodge to take 
care of the visit<»rs ha.s been exceed- 
ingly busy and exceedingly fortunate 
in its 5-electlon of only the best of 
what i» on the market, for there is 
certainly nothing too good for The 
Best People on Earth" when they 
come here in June. 

The Calumet Elks will do every- 
thing In their power to make this 
convention a record breaker, to make 
It go away above any other gathering 
of the Elks of Michigan. They are 
being backed in their plans and work 
to make the convention a succes^ by 
the business men and private citizens 
of Calumet and the entire Copper 
country. The Elks of Hancock, whlih 
includes those of Houghton 
to assist their (\ilumet 
every po.ssible way. 

CO-ED IN MALE ATTIRE. 

Fair Lawrence College Student in 
Trouble for Lark. 

Apphton. Wis., April 22.— Punish- 
ment at the hands of the liigh tribunal 
.,f rh.' Students' 
association is in 
co-ed, who. 



April 22.— C. 

rli c 

of the Cfhit 



S. 



nn.. 

years, formerly dlvl- 



rU' 1 Wing. Mi 
Weston, aged uO . 

sion superintendent of the Chicago 
Great Western railway in this city, 
and recently superintendent of the Des 
Moines division, died at his home in 
this city yesterda.v. He Is survived 
by a wife and five children. 

Eric -^'Inblad. 2& years old. died sud- 
denly yesterday of heart disease. He 
leaves a wife and two children. 



an- 
brethern 



out 
in 



Weleomo t'^x-Governor Polk. 

Fargo. N. L».. .\prll 22. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Former Governor Folk 
of Missouri will be royally welcomed 
this evening by ex-Mlssourlans when 
he arrives from Duluth for an address 
here. The ""Show Me" club has the 
affair In band, and a few others who 
were not born in that state will bo 
permitted to participate. 

• 

New <'ro«ki>t<>n Uaud nireotor. 

Crookston. Minn., .\prll 22. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — The Crookston band 
has closed a contract with Arthur 
W'asshauffen of Chicago, who will suc- 
ceed Bandmaster G. O. Riggs as direc- 
tor of tlie Crookston band, assuming 
his duties May 1. Mr. lUggs has ac- 
cepted the leadership of the Grand 
Forks band. 



WISCONSIN BRIEFS 



T( 



M! 



I bove 



STATE SCHOOL 
IS CARED FOR 

Legislature Did Pretty 

Well for Institution at 

Crookston. 



House (jovernment 
store for a Lawrence 
a lark, strolled about 



for 
the campus in ma.sculine attire. 

Ormsbv hall was the scene of a 
uni entertainment given the upper 



Don't Wear 
A Truss 



fo T 

■oicing I 
■ver the 

uire t 
agriCLilt 
tion foi 



t*a t 



. ,. .\1m.ii,, .\pi-ii _*: .ii 

aid. I -^'I'l.^-r.' IS ^- re- 

ii.iugliout Xorihern .MmiKsota 
manner in which the legi.sla- 

d the ("rook-ston school of 



Mlcr Thirty Yeats' Ilxixrlenco I Have 

.Made a N«"vv I>ls<'Overy For Men, 

Women or Children That 

Cures Kuptiire. 



ie 



way of appropria- 



Ti, 



f 



wiUil: 
of r|!i 



; I; 



l> 



iJAN'ClUt, 
ik Building. 

■ M- Plain t:ff 
Apiil ^.'. 29, 



w 
li 



r vmir 

l.*al.-r 



I ) w n 

w ! I O 



I 



interests and 

i.-; constantly 

thing .in.st as 

1-c for. Nfver 



,aK- 



._ . ■ .i 1 It I,-. .^"-Ot Inn 

t l)cKuti lo rruii/a- the iniport- 
t'..- work being done and the 
lie- il will have on the l>el- 
,;ii. rii .-f the i;.d Iliver val- 
luding all Northwestern Mlnne- 
Tlo- new main liuiiding ami the 
d.>rniit.! , will he greatly 
lu \t V. 1 . ;UMi with llie in- 
rooni'atil facilities the ca- 
.f the iii.<! I iiiion will be taxed 
• in tilt- work i»f tiie scliool 
1 such a pitch lliat appllca- 
... already been received for 
admission t-»r n-'Xt year. 

EMREZZLEMEXT CHAIKiE 

AOAINST ASHLAND MAN. 



.V.sliiaiid Wis., .-\pril 22 i .^;..-i'i.i 1 to 
Tie H<'rald.>— SherilT Klien.stf-rher left 
last night for Houghton. Mich., after 



1 1 



i oM<« Vou Not bloK To Try It. 

If yim Unve tried most I'Ti-rjtlilns rise, com*" to 
nie Wlnff other full 1» wlitn- I liave my grcntest 
«m<-i>a%. Sci'd »ltiu'l»«l rnupoii KKlnjr and 1 will sriid 
jou free iiij' l>""h on Uuiilure and 111 cure, showing 
iny new discovery jnd giving you prices 
of nuuiy p»"Plp *ho ha*e triid It mid 
la Instant nllef wlini »» other full 
no siiln^. 1." iKimess. no lie*. 

1 sfiid on trial to prove wriiat I my U truf. 
are the jud^o nnd oiK-e having seen my 
rend U you vtlU W- as enthuslasUc n» my 
patients vih(»c letlera you can alio 
free coupon Ik-Iow and mitU tiHlay. 
vour time »httiirt you try my dUc<.v«ry or not. 



and nuincs 
were curwl. 1 1 
Ueuiember I um; 

You 
IxMik and 
hundrr<ls of 
rejkd. Kill out 
It's vrell worth 



Ashland — A paper from Aberdeen. 
S. D.. mentions a seriou.« accident that 
befell one of the children of Ben Har- 
per, formerly of this city. A piece 
blew off the roof of a schoolhouse. 
bitting him on the head and fracturing 
Ills skull. His condition has been ex- 
trt-meiv critical. 

Kaukanna — The saloons of Kaukau- 
na mav soon commence closing every 
evening at 11 o'clock, in accordance 
with a law on record here ever since 
the city was organized, but which has 
never been enforced. 

Madison — The present legislature 
mav complete the state historical li- 
brary building, by providing for the 
erection of the west wing. Two bills 
on the same subject have been intro- 
duced in both houses. 

Sheboygan — Two . genuine European 
storks, "the kind that build their nests 
on house chimneys, and first cousins to 
"'the" storks, have been ordered by 
General Manager Gonzenbach of the 
street railwav company for the picnic 
grounds at Klver View farm. Tliey 
will require a heated apartment in 
winter. „ . , 

Green Bav — Frank Zero, a brakeman 
on the Milwaukee road, in an accident 
near Menasiia on Tuesday, had his 
feet badly mangled. Walter Gabriel, 
aged 11 vears. was t^truck by a Green 
Bay & Western engine and lituled 
veveral feet along the tracks. Although 
hadlv cut and bruised, he will recover. 

Itlo— A fire In the photograph gal- 
lery of Peter Skogen was caused, ac- 
cording to the owner, by the sun shin- 
ing on the lens of a camera. 

Kllsworth — Charles Crouch, a com- 
edian and tumbler with a traveling 
medicine company, committed suicide 
by drinking cirbolic acid. He lived 
at Hock l.sland. 111. 

Fort Atkinson — Senator htephenson 
has introduced a bill appropriating 
$60,000 for a federal building In this 

(^rand Rapids — Demonstration spray- 
ing of cranberrv marshes for Insects 
and fungus pesis will be begun soon 
bv the agriculture experiment station 
"f the University of Wisconsin. This 
work will be done at the cranberry 
sub-statiou near t!; -vd Kapids. 



Big Sale of 

Trunks 

Largest assort- 
ment in the city. 



Prle4^s 
lowest. 



tho very 



Silk Headquarters Head of Lakes. 
Lake ATODne. Mlctilsao and Superior Strecu. Dttlnth, Minn. 



Great Sale On 

Suit Cases 
and Bags 

Eveiy thing you 
want is here at 
prices you want 
to pay. 



Friday^s Basement Specials! 



Ready With House Paints 

Our new Spring shipment of paints has just 
come in and we are splendidly ready to meet the re- 
quirements for house and 
floor paints, Japalac, var- 
nishes, stains, etc. Our 
prices are absolutely the 
lowest, quality considered. 



House Paints, 
per gallon 

Japalac, 
per can 




Cementico 5 lb. Pkg. at 40c 

A high grade wall coating makes a cement sur- 
face smooth, dense and hard, will not scale or 

rub off; in while and 
all tints; always ready 
to use, simply mix with 

water and apply 
price 



Bath Room 

Fixtures 
at 25% Off 





ular 

Itroduce 
iiig, we 



Reg- 
50c; to in- 
this wall coat- 
shall sell 



5-lb. package 
tomorrow at. 



.40c 



5 Barrels of Water Tumblers 

Colonial Style, regular price 60c -i Qp 
per doz. Per s«t of 6 for M.UKf 

There will be some lively buying at 



Tomorrow 




we shall offer 
all our high 
grade bath- 
room fixtures 
at 25 per cent 
off regular 
prices. 





the glassware 

Women will be 

chances are the 

gone in a jiffy 

early as possible 

in this bargain. 

Regular price 60c 
Tomorrow set of 



section tomorrow, 
here early and the 
five barrels will be 
Better be here as 
if you care to share 



per dozen. 
6 for 19c. 



Ammonia 

^'yUiaAMMONl* 
icpfiml -Si fUU'"'' 



dry 
for 
scour- 
r u b bing 
and cleaning. Spe- 
cial tomorrow, 3 
cans for 



Ammonia in 

form. used 
washing. 
Ing. s c 



85c Tea Kettles 59c 

Gray 

Granite 

Tea 

Kettles 

regular 

85c value 







65 Galvanized 

Wash 
Tubs at 39c 

Heavy galvanized wash 
tubs; our regular 65c 
leader specially priced 
for tomorrow, 
selling at 

39c 



Cake 
Boxes 

Home Com fort 
Bread and Cake 
Boxe.s — a good 
one for 

$1.25 

Large sizes at 
$2.48 to $4.98 



50c Cups and Saucers 25c 

Tomorrow we place on sale an- 
other lot of those flne Jap. •- ups 
and Saucers that made such a 
a week or so 
well worth 
Our 
price 
Spe- 
Friday, 



Waste Baskets 48c 



Good s t rong 
waste paper 
baskets. Large 
variety to .se- 
lect from — 
R e g u lar T5c 
values, at each 
tomorrow 




Young Men's Christian association vvlU 
„,?on^.e completed and made ready for 
the men of Ishpeming and ^ '-'•''tj. 
The dedication will be held in May. 
the definite date to be announced later. 

Neeaunee— The members of the po- 
lice lorce have had their measures 
taken for new uniforms, which will 
Le furnished l,y H. J. Peterson. M. T. 
Murphy will furnluh the hats. 

Clmssell— August E. Sauvola. a taxl- 
.lernilst had an order for a mounted 
^I'oK and found it ''"Possible to secure 

one from any """^.^T f^t/J^'intlfe e^ 

the wary animals, 

to fall victims to 

or any of the other 



hunter. All yho 
to bring him a wolf faiied in 
forts to land one of the wary 
the wolves refusing 
traps or poison 
means in use. 

Hancock— For threatening 
wife upon various and 
sions, Joseph Vezma 

miner who is .said to , 

hat he is a bad man. was sentenced 
!o ninety days in the county jail 
Judge Olivier. 

Houghton— The new 
coal hoisting device at 
.inf'ks the first of its 
Superior was tested Monday and was 
foun.l to work smoothly. 

Calumet— Capt. John Trevarrow of 
.'onSny A Engineers. »fas eonflrmed 
the persi.stent rumor to the '^ff^'-t/'^^ 
he was to retire from his oXnc\^\ ca- 
acitv in connection with the Michi- 
gan state troops. The retirement will 

tnk»» i>lace Mav 4 and 

taKe piats.. - y^^i-^^ of fifteen years 



to kill his 

tre<iuent occa- 

of Atlantic, a 

have concluded 

senten< 

by 

electric bridge 
Ibe Van Urden 
kind on Lake 



jury and a couple ot 
will hold forth. In ac- 
VVood has been named 



of the 

before 

afternoon and 

ninety days in the 



federal grand 
term:- of court 
c<. I dunce Bert 

'^D^'l-ils Lake. N. D— W. H. Vander- 
hoef. the Devils Lake hotel keeper re- 
cently arre.sted for violations 
prohibition law. pleaded guilty 
Judge Cowan Monday 
was sentenced to 
coi'.nty jail. ^ , fu , 

Bismarck, N. D— The appeal in the 
case against Dr. Thor Moeller, charged 
with man.^laughter lu the second de- 
gree, will be taken up by the supreme 
court in October. The court is rapidly 
disposing of a large number of cases 
tliat have been pending for some time. 

Minot. N. D.— As a result of the com- 
plaints made by local shippers against 
the freight charges out of Minpt, the 
Commercial club of this city will take 
steps to secure a reduction 
claimed that the companies 
ing rates that art too high 
a nee with rates in effect 



the ship 
Sunday 
the range 



wil bring 
close a military 
duration. . , ., „, 

Hancock— The lighthouse at 
canal went into commission 
night for the first time and 
llehts were lit Tuesday night. The lite 
Vavng station at the canal is also open 
the nfvigation season being now fair y 

under wty with the d^'Pf "^%*;J,.-^f, „ 
eral eastbound boats and the staiting 
of a number of vessels from the lower 
lakes for Lake Superb^-. 

Houghton — fJeorge H. Mance. 
urtr of the Cactus Development 
panv, in which Copper country 
are " heavily interested, 
to his home In Duluth. 

'■'Liurlim-Mrs. Johanna Sistela of 
Wolverine died Monday, cancer 
the cause "of death, -^h*?,)^'^' 
vears and is survived b> a 
imi five children. The funeral 
held Wednesday afternoon, with 
ices at the Wolverine church 
L Heidemann officiating. 



has 
after 



treas- 
com- 
people 
returned 
a brief 



being 

aged 55 

husband 

was 

serv- 

Uev. A. 



DAKOTA BRIEFS 



took 
Mlch- 



FHEE IXtX>llM.\TION 



•. i: im«»oKs, 

I'lciKe setiil 
liirormaUon 
.if lupiure. 



of 



me 
your 



COUPON 

1 Hrook-^ BlilK . ^fa^»llnll. MUli 
hy mall In plain 



new UUcovery 



wraper f u 1 i 
for tlM curc 



N.iine 



PENINSULA BRIEFS 



Grand Forks. X. p-Rom-iin T^]^p^\^- 
the ll-month.«-old baby of Mr. and Mis. 
olfveVanuli... died Momlay at the home 
on 704 Thlrl avenue. The luneral 
place Tuesday morning from bt 

''*'Fargo"'N'- D—United States Marshal 
Tames Shea has received authority 
■from the department of justice to ap- 
point an extra deputy marshal during 
the rush the next two months when the 



It is 
are charg- 
In accord- 
elsewhere 

Grand Forks. N. D— Michael Meros- 
kv, who was Injured last week by be- 
ing "-un over by a handcar, is improv- 
ing rapidly at St. Michaels hospital, 
where he is being cared for. The pli>- 
slcian .<avs that he l.s not suffering 
much pain and although his Injuries 
for a time were considered serious, 
is now thought that he will recover. 

Fargo, N. D. — A systematic plan 
campaign In the effort to makt 
a city of more civic beauty and a 
healthful place in which to live was 
the result of the meeting of tlie execu- 
tive committee of tlie Civic Improve- 
ment league, held at the Commercial 
club Monday evening. 

Valley City, N. D.— There are 
six traveling men making their 
quarters in Valley City. The.change of 
the Northern Pacific .station irom Jowti 
town to the hill will result in several 
families removing from J''*? ^'t>^,„,.„,,^. 

Grand Forks. N. D.— M. F. Muiphj 
left Tuesday evening for the east witn 
New York as his uftimate 'iest'nf, '•;>;, 
In New York Mr. Murphy will make 
arrangements for the "-eturn of h's 
wife to this city. She was injuied in 
the collision of the Republic last 
ter and has since been in New 
Mrs Murphy has recovered tiom 
injuries. 



it 

of 
Fargo 

more 



forty- 
head- 



wln- 
York. 
her 



MINNESOTA BRIEFS 



son of Mr. and Mrs. Peter Lamb, wera 
held Tuesday morning at St. Joseph's 
church, the Rev. Father Charles offi- 
ciating. 

Brainerd— William P. Bartsch has 
sold his residence on Bluff avenue 
north to Nels Johnson of Johnson 
Bros., who will give possession about 
May 1. The consideration was $l,5oO 
cash. Prof. Bartsch has rented the 
Charles Walker residence on Norwood 
street, now occupied by J. C. Manville, 
and will occupy it as soon as that gen- 
tleman goes to Two Harbors, 

Stillwater — The marriage of Miss 
Rose Isabel Mackey. one of Still water's 
popular young ladles, to .Samuel Ghar- 
bonneau." was solemnized at 9 o'clocit 
Tuesdav morning at St. Michael's 
Catholic church by Rev. Father Cor- 
coran. 

Bemldjl — A proposition has been 
made to the Bemldjl Commercial club 
for the establishment here of one of 
the largest machine foundries In the 
Northwest, the offer being submitted 
by C. J. Anderson of Menomonle, Wis., 
who appeared at a meeting of the Com- 
mercial club held Tuesday evening and 
explained his proposition. 



and 
The 



\.i.lr': 



< Uy 



.«l(at«. 



Negannee— The Negaunee bcandina- 
vian society will hold a picnic on Mid- 
summer day at the Cleveland park. One 
of the lehpemlng societies will also 
pi.nic In the wove. The Negaunee or- 
ganization has secured the east pa- 
vilion. The Ishpeming Light C^uard 
band has be«n engaged by the Ne- 
gaunee society, , , „,. 

Negaunee — -A. four days examination 
for the position of midshipman In the 
United States naval service is in prog- 
ress at the government building Three 
candidateH are taking the examination, 
two from the Copper country and one 
from Munising^ , 

l8hperain«-?rhe new building of th« 




sthma 

Bronclutis 

DifficultBieathine 

OmeiaOil 

Pour a teaspoonful of Omega Oil 
In a cup of boiling water, hold the 
mouth and nose close to the cup, and 
inhale the arising steam. The steam 
carries the healing propertiep of the 
Oil into the thmat and lungs and 
gives (jviick reliel. lOc, 25c., 60c 



\noka— Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Pratt 
of' Helena, Mont., spent Thursday and 
Fridav in Anoka, tho guests of Mr. 
and Mrs. Albert F. Pratt. They have 
been visiting in Rocliester and the 
Twin Cities for three weeks. 

Little Falls— Lucile Minnie, the 10- 
year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Joseph Klewel. died Monday after an 
.llness of several weeks' duration. The 
eh lid had been ill for some time, 
death came from compUcations. 
funeral is to be held Thursday after- 
noon. 

Mankato— Several more of the ball 
Dlayers have arrived to join Managei 
Benack's team. Dexter, first baseman; 
Monroe, pitcher, and Campbell, short- 
stop arrived Monday night. Two or 
three more have yet to arrive, and 
then the team will be complete, 
believed to be a strong 
opening game will be 

t t*rost 

Grand Marals— Matt Johnson re- 
turned Sunday night from Duluth. 
where he went to have his eye treated, 
over which a film had grown 
winter a slick flew up 
right eve. which was 
tlie trouble. The 

' '"it'kin— Next week Friday will be 

the talk and demonstration of 

nf dynamite for the purpose 

ing land. It is probable 

in cliarge of the work 

invitation of the ladies 



team, 
awaited 



It IS 

and the 
with in- 



Last 

"and hit his 

the cause of all 

member is entirely 



will 

the use 
of clear- 
that the men 
will accept the 
of the cemetery 
association for removing the stumps 
un the land adjoining the cemetery, 

Rochester— E. P. ^o^'^'^- /o'.fnV,'*' ^ 
resident of Horton. died April U. at 
bis home in Seattle. He was 74. Mr. 
Lowrie left Horton in 1895, going to 
Simmons. Mo. From H'e^e 'le went to 
Washington, locating at Seattle. He 
i.-< survived by his brother, George 
Lowrie of Pleasant G^«ve and three 
sisters, who reside in New York. 

Moorhead— Funeral services over the 
remains oi th« lAte Ambrose Lamb, 



Eye Diseases 

FAILING SIGHT 

Cured 

■■npp Full Cours* of My Mild Horn* 
rntt R»m»di»« which ar« Rcstor- 

* "'^^ ing Sight to Thousand* 
to try for Fiftoen Days'. 

If you suffer with failing sight or diseased 
eyes, or if vour eyes are jtist becomnig weak 
and you think yon needglasscs, write me and 
I will prescribeand send, all charges prepaid, 
a course of my remarkable absorption reme- 
dies to use freely 15 days. If you are not sat- 
fied to continue the treatment, you will not 
owe me one cent. I believe 
I CAN CURE EVERr CASE'OF EYE 8TBAIM, 
EYE DISEASE OH FAILING SICHr 
It th» etructurM are not too badly di«e»»e<l I li»T«tre»U4 
oTPr a hundred tli.ju»»nd c»«M aiit rertored ilfht to 
many who had Leon blind twenty y«ar». »l yoor eyea 
need attention I want t-i ha'.p yo<i. ,,,.,, 

Pit an (k) mark in fr.ntof tha iymptoini lo ttolol- 
luwiDgllit which you find you ba?a: 
Ire the IM» iranulated* 
Do you ••• objectt d •iMaf 
Poy ivir eyea amartur ti'irol 
Do they WMp or run waterf 
Do you tnffer with Wild Halnf 
Muat you rubetet tu *e« cle>rlyt 
Do thoy itch, icratch or feel dryf 
Can you r- ad amall prtntclearlyl 
Dj the mirds blur or nm Vijeiliert 
Any fljatiuf ipota before your eyetf 
Do y..ur eyoi f.iel wialt. •(•re or ttredl 
Do you wear glaises f>'r weak tiKlitl 
Aretha eyehalli rad. aore, iaflainedt 
Aoba or pain in or abo:it the eyebillif 
Viiion becominc amnky, cloudy "r dimf 
Haie \ou an> Spoti, ecume, PterTSiuma or frowthi of 
any kind growint ..n tho eyeball* If ao, daacriba then. 
Have T '" cateracta forniinf In eye»? 
Try ThIa T*at: Stick a pin tlironth a plain whlU 
card; close one eyo; Iwik through hole with olUer. If you 
■ee any epoti or web« it i* Cataract or aonie braaklof 
down ot the internal eya. 
DON'T NEGLECT 
VOUR EYES 
Tlie»e aro thous- 
and! lit people 
whose sltnt U 
I just eommencinc 
to fail, others are 
rapidly gr. wluf 
blind wh" dn not 
know whereto £• 
ill prevent blind* 
Deal A!iulehlur< 
riu£ of the aiaht 
f}-day may mean 
blladneisin* 
year if nerlected. 
Cut out this ad, 
■itn coupon an4 
write mo to-day 
al>.mt yuur eya 
troubles and let 
me prore at my 
expen&e that 1 
can cure them. 

PtII Out and Sand ThU Coupon 



rRCE theatmemt coupon. 

OR. W.O.COFFEE. 

D«pt. *ui\ , Da* Moin»a, la. 
Dear D..cVjr. _ „. .. 

I in,»pt your ceneroua offer Plaaaa (and ma your 
Abs'>rption Treatment tor 15 dars' fair trial oa 
my caaa. whicb I daacriba la aneiuaed (beat. 



Mama . 



Addreat 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 





E«aA.«iHMnMpa 



-T^k. 



I 







t 



\H^ 



r 

I 



Jlii iWI I' ll i ii 



4-^ 






L 







THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: THURSDAY. APRIL 22. 1909. 




CONCERNING 



••We want Hi- ' '!c to visit the 

ihlldren's homt- Mr». T. J. Davis. 

Iha president of the home board, today. 
"We, of neco'^Hv ask contributions 
from lh« li far after yoar. and 

receive most generously, but compara- 
tively few of the many who contribute 
to this work rf-allzc how fine an In- 
dtltution the people are supporting. In 
©rder to Kive them special opportunity, 
the board of the home has arranged 
for a aeries of receptions to the public 
Fridays during AprJl. and we hope that 
manv will avail themselves of this 
opu«'rtuiiltv to see .lust how Duluth la 
caring t'ur the helpless little ones, who 
fcre dependent upon public charity for 
their life. The home Is open to the 
public at all times, of course, but we 
%Ill bo especially glad to ijreet visitors 
tomorrow or next Frt.lHV." 

Itecelvlngr at t .9 tomorrow 

wUl te the follow .mhors of the 

I Mrs. T. J. l>Hvis, Mrs. S. R. 

11. Ctowley and Mrs. 
he buUdinK han been 
d and Improved and 
iK carried on with 
.'to every one con- 



.1 



I. , Mri 

J. N. Kill.! 
recently r* 
th*- 

mil 

1\ V afternoon Mrs. T. I... Cliap- 

rr f. . (iiiilmts a kindergarten 

, twice each week tor 

, n. not yet of school 

age. will liave a class to which the 
visitors are Invited. 

Mundav, Tuesday and Wednesday of 
next wet.k the uiembers of the board 
will go throuifli the city to solicit con- 
tributions for the rummagte sale which 
Will be held next month. It is hoped 
that a large sum of money may be 
realiated from "'!« -ffiTt for tlio sup- 
oort of the h. •! every citizen of 

Duluth will »-. I to ke.p the >«itl«" 

iB mind and rtlcles lu. contri- 

butions towa: 

BRILLIANT WEDDING. 

Miss Sell wood Becomes the 
Bride of C. E. Mershon. 

the 

Eu.- - 
MerHh<' 
of the 
of 1 

brUlva lu se^ 
wedding last 
mlnation of 
affairs. The 
O'clock In R '■ 
Into a bow 
At the >i 
music ' 
tra 



til «<>cletv was Inteicsled in 
asi evening of Mif<a La 
and Oharlea Edward 
1 1 the home 
'>A .Seilwoud 
si ciuptriur all ""•' ' - 

Oeeu ».ine of ' ^ ' • 

'- ''asiJiiSi iiiji.i Cue 
■ was a fitting cul- 
u *,= i.es of beautiful 
service was read at 8 
' ■'" llmt was transformed 
'.veel peas and smllax. 
d hour the wedding 
i Ly Flaatens orches- 
!al party entered tlie 
, ',<. o little nephews of the 

i . <j Kichard and Gerald 

Bt:iw..oa. entered flrst and marked uut 
an aisle with wide salln libbona. and 
^^r.- ■' " ■" ' '"■ " '"^ ""* ^ Bice of the 
j»|j-, I,' read the 

»mu».^v .. .... - -.1! 38 Frances 

Sell wood entered next, and was fol- 
lowed bv the matron of honor, Mrs. 
I4. W. Lelthhead, and last came the 
bride with her Ifath*r, Mr. Mershon 
awaited her at tlie improvised altar, 
and during the service the orchestra 
played softly. , _ , 

The bride wore an exquisite gown of 
flu< ' ^ -atin in a dlrectoire model, 
wit els of beautiful rose point 

lace, uiiu ^he earr*--' - -t-.w.-,- K,,(.,,uet 
of orchids and Hi *'"*; 

Lelthhead wore .1 '■•• -■.',' •-'i 

Dale apricot satin, and earned a 
bouquet of fink rnsep. The little tlower 
girl wore s: of wliite. 

* jl^t the ; :i followed the 

ceremo: large number of guests 

ng about the rooms were 
Mrs. John Fanton. 
_,,., . iitln. Mrs. A. W. 

HaVtman ami M::^. O. D. Thompson of 

Bt. Paul. , . -. , 

.<-v _ ,:....-'■.. .^ ..•HO "served at Mrs. 

tilng the Sell- 
dining room 
of liliea of 
• " used, and 





0^»^ Friday . 

IPARjGAIN 






Wash Boiler 



Sleeve Boards 



IX Wash Boilers, with copper rim and 1 Well braced, made of selected wood- 
bottom, sells reg- j regular price 19c ; on Friday 

ularly at $1.98, on 
Friday — 



' . \:<i* 



I'lmwB 



$1.69 




Carpet Sweeper 



Domestic Car- 
pet Sweeper — 
made by Bis- 
sels, sells reg- 
ularly at $1.85, 
on Friday 
only 

$1.59 




railed. 

Mrs. 
Mrs. \'. 



Clothes Lines 

Keystone brand Clothes Line, of the best 
quality hemp. 50 feet in length; regularly 
21c, on Friday 2 for 25<, or, f C. 

each ^*^^ 

Clothes Prop 

Clothes Pole or Prop, 9 feet long with 
notched end, -elected wood free 1 f\ 
from knots; regular price 15c, each. 1 Vlo 

Swift's Washing Powder 

For scrubbnig, bcouring, etc., 4-lb. packages, 
S(,ld everywhere at 25c, our price -l Q 
on 1 riday. each * *'^ 

Toilet Paper and Holder 

Six rolls of our celebrated P & W. Toilet 
Paper (usually 5c roll), and a nickel OC^ 
plated holder, on Friday for ^%J\^ 

Wash Bowl and Pitcher 

Plain white ware, in plain shape, best grade 
of earthenware, full size, regularly QC^ 
$1.10. on Friday 0*JW 



Cut Glass Deparment 

Four Bargains For Friday 

At our regular prices, our cut glass would, in com- 
parison to the so-called "special" prices of others, be 
the biggest value ever! And as we are not contined to 
buying from one factory alone, but carry in stock the 
product of half a dozen of the best cutters, we can oittr 
vou. in addition to lower prices, the most extensive as- 
sortment in Duluth. The few items below arc exam- 
ples of the value you get in this store at special sales. 

FRUIT OR SALAD 
BOWLS — Large 8-inch 
bowl, in the famous Hob 
star and sunburst pat- 
terns, cut on imported 
blanks; our regular price 
$4.25, on Fri- d»0 QC 
day, each ^£f%/%J 



Gas Mantles 

"Welsbach" Inverted Gas Mantles; you all 
know the "Welsbach" quality, also OC*» 
the price; special for Friday 3 for...fc*wV 

Copper Tea Kettle 




MRS. CHARLES E. MERSHON. 
Formerly Miss La Rue Sellwood. Daughter of Capt. Joseph Sellwood. 

Wedding Took Place Last Evening. 



The 



.Mr. ami -\lr.>; II. rut W. Reyner and the 
quartet nud choir of tiie First Mrtho- 
dlst ehin.!i. Ati informal musical*? 
was enjoyed. 



Thimble Bee. 



tii« 



.■U.»rs 
. tlons 



K 



lit 

p!e 



Mrs. Jacobs and Mrs. Coolc were 
hoKlfBsea yesterday afternoon at the 
parlors of the Flr.«l M.thodiiit church. 

at - .'.•liKlitfvil rnefling of thf Thimble 
I., the church. The members 

1, htir own sewing- and enjoyed 

ii' afternoon togiethev. 

w three present. 



There 



.\lr^. J. 



Card Party. 

H. Ktllv ami .Ml■^' H. 



■ rij:i to tiif I'last, 
■ •■ ;it hoine at 
until tlielr 
,,,,,, ,„ _..,.,! L- ' Hst Superior 

out-^'T^town ftuests for the wed- 
j,,J,- mIk 1 rst.t.n. Miss .lane 

Me«hon."A . Morl.:v,, Miss Mor- 

lev and Mis.^ Wicke.-^. will leave to- 
morrow for tJit'lr home.-i at J^aginaw. 
■I ■ 

Informal Musicale. 

Mr and Mrs H J. Kolling enter- 
tained inforrnally iast eveninB at th.:ir 
home 1126 Second street, in honor of 



mm entertained 
4511 ramlirldpe 
was played ait 



:U canl-s 



-•tri 



1. 

tal. 



F. Wii- 
. •sttTdii.''' at 
Fjve 11 u lid red 



Cups and Saucers 

Cups and Saucers from 
tlic famous Imperial Bone 
China factory in England, 
full sized tea cups with 3 
lines of gold tracing on 

edge, four on ^<^^' ^^. f^^''\^ ''^''^'''%''' 
$2.50 a dozen; on Friday *1.50 a 1 K/» 

dozen ; each 






14-ounce copper Tea Kettle, heavily nuk- 
eled, large No. 9 size, retails d**! I Q 
regularly at $1.69, on Friday. . . . %p 1 . 1 */ 



CELERY TRAYS— Hob star or sun- 
burst patterns, cut on heavy imported 
blanks, our regular price ^Q ^Q 
$4.00, vn Friday ^^^•\JZf 

SUGAR AND CREAM SET— Of 
good size, beautifully cut on heavy 
imported blanks; regu- d*0 iZCk 
larly $3.95, on Friday ^£t.\JiJ 

OIL OR VINEGAR BOTTLES— 

Sunburst pattern, perfectly cut on 
perfect blanks; worth d»0 OC 
regularly $3.25, on Friday .«P^«^*^ 



Copper Coffee Pot 

Of heavy weiglit copper, fully nickeled, 
4-piut size; regular price 95c, on gO^ 

Wilson Gas Toaster 

Toasts 4 slices of bread at same time, with 
space on top for coffee pot; regular ^ »T 
price 25c, on Friday * "^ 

Sink Strainer 

To be set in sink, made of imported enam- 
eled ware; regular price 29c, spe- I Q 
cial for Friday, each •■• ^^ 

Water Glasses 

Colonial pattern Tumblers, of clear 
glass, with ground and polished 
bottom; regular price /»Q^ 
$1.10, Friday, per dozen 0*/C 




Personal Mention. 



■} 



'dren. and 
r terrace. 

here they 



Mr.«j. A. II. Miu'li <i! 
the Misses Han ton o( 
have gone to Wmnii 
will make their home. 
• • • 

Mr<? J. W. Kreitter and Miss Olive 
Kreitter have returned from a u-w 
days' visit at St I'aul. 



.Mr.-?. Paul 



• « 
Sharvey 



will r«'tiirn to- 




Inferior Gloves Cost 
Like Kaysers 



The best of silk gloves— the Kayser's 
—cost no more than inferior makes. 

They are worth twice as much. 

Such finish and fit, such fabric, 
such wear, can be found in no other 
gloves. See that "Kayser" is in the 
hem. 



Patent 

Finger-Tipped 

Silk Gloves 



For 25 years, the Kaysers have stood for all that made silk 
floves desirable. 

The patent tip— the pure silk fabric— the finish and fit that 
comes through our fifty operations. 

The guarantee is in every pair. 

If you want them, don't take others. Simply watch the hena. 

Short Silk Gloves, - 50c. 75c, $1.00, $1.25 
Long Silk Gloves. 75c. $1.00, $1.25, $1.50 

JULIUS KAYSER & CO., Makers, New York 




!!■... IT. 'U- fr( Ml a two weeks' vjh'jt at 

Chicago. 

• • • 

day t'venluK for • to attend tl^e 

last four days oX i... jiatjonal \. W . 
C. A. convention. 

• • • 
Mi> W H .Stowell. fornurly of this 

cttv J.ui- jii.'t rttinrifd from a trip 
al.foiui and i.s visiting litr sister. Mrs. 
I-Mv\!;; -\ .1at-u:;.r<l .-f St. F'atll. 
• • 

Ml -^ ' > ' ' 

from a lew >; 

.4 • • 

Mi.«!S Mar\' 1'. AK Paviiji : ' ' ■ ■ ■ 

from s?t. Faui. 

• • • 

Mrs^. C. I>. Thomp*:Mii 

ih*- KiHst 01 Mr. and Mr.-- 1 ■ > -.- 

head I'f Kiglitt-eiiili i^vt-niie ^a ; 

• . • 
\ . Ml I'ai laru' of Bemidji. for- 

mtTiv ci thi.v city, :b visiting friend;- 

iiert. 

• . • 

Mr(= B r Wilson of Lakeside will 

leav*- Saturday lor a viBit at Minne- 
apolis. 

• • • 

MrK *• W. Seddon of Proctor has re- 
turn.(i lioni a vioit at Crooksttn. Minn. 

• • • 
1\!- nr,.^ -M;- F^hilip Ha t r 1 n/u' ; en of 

(-,, \vi!l -oon foi 

(•;, :h«- p.u Mr and 

Mrs. Olivtr Quick fop n l-w dayn. 

WOMAN IN BUSINESS 

Is Gently Discouraged For 
the Common Good. 

In .J. 1 ,. : !ig the fact tliat v/vna u are 
u.^-iialiy laid less than men foi tlie 
i^aiiu- work. many writers overlook 
ttrtain points which are nec*PFary to a 
just consideration of the question. As- 
no one individual or corporation, more 
tlian another, is. to blame, it is the 
wiild in g^eneral tliat mu.«.t be ijlanied 
or iustifled. With many notable excep- 
tiofs!', tJie world tenda to frame its 
cu.«lomer» so as to work out tlie great- 

e«t K ' '" "" g^realest number. The 

indiv be forever secondary 

to tl ■ '• grood. says Colliers 

The iiuesiioii may tlien be stated tiiu^ 
Can we blame the world for not encoui 
agring women to give up tlie proper 
feminln* ideals of liome niaking by 
making them even-handed c6mpetitors 
with men and independent ol th»i)i' 
T Id especially neds two things, 

,1 ,i better homes and more and 

beiui i.eople. Is it to be biamed for 
not framing its customs to attain tliose 
end-*" If it be denied that this general 
t tie "means to gain it are good. But If 
reoult is good, tlien it may be denleil that 
it be admitted that the general result 
Is tlie right one, tlien tlie worid is Jus- 
tified in not encouraging too great a 
divergence from whatever will conduce 
to that end. The world if justified in 
saying to woman: 'For you. Inisiness 
it but a preparatory school, a stepping 
stone, a partial service. Your real work 
is to be Witt* and mother. Be employed 
at anv u-eful work 80 long as that 
s. '(St for you individually, hut 

1, r tliat you are endowed with 

a i.ife'i'ei capacity for service, and there 
Is need for vour work in the home. 
To give emphasis to this dictum, and to 
k< ep it iiourly fresh in mind the world, 
pt rhaps wisely and kindly, decline to 
tncourage woman overmuch to prefer 
an independent life. 

it is ditTlcult. if not Impossible, to 
speak 'In geneial terms of the probleni 
of women in business wltiiout geemlng 
to countenance many flagrant wrongs. 
In presenting this view it is not to 
justify any known injustice the reader 
may have in mind, but to afford a per- 
spective which may enable us to eon- 
aider ut;iV(ifiil if-ndencies. 



Water Pitcher 

Pitchers to match the tumblers 
—heavy Colonial style— ground 
bottom, large size; regularly 



59c ; on Friday — 




Imported German and Genuine Mettlach Stems 

Beyond a doubt, ours is the largest and most varied stock in 
Duluth ; there are over 50 patterns, sizes and designs to choose 
from "Elks" and others who intend to purchase bteins, 
should see our stock. There is a price saving in every pur- 
chase. Prices range from — 

69c to $12.50 



Waffle Irons 




p\N10N&pnEO 

I THE BIO 11 ^^fc^ \< 



GLASS BLOCK 
5TOKE 




QUALITY IS" 
PARAMOUNT 



With high 
frame, for 
use on gas 
ranges or 
oil stoves — 
regular 
price $1.19. 
On Friday 




had to be decidedly changed before it 
was accepted by American women. 

There is a dearth cf 18S0 styles 
among the latest French models, de- 
spite its having been so loudly her- 
kfded from the other side. Byzantine 
and Egyptian ideas are mostly con- 
fined to the beauty and glitter of the 
new trimmings that are used to orna- 
ment the corsage, and of these thc-re 
tB an abundance. .t>irectolre tind ern- 
Dlre effects are decidedly modified, foi 
the new waistline is much more near 
Ihl normal than it has b^^^" «" ^«"}^ 
seasons. The one-p:ece ff'^". <^]^ 
princess style, continues tc La what jv 
most olten seen, 

* • • 

Medieval styles are shown in cos- 
tumea onlv. and they must be stil 
mc^t^lmodified if they are to l^nd any 
general acceptance In this country. ^ or 
the won.an wha wants sometliing dif- 

erent this mfdi^Y'-^l i^^^^^'JJfg ^ ^ 
undoubtedly be the choice. This is a 
t'lght-ftttlnl garment from above the 
bust to t'tiow the hips. The flttexi 
portion is rather short m the back, 
and curves gradually down in front, 
wliere It Is sometimes of rounded out- 
Hne while in other models it erids in 
n rieen point. The full skiit is at- 
fached trtl^is fitted bodice, 1" other 
models the fitted effect ;s produced 
1 V a rather piuin drapery. 

The great value of this rneiiievR] 
costume to the average woman will be 
thltTtl points the way to a gradual 
icmgthening of the waistline of which 
we sl.a 1 undoubtedly, see better and 
greater expression in the coromg au- 
tumn. _ 

LIFE A CHESSBOARD. 

Hunt For Move to Win the 
Game. 



Medieval Styles. 

Motiern ciisloms require dressing 
llitit is essentially different from the 
stvles of bvgone centuries, and when 
all is said and done modern taste in 
dressing is by far the most artistic 
the world has ever known. No longer 
will American women as a class accept 
freakish and outlandish styles, by no 
natter how high an authority they are 
launched. Ptvles must be modified 
to tile more refined taste to meet with 
any general acceptance. This was 
well proved only last fall with the 
tntrance of the shealb skiit, wbtcli 



A man cf large affairs who had 
won great renown in his piofessioii. 
wks asked his secret ."I l^f^e "one- 
he replied, -'unless It is that I never 
admit failure. 1 treat every group of 
cirTumsrances. good, bad or indifferent 
as if it were a game of chess, and I 
fry to find the move that under those 
condlHons seems inevitable." ^ «»^h an 
attitude masters circumstances, wliat- 
ever they may be says an exchange. 

A factory girl in a college town, 
nartly as a result of the poison she 
had breathed in at her work, was 
Struck down by a disease that makes 
her absolutely helpless except as she 
is moved mechanically. She might have 
had onlv the charitable pity w-hich 
her condition would warrant. But iiv- 
stead she has made her sick room 
^uch a center of cheer and inspiration 
that people visit her as they might 
royalty A club cf a hundred college 
e\rls find in her constant stimulus, and 
fhe whole town is the better for her 
bright courageous spirit. As a ^ft*;" 
lorv girl tiiey might never have heard 
of her But, crippled and apparently 
out of the race, slie has useS to the ut- 
most thi one talent she had and 
Xsen the attitude of mmd that makes 

^'^Usliafly^ h^owever, our trials are not 
so drama ic. Everyday character tests 
seem rather stupid oftentimes, not 
nel^y so interesting as those done be- 
fore thf pSbllc. But because we can 
nmke heaven or the reverse out of the 
very same materials, and because the 
materials for our earthly lieaNcn. at 
least, are just these liumdium Inci- 



dents, our point of view toward them 
is perhaps the most imp ortant of all. 

CASTE VS. CULTURE 

Higher Education Brings 
Different Ideals. 

In an argument against college for 
g-irl?. which appeared some tlmo ago in 
a j.urnal that rtnnds Pre-emlnently for 
culture, it was contended that t He col- 
lege not cmly demands mst those loui 
years during which the girl w""jd nat- 
urally take up social life, nnd de\ elop 
acquaintance, but that Its ideals and 
course of study put her out ot sym- 
pathy with the ambitions and interests 
of the girls, and men of her caste. 
■w'ritfS VoKUC 

Although it .seemed peculiar to rneet 
such views in a journal of. leading 
and light, those who have intimate 
acquaintance with modern ProKre>^sive 
mothers know that this Prob em of co - 
lege or no college for their girls is 
one with which they all wrestle; that 
while the many advantages of college 
experience are appreciated, they are 
outweighed in large measure, by the 
fact thit its training, and the influence 
of association with fellow students , so 
changes the girl's point of view thai 
the eligible men in her own class cease 
to interest her, and that, a good mar- 
riage. In the sense in which that teim 
8 used socially, loses its gutter. 
Anxious for the social success of her 
daughter naturally the mother does not 
regard with favor a course of study 
which may kill her ambitioij foj. f^ial 

^^^!^, d^o^e's noV* fee/^lt^get£r 
yu.stified in withholding from her child 
latter-day opportunities for intellectual 
development Herein lies the problein 
which she worries over for. years, and 
usuallv decides in the negative. 

No better illustration than that of 
stunting a girl intellectually and de- 
priving her of the inestimable experi- 
ence of college life, because of the 
fear that she may marry out of her 
class could be adduced to prove the 
?ruth of the contention that we are a 

ong w-av as vet. from practicing so- 
cial democracy. To deprive the girl 
of higher education is far more repre- 
hensible than foreign practices in re- 
elrd to which we are most virtuously 
fndignantTand the time will cotne when 

he force of public opin on ^iU .f^^^^^** 
iuiL-tice, not only for the girl s saKc, 
bit also for that of the nation. Those 



A Skin of Beauty to • Joy Forevw. 



D 



R. T. FELIX QOURAUD'S 
Oriental Cream or 
Magloal Beautlfier. 

KeBBoves Tan, PimplM. Fr«>ck- 
its, Moth Patches, Ra^h and 

Skia DtKaMS. as I arary 
blemith on ttaMily, amd da- 
flc> d.-tectioD. It hat stood 
the ir*i of to ) aan, aod !• to 
barmleat wc taata it tolM 
■uia it la proparlv mada. Ac- 
captno counterfeit of •Imilai 
•aise. Dr L. A. Sayra (aid 
to a lady of the hauttoa (a 
[:*ti«at)i "Aivvii'MlUa will 
uae th«B. I raconmaad 
•COURAUD'S CRl'.AM' u 
itie ieaxt hannful of all tb« 
iklnura '>r»il>)Bi. " Pot iila 
by all dcucii.'tita aad Fancji 
Coo^t D<»T« « in tha Unit' J 
Statas, Canada and ^ utopc. 

f«d. T. Bofklu. Pr*».. S7 ertal J«Mt St. New Yorl 




mothers who substitute the ideals of 
caste for those of culture, cripple tlieir 
daughters intellectually, and stunt 
them morally. 

Porch Furniture. 

In selecting porch furniture, avoid 
rustle- chairs. Tliey collect dust which 
is absolutely Impossible to remove. 
Such ciiairs are best suited for garden 
purposes, and then only in very large 
gardens or flower yards. 

A soft rush chair, the wood work 
of which is smootli and plain, is best, 
and a light oak is to be prefcrrei to 
dark green or a painted piece, as it 
does not show the dust. 

One should have ail rockers covcrod 
with half-rounds of rubber, to prevent 
the scratching of the porch floor. 

These rocker tires are procurable 
at any furniture establishment and 
they are easily adjusted. 

Costuming Hints. 

Watches were never daintier than 

they are now. 

« • • 
Many sleeves are buttoned from 
shoulder to wrist. 

* * • 
Almost every gown has a different 

shoulder scarf. 

« « « 
Sweet peas nod on summer hats. 

• * * j> 

Paris says colors are growing crude! 

• • • 
White crepe ruching. doubled, is 

much used as a flnisli for neck and 

lace. 

* « • 

New effects in net are a leading 
feature of the lace and trimming de- 
partments. 
* • • • 

Even lingerie waists of the most 
^costly sort have adopted tlie little sou- 
'tache braid. 

• * • 
For linen suits, and in fact for suits 

and frocks of all washable materials, 
the Irish crochet buttons promise a 
vogue such as they liave never yet en- 
joyed. ^ ^ , 

Filet net stockings in lisle and in 
silk are the rage of the moment. 

* ♦ • 
The separate waist and skirt has al- 
most disappeared from view. 

♦ • • 
The gold and silver rose of the win- 
ter reappears on the shirred taffeta 

liat. 

• • • 
When two immense roses appear on 

the same hat they are unusually Hat 
In shape. ^ ^ 

Jet has not lost its popularity, and it 
appears frequently upon gowns and 
hats. ^ ^ . 

Lace will be more than rivaled iri 
popularity by embroidery and braid 
trimming. ^ ^ 

One of the new Fr<nch toques is 
termed the "Marie Antoinette. It Is 
made Of soft straw or shirred liberty 
satin. ^ ^ , 

Ribbons still have a strong hold up- 
on the coiffure, and are wound in and 
out with the hair while It is being 
done up. 



BODY OF MISSING MAN. 

Is Found in Red River fwehe Miles 
North of Fai'go. 

Barnesville, Minn.. April 22.— Tho 
body of Ilobert Hutchinson, who left 
ills Iiome last November, after telling 
his family that he was going to a 
neighbor's, was found Tuesday twelve 
miles north of Fargo, in the Red river, 
wiiere the Cheyenne empties into It. 
The body looked as if it had been in 
the water only a sliort time. Whether 
lie drowned himself or fell through the 
ice may never be known. When he 
left home he liad $2 in his pocket, hut 
wlien found there was not a thing on 
his person to tell whose the body was. 
He leaves a wife, two girls and one 
boy. One of tiie girls. Miss Latto. Is 
seriously ill at lier wiili brain fever. 

NEGRO IS HEIR TO $35,000. 

California Authorities Endeavoring 
to Find Trace of Missing Wlaek. 

Sioux City Iowa, April 22.— Heir to 
an estate valued at |35,000, Charles 
Klgin a negro, is being sought by the 
officers of Oakland, Cal. Elg»n ran 
away and joined a circus in Fayette, 
Mo., when he was 11 years old. Hiram 
Elgin, his father, who was a cotton 
grower, died recently in California, t.1- 
gin was married here in 1898 under the 
name of Charles Wlillam.s, to Kate 
Taylor, hut notlilng has been heard ot 
him lately^ 

HOMESTEAD SHACKS 

TAXABLE PROPERTY. 

Fargo. N. D.. April -=•— /Special to 
The Herald.)— Judge Amidon of the 
United States court ha.s uplield the de- 
cision of one of his reierees to the 
effect that homestead sliacks and resi- 
dences are subject to taxation even if 
final proof has not been made. It 13 
claimed tliat this is the first time the 
point has ever been passed on in court. 
Of course the land is not subject to 
taxation, but the court holds that all 
Improvements are. The decision is a 
far-reaching one and may be carried 
UP by homesteaders, tliough their Im- 
provements are rarely of such great 
value prior to final proof that the bur. 
den of taxation would be serious. 



iNCERDARMfc): 

used on an^ Sewing Machine. Shown 
In use at Singer Stores. SeeltTO-DAY.it 
14 WEST SUPERIOR BT 




!l: 





MMIPM |i 





I 

I j 

» 










THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: THURSDAY. APRIL 22, 1909. 



S UNBEAM THEATE R 

TONIGHT 
SOUVENIR NIGHTr 




A Treat for the Ladies 



A 



■ rt'il 



i ' 



KltMI-^sHty. 10 IK SITS. 




THOMASSON 



■»» 



"THE FURNITURE man 

ODD fUMWS lAU lOILOINS, 
U !«» li UlE AYIMUI liOITB. 



Ruffled Muslin Curtains 
Special Price a jQr* 
Pair Zr 7L 



NOW! 




HOLD LANDS 
ON RESERVE 

Those Who Filed on LaKe 

Superior Reserve Need 

Not Worry. 

The Rights of Entrymen 

Will Be Respected By 

Uncle Sam. 



iji. Minn,. 



April 22.—^ 



■vy wli 



! i: t -' 
J II si 



Mr 



to 

; h I IS 
•111- 



• ''II 

■k- 

iier: 

An- 



rlirator at the fire hall has now been 
<-onn<Mt«».l uj) and it in w<n-kinK order. 
Bt^siilf.s tlu* current Indicator, four hut- 
tons had t)een plaeed In close proximity 
to it whith, when pushed open up the 
doors for the hcuses. ringing boU.H and 
likfiuinj; the imandesvents. A lar«?e 
clock Is also attiiclied Kivlni? the cor- 
rect tU»»e ut all hours of the day, and 
a illal showing the pressure at all 
times conitni; from the pumping sta- 
tion, so that one con easily tell what 
the pressure Is at all the hydrants. 
Tliese new additions are great helps lo 
the men In the department, and also 
make tlie df^partment one of the best 
equipped on the range 

MERCHANTS ARE 
BUYING FREELY 

Future Assured, Range 

Business Men Prepare 

for Good Trade. 



T- 

<n 



• i.i\',s ar<' V, 
' ' !, 1 1 e V e 1 1 > 
nlv 



inci' 



the Hi 

h M V ^ . 



:r. all yyn 



29c a Pair 



$r Music Cabi- C4 Q C 
nets at ^^•f^ 



top tn K>;-!i- 




Mir.n . .\i.ril 22. — (S| i.il tv) 

.ltd. >— Travc-llng men winj 
le Ev.'leth In the past couple 
. iii'icti pleased :iiid say 
j! M.e tonnage tax has 

ased their business. 

-::ite pas.sed the bill, all 

ri the range ret used to 

: the hill woulil be 

,»vernor and a number 

-: tn-ti left the range 

I'k.^nlug up of 

. \\-i the merchants 

iXe and are buying 

ivvlcds--' that a good sea- 

I of them The vetuinB 

.ini;.tge tix was certainly a 

to thf riinee ciMintry. 



but 
tlie 



.(, .-.1 
tan 



.; ...,,.u:-y. 



V.\ 



FKKFAiUNii FOK liAMES. 

rieth \iut's liT CettiiJS Ufail} 
}i»r the S»»asiHr> SiinH. 

il to 

the 

^terday. 

••■:-ri of 
; hiu 



niBBING FIbELS 
EFFECT OF VOTE 

Restoration of Confidence 

Inaugurates Plans for 

Much Building. 



n 



M'- 



T 



< "■!■'.■ .■tTKit 

line of h: 
awav t'.) 






■ m 

are Jt ii.utjiii^ 

range, tliat c. 

>ns veto of tU' 

IX bill. (> ftl! ; 

L>epr. 
;:rv ui\ : 

-I 

.1 ion ji t'.u.s 
own in ilu- 
under waj 
lo entirely 
bv Mrs. 



uned 
J. A 

s r 
front will 



ai to 

.r coTiii- 

' ' Uc 
til 

1 : 1 1 I u I - 

r. .j\'.;ry 

given 

side 

yesslm- 

".■ra of 

aaiouiil 

. Work 

remodel 

Hibbing 



will wear wTi!te~lbbons and those un- 
der Mrs. Ellsworth the blue. The 
contest will last Up to June 16, and 
longer If fmiudt necessary. In addi- 
tion, they BiUai^ home cooking for 
the public Ad tV" '" ^^'^ profits. The 
white rlbWBVieW have already an- 
nounced a Mlmwl cooking sale to take 
place Satur*yaJ Z p. m. at the I'.veleth 
Cash groccHh am 

The members of the two teams are 
Mesdames James Floyd. J. C. Bradford. 
Bawden. Ca,wnQii James Wilson. John 
Wilson. J. F. Williams. A. IVterson, 
Provor. J. A-r Itrrftb. Angove. Trengove. 
Bloomfteld, I'enrod, Nancarrow. Corn- 
Wf-ll C. E. BlaU^'. Diingan. Ellsworth. 
Alfred DavejTl^tle Morrill. P:dwards. 
Ferris. Kob«jn J*nnson. Nannibal Hart, 
Krinning. ^ «» 

MUCH' BUILDING 
IS UNDER WAY 

Several Structures Are 

Already Under Way 

in NashwauK. 

Nashwauk. Minn.. April 22.— (Special 
to The Herald) — The ruins of the build- 
ings owned by Dominic Tarro and K. 
J. L'rani. which were destroyed by fire 
last winter, are being renjoved and new 
.•jlructures will soon be in course of 
erection on tlie site. 

Cliarles Veritna Is building a resi- 
dence l)uilding on Tiiird stret^i. 

W A. Gordon is completing the re- 
modeling of his residence on Third 
street, where he will live a.v. soon as 
the building is completed. Mr. Gordon 
ha.s rented the W- Jf liotul to a party 
from Ironwood. .Mich. 

.Mr. .McCloud oi Minneapolis, arrived 
Tuesday, to examine the work on the 
new higli school building, lor which he 
has the contract. _, . 

Capt K. Thomas of Ely arrived here 
Monaay He will take charge of the 
underground work at tlie Pearson mine, 
under Supt. Fred Cram. It nas been 
rumored that the mine will employ ::00 
men the eonung season. 

The Hawkins mine has completed the 
repairing of the engines and sieain 
sliovels. and is waiting for word to 
start shipping ore. , ,,• „ „ 

Tlie V ali.oiij ladles are holding a 
bazaar at the village hall, which will 
U.st four iiay-s beginning Tuesday. A 
.itllcious supper was served Tuesday 
evening Many fancy things are be- 
ing exiiibited. 

The uuilding owned by Mrs. Ssarali 
Blur! lias lieen quarantined the past 
week on accouni of scarlet fevt-r. An 
occupant of the house is reported to 
have diod witii the disease. 

Officials of the Larne and Crosby 
mines were her** In their special cars 
Wednesday to loQk after ineir proper- 
liis It is expected that an independent 
cuinpany is. about to establish a tele- 
1.-11. >ii.- line hero. Some days ago three 
>uiside men were here looking over tlie 
field and were entertained by a eom- 
inittee of llie Commercial club. They 
sotined enthusiastic about the prospect 
aid were of the opinion tiiat Nasli- 
wauk i.s one of the coming towns on 
llic rang". These men are supposed 
to represent Minneapolis capitalists 
who are looking for openings In the 
telephone field. Such a line, if estab- 
lished here, would take in tiie neigh - 
Ixiring villages of Keewatin, Calumet. 
.Snowball and several construction 
camps. 



,n . \ e 



r i i o r 

the 



the White 



Will 



.Miller, as a curio 

■ ttit. An en- 

in the Latter 

.. , 4.1 iud walls 






DR. MARY GILLON 

KEIIROPRIICTKI 



-Pfc 

It 1- 

»el<iom falls; r. 
MI»FM.ATIf i ■•• 
11i-:..%iJ.%U. w] 



OFHATH 



\ I ; I. - 

■ .„>f 
■* the 



t!. 



KNIFE INMU PILLOW. 

(umjilairiiii^ Witiies.s in .Assault 
Ca*ie (iot Into Troiihl**. 

Kveleth 



.'Ut a 

Vh 1 ' ; t 



li» V\e»«t l-"*r««l Hireet. Flwt "11." 

Old Phoitr •J7M-K. 
< Iti-idueinna <£ UuHwell Block. > 



"U 



n: - 
in:- 



Minn.. April 

i!.|.)— Ye.st.M-day. lu 
iiirt. Mar- in Matirin 

a charge of 



1.1 t'> 

I tie mu- 

was up 

'lattery. 

When 

stand it 



.\..k:i .loseph Flowers 

i-; !)ii C<?nt>'r street t-'^ 

1, .;. ted and will be ready 

•v sliorl time. The 

'ory brick, and adds 

liic opinion of a great 

lar and tj.-nter streets 

v\ a: -ioun i> . as thoroughly l>usiness as 

rine and Third streets. 

Mrs. r. H, Mcl'hail is erecting a new 
two-.-«torv building on Third av»'iiuc. 
Mrs. McPhail will occupy the ground 
itoor wltli a confectionery store when 
■omi»leled. Her present location will 
J> • ;.v Ijer leased for a barber sliop. 

i:rieK Nord has been appointed by 
the council to take the place vacated 
by Patrolman Wilson. 

Willi im KItz, who haa been in the 
dr, !A j'ds l)usiness here for some 
years past an.l who recently closed out 
his affairs, iias left for a two weeks' 
.Slav at West Baden from where he will 
I)!-' eed to Chicago to make his future 
home. 

rf. .S. -Sett left yesterday for Duluth 
t(. !..■ ih, T : 1 -.■uti!.> i)t' doys on busi- 



SINDAV SCHOOL WORK. 

TluMiie Discussed at Meeting Held at 
Coleraiiie \\ednesday. 

Coleraine, Minn.. April 22.— (.Special 
to The Herald.)— With delegates pres- 
ent from Coleraine. Bovey. Taconite. 
Marble. Nashwauk and other points on 
the Western Mfta^ba, *n institute of 
the Minnesota Sunday School associa- 
tion was held in the Presbyterian 
churcli here yesterday afternoon and 
evening. Many matters pertaining to 
Sunday school work were 



following 



discussed, 
program was ren- 



ji 



evi- 
. , .... lined 
iplainant 15 



h'it 




■ I'.i 



tn 



1^1 . :~ ; •■-^ visitor 

.V in Hibblng. Mr. Konze has 

up hi.^ new billiird hall in 

1 anl will Install bowling al- 

.>i)Mii IS the building can txa 

m lo receive. 

Hal' • has been attending 

' Mil '1 .Milwaukee has returned 

.; 1 two weeks' visit with his 

T F Brady is iM wilh a 
• t.ick of the g1-ip. 
is great joy in the lionie of 
Kelly of Fourth avenue over 

mvM' ijf a son. 



di»trn.s.s>-d. 

• — 



By the Way 

When buyinjj a cigar 

Elcora or 
Mataafa 

AH Dealers Sell Tlicm. 

DULUTB CIGAR €0.. Makers 



AlUORA APFdlMMKNTS. 

Villase Couiipil Names ('. T. Murphy 
as V illage Attorney. 

Aun.ro. ?iliriti . April 2 j --( S'l.'.-ial to 

The ir ' '—The viU'it;.- ouii'-i! lu.-it ^ 

niglit ■•Hf Ctiar'-^ T. MMn-liy vil- | 

hige ,> ' ''f' ^*^^'- 

.... 1 ' O 1 1 ' ) t 



itrles 
was 



Brocklehurst 
Business College 

'..■■• ', iiiiv enroll :it :»n\- tlnie. L'>. 

I '■ W C. A ro-.ims. ov.-r Ten- 

, : -til l*t.oiie--i^--Zeulth l'J')i. 



GOPHER SHOE WORKS 



NATHAN LAMPSON DF.AD. 

Old Eveleth (itizeii Passes Away I 
After Several Mouth-' *<i< kness. I 



Eve' 
Tlie 1 1 

id ye.i 
.settlcr 

ing 

f.tr I'' 
in Inc. 
iiiiiri' 'i 
II' ' ' 



\\h 






.Vj.ril 
.1 n 
■ ..f 



Laii. 



i-it 1 



oIl ha* been 

The exact 
H 



,,'l-: :\orn- 

.e was foreni in 

. at the Fajat 

s,4ok the past few 

pause of death Is 

survived by his 



OLIVER ( LIB AS HOST. 

Ente!'tai»uient to Be Mven This 
Eveiiiiiff Bv Hihbing Oij^anizatioii. 

Hihi.i: n. April 22. — (^fpeclal to 

Tlie H>MiM.>- The Oliver club, a social 

organization tnalntained by the officers 

and itYi of the Oliver Iron Min- 

i; "ii!),ii y. will be the scene of an 

:riniont tonight, to be given for 

iw tubers and gue.'its. It will con- 

of a program of athletics and 

marKing the debut of the new 

a receiitlv organized under the 

' lip of O. J. Tucker. 

rchestra is composed of twelve 

[itav-rs. many of whom had 

\perlence before coming 

.\11 are employes of the 

Ulivei liuti Mining company. 

A ht;is« band has also been organized 

I cluli members. It Is composed 

?.i>-foitr players. A set of new 

:i ;; i:,i-Mt f. Silver plated and i>f a 

li:(4!i t^tji^l", arrived recently and night- 

1\- pra'ti -c^ are being held in the auili- 

torluni of the club bulhllng. The band 

is un<ler the leadership of Charles Ben- 

t 'I, an employe of the Oliver machine 

., \r, it..'inett formerly lived in 

.ile th;?re organized the 

iiich gained considerable 

lime i!i ttie county. 



The 

dered; i i 

Afternoon— Devotional exercises led 

by Rev F W. Hill of Coleraine. 'In 
what way can the «""«lay school be of 
of greater assistance to the home In 
teaching and training the youth, by 
Miss Kuth F. Cole of Coleraine; How 
mav parents do more tlian they are 
novi- doing to help the Sunday school 
In the work of teaching aiid training 
the youth." by Mrs. E. H. Bllher. Bo- 
vey discussion on diflerent topics led 
by the state representative. Mr. Trel- 
stad of Duluth; announcements and 

benediction, i i k., Tt^xr 

Evening— Song service, led by Rev. 
WO Oarrett of Coleraine; address. 
•How' the Sunday School Association 
may help the individual Sunday school 
and how the Sunday school may assist 
the association," by Mr, Trelstad of 
Duluth; offering, music, address. Edu- 
cational worth of the Sunday school, 
by Siipt. J. A. VanDyke of Coleraine; 
discussion on topics presented in ad- 
dresses led bv A. S. McCullough ot 
Bovey; music and benediction. 

REPAIR MAN INJIRED. 

Thomas Stratton Falls and Is Hurt 
at the Burt Mine. 

Hibblng. Minn.. April 22.— (Special to 
The Herald. I — Thomas Stratton. a re- 
pair man employed at the Burt mine, 
met with a serious accident yesterday 
afternoon while repairing one of the 
steam shovels. He had climbed up on 
the boom to make some necessary re- 
pairs and In some manner slipped and 
fell Stratton was unconscious for 
about an hour. He was taken to the 
hospital, where an examination re- 
vealed a badly sprained arm and sev- 
eral wounds about the body. 



LODGE RINS THEATER 

NETTING A NICE SUM. 




DrUTH— HI Ixt Ave. \V. 
Superior — 141H lower Ave. 



The Grand Arizona Copper Co. 

Is -."iy s.^lHng treasury .•^iin-i'. at only 
r,i, tier share. For further In- 

f.t !. call on 

O. E, PETTERSON &. CO.. 

FI«i€AI. A<iK\rs, 
3t»-tt First National Uank Raildtmc 



EVELETH ODD FELLOWS 

TO CELEBRATE TUESDAY 

Eveleth. Minn., April 22.— < i=:p'^"cial to 
The H^-rald.)— The odd Fellows are 
malting j.reparalions tor ei c.lebration 
next Tuesday night in the Monitor hall. 



to ■•■■'■■ 

n\ 

T 1 

I'alki 

bekn! 

T; 

M: 
pi • 

J"> i'*' 
b-rs. 

and >' 
local 
Sell wilt t/. 



church will deliv 



-morate the ninetieth anniver- 
iild Fellou -il.ip. The arrange- 
nmlttee. cjtt.po.<»ed of Hoh,.rt 

Thomas H ' ' ' 

M. Win i am r '"> 

: I comuultce oi tte- 

r.f Mrs. liichard 

, p f '' ^ Richard 

m. Mi- 'ow and 

, MnnM\ jv 111 ••tjai iiig a fine 

vvl!i.-!i will ti- the more en- 

i.iitioii of musical num- 

its of cake, ice cream 

.\ financial report of the 

will be received. Rev. 

the First Presbyterian 

I ati aihlifs.s v>ii "Udd 



TO RAISE CHURCH DEBT. 

Eveleth M. E. Chureh Women Inaii- 
pirate Money-Raising Campaign. 

i:veleth. Minn.. April 22. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The women of the M. E. 
church have started a campaign to 
raise $6.t)<)" ncc>'ssary to lift the 
church debt. 

They h.ave divided themselves Into 
two ti»ams. led by Mrs. I'enrod and Mrs. 
Ellsworth. Those under Mrs. I'enrod 



E\ELETH DEPARTMENT 

PUT IN GOOD SHAPE. 

Eveleth. Minn . April 22. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The new current ia- 



The Best 
Eye-Opener- 

A iteainlna cup ol deliclODS 

PC STUM 

It removes coMee aches and alls. 

"There's a Reason" 



Hibblng. Minn . April 22.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — The local lodge of the 
Maccabbees took over the entire per- 
formance at the Power theater last 
night and sold tickets, the idea being 
to raise funds. The affair was a suc- 
cess both financially and artistically. 
The bill was the best shown at the 
theater this season. 



MRS. LEBE.\U BURIED; 

MANY ATTEND FUNERAL. 

Eveleth, Minn.. April 22. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The funeral of Mrs. 
Napoleon Le Beau, wife of the assist- 
ant superintendent of water works, 
who died Monday night at her home on 
the Ailams location of a sudden par- 
alytic stroke received In the the morn- 
ing wa.« held yesterday afternoon from 
the St. Patrick's church under the 
auspices of the Lady Maccabees and 
Eagle lodges. Many lodge members 
were in attendance. Interment was at 
the Virginia cemetery. 



GRAND RAPIDS HOTEL 

HAS CHANGED HANDS. 

Grand Rapids. Minn.. April 22. — (Spe- 
cial to The Hearld.) — Tiie Fountain 
hotel has been taken over by E. V. 
LaValle. recently of Lawrence Lake, 
north of Bovey. who is now In charge 
of the hostelry. 

Mr. and .Mrs. M. L. Doble. wlio have 
been running the hotel, have removed 
to Taconite. where they will run the L 
O. M. Boarding house. 

DOWN GOES THE PRICE 

(Continued from page 1.) 






New York Style Show 

Today's Correct Clothes 
for Men and Young 

Men 

THIS is the only store in this 
city where you can see the 
real New York Styles of today. 
When you see 

penJaminQothes 

Ma^e in New Tork for us by 
Alfred Benjamin & Co., you see 
the identical clothes being worn 
today by fashionable New Yorkers. 
Visit the 

New York Fashion Centre 



KENNEY & ANKER, 

409-411 W. Superior St. 



The Prices are moderate 



prices would be as high or higher than 
they are."' said the bull leader. 

Since then the market has been de- 
clining In a way that the ordinary fol- 
lowers of Mr. Patten have been un- 
able to explain. Today, Instead of the 
recovery expected after the b cents de- 
cline of Tuesday and Wednesday, the 
market opened extremely nervous and 
weak. May sold at |1.28% early. 3'^ 
tents under yesterday's close an.l S'g 
cents below the high price last week. 
.July in which the bulk of trading 
lias been done recently, declined to 
S110\ ZVi^a^ cents below yesterdays 
close and 8^ cents under the record 
price last Friday. 

Bean* Preaited AdvantaRe. 

\t these prices the market steadied, 
but showed no evidence of recuperative 
power. Bears jubilantly pressed theli 
advantage, pointing to the weak for- 
eign market as Indicative of the cor- 
rectness of .the bear view that there 
Is no world-wide shortage of wheat. 
Stop-loss sales were numerous. 

A%\our. who In a recent interview 
UDheld Mr. Patten's bullish survey of 
conditions and whose house was 
credited witii buying yesterday, w a.s 
rumored to be selling on the Liverpool 

'"in^the Bartlett-Patten offices It was 
stated that there was no reason to 
change anv statement previously made 
hv Mr Patten. The break in prices 
was chat acteri;c.^d a.s a Hurry, The lost 
ground? it was said, would be regained 
without any manipulation. Timid 
holders it was declared, were unload- 
ne friehtened at the decline, or be- 
a^se their "esources were insufficient 
to maintain them in the market. It 
was this class of traders mainly who 
expressed curiosity as to Mr. Pattens 
present views. Despite his assertion 
[hat he is not manipulating the mar- 
ket thev expected that he would pre- 
vent any such slump as the present 

*'"\mong Mr. Patten's allies and inti- 
mates however, the word "wait" was 
spoken optimistically, although some 
of them .iald "It looks funny the way 
the market acted." ^a- ^ \^\„ 

KiKht cents decline has made a big 
hole In paper proflt.s. although to what 
extent no one can say. as no one knows 
the extent of the long '«"*'% '^'^•,"% 
at what prices purchased. Also tne.e 
have been heavy actual losses among 
traders whose resources have given out 
and their trad es closed. 

POWERS WARN PERSIAN 
SHAH THAT CONSTITUTION 
MUST BE RECOGNIZED 

(Continued from page 1.) 



have l>een sent to ooirils '" Asia Minor, 
notablv Eski-Shehr. a station on the 
Anatolian railroad, to Intercept fugi- 
tives and cut off communication with 
the capital on this side. 
> 
Aniericam* lu Peril. 

Beirut. April 22. — Five American 
women "missionaries are in danger at 
Hadjim. in the vilayet of Adana. Asiatic 
Turkey. One of them. Miss Lambert. 
has sent a message down to tho coast 
asking for immediate help. The women 
are entirelv alone and defenseless. The 
villages surrounding Hadjim are in 
names and Hadjim Itself Is invested 
by Nomad tribes. Messages from the 
interior are being suppressed by the 
authorities. .. ,,, ^,i.,„ 

Miss Virginia A. Billings, Miss Olive , 
M Vaughan. Miss Emily F. Richter and | 
Mrs, Mary P. Pwogers. wife of Key. D, | 
M. Ilogers, who lost his lilo In Adana, | 
are stationed at Hadjim. I 

The situation in tiie country north. I 
east and west of Alexandretta arising 
from the anti-Christian outbreaks is 
><erlous. There has been massacre 

and pillage at Antiocli and rioting at 
Bireiik. .Meppo Is In a state of panic, 
and there are but 400 Turkish soldiers 
in the city. Business is at a standstill 
and there is every reason to fear an 
outbreak. The city Is full of Bedouin 
.\rab.s, Kurds and Circassians. 

Kirikan a short distance east of 
Beilan and southeast, of Alexandretta. 
lias been sacked and burned. At Ayas, 
on the west coast of the Gulf of Alex- 
andretta. 41S murderers were released 
from prison. They joined the mob and 
began committing depredations. 

\t Tarsus 100 persons have been 
killed, houses have been burned, and 
tliere are today 5.000 persons without 
homes. Several native pastors from 
Vntiab were killed while on their way 
to attend the district missionary meet- 
ing at Adana. 




pired men In the .'^""^^a" '""/''li.l^V^ 
son and the replacenient of t'**? '^. 
malnder of the K^rrlson b> salonk 
trnons- the pun shnient of soldiers ac- 
cord^'ng to tSe degree of their guilt In 
the revolutionary movement o* jaf^ 
week and the transfer of the policing 
of C'^nstantinople to the reformed 
Macedonian gendarmerie, all of these 
confUlio"is to be executed with care and 
moderation in order to prevent blood- 

^ The investment of Constantinople by 
the Constitutionalists is practically 

Contingents of the Third army corps 



WHERE TO GO TONIGHT 



LYCEUM — Al Wilson in 
New York Was Dutch." 



"When Old 



TRY 'EM|' 



amidst quotation of crop statistics, that 
actual users were responsible for the 
higli price, and that the cereal was 
worth all that wajs being paid for it. 
"Were we entirely out of the market. 



They'll cure that 

uncomfortable 
feeling called the 
toothache. Andrews' Toothache 
PluKM stops the severest tooth- 
ache Instantly, also obviate it by 
filling the cavities, preventing de- 
cay. They have deservedly gained 
universal popularity and merit all 
the praise we can shout about 
them. They have no equal at any 
price. 10c a bottle. Al drug- 
gists or by mail. 

ANORFAVS 1>E!VTAI. CO., 
1243 82d Plar«. fhlcajco, III- 



Al. H. (Metz) Wilson. 

Al H. Wilson, the sweet singer and 
German dialect comedian, will be the 
attraction at the Lyceum tonight, to- 
morrow and Saturday matinee and 
night, in Sidney R. Ellis' romantic 
comedv drama. "When Old New York 
Was Dutch." In this play Mr. Ellis 
has furnished Mr. Wilson opportuni- 
ties; botli in the singing and acting 
lines, wljich are said to show him at 
his best. During the progress of the 
play the audience is drawn into the 
picturesque pioneer days of old New 
Yotk, two centuries ago. and the heart 
interest is awakened by the love af- 
fairs of a young nobleman (Mr. Wil- 
son), temporarily reduced to rags, and 
a voi'ng maiden of noble family. The 
plav throughout appeals to those who 
appreciate strong sentiment, and a 
generous measure of the romantic. Mr. 
Wilson is supported this season by a 
competent cast, including Irma La 
Pierre. Julia Batchelder, Florence Stov- 
er, Edith Wright. Fletcher Harvey. 
Willium Balfour. Ross O'Neal. Richard 
Millov, Ross Moblev. Max Myers, Vic 
.lossehberger. Olive Wright. Burt Sheri- 
dan. Rollin v. Mallory. Lillian Van 
Arsdale and Florry Sloan. 



tion of Mr. Zangwill, would have dared 
to advance the p'an of the intermarri- 
age ol the people of the two religions, 
but this is what Zangwill has done In 
"The Melting Pot." He advocates the 
wiping out of religious differences be- 
tween Jew and Gentile, the fusing to- 
gether in the crucible of American cit- 
izenship and American life of all the 
old racial prejudices, and the refinluar 
of all the dross of the ages into the 
pure gold of a higher life in the melt- 
ing pot — America. Whiteside plays the 
part of David guixano. a young Rus- 
sian Jewish composer, whose parent* 
have been butchered at Kisheneff, be 
barely escaping with his life, to flee to 
America. Here he meets Vera Raven- 
dal, Russian girl. Chrletlan, revolu- 
tionist, settlement-worker and daugh- 
ter of Baron Ravendal, "The Butcher 
of Kisheneff." Unaware of her parent- 
age Quixano falls in love with her. 
Later he learns the truth. In the scene 
in which he denounces tlie butcher, 
describes the massacre, and renouncea 
his love, Mr. Whiteside Is said to pre- 
sent a scene, which, for power and 
force has seldom been equalled. In the 
supporting company are Crystal 
Hearne, John Blair, Henry Bergman, 
Grant Stewart and many other player* 
of equal note. The production Is under 
the management of Llebler A. Co. 

JAPAN POURING MOKE 

TROOPS INTO MANCHURIA. 

St. Petersburg. April 12. — A special 
dispatch received here from Harbin, 
Manchuria, s^ys that Japan is sending 
lirtre reinforcements into Manchurl* 
anif'that tho soldiers are spreadinflr 
along the frontier. 

STEAMSHIP SERVICE, NEW^ 
ORLEANS-PHILADELPHIA. 

New Orleans. La.. April 22. — That the 
Philadelphia & Gulf Steamship com- 
pany, which Is to oper.'ite a line be- 
tween New Orleans and Philadelphia, 
will be In service by July 1, l8 the an- 
nouncement made here today. The 
company will have a weekly service 
and will operate four ves sels. 

CANAL ZONE EXPENdTtURE 
NOW REACHES $93,915,000. 

Washington, April 22,— Expenditure 
of S3 250,000 on the canal zone during 
Marcli brouglit the total expenditure 
<m the zone toward the construction 
ol' the canal, civil administration, 
sanitation and plant building to $93.- 

it 15,000. 

• 

We often wonder how any person 
can be persuaded Into taking anything 
but Foley's Honey and Tar for coughs, 
colds and lung trouble. Do not be 
fooled into accepting "own make' or 
other substitutes. The genuine con- 
tains no harmful drugs and is in a yel- 
low package. Sold by all druggists. 

• — 

Ohio Storm KHI« Three. 

Cleveland. Ohio. April 22.— Three 
persons were killed, six fatally hurt, 
fifty sustained injuries, and property 
valued at more than $1,000,000 was de- 
stroyed In a tornado which swent 
through Cleveland and Northern Ohio. 



"The .Melting Pot. 



"The Melting I'ot," Israel Zangwill's 
new plKV. with Walker Whiteside in 
tl.e principal role, will be the at- 
traction at the Lyceum on April 26, 27 
and 28. Mr. Whiteside comes with 
the same splendid company, which ran 
for five months in Chicago, where its 
daring themes started a discussion that 
i.*: now sweeping the country, the Jew- 
ish rabbis and Christian ministers lin- 
ing up. part of each on one side and 
par* on the other. Jew against Jew and 
Cl.ri:itian against Christian. No Jew, 
save one who stands In tlie high posi- 



What is Home Without 
an Up-to-Dat€ Iron Fence 




Makes Hmbc iMtractlvef Will Ust a LUcUmel 
OUB PUCES WOL SURPRISE YOU. 

J. Se RAY & CO., Superior St. 



V 



X 

I 



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|lll'riHilll«nfl|HiWTi ' -^ ■• 



jlU'riliiilllMnfllii 



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mmmmmmA, a-i-iiM ■■■ II m 



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DEFECTIVE PAGE 



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THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: THURSDAY, APRIL 22, 1909. 




BIG SAVINGS HERE 
THIS WEEK! 

Of course you'll find llicni here every week. This 
week some specially fine values — some values you will 
find oulv in this hij^ j[>ro\ving dei>artment. lUiy ihem 
it ^ il J->ij< ^aviiii {'^ \i}\\ lo do it. 



t1 <M » • - 





Benls Potato 
Rlcer 10c 



Works t." i»rf>rtiiMi — 
for beating *'KK-^ "r whip- 
ping cream — hua «"'l 
edges. 



Miuir <'f Kooii 
heavy, sinnoth tin 
—generally prired 
at 5c and 6c. 



II 
II 





Ptetl fc';iv fiianieU'd 
w.iie t'M k.ttli"«. Every 

.,.,..„ <">*■ fully wurranted — 

A8BE8Tf»S MATS — ^^^^,^^ ^^^ ^^^^^,.^ ^,^. 

Thesi' mats have tin splendid values. N-. "''^ ^ t , ..„«» 

cnin.plc-d edges, hun.ly ^/'^'^^P^'",'*'' 

to have ceveral In <■ very 

kitchen— '^t/» ^^- ^ »'s=e-— 

special at OW special at . 



59c 

78c 



< AllPET 

WHIP— 



f :i s t <- II <• ( 
li.-.tlilU- I h it I 

w i> lit w o r k 

Idtisf. 

Privi' 







$1.29 for a m.ip jiail 
with tnop wringer 
ftttat'hment, s a v e a 

stooping — saves 
wringing m<<p ^y 
hand. T-uMl fuHi 
this a id lahor- 

■avlng device. 



Importeii white en- 
amel ."teel tKilet 
pail Perfectly sani- 
tary easily k»pt 
clean. These are 
splendid valU' s here 
ti>moror\v jDjU/» 
at only . . -OOV 



Galvanized 
Tubs 



Small s=ize . 
Medium size 
LarRe size 





SI Mi. STRAIMU for 



A\f;M: r.A>ii's 

a .,'l.-.ir. 

J. . : ., w li i t e 

i:i:aniele(l KoivikI lonier Ii^;ht. \\ .• 'lave 

. i , , . , , „ 1 , . ^ , , ^. j n 
... .... >iiiks — A new knul . , 

POT rOVFIl HOI.DMl "" 

lOl t*»ir.i. strain. 'r, fa^tMis >.-..,..> .,;;.;, -...^ ,!:■• :;'vv- 

, t'» anv rnamelvd sink. g<'n- '-^^ i . . , 

•^,,n- '■=•''''> ••••''«i '^"'' ■■ * '"' taires ai^.l h-iii's 

•m ^ whrrf t;;is IS ni-t 

M^C ^'^•■'' ''"'''' '^'''■"' "^ 

necessity. 



Has fin: 
er 



38c 



prlt;e Is 

' >T ily .,••««*•«• 







P, rreticn ftlue Flt.iiu Stoves will give 
y,.vi ah-olute sati.'^fc ti n — they burn 
i^ . quiek aet- 

iiiK .Muo...- ,:....,., .. r- don't smoke 

,.>r smell. The moHt perfect asid teu- 
nomical ' ■ tma 

Blue Flame. ^> < ... t S'^V 

of them: you'll »»■ ^v' U i ' ^i t*'^' 

hivestment. Fn. > <l at 

$5.75, $8.50, 
$10.50 



A 4-Burner Gas 

Range with Oven 

$7.50 

This week we offer a four- 
burner gas range, high grade, 
with oven — all complete, for 
only $T 'lO. We save you about 

■:'■ ' Ml en yiur gas r.'mtM.'S. 

Trade in ^'nur Old 
Stove for a G:\< Range 

We will take your <dd enal 
utove and make you a liberal al- 
lowance on it- taking it as first 
payment on a ga.-^ range. 



From Stationery 
Department of 

BAGLEY & 
COMPANY 

Known since 1885 as F. D. 
Day & Co. 

Jewelers and Silversmiths 

DESIRE to call the at- 
tention of yourself 
a A.1 friends to our most 
excellent Stationery de- 
partment. Being conduct- 
ed on the same plan of ex- 
cellence and quality as has 
always identified this es- 
tablishment with its many 
patrons. 

• We are equipped to exe- 
cute promptly and correct- 
ly all orders for invita- 
tions to weddings, social 
events and pubhc cere- 
monies, announcements of 
births, betrothals, mar- 
riages and death. 

• The finest qualities of 
stationery for personal, 
professional and commer- 
cial purposes made up 
with original monograms, 
crests, coats-of-arms, ad- 
dresses, etc. 

« 

• Specialize on copper 
plate engravings of invi- 
tations, announcements, 
personal cards, etc. 

• In fact, the imprint of 
Bagley & Company on in- 
vitations or envelope in- 
sures a correctness of style 
and excellence of quality 
not obtainable elsewhere. 

• Our prices are no high- 
er than charged elsewhere. 
NOTE: A most exclusive 
display of Wedding Gifts, 
Wedding and Engagement 
Rings, Bridesm.aid and 
other Bridal Party Gifts. 

315 W. SUPERIOR ST. 




*'Meet Me 

at the 

Columbia 

Corner'''' 



MEETING WILL 
BE IMPORTANT 

Several Live Matters to 
Come Before Commer- 
cial Club. 

Important matters are slated for 
consid^-ration of the AVest fujlulh Ceni- 
merelal club members at the regular 
mettlng of the club tomorrow tven- 
Ing. One ol the firft tilings to be done 
will be to p»»p a resolution of thanks 
to CU.vernor Johnson in vetoing the 
tonnage tax measure. Many of the in- 
dividual members of the club have al- 
ready wired the chief executive of Min- 
nesota their thanks. 

The West L»ulutli delegation to the 
sef^flon of the St. Louis County elub« 
at Virginia will report tomorrow even- 
ing. The party from West imiuth in- 
cluded L. A. names. L. A Sulcove and 
r. H. Martin. II the business ses^ on 
is long "nouph. the Commercial club 
membeib may also con.«ider «h*= P^'^Pj^- 
sitlon of agitating for more parks and 
puMic piaygrounds. ,,. . i, ,,„ 

Tlie Wen Ouluth dub will loin hands 
with the Superior club in the matter of 
the Grassy Point bridge. Already each 
club has petitioned congress to I'rovTde 
that when the Northern Taciflc eon- 
It ructs the bridge it shall be renulred 
to have a passageway for pedestrians 
and team traffic. The ^charter under 
v.">uh the bridge is to be bui t states 
that wViatever congress shall deen, 

.uce.-saiy for the .^^'''^'^'J'^^M*:^,,'/ 
peopl* on either side of the b"dge. 
si ail l»e provided by the r&.litad com- 

lai.y. 

I ( hiiich StTvices. 

servlres wt rt held last even.ng at 
■ .' Asbiiry M K. <hureh by the . on- 
L-regation of "the Finnish Apostolic 

Lutheran church, ^'^^'".' V'^' "I'J^ ;!:[;i 
jittending. Services will also be held 
at the church tomorrow evening. 

\^ ill Visit Cloquet. 

A partv «d voung people at West Pu- 
liiih will leave .Saturday afternoon for 
CloquHt. Minn wher» they will attend 
a party Saturday evening. Among 

Uiose who have signiti-d tii^''^ »"»"'; 
tion of attending wre. -Missefc ur. 



Bleau, Mary and Frances Polinski and 
Ernest Bieau, Alphonse Bleau and Kd 
Winters. 

■ 

Lodge Anniversary. 

Fraternity lodge No. 860. M. B. A. 
celebrated tlie twelfth anniversary of 
the order and the fifth of the lodge 
last evening at Gilley s hall. The pro- 
gram was varied, consisting of a nurn- 
ber of .speeches, a pie social, and end- 
ing with a dance. 

Among those who spoke during the 
evening were I* A. Barnes, \% . 11. 
Richter and J. C. Wesenberg. The lodge 
ha.s a membership of about 205 mem- 
bers. 

West Duluth Briefs. 

J .1. MeDonahi and wife of Asliland 
were busines visltor.s at West Duluth 
toda>-. 

R. E. Ri.?ckhoff. New Duluth, has 
gene to Chicago on a business trip. 

The Misses Tessie Broadwell bnd 
Eva LaLone returned yesterday from a 
visit to Two Harbors. 

Otto Eilers returned from Scanlon 
today. He does not begin his work 
ihert^ until next .Monday. 

Miss Frances Gelenaw of 221 ^30uth 
Fifty-eighth avenue west is ill at her 
home. 

John W. Sullivan is down from > ir- 
ginia on a short business stay at West 
Duluth. , _, 

J W. Searles has left for Deer 
River, where he will look after his 
interest in a hotel tl ere. 

Archie Bedard returned MSv evening 
from Two Harbors, where ne had been 
on business. ,^ , „„„„ 

Mr and Mrs. M. Ryan have gone 
to Portland. Or., where they v 111 make 
their future home. Tli.?y ^'.re wcl. 
known among West Duluthians. 

Good 50c overalls, on sale for 25c, at 
.^'trands. i.'2C. Central avenue. 

The Hematite club will rneet thas 
evening at the home of ^Viliaini ow- 
ner a-fK'b Wadena street. The subject 
f,,r discussion is "The Origin and llis- 
tirv of the Presbyterian Church. 

C. Nelson, the grocer, is nioving to- 
day into als new <iuarters at 123 r».ortn 
Central avenue. The lower *=tor of 
the building will be used as a ^loic, 
and he will reside in the upper s^loi>. 

Uld Hickory camp. No. \Uoo. M- \\ 
A., held a drill last evening at (.itai 
j:astern hall. .,, , ., . 

Good 50c overalls, on sale for -.« ■ at 
Strands, 22i Central avenue. 

L A. Barnes has moved his oflae 

from the second story to tlie ground 

floor at 3<»-i Central avenue. The rooms 

ormeri; occupied by Mr. Barnes will 

now be used by Attorney H. AN. Lan- 

"'charles Steele of 612 North Fifty - 
sixth avenue west moved with nis 
f un ly this mo.ning /^ .^^\7:.^"- ,^ ''?"■ 
wl,.re tt,.y «ill reside '"/''.^, ^"Vu [ : j, 
Wafli lepainng, Hurst. \\ . Dulutn. 



D. E. H., 4-22.'o9 



For your top: 
A Columbia J3.CX) Hat. 



Today's Arrivals: 

Boy's Knicker- 
borker Suits, 
JIanan Shoes, 
Union Label Suits, 
Stein-Bloch Suits, 
Adler Glozes, 
duett Collars. 



^ 




'V ""w. a 






Ess- Aitch-Eye- Are-Tea 

The dazzling colorings and the rich 
choice of a big fresh shipment just re- 
ceived from the Manhattan Shin makers 
has thrown a "spell" over the .\d man. 
Speech to describe their beauty is beyond 
his capacity. 

Come in and under the spell. You can 
have a fit for one-fifty — a perfect fit. 



""■^WS 



We Make 
Shirts 

to 
Order 




Clothing Co 



At Third Avenue West. 



Ha nan Shoes 

for 

Men and 

Women 



Sfe: 



-.S 



Prices of 

Pianos 



\ M- ^i' ; ; ■ ^1 r.i! <. ■■ 

iMK. ilial i.i« buyer har<; 
which to bvjy and wliich ti 



r V- 
ws 

ne. 



Do You Know What We'll Do ? 

We Will Save You MONEY, TIME and LABOR With Our 

Automatic Electric Washer 

Just ht us put one in your laundry and yu use it fot r two 

wfl«hinirs Then if you don't like it we will tak. it out. The trial will 
noT crTVou amthlng and you may like it. L-t us talk with you 
about it anyway. 

NORTHERN ELECTRICAL COMPANY 

210 WEST FIII.ST snil IT. 



Hv applviNi, t" us you save yourself 
agreat "ih i' 1 I'f anxiety and uncer- 
tain! v. Our long .'-taraiing as the 
Fort-inoHt simile Iloune at t'ie Head 
of the Lakes. an,l tlie higli quality of 
the gof.ds wliich we ar. known to 
carry is a lasting guarantee to you. 
Why liesHate when you know ttiat 
vou can < oiiie to us and oi'tain Slan- 
dnnl i'lnnoii — each in its class — at 
Htiindnrd and reKuinr prleen, so much 
l< ss iliaii a small dealer can possibly 
obtain tliem. Tlie very fat t tliat we 
are Hole agents for the moj»t famous 
[.ianos In the world justifies us in 
clalminK to he the best house, and 
the further fact that we know that 
we buv better qua lit j for less money 
than any other h<oase. is proif i-o.-l- 
tlve of our ability lo ^av._ n.. 
our customers. 

fnir motto is: IliKbrHt <iiialit) of 
pinnwii for lo««-»il powoihlo pr«»-«-».. 

( lur bu\a-r loiN-s I ., 1 1.' ■: ;•• :.- "f 
carloads. 

A li...uiifu! Slelnvi'iij'^tak* n ;ri ex" 

cliao^;* V, .■ ..ITcr at — 

$400 

DULUTH 
MUSIC CO. 

KUMIMJ «i. cn.\rM.VN. Mgr. 



DEATH LIST 
IS GROWING 

One Embassy Places Fa- 
talities in Turkey 
at 15,000. 

Armenians Well Armed 
Against Attack By Mos- 
lem Tribesmen. 





THE BEAUTY 



In our Trunks is the durability and the great 
nducement of our "l.l^e and ^ ^ >'«),•" /'''rv' 
Wo mak- f.-m and sliow them ill BRO M> •>%>- 
I HiHT M'-t all dealers use their at. 

(Th«Te'i» n lleason.t Try us for a squai^ . ->. 

TRUNKS— BA6S— CASES 

NORTHERN TRUNK CO. 




■"•H WEST FIRST STUKKT, 
irppofilte Wolvln llulUJIng. 



Lret Vs Make Yoxir 
Next S\sit 

As to material. fit. workmaiijitilp 
aa.l price— We Lead. 0<her« Fol- 
low. <'all and look our line over 
and It't us convince you cur 

.STATE MKNTS are FACTS. 

M. STEINER, 

307 Eaut Superior St. 

The Fashionable Tailor 

We I'ress, Clcitn aad Ht'i'air on 
sliorl notice. 

Zenith Phone 1S03-D. 



Contractor'* Boadu .%eeepted. 

Mtnot, K. I>.. April 22.— (Special to 
The II. raid i The city council has ac- 
ccDted the bonds furnl.shed by James 
Kennedy who will build Mlnot s wa- 
terworku eyatem. The bonds aggregate 



1430,000, aa.l ,,',:.i.-l. .-^.-.aes |1C!^.,000 
surety bonds of the I'akoia Trust . ,.rn- 
panv, s<\tral iieisonal bt»nds, in which 
Max .'-t.m, Ah-x Stirn. Morris Kauff- 
man and laeutenanl Governor H. S. 
Lewis appear as sureties. 



$25.00 



For a 



SUIT OR OVERCOAT 

Made here in Duluth of good 
honest. all-wool material; 
newest cut, 

MORRISON, 

8 Lake A»«mip South, 



Coasta: i.^.^i- -■' '■ ■ ■ 22.-T1X situa- 
t;, a .r Asiatic Turkey, according to 
tue iat»'St intelligence received here, is 
very threatening. The wave of fanati- 
cism, which originated in Adana ten 
d;, ^^ :.!.. and lound its expressSon-in 
II • Christians, is spreading 

g.aiiaiiv II. rough the eastern prov- 
inces. Upward o! 10.000 Armenians 
were massacred m Syrian towns and 
.villages, principally in the vilayet of 
Adana during outbursts of fanatical 
'zeal which took place at the time of the 
i spring festival in honor of Moliammed 
land on the receipt of the overturn of 
'the government in Constantinople. 
!<jne embassy placts estimates of killed 
ja.- liigh as 15.0(10. 

I A dispatch received frbm Merslna 
sav« the Armenian town of Hadjim in 
lilu, liorthern part of Adana vilayet is 
' leleagueied by Moslem tribesmen, who 
'are only awaiting sufficient strength 
; <o lush the improvised defenses erecteU 
U.y the Armenian.-. The Armenians, 
however, are well armed and will put 
up a vigorous defense. 
■ 
RcporiM Roicer'i* Death. 
London. Ai^ri! 2^— A message re- 
ceived here from Tarsus, referring to 
the casualties tiiere, says Rev. L>. M. 
UoKexs the American missionary, was 
killed, but that the other Americans 

are safe. , . . 

This communication is taken to in- 
dicate that Henry Maurer, who was 
reported to have been killed at the 
same time as .Mr. Kogers, is alive. It 
was «eiit by Thomas D. Christie, a mis- 
sionary at Tarsus, at midnight, to the 
Bible Lands missions here. 
■ 
If, n Houttler ftlrl. 

Likhail, ln<l., April 2i;.— Misg Rose 
LamL.ert, a missionary at Hadjim. who 
has asked for protection for the mis- 
sion there is daughter of Rev. and 
Mrs tieorge George Lambert of this 
I ity. yhe has heen a missionary of the 
.Mennonite brethren ten years, and Is 
: 0. Her father has been Jn Europe a 
vear. and is on his way home. 

Mrs. Lambert has been informed by 
her daughter tliat she and two sisters, 
named Baldwin, whose home is in 
.Michigan, have charge of an orphan- 
age school, in which there are about 
4«a.i children, and that the school is a 
haven for Christian forces. 

.Miss Lambert determined to become 
a missionary at a revival meeting con- 
ducted by her father, who declared that 
every one should answer the call of 
God when he heard it. no matter to 
what field. He was astonished when 
his daug'iter proceeded to the platform 
and announced that she would go to 
Turkev, but he did not oppose her. She 
j)reviouslv had been a typesetter in the 
Mennonite putdishirg house. 
• 

* 

* 



LAKE SEAMEN 
ARE VOTING 

Will Decide Whether They 

Favor a Strike or 

• Not. 

oordance with the inslrurtions 
i.-.:v.d recently from the head offic- 
ials of the Lake .Seamen's union, the 
orranization at the Head of the Lakes 
this afternoon began taking a refer- 
' endum vote on the advisahility of de- 
j daring a strike. A large number of 

ballots were cast during »n^. "?f^>'- ,V"' 
as the voto was secret no intimation 
could be obtained as to the probable 
' oiAc me. Balloting will continue se% - 
erai days and until A ^."«"-:'<-'" ^If;'' 
has been cast to determine the senti- 
ment of the union body beyond doubt 
The- feeling amon^ local ^'JU-P "S "i^-n 
!.<: that the local union will follow the 
lead of Chicago and •^^^^y'^J^^I'^'^/ree- 
strike. and that some f'«:'01«'"i<^"V f hn 
able to both sides will be reached be- 
fcue he opening of spring navigation. 





MASQUERADE BALL 

To be given by Zenith City Tent No. 
1044, Knights of the M'^'l^;''".,**^,^;;^^'^*^,!; 
on Frldav evening. April -3. 1H0«. in 
Macca.ee hall, 224 W. st First street. 
Bvervhodv invited. Door right s re- 
served, tickets. 25 centw^ 






CHILDREN WERE 
CAUSE^F FIGHT 

Fathers Arrested as Re- 
sult of Dispute Re- 
garding Them. 

Dan Maher, 731 West Fourth street. 
was fined »1 and costs by Judge Cut- 
ting in municipal court this morning 
for assaulting John P. Melander of 719 
West Fourth street. 

The original trouble began witn 
treatment said to have been accorded 
the defendants children by Mrs Me- 
lander. Mr. Maher resented what he 
heard of the actions of the woman, 
and, meeting her husband on the street, 
had an argument with him. 

According to the story told the po- 
lice Mai er grabbed Melander by the 
ears and shook him violently. Maher 
was arrested, but the judge eoncluded 
there was some reason for Mahei s 
anger, and let him down with a light 
tine. 

TWO ORPHANS .MISSING: 

KIDNAPING IS FEARED. 

Milwaukee Wis., April 22.— A Jour- 
nal special "from Beloit. Whs., says. 
William Thomas Northey. aged6. and 
Doris May Northey, aged 9, two or- 
Dhans are missing, and are believed to 
rave been kidnaped by- a relative. It 
is thought they the on the way to 

Ireland. ,. .,. . ^, 

Charles Northey, grandfather of the 
children, and a 12-year-old brother, 
are distracted over the disappearance 
of the little ones. The supposed kid- 
napers and children went to JanesvUle, 
from which all trace has been lest. 



^^^^-^»'t/» '^Uidnth's Leading Jeirelers.'' 

,^,JEWiLIBY M. 

■^'cyfajn j5ai>'* 332 West Superior Sired. 

°" """^ Sprina Jewelry in Full Flower 

Under the Chimrs. r a •> 

jewelry exactly to our liking and ^-our demands. The troii- 
hle about the prct'ty new "up" modes in Jewelry, is that they 
lake a "ra^e"' and 'grow horribly common. Not so with ihc 
exclusive, yet very reasonably priced things we are showing. 

Bargains for Saturday, April 24 

Saturday, and SATURDAY ONLY, we will (.fiVr to the Duluth 
public: 

Six sterlin g silver 5 O'clock Tea Spoons.'for, a set ^2.48 

One ste rling silv er Individual Salt and P epper set, for, a set ^1.75 

Gold filled Collar Pins. 2 in a set, for, a set 34^ 

Black Jet, extra long I lat Pins, for, each 25c^ 

Cut Glass Suga r and Creams, Libby's, a pair $2.48 

White Stone Hat Pins, imported, each 88^ 

Spasmodic Alarm Clocks, for, each $1.10 

Sterling silver deposit, one-quart Water J ug for $3.48 

Rogers' Sugar Shell and Butter Knife, in case, French 

gray, a set ^"^ 

F ine White Diamond Ring, for lady or gentleman $20.00 

Comb, plain shell for monograms, each 07< 



For Quick Results Use Herald "Wants"! 



WAXTKD TO KNOW. 



* Mayor Haven was <me «>f a 
^ RToup of men Mantlinjr on the 

* rear platform «»f a West l>ulutTi 

* car last evening. Two of tlie men 

* \»rre discus.slnK tl»e tonnago tax 

* bill ami its* vet<) by tiovtrnor 
^^ Johnson. Two lumlK-rjarks were 

* sqtieezotl up against the ba«k of * 

* the car. smoklne. and listening l<i * 

* the conversation. Finally <»"** "' * 

* the wootlsnien turned to the other ^(^ 

* and. in a Uiw voice, askcil: * 

* "Say. Jack, who i» thib Bill * 

* Tonnage, anyway?" * 

i|U^HMH|>^MtHN( »»*»*»»»»*»»»*»» 



How** ThUt 

We offer One Hundred Dollars Re- 
ward for anv case of Catarrh that can- 
not be cured by Hall's Catarrh Cure. 
F J CHENEY & CO.. Toledo. O. 

We the undersigned, have known F. 
J Cheney for the last 15 years, and 
believe him perfectly honorable in all 
business transactions and financially 
abfe to carry out any obligations made 

^V'ALDING, KINNAN & MARVIN, 

Wholesale Druggists. Toledo, O. 

Hall's Catarrh Cure is taken intern- 
allv acting directly upon the blood 
and mucous surfaces of the system. 
Testimonials sent free. Price <5 cents 
oer bottle. Sold by all Druggists. 

Take Hall's Family Pills for consti- 
pation. 





—Is The— 

Biggest Thing of the Kind 
Duluth Ever Saw ! 

It must be a mighty good sale to draw such crowds as 
we've had today ! And it is for women hereabouts, who are 
too good judges of Silks to get excited over any ordinary sale 
of silks at ordinary prices! 

The silks are taken from regular stock— the reductions 
are precisely as advertised! Hundreds of yards to se- 
lect from in four rich lots— on sale at these prices: 

39c-49c-69c-89c 

The lot at 39c sold regularly at 50c. 59c and 65c; there are $1.25 
and $1.50 silks at 89c. and the other lots are equally attractive. If you 
can't be waited on promptly, your patience will be rewarded by silk 
bargains to be proud ofl 





1 








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I 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: THURSDAY. APRIL 22, 1909. 



EVENING 



AM IKI»KI*F'SI>K\T -NiKXtxrAI'KK. 



P'ubi 



T.'l, 



It.; l\ 



a>(.iu.i 



THE HERALD COMPANY. 

4. Editorial K. >ms ll:i'>- 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. 

I nltcd «t«t«-it ana < ■iiada. IN»»t«g;e ITrnaid. 

H-t.OO 

. , . .3.5 



thoughtfulru>^ on the 
lives in the Wf^t. tin- 
priifiliMii I'S rnoK, thin 

I > t ' > f ; 1 -, _\ .• i 
Sitnply by lakintj 
h\ bi'iug careloss 
the fearful prire 
out xiiutioll of the 



DULUTH WEEKLY HERALD 



tt.ttO] 

'.0 ■' 



r 



Bl CARKIER. m THE CITY, TEN CENTS A WEEK 

KV KM 1 K \ K%t\i i— I* K 1 .1 V K « KI*- 



put .«t iveiy citizen, whether he 

Souih, or tlie Kasl. One race 

we have been able U) solve or to 

We certainly do not want another. 

care u c may ii'W prevent a second; 

we may have to pay all over again 

we liave (>ai'l for the as yet not worked 

uciiv > proM -in. 

The intelligent, oii-^ei \ ati\ >• - iitiment on the Pacific 

eo.i>it do,^ not t.ar an immediate danger. It is not 

advocatiii*.; retahit'ry mea.^urcs against Japan because 

r feat^ that Jajiaii !> plotting a war. It believes, in 

t.i. t. that japan i-. e-irne>!h ende.ivoring to carry out 

u- i<reenu;it. in < lod faith, to prevent its coolich from 

coming to thi> country It is not the gfU'ernmcnt of 

is teirid, htvt tlie Japanese people, the Mon- 

in ! i^he-t de veloptnent, the brown man 

Nippon It Ihc Japanese governiiient can 

-; ■•! it> pledge^ and ke-']) it- brown men on its 

.1 the Paeiiic. all will he well with both 

■ ;! if Nippon cannot hold bai'k it,> iu-i>ple. 

then .ill this country nuut unite with 



It pan 

. lian 



that 

race 
> ti 



th, 



Pact tic 



oast 



HI 



maititaininy; .\.>iatic evclu^ion. 



. ir, 

LVliO 



T 



THE JUSTIFICATION. 

people of Minnesota rejoi' e today 



TO SUBSCRIBERS: 



ORGANIZE FOR REAPPORTIONMENT. 

Mmtio- 



rv.p 



.1 It 



I lideiice in ' 
I Particularly 

;...M 

I lieved 

nug'lU 
t 



!at iheif 



mcnt. that 
John A. J 

iias 



<)vernor }• -hii .on 
in Northeastern 
>}i Republican i^ni, where 
and vot'-d lor John A J. 
tliat he would i^sve 
be th>- is>ue, — ' 
:iti deuce 



Iia.T a^am 
Minnooia. 



Uo 



that their con- 
Itcen justified, 
thi^ strong- 
aliaiidoned 

• ;ii<-y be- 
ll whatever 
()ooplc rejoice 



IM 



liunt 
•hn^' Ml 



with the 

tf ' 



I' c - 1 , 



Joiihle 
i'l^ti'i 



• me 

T! 
tniin 



■. t»i;t 
^niall 



It in the govern 



tile peop 
J.Miiis.iti her 
them a m|U 
' ifticularly 

la^ ijcen justihed. 
iturnlly rejoices along 
:eiec, as well a> upon 
red> and th 'u-amU i>ut 
^I November, The 
> fej'.tu e, I 
it has been 
not in the le.ist lead it> readers 
le contrary it a^^i^u-d them, in 
tlicir coniplele>t victory 
• ^. ^. iiry, — f'>r the victory o\er the 

iii>n would not iiave been 
iuie other man than Jedin A. 
>r'> chair on Tiie^dav last. 



eau-.e t 
d. and 



ir 



>r 
lu'u own judg- 
their tru-t in 
Herald there- 
it> own conlnlence 
marie m'^st abnnd- 



thal on 

nieasu' 



d. that. 



to bt 



liiey 



half, tile ;>e- 
■rnof lohn^ 



a 



I'Jemocrati' Not at all. 

1 -lU" _\eir-> of eon^pienouj. service 

lie of Minnesota have eouie t^ 

1 and to tliorou^dily believe in 

t iiii! iK'e tax, therefore, aiii' 



quite so 

lohnson 

Becau!>e 

But because 

in their be- 

) know (iov- 

him When 

,ets fortli his 



!l. 



\eto, he speaks with greater authority 

.! : i-.MM in Minnesota could speak. The 

... .f -eiAice ni siiikjlene— oi' [lurposc. 

weight of the largest -l . f pul)lic conliUence 

I .Mmne- .1.1. -.peaks in that vet(j 

-r J.dir.s'vu condemns the ton- 
it tn ore thoroughly t''*" ■'">' 
i do it His word will carry 
be listened to. So G'>v- 



nian m 



■r \\ lUii 



!ia.- 



rendered Northern Minnesota, and 



the ton 



.vill 
the ti; 



UiUi; 



IK prmcii>1e 
can be rai-ed 
fash: )n has Governor 
reposed in him. 



that of simply de- 
lle has condemned 
with the strongest 



service than 
., 'ax bill. 
it -elf and 
against it. 

Johnson justihed 



th( 



: a s 



Aldrich is not -nly a v,'>e.d bet but a sure thing. 



J' ^' 

latii 



m I* 



t: : 

the 

rep: 

ses,ii''),r. 

r 

u- 




Joy riding 
i'.omicide. 



ii a method of .slow suicide and quick 



When one part 
cannot thrive. 



preys up.)n the other, the body politic 



•n 



speaking of 
Mdrich. 



taritT "jokers" let nobody ovcr- 



■trr* its fiitida- 

■ raclical, 

. s.-i. lire justice 

... ■. . .„.! ready has the 

rti oitment, for the entire 



Two jurisdictions and 
harming Mrs. Boyle. 



any number of men want the 



fo 



The staff of life ^; 
- sonic poor mortals 



slender that it inay snap 



fav 
a 



to uiii' 

Such a 





lie Twin Citi ■ 


- : ■ . ; • ■ - in 


aeut. 


What is 


and 


'■ 'H. 


A reapp 


...•aL ..eague 


:ii-c 


with fun Is V 


itficient for a 



What an 

Roosevelt wi 



interesting parade the pooi)Ie who miss 
.uld 



make 



ke! 



ltd C'Muinuous campaign 

.'■'■! f >r reapportionment 

It can be made active, 

. than can the rising of 



The old world i.s yesterday, the new world is today, 
and the West is tomorrow. 



in the legislature 



NO MORE RACE PROBLEMS WANTED 

T: .[ sca for the anti-Jipaaese 




Turkey 

^-k others 



appears to be about cooked. Will Russia 
in to dine or will she dine alone? 



It seems appro[>riate 
' G ov ern »r Johns<ni 
nage tax. 



at this time of housecleaning 
should hammer d'ovn the ton- 



Northern Minnesf)ta haa 
and it siviuld remember thai 
tive weapon. 



got to fight 
education is 



for it;* 
its most 



rights 
etfec- 



ast are functi^' 

tear th;; in 



, .. 1 



C - a.3 1 U ■ 

it IS not the 

1 1 1 i i i t; - ■■ 

the W'.- 

of deatfi .' 
as It'H!^: up to 
and 

I err 



of Pre 
China II 

te- fti- 

i 

in 



rcMdy 



:i ts 



■V 

with dread t 
1 a matter 

:. in the ca- 

a I! that th 



the p 

ft 

. 1,.. 



. ip 

■."alifornia :\r.'\ . -M;er 

')Ie immigration 

net and suc- 

■ : ,. iiese, and if 

hriris 'i^. the p:'e)blem 

:iy solved- But 

■|.r that causes the anti- 

:i the coast, but a far more serious 

■• 'ther race problem, the fear that 

; upon to go down into the valley 

.uth. and to toil as painfully and 

; ' -he mountain peaks of life 

Is uie si,.vtre of another race prob- 

West, 

■ into the Golden state," says 

■rnia. an earnest supporter 

: n; iMs Japanese policy, "the 

,»• to concede al'^o'.it . domination 



The excesse.i that wc go to over the heroes 
know about just help to strike a fair average 

11. any that never get into the papers. 



that 
for 



we 
the 



HOTeL-GOSSIR 



G. J. 



the Lenox tittti yea 
saya work iip«n The 



If all Minnesota from St. Cloud north had been as 
strong for reapportionment as is Governor J<)hu>on in 
tonnage tax message we might have had it ere this. 



his 



Discussing the game, seeing the game, and being paid 
to see the game are the three degrees of comparison of 
unalloyed joy, from which it appars that of ail mortals 
the umpire is the happiest. 



inhabt'ants. 
, or 



He 
may 



i',,iii It 



cocky. 



Here 



He dignity ■: a '••:'.>.■ 
oi, [lie Japaues..' 
The Chine - 
jai)ane-. ■ 'iie is 

^es ile, ' 
tic, too, works !«,>!; ^ 
. :>€ at least the equal of 
ially, but in every otlier 
tlie crux of 
The matter 



did : ic whtj was 

>r. He t.)ok no intcre-t 

1! .- in ul ■ no pretense, 

' ■ was content to be a 

/ater, and he was ever 

; ::\n was his social, 

that the Chinese qnes- 

!)n. But 



Thirteen million dollars is 
Northeastern Minnesota will 
fourths of it. Unburdened by 
able to pay and have i>lenty I 



Minnesota's budget and 

continue to pay three- 

a tonnage tax it will be 

eft for its 350,000 people. 



Mr. Harriman intimates that he could save us money 
if he had the running of the g'.vernment. Maybe; but 
he never saved us any as a lin t itT of railroads, and we 
are inclitiol to look wi'h suspicion ui)oii Mr. Harriman'a 
singleiie-s of inirpose. 



Mltehfll of Fort Frances was at 
^aterday. Mr. Mitchell 
e power dam that la 
being erected alj tU« falls l)y the 
Bai ku^'Rrouks <^iipany. aided, it ts 
believed, oy KaMtern capital, ia prog- 
rcaslng rapidly, and It Is probably safe 
to stale tiiat the tlani Is half completed 
at the present t|ine. according to the 
t'stlinate of Mr. AKtcht^U. 

Work upon the paper mill at Interna- 
tional I'alla, the blK^t^nt mill upon the 
rontinenl, by tlie way, Is also well 
under way. Then tliere In a puii)Wood 
mill undor course of eonatruetion at 
Kort lYanees. Tlie Baokus-Brook-s peo- 
ple are building tlifl mill at the falla, 
while Canadian capital la interested 
in llie mill up')n the Canadian side of 
the. boundary line. 

T!ie hi« dam at the falls will be 
utilized for power purposes. It is pro- 
po.sed, aecortling to .Mr. Mitchell, to gen- 
«rate electricity witli the power ob- 
tained from harnessins the river. 

Mr. .Vlitchell says that both Interna- 
lioiiai I'all.s and' Kori France.s are 
ijrowinK. I'ort Frances will iiave elec- 
tric llglits by next September. It Is 
expected that many tourists will come 
to the falls this .summer. 

.Mr. .Mitchell believes that the manu- 
faeturi- of paper from the pulpwoud of 
the northern part of the state will be- 
eome a gitat industry at International 
Falls, with the completion of llie paper 
u'ill. Tlie mill upon the Canadlaii .side 
of the line will manufacture from the 
Canadian pulpwood. These industries 
are e\p»eied to add additional prosper- 
ity to ihr- .orrowing towns of Interna- 
tional Falls and Fort Frances. 
• • •. 

K.\-Oovernor Folk of Missouri is tlie 
kind of a man who grows upon you. 
The first glance at tlie pro.secutor who 
sent tlie gang of St. Louis boodlers to 
the peiietentiary leads to the opinion 
that Mr. Folk is a quiet, kindly man, 
whom you would never suspect of con- 
ducting one ol the greatest, if not the 
greatest, anti -graft campai.'^n that has 
ever been waged in tliis country. But 
to get a different opinion of the ex- 
governor of tlie stale of .Missouri it ia 
only necessary to get him wrought up 
upon some subject. 

Then you will See the slron.g, fight- 
ing linos in the face of the .Missourian. 
Mr. Folk Is the kind of a quiet man 
wlio leeeives. It is said that big Kd 
Butler, the grafting king of .^t. Louis, 
smiled in amused derision when he was 
informe<l that Folk had started after 
the scalp of some of his cohorts. 

Butler refused to take the young 
pro.iecuting attorney seriously. It was 
considered highly amusing among the 
grafting assemblvmen of rft. Louis. 

They didn't know Mr. Folk. How 
soon this smiling, sneering, derlMve 
attitude changed to one of fear. The 
men who had laughed at tlie little 
prosecuting attorney begged to have 
this fanatic called off — this new kind 
ot a grafter, whom they said, would 
stop prosecutions when he received his 
i>iice. 

Again were the grafters and corrupt 
business men of tlie city of St. Louls 
mistaken. They had taken an ex- 
tremely superficial view of Joseph \V. 
Folk. How soon tluy were to learn 
the true estimate of the man. They 
came on tlieir knees to the prosecuting 
attorney, begging for mercy. .Some of 
the grafters •s'jueated." They turned 
state's evidence. They peached upon 
their pais in iniquity. It was in these 
strenuous times., that Josepii \V. Folk 
showed to tlie i>eople of St. Louis of 
.Missouri, and of the United Slates, 
wliat luanner of man he was. 

It Is sal. I that Mr. Folk never be- 
came angrv ; never lost that quiet man- 
ner, that leads many to mightily mis- 
judge the man. It Is this quiet man- 
ner, this klndl.e smile, tliat lias caused 
many to fail to compreliend the Iron 
that lies beneaili the surface In this 
man. 

Hut merely ask the reformer some 
iiue.stlon about graft, about the cru- 
sade of reform, get him interested 
oiue. and vou will begin to .see the 
.loe Folk that made a hell of haunting 
fear for the doers of municipal evil of 
St. Louis. You will get a flash of the 
fighter, the rtl«-ntlVss opponent of 
graft and wrdngdoing In the body 
pidltlc. Th.at \s the kind of a ftghl he 
waged at .^i. Louis, and it is the kind 
of a figlit Mr. Folk says he is going to 
keep on waging. 

Mr. Folk was the recipient of many 
calls at the Spalding yesterday. He 
showed a deep interest in the tonnage 
tax, and also ia llie municipal affairs 
of Duluth. 

• • • 

At the Spalding: Louis J. Fiber. 
Chicago: H. A. Hatfield, Chicago: L. 
(Selstel, New York; Harry A. Storms, 
New York; F. W. Robinson. St. Paul; 
Maurice Fried. New York: B. M, Ilulh- 
erford, Chicago: t)scar Caller, New 
York: L. B. Laviek, Chicago; Samuel 
Hartman. Chicago; G. K. Hamlin, Chl- 
eago: A. Hendrlckson. Chicago; A. J. 
O'Toole. Chicago; Charles Levy, New 
Y'ork; W. J. Willoughby. New York; 
Arthur Kritsch, Milwaukee; A. G. Kerr, 
Chicago: K. P. Bartlett. Chicago; F. H. 
Flatan. Minneapolis; Arthur Brown. 
Mlnneapoli.^; George H. Abecl, Mon- 
treal; Ike Lederer, St. Paul; J. J- 
Haves, Chicago; F. Chaffee, Amenia. N. 
D.; .1. B. p:iwood. Chicago; J. F. Kelly, 
Minneapolis; W. M. Miller. New York; 
W. H. Lowe, Minneapolis; Henry Saul, 
Hibbing; George H. Taylor. Minne- 
apolis; A. W. Tuttle, Chicago; D. Sutor, 
.lanesville. Ohio; B. T, Harris. Minne- 
apolis; W. Stoper, Chicago; W. W. 
Thompson. New Y'ork; H. P. Kenna. 
.\shland: J. L. Weeks. Cleveland. 

• • • 

At the Lenox: Mrs. Haldeman. Min- 
neapolis: H*ns Berglniin. Two Harbors: 
C. A. Smith and wife. Minneapolis; H. 
W. Dow. .\ppleton. Minn..; .1. R. Dow. 
Appieton; A. G. Rice and wife. Vir- 
ginia: F. Ellnore. Chicago: M. \V. 
Withan. Minntapolls; T. Tichenor, 
Stewartville: Lotty Mitchell, Iron Riv- 
er: Andrew Krickson. Aurora; W. H 
Colburn. St. Paul; Samuel Pfluam, Min- 
neapolis; H. Green. Milwaukee: Otto 
Lohff, Minneapolis: J. R. Loe.«». St. 
Louis; R. Climlnson, Michigamee: 
Chrrles tt aro St. Paul; .T. E. Green, 
Mlnnenpt.lis: A. M. Thoini)son. St. Paul. 

A. D. Hallidan, Two Harbors: SIg Rils. 
Chicago; I'dward Gettelman, Milwau- 
kee: Mr- Lancour, Knife River: M. 
Wilson. Mir.neapolis; F. G. Guzer. Min- 
neapolis- D. HIckey, St. Paul; \>. M 
Rod well. Cevtlnnd: B Whitman, Clo- 
ouet, C. >. "Wright, Sturgeon Lake; L. 

B. Woeckler Milwaukee; D. O. Aske- 
raard, Fargo- George R. Dane. St. Paul; 
n. IZ. Lee and wife, Ashland; O. P. 
Mu/.sy. Miiiaeapolis. 

• • • 

.\t tlie St. Louis: William Lezon. 
Burlington. Iowa; M. H. Hersey, St. 
Paul- Carl Olson. Chicago; Henry Felgl, 
Milwaukee: .\. M. Gerllng, Milwaukee; 
A M. Chaffee. Covington; Otto Ander- 
son. Ely: T. H. Hyman, New l^ork; J. 
F Mossman St. Paul; Thomas Sulli- 
van St. Paul; Frank P. Honey. Mln- 
oeapolls: Gust Carlson. Hibbing; F. W. 
Ramelev, St. Paul; E. L. Berry. St. 
Paul: Julius Shanedllng. Virginia; C. 
H Street. Minneapolis; J. H. Fltzpat- 
rlck and wife. Iron River. 
• • • 
At tlie McKay: K. .Mason. Dubuque: 
W. G. Norton. Buffalo: E. Hulquist. At- 
talia. Wash.: Earl Johnson, Minneapo- 
lis- J. W. Needham, Minneapolis; W. J. 
Strlcklen, Minneapolis; H. H. Tellmy, 
Grand Forks; Mrs. Ellen O'Brien, Wood- 
stock: H. Green, Chicago; Mary Heg- 
lar Eveleth; B. L. Dahl. Bloomer; E. 
K. hughes. Embarrass; Barbara Laurln. 
Eveleth; E. H. Edwards. Minneapolis; 
.Martin Sever. Biwabik; G. H. White. 
Winnipeg; William Heisterkank and 
wlf". Shell Lake; A. .M. Selb. Minne- 
apolis. 




THE WEATHER 

Tlie little snow 
flurry this morning 
was short lived, and 
was promptly fol- 
lowed by bright 
sunshine. The 
weather man looks 
fi)r fair weather t(j- 
niglit and Friday, 
with moderate 
windM. 

The sun rose this 
morning at r>;07 and 
will set this after- 
noon at 7:06, making thirteen hours 
and flftv-nine minutes of sunlight. 

A year ago today the weather was 
dry and fair. 

Mr. Richardson makes the following 
comment on weather conditions: 

"Slight barometric depressions over- 
lie western Lake Superior. Mexico and 
British Columbia. During the past 
twenty-four hours these disturbances, 
in connection with another thai moved 
northeastward Into the lower St. Law- 
rence valley, caused rain or snow in 
the North Atlantic districts, the lake 
region. Upper Mississippi and Red 
River vallevs. Kansas. Colorado. New 
Mexico. Utah and Wyoming. Colder 
weather attends an increase in pressure 
over the central valleys, lake region 
and Northwest, freezing temperature 
extending southward to and Including 
Nevada I'tah. Colorado, Nebraska and 
Iowa. A ridge of high pressure ex- 
tends from Kansas to Oregon. The 
British Columbia low pressure is at- 
tended by warmer weather." 

last night's lowest 



Following were 
temperatures: 

Alilloi.d 48 ' Medioliie 

.\>lutUle jS Memplils 

.-VLlaiiU fi4 

Itattlfiinl Ill 

Hl^m.ink H 

IliMiuii 4:: 

UiilTulo 'iii 

Clin. 4H 

CillKiO- '^b 

<'h«r!i»i.i!i 68 

(■Iil.-:igi) 4» 

('liii-lnii»U Iti 

Coiii^oraia 5'i 

l>ioeiir«rt 34 

l>eiivi-r 2H 

Dftfilt 3S 

Dwlli l.»k,> II 

IKHlge Sri 

llululh sr. 

Kilmonlun 24 

lU ru.^1 '.J 

Rsi^aii.iha 2S 

(;«h«»li>ii 72 

t.ritiiil Havpn 3G 

tircfii Bay ."2 

H»»re 24 



Hat 



llt-lpiia 
HouRtilon . 
Hufin . , . . 
Jaok.>'.>nvlll« 
Kamtoop^ 
Koii-iiiii (Ity 
KiioxTllla 
1.4 i'rijsse 



I.ana<r il 

Little Rook 4.'1 

I.IH Aiicelis 48 

MdriluetU; ii 



24 

5-2 

Mllw Cltv 

Mlh\aiiki-« 3'' 

Mliinedosa ^ 

>r>aitia -ij 

MmitgomeO' '•* 

Mi"irhe.Tl '-J 

New Orleaii* 

New Y rU 

N.irfolk 

Ni.rtliflfl.i 

.N.)rlli 1'l.aie 

(Iklalioma 

Omaha 

Pliui'iiU 

I'leriv 

Pluslmrg 

I'ort .\rtliiir 

I'ortUiid. Or 

Prinoc .Albert 

qii'.Vppelle 

Uapld Clir 

St. LouU 

.SI. P.iul 

.San .^iitntilo <ii 

Sail Francisco Is 

Santa i'f iO 

... .SaiiU sto. Marie ."IS 

(5S JsliTt»ep<>n -iS 

.44 ( .Sp<ikai.e ■i'^ 

Swift Ciimiil. li' 

Washington .in 

Wichita >S 

Wllllston .^ 12 

iviiinemuc"-! '-2 

\Vliinlp<>g 1' 

Vollow»li>n9 1' 





Or. 

Pricels 

Cream 

PoWder 



.30 
.2« 
.24 




.38 
.58 
. ...1 



Department of Agriculture. Weather 
Bureau. Duluth, April 2^. Forecast tor 
twenty-four hours ending at . p. m. 
Fridav: Duluili. Superior and vicinity. 
Iniluding the Mesaba and Vermilion 
iron ranges — Fair weather tonight and 
Friday; not much change in temper- 
ature; moderate westerly "^\'"'V„^. 
H. W. RICHARDSON. 

Local Forecaster. 



22. — Forecast 
ending at T p. 



for 
m. 



Chicago. .\i»ri! 
twenty-four hours 
Friday: „ , , i . 

Upper Michigan— Partly clou ly to- 
night and Friday; with probably snow 
Hurries near Lake Superior. 

Wisconsin — Generally fair tonight 
and Friday. ^ . ^ . , , 

Minnesota — Generally fair tonigjU 
and Friday, warmer in northwest por- 

North Dakota — Generally fair tonight 
and Friday; warmer tonight. 

ME.\NT TO BE FINNY. 



A pure grape cream of 
tartar powder. Its fame 
is world-wide. No alum, 
no pho5phatic acid. 

There is never a ques- 
tion as to the absolute 
purity and healthful- 
ness of the food it raises 






THE TONNAGE TAX VETO 



Washington Star: "Did you do much 
sigiil-seeing wiien you went abroad. 

-No," answer-r-d Mr. Cumiox. -'Motlier 
and tlie girls did the sightseeing. I 
had to put in my time finding tlie places 
wlitre they cash letters of credit. 

Judge: "I see that Enos Hand has 
just got his high-toned eight-day clock 
from that big Chicago store. Enos 
says that clock will run eight days 
without winding." ^ . , , ,. 

"How long will it run ȣ it s wound. 



Atlanta Constitution: "The alligator 
swallowed him." 

-An' did they kill the gator? 

"No; they thought that swallern' 
was punishment enough'." 



him 



Success: "You 
What's got you? 

"Work. From morning 
only a one-hour rest." 

•■How long hove you been 

"I begin tomorrow." 



look so pale and thin, 
to night and 
at it?" 



Louisville Courier- Journal: "He Isn t 
handsome, yet he seems popular with 
the girls." , , , ,t ,,. 

"They think he looks like a Billl- 
ken." 



Cleveland Leader: "No one should 
drink water that hasn't been boiled 
at least an hour." 

•You are a physician. I presume? 

"Nope. Coal dealer." 



vou en- 
^ow do 



London Opinion: "And did 
joy vour African trip, major? 
■you "like the savages?" , , . . . 

••Oh. they were extremely kind-heart- 
ed: They wanted to keep me there for 
dinner." 



say tint .'i iivm 
! hi.> income f 



n 



' ricky, 

• ii-umes riee 

' urs. But he 

the white man, 

vv:iy," 

the whole situ.ation on the 

is one that cilia for serious 



l-'eo!ii .mi-ts 
than ' ■ •It 

has ju^t p:iid $2,iXltl for one 
cott:ige at Beverly. Mass., so 
that he is living well within 
dt leait. 



night n 

ir rent. 
ye:ir"-, rent 
lli.it 
his 



>t to pay more 
President Taft 
of the Stetson 



tlie country is assured 
ncorne in this respect 



.\ B. Stickney of the Grcit Western says that he is 
going to retire and take it ea^y Oilier railroad mag- 
nates will be able to take it e:«>i.-r if Mr. Stickney re- 
tires, also, for the former president of the Great West- 
ern had an cini>;irrassing habit of telling the truth in re- 
gard to railroad matters. 



Washington Star: "Is that new dia- 
lect story a best seller?" 

"No," answered the publisher, mere- 
ly a worse speller." 

Houston Post: "His wife used to be 
strongly opposed to his playing poker 
and now she likes to have him play.' 

'"Yes, he plays better than he used 
to." " 

Chicago Tribune: Uncle Hiram— So 
you plav baseball, do you, Dickie? Has 
your ball club a name? 

Five-year-old — Has It got a name; 
Gee' You've heard of the Rag Alley 
Yannigans. haven't you. uncle? Well, 
I'm their regular shortstop. We re go- 
ing to whale the everlastin' stuffin 
out o' the Bumtown Billygoats next 
Saturday*. 

Washington Star: "I am afraid Crim- 
son Gulcli is a lawless community," 
said the visitor. 

•No." answered Bronco Bob. but we 
aln t so crazy for more law that we 
drag in the unwritten kind " 

. 

ReflectlnuN of a Bachelor. 

New Y'ork Press: When a woman 
loses her figure it's a sign she Is not 
going to advertise for It. 

The suburbanite thinks he Is a wild 
dog if l-.e gets home one train late for 
dinner. . ^ .. 

Some people can be glad to be run 
over by an automobile becaus.e it s a 
rich man that does It. , , . 

When a girl makes up her mind to 
marry a man It's a sign she can make 
up his for him, too. 

\ woman would rather have a but- 
ler who Is no good on earth, than five 
plain, ordinary competent servants. 



Minneapolis Journal: Governor John- 
son did a courageous and sensible 
thing when h: vetoed the Bjorge ton- 
nage tax bill >ei-terday. A native of 
the southern part of the state, whence 
has c«"nie the most Insistent demand 
for tiic immediate f-nactment of the 
law, til" governor nevertheless was 
able ti) lake a broad and statesman- 
like view of the matter. In his veto 
message he goes straiglit to the point, 
without turning or trimming. He 
states the well-known objections to 
the bill clearly and cogently. He shows 
tliat It is hastv. unscientirie. e.vperlmen- 
tal legislation, and probably unconsti- 
tutional; that it aims a vicious blow at 
a single section of the state tlirough 
its principal Industry, and is, therefore, 
calculated to arouse sectional feeling 
an<l imperii the state's development; 
that the present system of ad valorem 
taxation is working well, yielding a 
revenue that is thirty-throe limes as 
great as it was a decade ago; and 
that the better course is to proceed 
slowly, after due study of the various 
problems involved by the state ta.v 
commission. 

Declining to "play potitics. the gov- 
ernor speaks plainly. He declares that 
fifty-five counties are now receiving 
more money from the state than they 
pay to it in taxes, and adds that it 
scarcely seems possible that such coun- 
ties should now strive to Impose on an- 
other section of the state a system of 
taxation based on an inequality. He 
calls attention to the fact that, if the 
legislature had done justice to the 
northern counties and given them fair 
representation according to population, 
the bill could not have been passed. 
Tliese are not tlie shifting and plausi- 
ble arguments of a politician, but the 
plain speaking of a puolic man who is 
not afraid 

The fact is that Minnesota has ar- 
rived at a critical point in her career. 
The whole future Is now at stake. We 
have developed a dangerous tendency 
in the legislature and elsewhere to 
treat taxation as a means of punish- 
ment and revenge. Our lawmakers, 
finding their insi)iration to a large ex- 
tent, no doubt, In an unreflecting pub- 
lic sentiment, are inclined to pile the 
burdens of taxation heavily on the cor- 
porations, both railroad and Industrial. 

Tlie future growth of Minnesota de- 
pends to a very great extent on the 
activity of capital within the state's 
borders. Entitled to no privileges 
above those of ordinary cllzens, these 
corporations must, nevertheless. be 
treated with fairness and justice, if 
they are to do their share in the work 
of developing the marvelous, but 
scarcely touclied resources of the state. 
.Anv other course means that capital 
will pass Minnesota by and engage In 
other commonwealths, where the peo- 
ple and their representatives are not 
so short-sighted. The tonnage tax bill 
was a peculiarly unfortunate exhibi- 
tion of this tendency, because it sought 
to lay a heavy and unequal burden on 
one section and one industry. 

Superior Telegram: Governor John- 
son of Minnesota has placed himself In 
the class of real statesmen of tlie con- 
structive kind In vetoing the iron ore 
tonnage tax bill. • • • The tax bill 
is now dead with every probability 
that it will remain dead for a long 
lime Northern Minnesota is happy, 
and Northern Wisconsin, the prosperity 
of which is In some particulars linked 
with that of Northeastern Minnesota, 
also rejoices. 



If this isn't getting out of a hole, wo 
don't know what would be. 



Stillwater Daily Gazette: If tlie gov- 
ernor vetoes the tonnage tax bill, as he 
sliould, he will receive the warm con- 
gratulations of liie ii.jrthern portion of 
the state in particulai. as well as the 
central part ol the population, and If 
he does not sign the hill tliere will be 
a few wiio will be disappointed. This 
imposing any more than a just tax on 
any community Is an injustice. 

St. Cloud Daily Times (before ttie 
veto): It is not an exaggeration to 
say that the passage oi this measure ia 
due to sectional feeling — .Southern Min- 
nesota against Northern Minnesota, and 
a belief that the United States Steel 
ermipany should be hit in this way. In 
doing so, it Is very probable that the 
northern portion of the state, and 
thereby Minties^ta as a whole, would 
be the greater sufferer. The governor 
is certainly placed in a position which 
will lest his firmness, and determina- 
tion to do wiiat he regards as right, re- 
gardless ot pressure. Under ail the cir- 
oumstances a veto of tlie bill seems to 
us tlie proper course. 



Rochester Daily Bulletin: We of 
Soulliern Minnesota have little concep- 
tion of the anxiety that has prevailed 
over the northern "section of Minnesota 
in regard to the imposition of the ton- 
nage tax on iron ore. If the siata 
should levy a special tax on every 
bushel of barley we produce, what a 
cry would go up. The people of the 
north are as jealous of their iron crop. 
The prosperity of hundreds of com- 
munities depeiKis upon the full opera- 
tion of the mines, and the people would 
suffer much hardship it the Bjorge bill 
became a law. Governor Johnson's 
veto mes.sage will be misjudged by 
many, i)Ut llie Bulletin believes it re- 
veals the governor's knowledge of con- 
ditions and fair-minded staieamansUlp 
to a marked degree. 



St. Cloud Times: The enactment of 
such a law would have t)een a grave 
mistake, and in interposing a veto Gov- 
ernor Johnson !\as performed i>ne of the 
most meritorious acts of his three 
terms. 



Brainerd Dispatch: Governor John- 
son has vetoed the Infamous Bjorge 
tonnage tax measure and In so doing 
has lifted a load from many n man's 
mind In the iron regions of Niirthern 
Minnesota. The action of the executive 
in exercising the right of veto In this 
instance and his fearless stand for 
what he tliought was right will meet 
with the commendation of the jjeople 
of Northern Minnesota, and tliroughout 
the state for that matter. 



Pointed raragmphN. 

Chicago News; .Some people cannot 
even do the best they can. 

When duty calls a man up It often 
gets the busy slgn.11. , ^ 

The eighth wonder of a married 
man's world Is why he ever did it. 

No matter how silly a pretty girl 
talks men never seem to notice It. 

\nd many a man after robbing Peter 
to pay Paul tries to stand Paul off. 

Usually a man's shyness prevents 
him from wanting to meet his credit- 
ors. 

It doesn't take long for a handsome 
young widow to> convince a woman 
iiater of the error of hi.s ways. 

It's usually the man who Is too lazy 
to carrv a stielt of stovewood that goes 
around" with a chij> on his shoulder. 

Speaking of shooting stars. It would 
be very wrong to take a shot at some 
of those who pose behind the foot- 
lighta- ,i 



Id 



Hfmrr !^ 

Sacramento Bee; 
Tribune complains 
fluence of Francis 



(o Control. 

The .Medford (Or.) 
bitterly of the In- 
J. Heney at Wash- 



ington, declaring that for nearly four 
years he has named United States at- 
torneys, federal marshals and land 
office officials in that state, and that 
the appointment of a new federal 
iudge for Oregon is held up until 
Heney passes upon the fitness of the 
candidates. The Tribune closes with 
this observation: 

"If President Taft is to continue 
Heney's dictation In Oregon affairs, he 
will complete the demoralization of the 
Republican party in Oregon." 

The Republican party in Oregon de- 
serves to be demoralized if it cannot 
furnish candidates honest and public- 
spirited enough to stand Heney's scru- 
tiny It would be a good thing for Cali- 
fornia If he had the same influence 
regarding federal appointments in this 
state which the Tribune credits him 
with for Oregon. 

. 

Would Tent HlH CouraK*. 

Detroit Free Press: But Harriman 
doesn't dare hustle over to Africa and 
MUr it to his face. 



Minneapolis Tribune: The next time 
the governor's enemies in both parties 
and In his official family think they 
have put him up against It, they will 
remember the tonnage tax veto. He Is 
a man of peace and doesn't mind play- 
ing a little politics on the side. But 
when crowded into a corner he is a 
hard hitter with a long reach. 

It is Impossible to read that mes- 
sage without finding In It the ring 
of sincere conviction. He met the issue 
squarely. He could have signed the 
bill without giving reasons. A veto 
had to be defended, and it would have 
been hard to conceal base or mean 
political motives in so conspicuou.? an 
act. In a position where either course 
was sure to make enemies and invite 
misconception, we believe that the gov- 
ernor has put aside every other con- 
sideration to take that which he 
thought was right. .. . », ■ 

That separates the final act in tnis 
drama from all that have gone be- 
fore The tonnage tax never lias been 
considered fairly on Its merits The 
Steel corporation tried to beat It with 
,„,5ney — legitimately of course, by 
financing the amendment fight and 
Junketing the senate. Demagogues 
tried to pass it by appealing to cor- 
poration hatred. Both parties played 
politics and appealed to sectional jeal- 
ousy The governor was so hemmed 
In that the line of least resistance was 
the neglected consideration of merit. 
He was wise and bold enough to 
take It. 

Not since Hughes vetoed the 2-cent 
fare bill has It been given to a gov- 
ernor to serve his state so well. What- 
ever the academic virtues of the ton- 
nage tax, this bill had bec.»me so In- 
volved with lower considerations that 
its enactment would have been a public 
calamity. The governor has saved the 
state from a fiscal crisis with millions 
of revenue tied up in the courts. The 
state of New York has hung up f40.- 
000.000 under the franchise tax Roose- 
velt jammed through. 

Moreover, he has saved It from a 
sectional division more bitter at the 
beginning than that which separated 
North and South before the ClvU war. i 



Winona Republican Herald: The 
newspapers of the northern seetiiju of 
the stale appear to imagine that the 
people of Southern Minnesota strenu- 
ously urge the passage of the tonnage 
tax bill, which is far from the case. 
There is little public sentiment in this 
section for or against the bill, and 
there would be no popular uprising if 
Governor Johnson should veto it. 'The 
people of Southern Minnesota do not 
want an injustice done the iron range 
country, and if this tax will work injury 
to them, as they generally elaim. they 
would find no fault witli the governor 
for withholding his approval of It. The 
clamor for this tonnage tax has been 
largely of a fictitious origin, with no 
real public sentiment b.diind it tliat we 
have been able to discover. 



Mankato Daily Free Press: Members 
of the legislature from .Southern Min- 
nesota are not making any complaint 
against the veto. They invariably voted 
In favor of the tonnage tax, beli»:»'ingr 
that in so doing they were carrying out 
the wishes of their constituents. Sen- 
ator Works of Blue Earth county voted 
against the bill and delivered a speech 
in opposition to its passage. 

Crookston Times: Locally, the mes- 
sage has been received with consider- 
able favor by both Republicans and 
Democrats, most of whom took the 
same stand as the governor, namely, 
that the measure would have been a 
severe blow to the development of 
Northern Minnesota. There is no ques- 
tion but that the governor has made 
himself a name in the history of 
Northern Minnesota and his backbone 
in opposing a measure which seemed 
to be popular In the greater portion 
of the state, will win him man/ 
friends. 



AMUSEMENTS. 




KIKST riMK 
TOXKiHT. 



LYCEUM 



TOMORROW AND SATrR».%V. 
Matinee Saturday. 

AL H. WILSON 

The Golden Voiced Singer in HIa 
Sonic Bedecked IMay, "WHE.N OI,D 
XEW YORK WAS DUTCH." 



Next Week — Monday. Tnewdny, 
\Oilnei»da)-. Matinee Wedoewday. 
AV4I.KI-:U WIIITKSIDK I> "THE 
MKI-TiNG I»t>T." Friday and i^atnr- 
dny, KLtHtEXt K KOHKHT-*. 




\ 



^iff 



4... 



i 



i 



itfBila 



■■ 



■■■■ 



■Ma tt. 



i 





T 



■ 




V 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: THURSDAY, APRIL 22, 1909. 



9 






■■'" iiii II - Jj^H' 



•••While ridlngc on hi" »>f-v.!rt along hj 
B<*nGh street tSils noon, v Urhard- 

•on ot the ftrm of RIfli • l>ay & 

Co.. was thrown from the luachina to 
- - -t and aufffit'd a fraciurt- of 
.f the left arm In two places. 
■K was the restilt of a 
'»j- thf too aiiddon uae 



the 31 rf 



Of I ■ 



•••E. C, 



'lEipniau. 



T 

1 



to ■ 
111 a ■ 



„f imliith 

V Tush Iff 
Nullonal 

II. 



has fTone 

Hei-tfct**' 
bank un- 






T«tw»»r ha.s ijone 
, . -r .• he vvUl b© 



"K, 



hlan-l.i near thf reat«»r of the »lat^. 
The scrov-ea were houtfht from Mr. Kea- 
nev. brother of Mrs. c". A. Poole. 



•••Fielder B. Chew, the 
land attorney. ha.-« returiu-d 
visit at Wa^ihhigt.'ii- 



well-known 
from a lonj? 



•••Hoiire'a 
hi,-- ■ . ,' - 

t h ♦ lui' •> v ' ■■ ^ 
In iHiluth. 



Easter concert al Turii.T 

.: vas poorly attended. 

turning out to hear 

... ,. , .1 i-omert ever «i\cn 



jM^ «»«««»*»*»»*«***»**»****«**»*******«**************i 



• ••pilgrim church 
doors la«) evniiig 
gathered to 1 



wa» packed 
hy DuUith 



II t..-'z\r, 



:i t 



irackss will Im- lahl i^y .st-jn. i. 



pari** It at 



laMi f. 
•••I., i: 

C'entervll!' 

•••%V ' 
now li 

tlm w 

ch«a«<i 



t .1 lilt 

>-i:tr."i' 



the 

win 

11. e 

i>ove 

tlie 



. 18 



m a 
<K;r- 



Iiefils 

!•: 

H 
11. 

eret! 
the ' 
W. l: 
byter 
ris. 
aiMli 
rue II I !■ 



.f tf! 



t wile left for 



who is 



■.-; Ml tMc 



to the 

peoide 

■arn of the work.H and 

l>ii!tith Humane .■society. 

1 t«< order hy liev. 

■d the londort of 

; iley. preshlent 

.J were delU - 



of 



■i.'ty. 



secrf'tiirv of 

U.\ I>r A. 

• I ': r-ii 1 're-<- 

M.>r- 

■ ,; the 

.nil I'll) n>'\v 



A II 



M 



1. 

wit llKh'hou.S»'. 



■II. VVlft 

left 

ire the 
vvlii<-h 



anii fauiily. ntn! 
to. lay f<"- Isle 
keeptT-i n{ .Si. -1 ki- 
wi!! n'>w I'f put 



In operation for tin: .>easun. 



• ••Herhert it. Tlr:khain. whone wife 

v..Hter.lay afler .sevt-rul v ^ -^ ""- 

Ht the residiMH-e. corner • 
t a It. I Tenth a vets no west 

r..w With til.- I'o.l. (-..I- i,.T I 
• li Maine. 



died 
iieM.H 



ith 

1 ve 

inner 



HOW VIRTUE 
TRIUMPHED 

«ii^^— ■■■ 1' 

knA Once More the Bold. 

Bad VIHain Gets 

His. 



blanched at t!i" >*■ 

\v r - ' ' r..u:.'i-'s< 

n,i.f"l n-:iy Kifi.- 
proiuielor ">1 a 
parly and hid : 

Ilruliier »* 
It! otlna houiiced 
hai'keil ^- • . ' - ^-i 

ni<'iiil>.-i - 



(111.1 of I'.vi. 



My 

the 



t tlie 



In I' 



ami 
I" 



I,- llie lahl>- II 

. ,.,i . , . nind her if li>- I 

op. !• and wanted (■>, 1 

>r oi tht' p'ay wouM •:"•■. >-■' 1 
broUuM- u.-tii- av 



table. 

til and 

other 

- right 

; ing on 
■ . oiild 
;>.! hhs 
at tlie 



Pearl, the Little Cut-Up, 

Learns Her Hard 

Lesson. 



i.f. 



1 

I, ■ ' 
■■\< 

w!th 



anil I't ail. 
u\ \:>'V the pr.qu'riy 
w-itli tlie knot'k-"Ut 
.1 :i:. !:.i!iu.'ed »''•-• "■«'■- 



m. 

il>- 
,.en. 
mans 
droi».H 



u 
u 

n 
n 
n 
n 
n 
n 
n 
n 
it 
a 






n 
•if 
it 
n 

n 
a 



a 
a 

it 
it 
if 
u 

H 

it 

n 
u 
it 
II 

n 
n 

u 

it 

u 



it 
u 



it 
it 
it 

H 

it 

n 

it 
it 



WELL KNOWN DULUTHIANS 
IN CARICATURE 



Your 

Credit 

Is Good. 






ggiBsijypiRSo^ 



111' 



. 1 Kijiiy !• . 
-rot her ai 
•■■ I will a. 



;«11 to go nonu' 
I will see her 

.aiiious White, 
the gaudy, hut 
-. "I once loved 
iHt mull a-side. 

,, ;!iing for r-re- 




Your 

Credit 

Is Good. 



Basement Specials for This Weelc 




Flour 
Can 



Holds fifty pounds, 
heavily japanned, 
gold bronze decor- 
ations, worth $1.25 
— on .sale thin 
week, at — 




Gas Plate 



75c 



3-burner ffas Plate 
Iron. Burner can 
cleaned: well made 



heavy 
apart 



cast 
and 



Cashier 



W. I. PRINCE, 
of the City National Bank. 



i^HMt»^t »«»»»»«»»*»«»«**»**<*************************** 



1 1 1 



hu . 

o 1 'Eii'li.. 



!.ui tru 
her own i.- 
lotnie of ti 
blue CM kit 

I !..al<, t.'a- ! 

1 k 



ii.-. 

sht 



I'.-arl \vant.s to 
fore she goes 
itiful la'1 



go to 
to the 
with the 
opera 

\'»-lloW 



MINNESOn LE(iI8LATLRE 
WINDS IP ITS BISINESS 
AM) FINALLY AIU(U RNS 



< I ■.»ii 



uird from page 1.) 



IMg 



•ifui i-i'i; 



r. > i . m Lt LI ^•. 



llltM 

iihs 
I I. . 



I.Mfkup. 

in the Fast 



he- 



-.\ii 



Hi' 



\.y 



u jlll 
.iildn't 



!>r other. 

i the life 
:-ftii that 



Ll 



ulU 

thr. 



> 111 

iue. 



■ i 

ol 



«: 
II- 
a 

u 

I. 



. la in. 

IT. 



ti> 



Do] 

ll. 



a v\ .1 1 . 



I. J pi. vent. 



flic 
init 



I 1 : c 

, i 

- t L' 

■.)tl- 

ihe 

O'- 

she 
. mi- 
ll ps, 



Th-i 
the 



sllioi;. 
<>r .l.>r 



(III 
In 

was 



^1' 



Her 



With Pwkrr. 



his 

few 



Wl 



■►• tr.'Hisfers 



. 1 

a.veiio. but 

that went 

He U 

^ down 



recti., 



h 

V 

1 ' 
h 
f 
t 

V«.' 



..»rf M 


a, r • \.- 1 . ■ 


i . ' > " 1 1 


.,::i-i to 


.St'-!1 lUl 


:, .\»M 




' ■ i \a.i 1 !. 


hi Uiu 




!l.a V..- 


a c 


^., 


... ;.■- .. ' 


. > 1 1 ii 


va- 


T 




n's 


1 1) I . 




led 


.Hth-k '• 
and '' 


■■ 


Far if 






le. «'i P' ■ 







Vt last you 

. ; to mull. I 

iitig mull, so 1 



. wai. 
ir gi! 

,i>-n h'- >;>■> •• 

her III lihs 



■ t ti- 
the 



iii./'i 
arms. 



ad 

ta. 



ii.jmt- 



■ryiiiing. 



>ld 

itt. 



•San 
in:!. 



th 



t!io 



luwi 



the man 
Prarl « Mrgiilar C ut-up. 



his .>liiii>.v 

Fie^. Little 

■ ait the 

••nnial, 

lift, nance of 

about 



an 
of 

UIl 

au 



tlie 

1 III,. 

III! II. I 



Ije.l. 



rked iu th« lied. 

tiiiig and t uiinliig like 

puffing and lilowing — 

.'■.-r than he wa.=« last 

iihon 

an«l 

Thru tlie viilain falls on 

which la a fohiing affaii, 

with gr.'al prt-.sence 

iuin up In It. t.i the 

t ut every one in the 



according to the degree of kinship 
; v- . I ■'•ording t.) the amount of 
fiecaiiH' a law. 
« • « 
Among llie bill-s that died were the 
amendments to the anti-pass law. tor 
the beiielit of firemen, policemen, etc.. 
,i„,l ta.- hii: tlxin;; 4'J per cnl as the 
-.■-i.sliig pi oi«t': ly t "■ 
. te. 

♦ • • 

. . 'Tii.ti' .J..iiii.->.iii \'etoeil t i' -i-^ 

hiii. allowing the governor to "iM>"n.l a 
court of clalmi* to consider limbei ties- 
pat*s« ca.se.s which have gom- to judg- 
ment on leclinleallties T';- '-;^f"^« 
Lunihcr comviany and the Kat loiiagt- 
Lumber company were tntereated. 

• • • 

On it,-i I.' St h'K. the buaine.ss of the 
Thirty -slxtli ticsslon of the Minnesota 
h>gislHiure was very largely of a rou- 

, , a M-tcter yesterday afternoon and 

.Manv bills— mo.^tly of minor 
11 , , .^.^ — were awaiting oonsi.lera- 
tloli. and it was a rush to see liow many 
of them coul.l be put through. 
1, ,is farther advanced than 

vsas In a much ea.sier p'>- 
Ihe senate a large general 
left unconsidere.l, but no 
ll Importance were among 
I.ed at llie finish, 
afternoon the house killeil 
the L. H. John..*on county agricultural 
scliool bill, partly because the senate 
had amended it out of .recogmtioii. and 
pirtlv because the bill for agricultural 
hign 'school.s had already beci.me a law. 
and In a measure met the demand for 
wlde.spread agricultural education. 
There inav still be county agricultural 
s, h.) I St. L-.uis county will have 

;,ne . but there is to be no state 

aid for 1 liaiu. ^ . 

\Vh.oi Uu- .I.ihnson bill was returned 
Mate, its author tnoved that 
• mcur in tlie senate amend- 
,.iid demanded a call of the 
When the members had been 
KUi-M.-.i in from the corrldoi-.s. Hepre- 
s^iitative Hates moved that the bill be 
Indellnitelv postponed, an. I he was .sup- 
per' . I hy Kepresentatiye WelLs and 
oltieis. Tlie motion carried. .2 t.. 3.). 

Keprt>sentative Holmberg again tried 
to advance the bill hy Senator Johnston 
prohibiting shipments of cream except 
in refrigerator cars, the idea being 
kill off the centralized creainerles. 
motion to advance the bill re-v 
eiglity votes and it got but sixty-nine, 
th forty against It. 



.sentatlve Lobeck's bills prohibiting the 
importation of women into the state 
for immoral purposes, and prohibiting 
the di'tention of women In evil resorts 
for debt; the house bill providing a 
gravity tests on oils; tlie Stuart bill 
making the mortgage registry tax 10 
cents per $100 instead of oO cents, with 
an amendment re.iulring the concur- 
rence of the house: and the house 
drainage committee's bill authorizing 
tlie state drainage commission to make 
a topographical survey ot the state in 
order to frame a svstem of drainage 
that will prevent the outllow from one 
section Hooding some other section. 
• • • 
The galleries were packed In both 
houses most of last evening, but the 
proceedings were rather tame nio.st of 
the time, and along toward 10 o chick 
the crowds began to thin out rapidly. 
Late in the evening a substantia,! lunch 
was served to both bodies with tiio 
compliments of George It. Kibbe. man- 
ager of tiie Merchants 
.STILLM.VN 




frame of 
be taken 

in every way, regular 
value $i:.50; on sale this 0^ |*Q 

week at ^J.«V«y 

«.\S HOSB, 5c PER FOOT. 





Slop 
Jar 



Butcher Knife 

Made of high-grade crucible steel, 
f.jrged every blade warranted — 
regular 5i)c value — now 



hand 

39c 



Comblnelte of heavy stoneware, 
plain and decorated: regular val- 
ues 80c. on sale this week ^Q|* 



Craters 




Ironing Board 

Ironing Board 
wUh stand, well 
braced, folds into 
a very small space 
when not In use 
made of hardwoo.1. 
regular value $1.:>5 
— on sale 7Q<* 

this week at. ■ •'*' 



Gasoline Stove 

2-Burner Gasoline Stoves, body of 
heavy one-piece steel; full cabi- 
net style, hard baked japanned 
finish. Burners have largest gen- 
erating surface made: regular 

value $2.95— this *a OQ 

week 9A»09 

Sink Strainer 



Made of heavy 
block tin. re- 
enforced cor- 
ners; regular 
value lac; on 
sale this week 
al — 



:e size heavy. 

made Graters 

coarse, medium 

fine work: reg- 



Gas Oven 



value 
this 



10c: on 



week at. 



6c 



v'-y **- 



Made of sheet steel, double 
walls, removable shelves, 
for gas or gasoline stoves, 
regular value $2.50 •'t Off 
—on sale this week**»«»«' 



Carpet 
Beater 

Genuine Preston Car- 
pet Beaters — the 
world's best — wood 
handle with heavy 
metal loop: regular 
value l.'Jc; on sale tlda 
week at — 




Lamp 
Burner 





■ -W 


3^ 


3 


m 


w 1 


m 


m 




el 


r^ 




9c 



Dust Pan 

Extra heavy 
japanned Du s t 
Pans; regular 
1.5c; on sale 
this week fi^» 




Large size No. 3 Lamp 
Burners, s.ild every- 
where at IS.-: on IQo 



sale this week at 



Water Pitcher 

Good heavy Glass 
Water Pitch, ers — 
liandsoine designs to 
select from. They 
h.dd one-half gallon; 
regular value 35c; 
this week at — 





m 



n 



23c 




Hand Lamp 

trood sized Hand 
Lamp with handle 
complete with burner 
and chimney; regular 
value S.ic; on sale 
this week at — 



23c 



^ 



hotel. 
H. BINGHAM. 



■I ■ 



-►- 



The Great Carpet and Rug Sale Now Going On 



i .■.H.-u ilii> 



front 
tfu* i 



Tlien the 



1>»1I> 

girl 



i 

6 
] 

I! 

t 

t 
1 

pert>us 

}% . . t I 1 1 U ' 1 

1' 
« 
W 1 1 1 I 



act. 
his j 
his j 

jijor . 
ew 



t.e«H Her*. 

,|.,.-^ a ll' ; !•■ -inaslit'ig 

■MUnl. >lia lhr..itl ics 

atid breaks a water 

head of the colored 



pt 
N 



guard. 
It is 
mi nut"! 

si'f.ntle!; 



■at. 



Th 



gr. 

. to Iwrrow a 

,.f, wh»» writ- 



.-.■ling 

'Ilt.-li«a 
ini tla 



la:-!.- t . ■ n 

from tiie 
[loliflcal 



to 
Tlie 
ilred 



wl 

evident 

bill. 



that iher*. was no 



This ma<le it 
hop*' for the 



After 



the 



:i mm. 
had a 

1 make 

al.His. 
r:,.> first act, 
liiif vv! ••II he 

,. . .... •.ritli 

I s a 



east 



A It I 

and W 

vi.sil t 
part ■. 

t!i>'o> 

ai: 



'III- 






t 



W-'!l, 



n, iiut 
.i rati.) 11 
the author 
full vi.-w 
' .il tc: 
at all I . - 

. 'Why t;;ii.s Leave 

.>n ait actual Inci- 

' •• -,uinm«-r of 



up. 

' ' e r 

-■. . ,) 

1 r 

to liave 

of th€t 

aiivi 



• • • 

killing it in tlie morning. 
1 ,1 the Allen bill, ontinutng 

f .;s iimre t!ie annual tax 

.,r j,;.,. for the extension of 

slate untversiiv campus The 
vote was Al for 
and :JT against. 
»'"• aflei iio.in, 
ag. 
if 

'"ong 



levy 
the 
_ forenoon 

indefinite postponement 
and the bill passed in 
6:2 to r.7. every member 
The motion to reconsider the 
,f tlie bill was made by Hepre- 
don of Duluth. who 



f ritMiii.s 
vote.l I 
so again. 

Ileprescnt 
bill increus! 
fr.im .'Z'i of 



Uf did 

.1 the b 

kill the 



S.J at tiie request of 
II. iiiough he had 
bill, and would do 



,(.\.- jMl.-n lli.'n 
tig the univeisily 
a 



mill to half a 



had his 
tax levy 
mill, lu- 



lu 11 
pla- 

■1 

If 

tlu.-. 'i 
plug 

1. 



the 

^arl to 


WE J 


and 




■ ^ '..; .■■ a 




■ ■11- 




-; .ia.im 


. . 


1 1 net 




■ Ml I ht» 


.ll 


WAS there. laU 


1 f- 

an-l 


11 bout meeting 


tei- 




wh" 


I..e White 


in.)ur- 



WEALTHY FARMEK IS 

KILLED IN UlNAWAY. 



III. 



X 



A 



!».. April ::-' As Oscar 
v.aa.tliy farmer i -siding 
lea north of \Vashl»urn. wa.H 
home, a colt which he was 
i. .( '■■ ■ horse becatne 

. i; ,1.1 t>y the road- 
started a ru- that re- 
th»> death ol ;u.staf8€>n 
a iury OI I i.s daugli- 
a son 
' scaped 



W a - 


Ill . i 1 


ai?lite 
■ , .4 with 


• and 
them 


v. 









Hunt's Perfect 

Food /^'lavoring £"xtracts 



The fruit 

■uch aa 

LEMON 



ar© made only from 
The berry 

auch a 3 

RASPBERRY 




,1 finitely postp.)ned. 

• * - 
The Thorpe senate hill, providing for 

unif.irm biil-s of la.ling. was passed by 
the lious.' in t!>»^ aft-rnoon. alter the 
housi- hail volcd It down in lli>.' f'>re- 

noon. 

• ♦ • 

(»n motion of Representative Horton 
the house kilted the sen.ate hill. pr.>vid- 
Ing that persons to whom hunting li- 
censes are issued must report the 
her of animals and blrd.^ tak.' 
them, to llie state game and fish 
mission. 



nuni- 
n by 
CO til- 



MRS. Mcdonald 

V^EDDED AGAIN 

Woman Who MadeTrouble 

for Lumberman Is 

Married. 

.St. Joseph, Mo., April 22.— It was 
learned yesterday that Mrs. Amber 
Belle Hamilton Tourney McDonald of 
matrimonial fame was married secret- 
ly In St. Joseph the evening of March 
9 last to D. D. McMillan, who told the 
officiating clergyman that he was a 
grain merchant of Minneapolis, Minn. 
The discovery was made through por- 
traits of Mrs. Amber Belle Hamilton, 
published In connection with sensa- 
tional stories In the St. Louis and Kan- 
sas City newspapers Sunday. 

The photograph was recognized as 
that of a handsome woman, beautifully 
gowned, who for nearly a week fol- 
lowing March i». lived at the Hotel 
Robldoux, this city, with her husband. 
Further Intjulry developed the fact that 
they were married on the eve of tlieir 
arrival In St. Joseph, 

Un the county records the woman a 
name appears as Mrs. Annie Belle 
Hamilton. Kansas City Mo., and that 
of the man as D. D. McMillan, Min- 
neapolis. Ivan. That they gave their 
correct names and addresses to the 
recorder, however, is evidenced by the 
fact that the license was made out 
correctly. Accurate information was 
also given to the clergyman. Dr. W . K. 
Dobviis. pastor of the First Presby- 
terian churcli. who performed the cere- 
mony. . , , .. ^ 

Dr. Dobyns declined to solemnize the 
marriage unless assured that neither 
of the parties had ever been divorced. 
McMillan denied that either had been 
divorced. He then asked the pastor to 
keep the •marriage quiet, explaining 
that they had -fixed things' at the re- 
corder's office. The couple remained at 
Kobidoux until March 14, when they 
left, leaving no forwarding address 
witli the clerk. 

EX-GOVERNOR SOLOMON 

OF WISCONSIN IS DEAD. 

New York, April 22. — Edward Solo- 
mon, former governor of Wisconsin, is 
dtad at Frankfort-on-Maln. Years ago 
he was one of the foremost men In poll 
tics 



pearance of the Commoner in Duluth 
for some time. Strenuous efforts were 
made to have him here during the 
recent presidential campaign, but Mr. 
Bryan found It Impossible to come to 
the Head of the Lakes then. He will 
appear in tlie Star lecture course. 

FLOCKING TO 
SAINTLY CITY 

Many Arriving at St 

Paul for National Y. 

W. C A. Meeting. 

St. Paul, Minn.. April 22.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Delegates to the na- 
tional biennial convention of the 
Young Women's Christian a.ssociatlon 
are arriving in St. Paul today to at- 
tend the four-day meeting which be- 
gins this afternoon In Central Pres- 
byterian church. 

It is expected that about 500 dele- 
gates will be present at the opening 
meeting, and that 1,000 will be In at- 
tendance before the convention cjosna. 
This afternoon the meeting will be 
devoted to greetings and organiza- 
tion. 

♦ 



for the coming year: Henry C. Har- 
rington. trea.surer; Benjamin M. Buck- 
minater, secretary; .J. H. Hulquist, 
George Lindberg. James Maher, J. W. 
Harter and B. C. Henry, trustees, ll. 
C. Henry was elected convention dele- 
gate with Henry Cr.issland, alternate. 

Foley's Honey and Tar is a .""afe- 
guard against serious results from 
spring colds, which inllame the lungs 
and develop into pneumonia. Avoi.l 
counterfeits by Insisting upon having 
the genuine Foley's Honey and "Tar. 
which contains no harmful drugs, r or 
sale by all druggists. 



VETO MADE STRONG HIT 

(Continued from page 1.) 



Th 



• * • 
,,,tise passed the Menate Hill au- 
t g judges to suspend sentence 

, .ce on probation, persons con- 

victed of first offenses 
for which does not 
prison. 



the punishment 
•xceed five years in 



* 

* 
* 

* 



BAKKRS' TRICK 

UKDUC KS WEIGHT 

OF BUE-VD LOAVES. 



New York. April 22. — .Vltliousli 
haker<« in New York and vi«inity 
have takon no concerted action 
either to raise the price of liread 
or to reduce the size of l«»aves, 
a canvft.s.s of scores of bakeries in 
this city revoaLs the fact tiiat tlie 
full pound loaf la a niytli. In all 
but three ca-ses the loaves were 
shortuelsht, due to the high price 
of wheat. At a casual glance, 
however, the loaves were as lar^e 
R8 before the rei«ent raise in 
wheat price.s, but examination 
slio\\e<l that tricks had In-en re- 
sorted to jjlve thi.s appearance. 
More vcast is added to the dt>ut;h. 
causing the l)re}ui to rise more 
and protlucing more air ?)nbbleH 
thus creating au apparently 
pound loaf. 



full 



* 
* 

* 

'in 
* 

* 

* 
* 



his veto of the tonnage tax bill was a 
niasierstroke." 

Lawrence Johnson of Minneapolis 
th.iught the governor had done some- 
thing that would always stand to his 
credit. "He has earned the gratitude 
of Northern Minnesota," said Mr. John- 

John Dalzell of Morton asked to be 
quoted as .saying that tiie governor .s 
Veto of the Bjorge bill was entitled to 
be called one of the best acts of liis 
administration. 

"He has made a hit." said Mr. Dal- 
zell. . , .^ 

At the dinner of The Friars at the 
St. Paul Commercial club, the govern- 
ors veto was generally commended. 
Eli S. Warner, president of the Com- 
mercial club, who was one of tlie 
speakers, said: "I am a Republican, 
but I honor Governor Johnson for any- 
thing he has done for the state. We 
pav more taxes than we ought to pay. 
St' Paul Minneapolis and Duluth pay 
one-third of all the taxes in tlie state. 
The people feel that they ought to 
have fair treatment and Governor 
Johnson has given it to them In veto- 
ing that tonnage bill today. 1 honor 
him for tlie stand he lias taken and I 
am going to stand back of him even 
ihougli 1 am a RHpuhlican." 

ROOSEVELT NEAR HUXT 

(Continued from page 1.) 



Indians and natives and presented a 
picturesque appearance. While gen- 
erally hearty in their welcome, the 
jieople were not demonstrative. 

The admiral left Adena a week ago 
and the voyage was without spe.-ial In- 
cident, the most interesting feature of 
it being the captain's dinner to Mr. 
Roosevelt on Tuesday at which there 
were enthusiastic excliang»>s of good 
fellowship and goo.l wishes. In toast- 
ing tlif ex-president th" captain wished 
him Godspeed and a safe return to 
the Unite. 1 States. Mr. Roosevelt re- 
plied first In Knglisli, then In German 
and French. 



A Ten-Dollar Bill 



yi>u can 
than In 



British East Africa, but he warned his 
liearers that they could not expect to 
achie%'e in a short time what it t'lok 
America several hundred years 
rompllsh. Ho commented 
that tlie people at home 
affairs abroad. In this 



to ae- 
on the fact 
knew little of 
connection he 



States and tlie 



the 
the 



The bean 

surh as 

VANILLA 



All absolutely pure 
and of the same high quality as 

Hunt's Perfect Baking Powder. 

Both at your grocer's. 



the 
of 



• • • 

The hill by Senator T. M. Pugh of 
[lulutli, reorganizing the slati oi 
Duluth naval militia to put it on 
same basis ae the United Stales navy, 
got through. 

The house last night killed the bill 
bv Senator Hall reni..ving *he limit up- 
on campaign expenditure^, under the 
impression that ii repeolea the corrupt 
practices act. As originally Introduced. 
Il did repeal tlie entire act, but the 
senate amended it s<> as to repeal only 
the sections ))uttlng a limit upon cam 
paign expenditures, and leaving 
sections which provide publicity 
campaigns. Nobodv in the house, ap- 
paientlv. knew that this change hJid 
been made, so the bill was defeated, 
getting 51 votes with ti'- against it. 
• • • 

Among the bills passed last night by 
the house were the following: 

By Senator Gunn — Authorizing the 
cresition of park boards in cities and 
villages having a p.Jt>ulation of more 
tlian l.oOtt and less than lO.OoO. 

By Senator Calhoun — Prohibiting tlie 
pavment or receiving of rebates on 
fire insurance premiums. 

By Senator Anderson — Authorizing 
town boar. is to cause trees or hedges 
within road limits to be cut dnwii 
wiu-n they are detrimental to the roa.ls. 

By the senate judiciary committee — 
Creating a state board of accountancy, 
and providing for the i.'jsuance of cer- 
tificates to .lualified public accountants 
who pass examination.^ 



and reform m.ivements. Born in 
Halbertstadt, Germany. Aug. 11. 1872. 
he was graduated from the University 
of Bt«rlin. and came to the United States 
In 1849. settling in Wisconsin, where 
he was admitted to the bar In 18.5.i. He 
was elected lieutenant governor of the 
state in 1.S61, and succeeded Governor 
Hardy the following year because of 
the death of the latter 

BRYAN COMING. 



»»»»*»»«* **** ******» *»»» *» 



Pandora, 
manned 



Has many po.sslbillties, but 
not put It to better use 
purchasing 

The Aetna 
Combination Policy 

What It Will Do f or You 
$1000 



For Accidental Death cau.sed hy 
any ordinary accident. (This 

$100 yearly 



for 



amount Increases 
five years.) 

$2000 

For Accidental Death caused by 
travel, elevator or burning building 
accident. (This amount increases 
$200 yearly for five years.) 

$5 Weekly Indemnity 




For Totally 
Injury, up to 



Disabling 
200 weeks. 



Accidental 



MUST GO BACK. 



Italian (iirl to Be Sent 
Native Land. 

In company with an otTicial 
Immigration 
rone, aged 
day, but 
be home 



Home to 



an oinciai of the 

department. Maria Per- 

18. started for Italy ye-ster- 

the Sunny peninsula will not 

for her, for her parents are 



Will 



Leetnre on *'The Price of a 
Soul," May 1« 

William Jennings Bryan will appear 
In Duluth up<m the evening of May 10, 
when he will deliver his lecture. "The 
Price of a Soul." at the First Metho- 
dist church This will be the first ap- 



Tlie Senate 



la^i 



night 



passed Itepre- 



Keep Fit 

Your brain, muscles and nerves 
depend upon good physical 
condition. Secure it by using 

BEECHAM'S 
PILLS 

Sold Evenrwhere. to boxM lOc and 2S«. 



trace of 
however. 



her 
and 



dead and she has lost 
relatives. She is an alien, 
she must bo deported . 

Since March 30 Maria ha-s been con- 
fined In the county jail awaiting a di.s- 
n.isitlon of her case. She wa.s arrest- 
ed in a hotise of ill fame in Hibbing, 
together with the proprietor and an- 
other Inmate . 

The other Inmate is not an alien. 
She will stay in this country and will 
be held as a witness against 
pr.>prietor of the resort, who is 
ing acUon by the grand jury 
charge of harb.jring alien w omen. 

MISSION PROSPERING. 

Park Point Society Holds Its An 
nual Gathering and Elects Officers. 

The annual meeting 
Point Mission society was 
mission hall 



of th.e Park 
held in the 
last night. The attend- 
ance was large and the reports of the 
officers of the several branches of 
society showed them all to be in 
cellent condition. Tlie report of 
treasurer showed that during the past 
year the receipts have beeii |1. 434.3a 
and the disbursements ll.. ill. sit. 
ing a net balance in 

*''The following officers were electedj 



Instanced tlie United 
Philippine islands. 

Strength In Peace. 

Roosevelt expressed his great pleas- 
ure at the welcome given him yester- 
day by the Britisii cruiser 
whose sails and masts were 
l>y cheering sailors when the admiral 
came into the harbor. He said Ije be- 
lieved in peace. but considered that 
strength is peace, and he h.jped that 
all the great nations would provide 
themselves with this means to the end 
In concluding. the speaker referred 
biyetly to his future plans and gave 
sdfme of his first Impressions of the 

'"^M"r^'"Roo.sevelt was followed by Mr 
Selous, who expressed the hope that 
Mr. Roosevelt would In the future uae 
the power of his positioti to bi ng 
about an entente between Great Biit- 
aln and Germany. , . ,, ,, . 

J. Alden L.^rlng and Maj. Mearns did 
not come ashore from the Adnriirai 
vesterday because of the heavy rams. 
They disembarked this morning. 

The people ot Mombasa were In a 
great state of e.xpectancy, and the first 
word of the sighting of 
brought them in crowds 
points, where they 
glimpse of 

The Adi....~ -- , , . „ 

to the harbor, and it was dark vvhen 
the ex-president, accompanied b> his 
son Kerniit and ttie captain ma. e a 
landing They were brought ashore 
n thf commandant's surfboat and 
carried to a place of shelter In chairs 
on natives' shoulders. There was a 
nerfect deluge of rain, but in reply to 
Expressions of regret at the weather 
R.iosevelt said he was glad to get 
ashore in any kind of ,^-t^athei. He 
a.lded that he was In spleiidld health 
and that the start lor the hunting 
grounds could not come a minute too 
Hoon. Tl:e governor's aide boarded 
tiie admiral and extended a \velconie to 
Mr Roosevelt, who received another 
cordial greeting on shore fr'>m the 
provincial commissioner, vk-ho conduct- 
ed him to the government house .s. F. 
Cunningham, the hunter and field nat- 
uralist who is in charge of ♦he expedi- 
tion was also on hand at the pier. 

Pleaded With Guard. ^ ^. ^, 
Tlie former president seemed highly 
pleased when he observed the military 
Kuard drawn up. He replied 
guards' salute 
smiling 
the treasury of pressed eagerly 
noted American. 

They were composed 



the 
await- 
on a 



the ship 

to vantage 

might catch a 

the dis'tinguished visitor. 

•Vdmiral, however, came slowly up 



$10 Weekly Indemnity 

For Total Disabling Accidental 
Injury caus.-d by travl, elevator or 
burning building accident, up to 
200 weeks. 

$250 

death from any cause what- 
whether natural or accidental. 



For 
ever. 



Loss of Limb or 
Sight 



$1000 



For Accidental Loss of both hands, 
both feet or one hand and one foot 
(This amount increa-sea *100 yearly 
for live years.) 

$1000 

Accidental Lo-ss of the e. tire 
of both eyes. (This amount 



For 
sight 



increases 
years. ) 



$100 yearly for five 



$500 



For Accidental Loss of one hand 
or one f'>"t. (This amount in- 
creases $50 yearly for five years.) 



$333 



For Accidental Less of the entire 
sight of one eye. (Tliis amount in- 
creases $33 yearly for five years.) 



the 
ex- 

the 



leav- 



the 

to the 

by doffing his hat and 

broadly. The crowds on shore 

forward to see the 

of Europeans. 



Double the Ibove Amounts 



Paid w'hen the loss 
travel, elevator or 
ing accident. 



is caused l>y a 
burning build- 



YOU WANT TIIF. BUST— 
WE FL'RXISH IT. 

Manley-Melennan 
Agency, 

Torrey BIdg.. First Floor. 




I 



-ilip 



■I 

I 





JiL 




10 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: THURSDAY, APRIL 22, 1909 




r 



'ff 



allii ■ 






.01 



has been worn by three generations of men and women, and with every generation has deserved 
and enjoyed the'reputalon of being a good shoe, always ^onesdy^^^^^^^^^^ material. 

It is sold today by more leading merchants than any otner snoe ^?^ 

manufactured in the Northwest: 

1 Because we are the only house in the Northwest which makes its different grades of 
shoes *in separate factories, thus insuring the highest degree of workmanship in each. 

2 Bec^ause every paiV of shoes we make has back of it the guaranty of more than a 
«.;ilir.n Hnllnr.; canital and of more than half a century's record of honorable dealmg. 
"^3 Because we car?y the largest shoe stock in the Northwest and can fill our orders most promptly. 

Our factories now cover nearly seven acres of floor space but what we are most proud 
of isthVquLmoiour output. No house in the world excels us in this, and our persistent 

^^^^^^i^i^lV^^^^^^^^^ Pnces, and every shoe we make is 

the best for the price. C. GOTZIAN & CO., St. Paul, U. S. A. 



ft 



\+ 



Mr 



I 




/df^. 



I ■ 



,'" III I ilMWIlMWini 







V [TUGS AT THE 
HEARTSTRINGS 

J't-rn 12-v.-ar-..M p'-m ..f Mrs, J..-hn Mul- 
fu^Mwini- ■ '-^ n.(>th./r of 



MOTHER AND GIRL 

HANG BY FINGERS, 

FLAMES CONQUER. 






Ti'ichaf'! 



kidnap tlit- 

(11 the boy's 

r.ar tlu-y 

to FuUf. i 

; 1,1, iM.\ risid bf"-!! 

■ I nol l>e returneil t<> 

tit' iiiuthtr <h'pi'''*f 'f'l 

]nCf designated in Uif 



ii..rrii»-i leii 't • 



'headless trunk of 
1 man who vanished 

ON EASTER FOUND 



!Iaf;f'--V,nr;r. Mis^,. Ai-ril 22.— Tlie 
>.f a miin. fuund in a 
. ti .. Urniif T-ivf-r Mf-ar 



MOTHER GETS NOTE 
SAYING BOY HAS 

BEEN KIDNAPED. 



,t'n.sf t luviv I 
.ere, hns l'«:-« t* 
B. M 



S ha- lie, -■ 

' vvif.'. r 1- 
: ! \V<Ktdr -iff. 



;is I ■,,( t "I' J. 
:il this 

.ir rival 
ly fioin .\[«-- 

thrf' wuiiii-ii 

■ ; i, <':i.sby 

;ind u;fi', and 




SOME OF THE ODD 

THINGS HAPPENING 



Aycr's Mair vigor 



ratlins Hair 

Ayer'f Hair Vigur promptly destroys the gerntt 
llMt cau»« fallinjj hair. It "t>"'i»l'«* *•:- "j^'J: 
bulb«, restores tlieiB to healin. T he tint siop» 
failing out, «rows more rapWty. .,""'"■ 7 "" V' ".j'»k,»' A»,»,'c ll^iSf VIdnr 

We wish you to positively and distinctly understand that Ayer s Hair Vigor 
dc>^ not affect the color of the hair, even to the shghtcst degree. 



Dandruff 

Ayer's Hair Viaor just as promptly destroys the 
germs that cause dandruff. It removes every 
trace of dandruff itself, and keeps the scalp 
clean and in a healthy condition 



GEORGE LEAVENS LILLEY. 



CANADIAN TOWNS 

WAGE WAR ON NORTH 

DAKOTA RATS. 

Winnipeg. Man.. Ai.rll 22.— Tlie in- 
vasluii of rats from Xortli Dakota i." 
assuming such .seriouhs aspects that tlu- 
countil of Winnipeg is combining witli 
llie councils of rural munii ipalitics to 
take .siteps to wage war on llie rodents. 
According to reports received here, 
upwards of 100 are being killed daily 
in several of the town.s in Southern 
Manitoba, and it is feared the wheat 
crop will suffer seriously unless iiri- 
mediate steps are taken to repel the 
Invasion. 

ECONOMICAL MAN 

PUTS CIGAR BUTT IN 

POCKET; FIRE. 

Clilcago. April 22. — A man of saving 
disposition, who placed a cigar butt in 
his ijucket thinking he had crushed 
out the light, caused an alarm of fire 
and a consequent panic at the National 
theater. Sixty-second and Halstead 
streets. A hundred persons ran out of 
the theater and the audience was on 
the point of stampeding when the 
saving individual ran down tlie aisle 
in a panic of his own, looking like a 



moving pillar of f-nioke. Winn tlie 
firenien arrived the house was calmtu 
down. 



WIDOW ONCE RICH 

ARRESTED: SHE STOLE 
BREAD AND MILK. 




American Exchange National Bank 

OF DULUTH, MINN. 

ClPim AND SURPiyS, Si,400,000 

CHECKING ACCOUNTS INVITED. 

Savings and Time Deposits Draw 3* Interest, 




Marl f.. 1. 1, Ai Til 22. — Governor George 
Leavtn.s Lilli'v ilied last evening after 
battling Willi -lis, use for four weeks. 
Tlie governor did not regain conscious- 
ness from the coma in wliich lie had 
lain mniiy hours. 

1 were at tlie Ix-dside liis wife, 

tl:,. IIS and liic attending phy- 

sic suns. Kirebells sounded the age of 
tlie liead governor— 49— and a detach- 
ent of the ifovernor's foot guards went 
on dutv at the executive mansion. 

Tiie 'utteiidlng physicians announce 
that the immediate cause of death wa.s 
t( .\i-s«'iiua, the result of acute ne- 
pl.ritls. _ 

CASE DlSMISSKl). 

L. E. Wahlsti'om Not (iuMty of Tres- 
passing on VV idow's I'l'optTty. 

L. K. Wahlstrom. charged with tres- 
passing upon the premises of Mrs. 
Amand.-i ll-ndrkks, Fourth avenue 
west, u:is . I If missed by Judge Cutting 
in municipal court yesetrday afternoon. 
The woman brought the case against 
Wahlstrom because she claimed he had 
slendered lier because she did not re- 
turn his affections. ^ . w 

The woman said Wahlstrom had been 
bothering her for a long time with his 
attentions, and had finally made un- 
complimentary remarks about her, after 
visiting her home in a drunken condi- 
tion, and being refused admission. She 
«ai'l under cross-examination of Attor- 
ney McMahon, that he did not want to 
maryy her. and never said anything 
aboiit matrimony. „. . . . ^^ ^ 

Judge Cutting told Wahlstrom that 
If he bothered the widow any more he 
would be liable to arrest and a heavy 

fine. 

« • 

Ptoplr past middle lite usually have 
some kidney or bladder disorder that 
saps the vitality, which is naturally 
lower in old age. Foley's Kidney Rem- 
edy corrects urinary troubles, stlmu- 
lutes the kidnevs, and restores strength 
and vigor. It cures uric acid trou- 
bles bv strengthening the kidneys so 
they will strain out the uric acid that 
settles in the muscles and Joints caus- 
ing rheumatism. For sale by all drug- 
gists. 



DOWNWARD COURSE 

Fast Being Realized by 
Duluth People 



is 



A little backache at first. 

Daily Increasing till the back 
lame and weak. 

Urinary disorders quickly follow; 

Diabetes and finally Bright's disease. 

This Is the downward course of 
kidney ills. 

Don't take this course. Follow the 
advice of a Duluth citizen. 

Thomas O. Thompson, 624 W. Sec- 
ond street, Duluth, Minn., says: "I 
was in poor health for several months 
and I suffered a great deal from pains 
in the small of my back. I had often 
heard Doan's Kidney Pills recom- 
mended as a cure for such trouble and 
believing that my kidneys were dis- 
ordered, I decided to try this remedy. 
After using one box my health was 
Improved In every way and since that 
time I have no further need of a kid- 
ney remedy. As I have found that 
Doan's Kidney Pills live up to the 
claims made for them. I do not hesi- 
tate to fflve this endorsement." 

For sale by all dealers. Price 50 
cents. Foster-Mllburn Co., Buffalo. 
New York, sole agents for the United 
States. 

Remember the nam© — Doan's — And 
lake no uthyr. 



New York. April ::.— Mr.s. Anna 
Trafford. a strikingiy handsome widow, 
whose husband, a Peruvian tilver 
miner, left her $75 000 tliree yeart age. 
is held bv a Brooklyn police magis- 
trate for "trial on a charge cf stealing ■ 
bread arid milk from doorstep.'^. Her 
hearing brought out the fact that she 
had lost all but > JOO of l.ei fcrtune en j 
the race tracks, wliith she fre(juen1ed , 
dally, and hall of that {LOO was lost in I 
a bank failure. ! 

. • I 

If you have backaches and v:rinaiy 
troubles vou should t.-.ke Foley's Kid- 
nev Remedy to ttrengthen and buiid 
up' the kidnevs so th« y wi'.l act prop- 
erlv as a strious kidney trout le may 
develop. For sale by all druggists. 

STEEL TRUST 
TALKS PLANTS 

Heads of Subsidiary Com- 
panies Plan for New 
Business. 

New York, Ajirli 22 — Heads of prac- 
tically all the various subsidiary com- 
panies of the United States Steel cor- 
poration met here yesterday for one 
of the conferences that are held by 
them from time to lime. It was stated 
by E. H. Gary, chairman of the Steel 
corporation's board of directors, that 
neither the discussion of prices nor em - 
Ploves- wages has been entered int(\ 
bi that matters in connection with 
the improvements at the various plant, 
and the development of new business 
were disc ussed 

MRS. BOYLE IS 
NOW IDENTIFIED 

Counsel on Both Sides 
Say She Is Helen 



sister, and returned to Chic&i4' i' 
pare means for htr defense. 

Since then funds have come frc.rn 
Chicago regularly to Mrs. Boyle. I'ur- 
ing the latter part of tlie week a de- 
popil of J1,00( was made in Mrs. Boyle s 
ttivor here. Facts in regard to her 
allegtd visits In Kansas City. St. Louis, 
Itenver East t^t. l.ouis. Louisville. De- 
tioit. Chicago, Cleveland. St. Josepn, , 
Mo., and Brooklyn are to be made; 
public 1 V the prosecution counsel. i 

Three days ago the woman's counsel 
were suiprised to ascertain that the 
agents of the prosecution liad wormed 
from the McKermott family the life 
history of "Helen A." as she signs her 
name It was then decided to tr> If 
possible to get the woman free from 
the stern laws of I'ennsyivanla pre- 
ferring to have her sentenced under 
the more lenient Cthio laws. It was 
lor this purpose that her senior counsel 
madf the trip to Cleveland, meeting 
with failure. 

BLIND SPEAKER 
ON "HAPPINESS" 

Rev. FredAtwood Deliv- 
ers Lecture at PIrst 
Christian Church, 

Rev. Fred At wood, iJie blind grand 
prelate of the Knights cf Pythlaa of 
Minnesota delivered his lecture on 
"Happiness,' at the First Christian 
church, Fourth street and Fifth avenue 
west, last evening. Until aboiit two 
years ago when he lost his sight, Mr. 
Atwood has been connected with vari- 
ous churches in Minnesota. Since tliat 
time he has given up active churcli 
work for the lecture platform. He is 
an able and convincing talker, and his 
discoui.«-e last night was listened to by 
a well-filled house. Mr. Atwood will 



I lecture in Two Harbors tonight and 

' will return to Duluth later in the sea- 

wlien he wjil lecture before th* 



son. 



^^5 

North" Star Todge of the Knights of 
Pytliia-, 01, the subject of "Pythlan- 



)sm. 



STEALTHY SLAYER 
USES DYNAMITE 

Opens Window, Placing. 

Stick on Bed of 

Victim. 

Chattanooga, Tenn., April 22.— Ri^ 
dolph Buol, aged 65, was murdered 
while asleep. 

The murderer opened Buol's bedroom 
window and placed a stick of dynamite- 
in his bed, exploding It with a fuse. 
Duol wae killed instantly. 

His wife, who was asleep at his side, 
escaped without the slightest injury. 

No motive is assigned for the crime. 

STONE (OMIM ES \MTH 

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS. 

New York, April 22. — Following the 
annual meeting of the Associated 
Press, the board of directors organ- 
ized b- the election of the following 
officers: ^, , 

President, x rank B. Noyes. Chicago 
Record-Herald: first vice president, J. 
C. Hemphill, Charleston. .S. C NewS' 
and Courier; second vice president, 
John H. Fahey. Boston Traveler: secre- 
tary and general manager. Melville B. 
Stone; assistant secretary and assist- 
ant general manager. Charles S. Diehl, 
and J. R. Youatt of New York, treas- 
urer. 



M 




McDermott. 



Making Fud( 
id Talty— get 




Mercer, Pa.. April 22.— Mrs. Boyle, 
alleged wife of James P. Boyle, abduc- 
tor of Willie TVhitla. is a mystery no 
longer. Absolute information is at 
band that she is Helen McDermott of 
Chicpgo. Attorneys on both sides con- 
firm the identification. Attorney 
Stranahan. the woman's attorney says 
Mrs. Boyle's brother has visited her 
oac© ana Had a iocg talk wltb Us 



A pure, fine-flavored synip that 
makes the finest kind of candy. 

In lOc 25c, and SOc tins at all orocc" 

A book of cooking and 
candy-making recipes 
seni free on rtquest. 

CORN PRODUCTS REHNING CO., 
New York 




liM fcii»i.a» 



mmm Hi M,M 



.:-^ 




^mm 



^! 













1 


1 













THE DULUTH EVENING HERAI-D: THURSDAY, APRIL 22. 1905 



11 





OF lUE OM 



ELECTRICS TAKE 
TWO OUT OF THREE 

Crimp Is Put in Big Du- 

iutti's Championship 

Aspirations. 



m^conti w^«k in May (or the worlil'a 

wi.--''i II? . hanipionsjhip and a |3,&00 

P 

i: will Ue under the dlrec- 

(iiiM .>i .iu«-k t'lirley .it <'hiMi:; J. 



15. .th men are tryinsr to strt'iigtlicn 
Ihfir teams, and they have lines out 
li>r a number of fast men 



T 
took 

HI . 



' t' ! ! n tT 



II I »i:M 



IMk MnitililM. 






\ 


^■■■■arn 
' the 
it-ral 


V-itt. 
Hro-. 

Mt„ 1 

r'hii. 


high 




iver- 





^POI^TING 



g^ini 



to register. 



are waiting 
', Minor Heir, 
lo under tlie 
t)acer is now 
le great and 
jTSavage now 
_^acers in the 
idded to his 
FSavage farm 



<;«'ii<*ri«l i!i.'f»rli-«». 



11 1 

and i'a.s- 
..-3 — O'Uay 



NEW DATE SET 
JOR FIGHT 

Gunther and Whitehead 

Will Scrap Before a 

Michigan Club. 







will 

;'nlng 

ut 



BALL SEASON 
OPENS IN BOSTON 

Philadelphia Drops the 

Opening Game By a 

6 to 2 Score. 



(By Bruce.* 

Lets all get together 
and boost for the White 
.s-ox thi.s yeir. Once 
there was a guy who 
liad onlv been married 
two weeks. He hltclied 
to a nice little woman 
at that. Along In the- 
se con d matrimonial 
week they had pie for dinner. Thi.s 
gink called his wife: told the pie was 
punk. Tliat man wa.s a pe.ssimi.st. That s 
not the kind of people that make good 
rooters We want optimists. Iiere in 
liuluth. and we waul good booster^ for 
the team. 

The Duluth management has .«spent 
iZ'uxl tuMtu-v on the team tliat will be 
way Dulcith wards in a few 
have, and are. making a 
i aincei "Vur to give Duluth a pen- 
nant T!ie team looks pretty 
good frojii thi.s long distance vii-w an<l 
it i.s up to the fans to begin boosting. 
We wain >i '-t'Mid lot of boosters this 
-•**>aso!i .n.l u.' ought to begin to cul- 
vate tiic spirit at the pre.sent time, 
iniluth won't always be In Class C 
-■■ The town is going ahead in 
■>i: it will have to advance in 
,. ;.all line. If Duluth gets the 
It ion of being a good baseball 
, th»r.> is nothinj? that can even- 
tually kt.-!' il Ifoin a bigger league. 
The town I- i:i uood territory, and once 
Duluth K leputailon of being a 
gn.1.1 bai: the eyes of franchise- 
s.ek.-r» will be ui»on the Zenith City. 
It is up to tlie fans of this town to 
iii.ik.- It t\ good biiseball piDpusilion. 
* • • 

Neighbor 



Fr.itilc fl.ilrh is s«T'king 



hortif 
wresi 
Haul 

( 
a 

lii 

Hi 

atii if 

Si-i>t 

[irobalile 



-iiir '-^ 111- IS (ii.wn iii"Io\vay" 

to show the admiring 

.1 I lie ability that made 

i Vussif .Malimout look like 

in ;i Sapho act. The other 

' . .ich took poor old 

camp, pinning the 

blades of the litlln 

t ill shtirt time It is 

that I'rank will " Hum- 



bolr 



A! 



lowa. Ills native liurj; 
• • "" will l.t 



sliort 
cele- 



W 1: 1 1 

If 

h 



• n 



and 

out 

I 
1. 



THROW FIVE MEN 
IN HALF AN HOUR 

That's What Leopold 
McLaghen Might Do 
With Local Wrestlers. 




the 
V — ■ 

I': 

a- 
li 



Staiidin§ of the (lubs. 

\V .11 IjOift, 

1 



i'»*» 



4 
3 



T..).-«t.», :!: l..iiilHvl1lP 1. 



Pet. 

.711 
M>i 

.:j:53 
.166 
.000 



! the 

rda>' 



ii 1 



I . tut •■•■ 

inaii. .V 

'■■r I'ive 
[lans 

IT. E. 
i t 



ot>^li liits Hiunboldt 

I grandiuothcis. the 

of the second K'Mi- 

le ill rants in arms. 

. ; . ■. to pay homage to 

V who has brougiit more 

V X ilian anything, with the 
■ption of the high price of 
■, n tt;.it way. Some of the 

that ex -Governor 

> ig a good ileal of 

AH ai VVasliiiiKton. or that the 

1 has cr^'at.'d some disciussion ; 

' : iiiiir In that 

.>f tlM- fact 

1 aiiK A. uo' i> u,.- iliampion 

L;!-aiii.l.-r of the world, .Mo--- power to 

\ ou. I* rank. 

Thi.s reunion of <:.ii.l. ami .mrient 
»' ■' — ' .-alls ii!> r.'jiiiiiisi t'lices. 
iitv tournament, or pic- 
; . ... , 11. :■ i.t" tlial sort, that 
,,1- lioy I": tiii (.•.■••ived his 

t i-iiiiiuir.g. 'an who put the 

iiplon in l>ed for tw) wcfks 
than the passe Mcl.eod. 
li .!ik h.iii "thrun" all the farmer lioys. 
hy iit-k at -1 was gettin' mighty chesty. 
H ' there was no one that 

! It. Then the lads that 

au.j.vc.1 as how tliat C.otch fellow was 
stuck up. imported MiLeod under an 
Jll-Hinelllng nam?. 

They met on the cinders of tlit* road, 
and !"r:v '- i-s lils big brothers ne- 
glect.! ti work for two weeks 
so that I. . r .. <uld be able to pick the 
cindeij, from the broad back of the 
future cliampion. Now Frank returns 
to ills native state and tosses poor old 
Daiin\ Mel 1 two fall.^ in about 

' \'rri I \ I : ;i' \v >rl.| 

P- ' • • 

V • • 

.\rid. hv III*' \\.i\ Viis:~if .Malimout 
i not sigh for lack of occupation. 
. >«• Voun<? Tuik ginks are raising 
a lot of liub hub ovr in tiie vicinity 
of the royal harem. Malimout can join 
the Young Turk party and make a 
prelly portable person for the cause. 
II 1 n't supposed that Yussif knows 



that the Giants are 
Hope not, tliough. 

• • • 
Northwestern horsemen 
with Interest to see «lw 
the wonderful pacer, will 
handling of Hersey. ' 
the stable companion 
only I>an Patch. M. 
own.s two of the grea 
world. Dan Patch h 

speed since coming to ... — .^ r,- 

at Minneapolis, and under the handling 
of Henry, who first drove the big slde- 
wheeler and Hersey the present driver, 
lias established a pacing record that It 
may take vears to reduce. Will Minor 
Heir show like improvement? Savage 
lias phenomenal luck. Maybe Minor 
Heir will develop like the Patch pacer. 
Horsemen in this neck of the woods 
will watch the campaigning of the 
Hersey horse with interest. 

MUCH BASEBALL 
FOR NEW YORK 

Weather Man Predicts 

Rain for the Big Town, 

However. 

New York, April 22. — Rain is predict- 
ed for today, but if the sun siiines base- 
ball fans of New York and vicinity will 
have plenty of opportunity to show 
their allegiance to the national game. 
Two openings are on the scnedule--the 
Kasttrn league In Jersey City, and the 
postponed lirst home game of tlie New 
Vork Americans against the Washing- 
ton clu'., vhich was to have been 
plaved at American league park yester- 
day, but was called oft on account of 
,-ain — also, Brooklyn's lirst home game 
^ith the New York Nationals. 

The Ka.stern league opens the season 
tod.iv with games as follows: 

Huffalo at Jersey City. Toronto at 
Newark. Kochcster at P.altimore, and 
.Montreal at Providence. 

President Ebbetts ot .Brooklyn has 
nmde elaborate prei)aration.s for tiie 
opening of tlie season across the east 
rivtr with llie Giants. 
»' 

Ea.sy for Farmer l^uiis. 

Sioux Cltv. Iowa. April L'::.— Farmer 
Burns, champion lightweight wrestler, 
defeated Carl Von Delivuk. Austrian 
<hampion. here last night two straight 
falls. The first fall was taken in 
tweniv-ftve minutes and twelve sec- 
.inds 'and the second tn twenty -.six 
minutes. 



Franklin Automobiles 

Satisfaction in Automobiling 
is a Matter of Comfort 

In the Franklin automobile with its full-elliptic springs and 
laminated-wood chassis frame— large wheels and large tires, the 
road shocks are absorbed and neutralized. The passengers are 
not jarred and jolted. The automobile is not racked and 
strained. It rides easily on all kinds of roads. You get com- 
fort and satisfaction. 

Franklin Mod»l D. With iti light-weight and ea«y-riding construction 
Model D, $2800, 28 horse-power, five-pagscnger touring-car is aptly termed 
the ideal automobile for family use. Weighing as it does a third less than the 

average water 






i 



cooled automo- 
bile of similar 
ability, it gives 
tninimum tire 
and operating 
expense. 

Model D now 
in its fifth year is 
an automobile 
you can afford to 
own and to use 

every day. It is not heavy and cumbersome. Its handsome body, 36-mch 
wheels and the ease and grace with which it handles place it in a class by itself. 

RUSSELL MOTOR COMPANY.p^ 

310-312 East Superior Street, DULUTH, Minn. 




SUM.M(3N^^ IN APPLICVTION Pi>Il 
UEGISTU.VTION OF LAND— 

.State of Minnesota. County of St. Louis 
— .ss. 

District Court, Eleventh Judicial Dis- 
trict. 

In tim matter of the application 
of Arihui \V. King lo register 
the title to the toliowing de- 
scribed real estate situated in 
St. Louis County, Minnesota, 
namely: Lot thirteen (13) 
and East twelve and one-half 
feet lE 12Vi8 feet) of Lot 
fourteen (14). Block one (I), 
Harrison's DIvi.sion of Du- 
luth. according to the record- 
ed plat thereof on file and of 
record in the office of the 
R'-gister of Deed-s In and for 
said County, 

Applicant, 

V3. 

City of Duluth. Jonathan Rees 
and all other persons or par- 
lies unknown, claiming any 
right, title, estate, lien or in- 
terest in the real estate de- 
scrihed m the application 
heroin. 

Defendants. 
The .'State of Minnesota to the above- 
nameil defendants: 

You are hereby summoned and re- 
rjuired to answer the application of the 
applicant in the above entitled proceed- 
ing, and to rtle your answer to said 
application in the office of the Clerk 
of said court, in said county, within 
twenty (JO) days after the service ot 
tliis .summons upon you. exclusive of 
the day of such servic;e, and If you fall 
to an.swer the said application within 
the time aforesaid, the applicant la 
this proceeding will apply to the court 
for the relief demanded therein. 

Witness. J. P. Johnson, clerk of said 
court, and the seal thereof, at Duluth, 
in said county, this lith day of .\prll, 
A. D. 1909. 

J. P. JOHN.SON. 

Clerk, 
By V. A. D-\SH. 

D'-puty. 
(.Seal of District Court, St. Louis Co., 

Minn. 
E. 1*. TOWNE. 

Attorney for .\pplicant. 

5(30-503 Toirey Building. 

Duluth, Minn. 
Duluth Evening Herald — April 13-22-29. 
1909. 



League .Meeting. 



in' 



ml t^ y 



' I il, f li 



K 1 1 1 1 ■> t« •« ' ' I > 



(itiii (luh Mf**!' 

"Rast (>rand '■" ';"'■' 



II; •>!. I'nul. r.l- 

April --•■ — ' 



-out constitutional government; 

'-•n't shaped for legal lore. 

iin one of those two-handed 

! 1 .. vh,.nii,l Iw.' able to U-ad 
upon tl.i^ .sultan p.r- 



i- a>k.-(i Tl.e H.-rald 

nt to give an opinion 

lu" of the National 

liartl to do, don't 

like New York 

. ninig vour ticket any- 

If ftlilv .Murray's Pliila 



lie 

■ 1 



I' 



i 






■{..•■Alil> :U J'JUf li. 



Fizht U ;i l>t'a»t. 



Inillnnnpwilt. 11: CwlMmbu*. 4. 

. . ., ■ . . ! ■ ' \ ■,■■!• ■■•■■ -■-'^iilurn- 

•eiith 
hoin-- 



waa relii 
n 1 J s !v ; 1 1 



li 

C 



I'-her shows the form 
1 last year. "Philly" 

-1 - all the way. 
• oked, but the 

, , , i , . .. , , , xjM , led to cop the 

Looking ;it the fight from all angles. 

anvious Inquir- i . n looks as If New 

York miglit aiiM.\\ tlie bunting. If 

Kllng and Evers don't come back. Chi- 

r.iuM u ill be fighting under an awful 

p. But even if they do. New 

IS a wonderful team. The West 

' man wants to see the Cubs bag 

fourth rag. But it looks as if it 

v.a.s \viitt<»!i on the board some place 



i.'. iixini' 



{ 




I'.ir-sor 

I Kokr:. 

_» 



■ '.v - 



EVERS WILL 

REJOIN CUBS 

Great Second Baseman 

Will Play Ball Again 

This Year. 



THE VASTNESS OF NEW YORK 

A City With More Inhabitants Than 
Many of the States 

HOTEL LIFE AND THE ST. REGIS 



-.loimny Evers. 
.,,s.....inan of the Chi- 
will join that club 



t.-,-: 

he nugiiL i; 

pr^'sei! t f4e« • 



arigt- in !ii-- 



■ 4 to a ■ 

• y Mtina^ 

; Uie Wllit.'i 

(1 to take a 

would 

■. and ' 

■i . V :.t all - 

!"■; ■■ failure 
: * -'■t anil 



I m re- 

mk L. 

i;v<;rs de- 

ionii rr.'it 

■ in the 

i.>sibly 

nuing the 

of the 

tlie re- 



plans. 



team matfs. 
, ,\cr--i to make 



liWtKSl I JM. h f.L <^««»« *•«'«*«*«*«»• ^ *'"™* *^ 



T()0('0LI)T0PL.4V B.\LL. 

The White Sox Players Have a Day 
of Rest. 

S.'iifi Ben.1, -lud.. Apri! "-■-■ — The 
weather was to> l '!.l to p-M-riiit base- 
ball playing ye.slerday, and both the 
South Bend team and the Duluth Dlay- 
i;rs,. lay otl. 

>' . Kuelmow of the Duluth 

nt th(* dav working. In connec- 
ts .will thtt Soutb Bend ui«uag«r. 



New York City Is th.^ metropolis of 
tho W'.-.st' rn World. Within its re- 
.stricted li i resides a population ex- 
..>-.-linK by nearly a million and a 
Mu;u t.r the total population of the en- 
lire state of Texas. 

The deii.senes.'i of New York's popu- 
lation, the volume and extended char- 
acter of its business transactions, and 
th«' magnitude of Its amu.sement enter- 
prKses and society functions. have 
mad«- hotel life here a nece.ssity. With 
the greater city ha.s grown up a new 
race of public houses. The modern 
hotels of New York surpass the world 
in tli.ir size, their elegance of appojnt- 
nienl, and the character of their .serv- 
ice. They supply every want, they 
even anticipate one's wishes. There 
i.«i one hotel in New York, with every 
feature of its construction, its furnish- 
ing, its e'lulpnient. its management, its 
cuisine and Its service equal to the 
most famous hotels of the world, 
which has succeeded in incorporating 
iinl retaining the "ht»me atmosphere" 
ill it.s regime. This hotel is the St. 
Regis, situated on Fifth Avenue at 
Fifty-fifth street. With all its luxury 
and hom.- refinements, it is by no 
means the highest priced. .Splendid 
single rooms are obtainable for $3 and 
J4 A day; the same with private bath 
for $5 a day (or $6 for two people); 
while for a parlor, bedroom and pri- 
vate bath the rates are from $12 a 
day upward. The restaurant charges 
are no higher than those of other first- 
class huLeiii. 



V meeting of the Duluth Amateur 
baseball league will be held tonight 
at tlie store of the Northern Hardware 
company. 

Fi;;ht Conditions. 

C«)luinl.us. Ohio. April -22. — Mayor 
Bond last night stipulated the condi- 
ti..ns under which he will permit the 
Abe Attell-Biz Mackey tight, which is 
scheduled for Monday. He .says it must 
be a sparring exhibition, without a 
knockout and of not more than ten 
rounds. If th.' fight is given the mayor 
will have police on hand to stop it un- 
less his conditions are complied with. 
• 

\\ hispers of a Bi^ Trade. 

Cleveland. Ohio. April 22.— It Is snld 
here that the owners of the Cleveland 
baseball club have ofTered to trade 
Pitchers Falkenberg, Berger and Lieb- 
hardt to the Chicago American league 
for Kd Walsh, th e spitball a rtist. 

PREVENTION OF 
TUBERCULOSIS 

Fifth Annual Session of 

National Association 

Is Announced. 

New York, .\pril 22. — Announcement 
of the fifth annual meeting of the 
National association for the study and 
prevention of tuberculosis was made 
today. The convention will be held in 
Washington, D. C. at the Ne%v Willard 
hotel, on May 13, 14 and 15. Owing to 
the present Interest In the campaign 
against tuberculosis, the meeting will 
be of unusual Interest and Importance. 
The various sections of the conven- 
tion will meet simultaneously. On Fri- 
day evening. May 14, a large public 
meeting will be held, which meeting 
will be of unusual interest and impor- 
tance. 

The membership of the National as- 
sociation now numbers nearly 2,000. 
and is distributed In almost every state 
In the United States. The National as- 
sociation has also a considerable mem- 
bership in Canada, Cuba, Porto liico 
Philippine Islands, and in several of 
the European countries. 

The reports of the year's work of the 
National association will be presented 
at this meeting showing a large 
amount of work accomplished by the 
organization. The most significant 
piece of work which the association 
has carried to completion during the 
past yrar was the meeting of the In- 
ternational congress on tuberculosis at 
Washington, D. C, where nearly 7.000 
delegates from thirty-three different 
countries were assembled. In prepara- 
tion for this meeting, the National asso- 
ciation issued a special directory of all 
of the tuberculosis associations and in- 
stitutions In the United States and 
Canada. .Another feature of the years 
work of the National association has 
been Its traveling exhiblt.s. "Three of 
tJiese exhibits are now conducted by 
the National association. One Is at the 
present time In Georgia, another in 
Kansas, and a third in Porto Rico. As 
a result of the efforts of these three 
exhibits, the state legislatures of Kan- 
sas, Tennessee, Porto Rico, and Ne- 
braska, have passed laws and appro- 
priated nearly $150,000 for the relief 
and prevention of tuberculosis. A large 
number of local associations have been 
formed in the various cities where the 
exhibits of the National association 
have been shown. 

Under the stimulus of the work of 
the National association, the number 
of state and local anti-tuberculosis so- 
cieties In the United States have shown 
over 100 per cent increase during the 
past vear; the number of sanatoria and 
hospitals for tuberculosis, nearly 30 
per cent Increase; and the number of 
special tuberculosis dispensaries and 
clinics, over 40 per cent -increase. The 
rate of Increase In the number of 
workers is estimated as over 200 per 
cent and the amounts given for tuber- 
culosis relief have been doubled during 

the year. , . , . » # 

Thirtv-three legislatures, out of 
thirtv-nlne in session up to May 1, 
1»09," have been considering laws per- 
taining to the prevention or treatment 
of tuberculosis, in a large number of 
states legislation affecting this subject 
has already been enacted and more 
laws will be passed before the close of 
the spring session. 

The National association reports that 
this past year has been more success- 
ful in the amount of Interest shown In 
the anti-tuberculosis campaign, and In 
the number of institutions and associa- 
tions established than the entire period 
previous to May 1, 190S. 




■ 



JUm 






I" 



WE !Be EVERYTHING 

FIRE PROOF WAREHOUSE. 



Office 210 West Superior St. 



Botli 'Pliones 402. 



.ST\TI-: OF MINNESOTA, COUNTY Ol 

ST. LOU I.S — SS. 
District court. Eleventh Judicial Dis- 
trict. .^ 
E P. Alexander. PlamtitT. 

vs. 
L. B. Arnold. C. M. Hill Lum- 
ber Company, a corpotation, 
and Duluth & Iron Range 
R.iilroad Company, a corpor- 
ation, and also all per- 
.-■ons or parties unknown 
claiming any right, title, es- 
tate, lien or intere.st in the 
real estate described In the 
complaint lierein, 

Defendants. 
The State of Minnesota, to the above 
named defendants: 

You are hereby summoned and re- 
ouir.'d to answer tiie >;omplaint »{ th« 
plaintiff In the above entitled action, 
which complaint has been filed in the 
oftice of the Clerk of slid District 
Court at the city of Duluth. County 
of St Louis and Stale of Minnesota, 
and to serve a copy of your answer 
to said complaint on the subscriber, 
at his office, in the city of Duluth. In 
the said county of St. Louis, within 
twenty CiO) days after the S'-rvioe of 
this summons upon you. exclusive of 
the day of such service; and If you latl 
to answer the said complaint within 
llie time aforesaid, tlin piaintini -.vill 
apply to the court for the relief de- 
mand-'d therein. 

Dated March 12. 1903. 

J. A. .SINCLAIR, 
Attorney for Plaintiff. 
703 Lonsdale Bldg . Duluth. Minn. 



"THE BESTIS, AYE, THE CHEAPEST." 
AVOID IMITATIONS OF AND SUB- 
STITUTES FOR 

SAPOLIO 



DIa- 



WHOLESALE 

JOBBERS AND 
MANUrACTURERS 

OF DULUTH. MINNESOTA. 
Reliable and Up-to-Date Concerns Who Do a Strictly 
Jobbing and Manufac turing Business. 



NOTICE LISPENDENS. 

State of Minnesota, County of St. 
Louis. — S3. . , .. , 

District Court, Eleventh Judicial 
triut. 

E. P. Alexander, 

Plilntlff, 
vs. 

L. B. Arnold, C. M. Hill Lumber 
Company, a corporation, and 
Duluih A. lion Raiig^ Rail- 
road Company, a coiporation, 
and also all persons or 
parties unknov/n, claiming 
any right, title, estate, lien or 
interest in the real estate de- 
scribed in the complaint 

herein, _ ^ 

Defendants. 

Notice Is hereby given, that an action 
has been commenced in this court bjr 
the above named plaintilY against th« 
above named defendants, the o!>iect of 
which Is to obialn a Judgment that 
said plaintiff Is. the owner in fee of 
the following described real property, 
•tnd that said defendants and each of 
i hem have no estate or intertst therein 
or lien thereon: The Northwest quar- 
ter of the Northwest quarter (NWVi 
of NWVi) of Section Twenty-one (21). 
Township Fifty-nine (S!>) North of 
Range Kourteen (14 » ^ est of the 4th 
P M .St Louis Count", ilinnesota. 

•l^aied March 12, 1/09^.^^^^^^^^ 

Attorney for Plaintiff, 
709 Lonsdale Bldg., Duluth. Minn. 
Duluth I'^vening Herald— March 1S-2B, 
April l-S-15-2:, 19'J9^ 



ASBESTOS. 
A. H. Kricger Co. 



BAKERS AND ICE CREAM 
MANUFACTURERS. 

Crescent Bakery. 



GLASS. PAINTS AND BUILD- 
ING MATERIALS. 

Paine &L Nixon Co. 



BLAST FURNACE. 
Zenith Furnace Co. 



BREWERS. 

Duluth Brewing & Malting Ca 
Fitger Brewing Co. 

BUTTER AND ICE CREAM 
MANUFACTURERS. 

Bridgeman-Russcll Co. 



GROCERS. 

Gowan-Peyton-Twohy Co. 

Stone-Ordean-VVclls Co. 

Wright-Clarkson Mercantile Co. 



HARDWARE. 

Kelley-How-Thomson Co. 
Marshall-Wells Hdw. Co. 



CEMENT AND PLASTER- 

D. G. Cutler Co. 



COMMISSION AND PRODUCE. 

Fitzsimraons-Palmer Co. 

Knudsen Fruit Company. 

Thomas Thompson Co. 



CONFECTIONERY. 

Duluth Candy Co. 

National Candy Co. 

(Duluth Factory.) 

CORNICE MANUFACTURERS. 
Duluth Corrugating & Roofing Ca 

DRUGS. 

L. W. Leithhead Drug Ca 

DRY GOODS. 

F. A. Patrick & Co. 



LUMBER. SASH & DOOR MAN- 
UFACTURERS. 

Scott-Graff Lumber Co. 
Woodruff Lumber Co. 



MEN'S FURNISHINGS AND 
MAN'F'RS CLOTHING. 

Christensen-Mendenhall- 
Graham Co. 



PAPER. 

Bemis Bag & Paper Co. 

Duluth Paper & Stationery Ca 

McClellan Paper Co. 

Peyton Paper Co. 



FOUNDERS and MACHINISTS. 
Clyde Iron Works. 
National Iron Ca 



PICTURE FRAMES & MOULD- 

ING. 

Decker Manufacturing Co. 



PLUMBING SUPPLIES. 

Crane & Ordway Co. 



FURNITURE, 
DeWitt-Seitz Company. 



SADDLERY. LEATHER AND 
FINDINGS. 

Schulze Brothers Co. 



MOUT<iAGE FUllECLOSURE SALK— 

Default having been made in the 
navment of the sum of Three Hun- 
llfT eighty-fiv. and S^l-DO .$3S5 36) 
Dollars which is claimed to be due ana 
id due at the date of this notice upon 
,1 c.rtaln M.irtgag^. duly executed and 
.lelivered by John Anderson, mort- 
easror to Mary J Williams .Mortgagee, 
b.-aring dale the ISth day of August. 
1S9V and with a power of sale therein 
contained, duly recorded in the office 
of the Register of Deeds m and f'^i' the 
Crtuniv of St. Loui.s, and .>5tate of Min- 
nes."ta, on the iSrd day of August. 1892. 
at 4 o'clock P. .VI.. in UooW al of Mort- 
gages, on page IH- 

Which said Mortgage, together with 
tlie debt secured thereby, was duly as- 
signed by said .Mary J. Williams. Mort- 
Iragec. lo Chas. P. Craig, by written 
Issignment dated the 29ih day of Au- 
gust 1S92 and recorded in the ofnce 
of said Register of Deeds, on the IStli 
day of (October. 1S92. at S o clock A. M 
in Book 97 of .Mortgage.s, on page 3«4. 
and no action or proceeding having 
been ln.-:titute<l at law or otherwise, 
to" recover tiie debt secured by said 
Mortgage or any part thereof. 

Now, Therefore. Notice is Hf^reby 
« liven That by virtue of the power 
of sab' contained in said Mortgage, and 
pursuant to the statute in such ca.sa 
made and provided, the sa-d Mortgage 
wil' b-^ foreclosed by a sale of the 
nremi-ses described in and conveyed 
bv .said Mortgage, viz.: Lot Eight (8) 
.)f Block Forty-three (43), Kimberley 
Sc Stryker's Addition to Duluth. In 
St Louis County and State of Minne- 
sota, with the hereditaments and ap- 
purtenances; which sale will be made 
l.y the Sheriff of said St Louis County 
at the front door of the (Jourthouse. 
in the City of Duluth. in said County 
and .State, on the 14th day of May. 
19H9 at 10 o'clock A. M.. of that day. 
at public vendue, to the higl.est bidaer 
for cash, to pay said debt of Three 
Hundred Eighty-flve and 3<i-100 Dol- 
l.ars and Interest, and the taxes. If 
any, on said prtjtnises, and Twenty-nve 
Dollars Attorney's fees a.s stipulated 
in and by said Mortgage, in case of 
foreclosure and the disbur.senients al- 
lowed by law; subject to redeniption 
at any time within one year from the 
day of sale, as provided by law. 
Dated March 31st. A. D. 19u9. 

CHAS P ''RAia. 
Assignee of MortgageeL 
W. H. PRYOR. 

Attorney. 
Dul'ith Evening Herald, April 1, 8 15, 
22 29. Mav 6. 



SHOE MANUFACTURERS. 
Northern Shoe Co. 






For space under this heading apply to F. H. Green. Secretary Jobbers 
and Manufacturers* Association, Duluth. Minn. 



CHICHESTER'S PILLS 

■'"^^■*- l,mdioat A.mk J»ar t>rummt*H'^ /j\ 
Cbl-ckea-ter** Ulomoad Br«B4/A\ 
IMIU la lied tad 4««ld ncalllcX^^ 
boiM. M«lcd with BlLiS Klbbon. ^^ 
Tak« ao otkar. Bar «f roar ^ . 
Urmniat. A<k for Cliri.Cin:S.TEMl 
DlIuiIND KRAND PILLR. for Ml 
y etrt known as Base. S*rett. Always RelUbl* 

SOLDBYDftluQiSrSEVERmiHEfiE 





who ^rant to 'OJ"!*"' •^"J* 
buy a box <>f KXRVI BEAKS. 
Tboy rella»« n>!r»oa« nijcnna ana; 
weaknesw's . r«»t«>re gtreugth anAj 



fltlW* tEHy" m, mo«t "ondorful TttalLlng rem^, 
fSr Tou^ and old. -irj a box -"d nota tba •»««.• I a*. 
B07C« Diug Co.. see Suportor SUjOuluUi, Mlna. 1 



i 





'' 



■•I Ml 




■la^u. 




1 


1 


f 


! 

1 


1 






I ,,_! 






J 





THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: THURSDAY, APRIL 22, 19094 




Yhe bio 

CLASS 5L0CK 

'3TOKL 




■VOUAUTYIS' 
PAiWIOUNT 




SPEaAL SALE ON 

MADAM 

YALE'S 

PREPARATIONS 

MADAM YALE'S 
SKIN FOOD FREE 
ALL THIS WEEK 



HUMAN SHIPWRECKS FIND 
LODGING ON FLOOR OF JML 



12ISING 




of Mttie Vti;'''; 

W» tre , >«::*■■.! 
<ie.m»r.j for ibf . 
Wt bear Ux'U <■• 
natw tuudiMl • 



TU, «aul.ltc lolI«t t«MU« It worih l« ".UM In gold to 

.r.,!r ,UJ. «1U> youthful plumpMi.. Tb« f.mo ^' "«»': \»'* • 

might .M m melt fiTtir couW not Kid *ni lu»Ur '"."^f,*' «'",": 

llTt irecf tJiM tli<-y aro »U tiuit U cUtoed fur «>«« 
::! Bcming fill "l»ht- In .U o# ou, «»«rt«c. •# U.». 

^„. u'n«.«ii.» .t ^di-l^.^aUl pepuUf U M»«- V.l«'i. 



MME. YALE'S 

HAIR TONIC 



MMW.. TAT.F 

(Ml* of 

IB tht 
fl.Ot p*r ;- 



'. H MR T'tMC 

itaot* nt'liO' use H. M>il 
. ,.„:d. Prl€« J5c. SOc «nd 

.r [iitcf- 



23? 43^ 89? 

MME. YALES 

HEALTH 
REMEDIES 



MME. YALE'S 

Beautifying Remedies 

MMK. VAI.F,-8 SKIN FOOD ''>' """^'•'^"•/t; 
iUn Mid obUter«Un« wrtuklm. Two ,Um. »1 SU 
I9.U0 our prtc« — 

$1.39 ?2.69 

MMF. YAI.KH AI.MOVU BLO.«*S0M COM 
PI.KXIO.N CRf;AM for de«nli-i. bealln*. •n 

hancliig uriJ pr«erilr;f wainy. doUUbi llkB U. 
PiKt sue and ll.CO. our i.rto»— 

43< 89^ 

MME. T.*Ur8 COMPLKXION BLEACH for 
cleanitn* lh# ikln of W«aiUh««, Price |S. 93, our 




And many other painful and 
distressing ailments from 
which most mothers suffer, 
can be avoided by using 
Mother's Friend. This rem- 
edy is a God-send to expect- 
ant mothers, carrying them 
through the critical ordeal with safety. No woman who uses 
Mother's Friend need fear the suffering incident to birth; for it robs 
the ordeal of its dread and insures safety to life of mother and child, 
leaving her in a condition 
more favorable to speedy re- 
covery. The child is also 
healthy, strong and good 

_„^,,_pH ^"^1 book contaiDing ▼alua- 
naiureu. t,jg information will be sent 

free by writing to 

BRADFIELD REGULATOR CO. 

AtianU. Ga. 




r- 



f^m^t^ 



t%IEND 



A 



-^ i 



\ 



X 



H 



tiftrf 



$1.69 



IfltC ^ a! ;■' V 

tenlc fur wftor- 
■tatiU. Tl'ie m- 
to ttl gnmi Bcr: 



»ur» 



89<* 



UMT.. V ■ 

H#»vilar t'rt« 93c tatd |1 '."' our pfi< 



43<^ 



89< 



UXM. TAU:-8 COMI'l-KXlUN TADLKTS make 
now rich Ul'XKi. Th*f wiflch the »Uii with 
hWllij wlorlBf, Tw© ilxs. 5«c and ll.uo, our 

pfk*-- 

43< 89< 



MM>-. 



V.Ujfc'U i'lLOOr* TO .Ml" cle»iit«» th» 
:1 and UiJiicyi. Hefulat prlea 11.00. 



98^ 



\LE*3 ELIXIR or BKAt'TT for pro 
~kln from •unliurn »ml tJie inclemriifj 

ui .ii- .,«^.,arr--lt miik«» Uve tkia n;UuraUy w!ilt«, 
tttit tl»« cimiplealoB btllllancj. Prlca 11 00, our 

ptka — 



89^ 



MME. YAl.r8 Bt.CSH OV YOITTH for toflm- 
Ing th» e«i>K««l»n— It tomw tfi* f»cl»l nentt, 
flv« pUaiHj to the muM-lea ind claiUdty to the 
•kin Prk-a 13.00. our prlco - 



■nlj 



$2.69 



MME TALKS DANP WHITESER. Price 
ll.W). our i/rlca— 

89< 

MME TALE'S MAGIC.U- fi-rRET FOH 
SOFTEN1.no UABD water U U 1* of trte 
tr«-al««t known toilet luiurlra, i!ellr«'.»ly fr*- 
ITsiit ai a tioufluat ol choice flowtia. ITlca Jl.ii), 

aw i»r»c»— 



MMK. 
•Mtlon 


TAWS DI 
aiMt can tii'.: .- 


.■ TABLrm aW dl- 
^0c uid H.OO. our 


Bll,!*- 


43€^ 


89^ 


M*t I 

f 


',■ 'ih ■- ■*, .■■■■■■ ' '1 


^ ::pt1C U a moat valuable 
".lit b« uaed 10 be ap' 
i the mouth and gams 

li III* Uiroat for ior» 
bruiiM. It la 

,. , i oui prlca— 




22^ 


89^ 


M'ME 
iikld in 

CullX 11 


da Te r 

ei, : . 5t>c 


!i a rieweomet. and 
• ■■xe In ruriag nua- 

m» r;.euiiiatlia, iMUfalgla, 
oat prU»— 



22<^ 



$1.39 



MMK. TALrS VIOLET TALCUM POWDER. 
Price aSc, aur pllce— 



22^ 



MME TALra COMPLEXION SOAP Price 
Mo. our pilc»— 



20^ 



MME TALK 3 COMPLKXIO.N POWDEB. Price 

SOci, our price — 



43^ 



MME. YALE'S COHN SALTB— D« not iufftf 
anolrtcr dtf with ccme. Ma»e. Tala't Coin Salte 
innlr. nick werk of them. Via It and en^of 
Uj* etailort of aound feet. Ptlca S6c, otif prtc- 



22^ 



Mme. Yale's Demonstrator Here All This Week 



T?*ll*^ 

IM 1X1 

gilts 



I,!.. 



rnontuatoi wtU rrmaln here »U thU wc«k In th* Vile StcUcn of our 
*tie wlU ntpUlu to the ladle* all atwut Uie prepttraUoni made b» 
^rflclet-»o that ladlai can find amon* the Hat lu»t what they 
Maduna Talei »»»Ut:MU Alir.«it charge, and the mung ladjr will 

ef the rcmedU* Dt-eUed. _ „ „ . ,, ^ . 

Udaae Yile'i M pag» loiiTanlf hoo* tt our ToDet Ooada Department, 
<• %o thcai living out of town. Write tor a copi. 



.•\ri avtiaKv of .v.\ cuty-nvo nif^n ask 

ami f\rc Kiv<n Ir.f' ludgiriKS ;it tli. po- 

..-ry iiiRht. Tliey are 

wiiiKMii III .ii. y anil without friends 

and havr ii.» othir i-l.uo m which tu 

Alwios '1' It"'-" t''"*" "♦" ^^^^ ^'^'^^ 
there <u-e applicants for lodginRS at 
llie polire .stiition, but the number 
just ))«''A is running higher than is 
usual lur Ajiril. The number varies 
from ni«;ht to niRht. Last evening 
it fell as low u» thirty, probably tlue 
I.) tiir warmth of the weather and the 
fact of the tonnage tax veto celebration 
downtown. With today's weather, the 
ai»5)liiani.s this evening probably "^vill 
numlnr i l.>.se to a hundre<l. 

These lodgers present a pitiful sight. 
Th' y range in age from 16 or 18 years 
to t'.-, ui so years. .Most of ih-ni have 



NIGHTLY SCENE IN CITY JAIL. 

been failures In life, due, in most cases, 
lo drink. Some, of course, are merely 
temporarily down and out. and may 
yet make something of themselves, oc- 
casionally in the list one will find 
voung men fresh from the country, 
"who came to Duluth with little capital, 
expecting to find lucrative employment 
Immediately. Disappointed in this, 
th»>v stayed at cheap lodging houses 
until their funds were exhausted, and 
then were compelled to a.sk the po- 
lice for help. 

Tht so cases, of course, are not so 
sad, for it probably will be but a short 
time until there is tvork enough for all 
and the young men will got employ- 
ment and get a start on the ruad to 
better things. It is the old men and 
their condition that bring moisture to 
the eyes of the casual visitor. Their 
faces "lined wiih care and dissipation, 



— Photo by McKenzie. 



bent gaunt forms clothed in fllty raps, 
dirt thicklv smeared over visible por- 
tions of their bodies, a hopeless, dis- 
couraged look in their eyes, they pre- 
sent a picture of despondency and des- 
pair that is pitiful to behold. 

Then there is the professional bum. 
who if he ever had any ambition or 
self respect, lost it early in life, and 
who would rather sleep in the police 
station any time than get out and work 
for a bed. Their faces are hardened 
and there is a leer about the eyes that 
is not pleasant to see. Professional 
vagrants, they are liable to develop 
into petty thieves and burglars. Ihe 
police keep a very close watch cm this 
cl.'(.<»s, and any of the men regarded as 
. uspicious characters are either thrown 
in jail on vagrancy charges, or else 
are ordered out of town, and if they 
fail to go are jailed for Ung stntences. 



K'rtclten Coolness 

No hot and blistering air 

to sap vitality and make 

cooking intolerable when 

work is done on the safe, 

economical and comfort^ 

able Nev^ Perfection 

Wick Blue Flame Oil 

Cook-Stove. Using //, 

your kitchen is not a 

room to fly from, but a place where all the 

necessary household work is done in restful coobies*— :; 

it doesn *t heat the kitchen. The 

NEW PERFECTION 

Wick Hue Ftame Oil Cook-Stove 

is built with a CABINET TOP just like the modern steel range. 
Combines conveniences found in no other cil stove. Fhe perfect stavi 

for summer. Three sizes. With or without Labinet i op. 

At your dealer's, or write our nearest agency. 



m^m 



The 






LtrXJ Xi: center 
draft lamp free from the 

faults of other lamps. A perfect artificial light. 

Handsome snd safe. If not with your dealer, 

write OUT nearest agency. 

STA.NnA.RD OIL COMPANY 
(iBCorporated) 






1 ^ 



'— " f * ■ ■ " 



ment Studies 



SI XIIAV HIHOOI. I.ESSO^is %PIUI> 'i^. 
Ai-tii U: l»-;M>t r^i^3« '•■>•* 0««»P«^> '■* 



B> H«-». 



Antiufb. 
.1. S. KIrtlry, D. D. 





THE BIG 

CLASS BLOCK 



QUALITY \W 

£ARAMOUNT 



THK tO^.^Kt TIOX. 

\\ , ;;., t.ack to pick up the story 

of how the gospel was .spread out frum 

lenisaleni when the persecution, that 

• ■ .lit .»^lephen drove the discl- 

1 .liMUsalem. We followed one 

. ,.iv K. .•Samaria and then we saw 

Hie conversion of the Kthioplan. and 

..»,... tiip (Vnturion and haul or 

;i some of the Ileeing t'liris- 

.. .al on up as far as Antiocli 

la and won converts, wlio started 

. ,.ich that v.as lo become historic 

,iiul I iMi.'h niiikin^x. 



B\iild Up 
TKe System 



|ittia**t*u 



aimivivcCTirHisManw 



m 



JwS^. 



A "run down" 
condition is due in 
a great many cases 
to the failure of the 
digestive organs to 
get proper nourishment out of the 
food taken. To people Buffering from ill health 
owing to this cause, 

DR.. D. JAYNE'S 

Tonic Vermifuge 



insures a quick return to health and strength. 
Unlike ordinary tonics which supply only tem- 
porary stimulation by furnishing food material 
in pre-digested form, Jaync'a Vermifuge brings 
about lasting results. It tones up the 
stomach and digestive organs and puts them in 
anormally healthy condition. Then the digestive 
organs supply the body with the proper amount 
of nourishment, and in this way restore perma- 
nent health and strength. 

Sold by atl druggists In two simms, 50e and 35e 

Df. D. Jajne't Expectorant is an effective 

remedy for coughs, whooping- 

cougb, croup and colds. 



TIIK I.KSSO.N. 

1. 

Centile Converts at Antioch: 19-21. 

"Tliev therefore, tliat were scattered 
uhroa.l"ui»oii llie trihulation that arose 
about Stephen traveled as far as 
Phoenicia, and Cypru.s. and Antiocli. 
.speakinn the word to none save only 
to Jewi*. But tiiere were some of them, 
men of t'vpru.<* and Cyrene. wlio. when 
li, s ware come to Antioch, spake unto 
ii. cii.ks also, preacliing the Lord 

Jesu.s." 

1. In Oenlilf Territory. 

The gospel is geltinK out from -"/'U- 
^aleni atui may be getting away from 
it The city »ias linally and fatally 
rejected the gospel and it is doonied; 
it ha.s not tliirty years more to live. 
We follow the track of one band of 
exiles and tliey will lead us at last 
lo the great city of Antioch. the capital 
of Wvria the Ihird greatest city in the 
rtonuiTi empire where was a mixed and 
inviting population of a half million. 

They went to these places for safety, 
but made It their business to tell their 
fellow Jews that tlie promise of a .Mes- 
siah had ben fullilled In Jesus It was 
natural for tiiem to speak of this to 
lews only, for no other were expect- 
ine llini Though these disciples were 
Grecian-horn Jews, they thought, eveii 
if tbev liad heard of the conversion of 
forneiius, that the Gentiles must send 
for them na Cornelius sent for Peter. 
an.l tla-v ii'«-d not first go to them. 

li. Preaching to Gentiles. 

But Uiost> refugees who reached An- 
tioch bcKan to tell the Greek.s. who 
were not even proselytes, about Jesu.s. 
Those who did it were reared a loiig 
way from Jerusalem of neces.sity—iii 
Cyrene down in .\frica. in the island of 
cvpnis where they would be It'ss nar- 
row and prejudiced. And they did this 
In a cosmopolitan city, too; they woti d 
have been slow to do so In a strictl.v 
lewlsh city, or where the Jews and 
Gentiles were warmly a»t«KO"'ftic. 
The gospel was eoing a step furthei 
llan the -lews without being sejtt for. 
A piiciple was •"st'iblishe.l i.i the case 
;,f Cornelius: it was in active opeia- 
Uon in Antioch. , „ .„, 

:! A New Gospel Center. 
\„tloc)« is the future center of 
Christianity and its '"'"«'.'.•"« jy .,^'^'",'j; 
11 was an oriental Home, the Gate ot 
he Kasl," where Jews and proselytes 
were I onerous and where Jews and 
t^eritlks eould be most easily blended 

"■VVe";elam''"of this Innovation was 
sli'iki '■.. Th^ pow-r of God was at 
o <e manifest in many conversions bo 
1 1, .He a V men who, so far as they 
knew, were there only to find safety, 
ami were In an artless way telling 
eveVvbody. without any di.scrlmmation, 
w-hat was uppermost in their mind.s 
were really planting a dynamo of 
^plrUual power in a new center of 
w rid- wide influence. They were do- 
ing fat better than they knew. They 
ad no c.mmisslon: they made no pre- 
tet slons. They told the news of a 
^'ivior And 'the hand of the Lord 
^4s withheld from them till they 
ceased to discriminate between races 
and bloods; some success came be- 
fore but not so much as now, and 
whe'n it did come it was largely be- 
.-Nouse they were on the road to the true 
praetke. 

Jerusal.rn Helping Antioch 22-26 
■•\nd the hand of tlie Lord was with 
thcin: a..d a great number that be- 
lieved turned unto the Lord. And the 
report concerning them came to the 
ears of tne church which was in 
Jerusalem: atid they sent forth Bar- 
nabas as far as Antioch. who, when he 
was come, and had seen the grace of 
(;od was glad: and he exhorted them 
all 'that with purpose of heart they 

would cl«av« unto tU« LKtrdi <or )i« 



was a good man, and full of the Holy 
Spirit aial of faith; and much people 
was added unto the Lord. ^And he 
went forth to Tarsus to seek for haul: 
and when he had found him, he 
brought him unto Antioch. .Vnd It came 
to pass, that even for a whole year 
they were gathered together with the 
ehurch, and taught much people: and 
that the disciples were called 

Christians first in Antioch.' 

1. A Careful Investigation. 
The churcli at Jerusalem was sure to 

send up to see about this matter. It 
was still the mother cluirch and had a 
guardiansiiip over all the churches 
tliat sprar.g up anywhere; they wanted 
correct information as to how the Gen- 
tile question had been treated and per- 
haps had a dislike for too much liber- 
ality toward the Gentiles: they watited 
to put the work on right lines and cor- 
rect any blunder that tintaught lay- 
men would make. Possibly, the older 
Jewish Christians in Antioi h were con- 
fused and uncertain what was best and 
had sent to Jerusalem for advice, 
tliough the sending of Barnabas seems 
to have been voluntary. 

2. Barnabas, the Investigator. 
And they sent the very best man for 

the work to be done. Barnabas was a 
Grecian-born Jew to begin with: he 
was reared on the island of Cyprus and 
was a fellow-citizen with some of 
these laymen, now turned preachers, as 
well as friend, and would be referred 
to as teacher; he had a reputation that 
would aid him in his delicate work; 
he was a man of great personal innu- 
ence he was a benevolent and con- 
secrated man. being the very first to 
sell his property on the island of Cy- 
prus ten years before and put the 
monev into the common fund: he was a 
sympathetic friend; he had an insight 
into men and motives, as shown in his 
Indorsing .'^aul to the brethren in Jer- 
usalem when they were afraid the arch 
persecutor had not been really con- 
verted; he was powerful in that form 
of speech which was called e.vhorling 
and which is so comforting that the 
very word exhortation c-ame to mean 
consolation as well, for the brethren 
ceased to call him by his original name 
Joses. and gave him the name of Bar- 
nabas, which means Son of Lxhorta- 
tlcn or Consolation. There was no man 
like Barnabas to send on such a mis- 
sion, not even among the apostles. 
3. His Delightful Discovery. 
Barnabas visits all interiiiediate 
points but does not halt long till he is 
at the great center of life, where tlie 
problems to be solved are most intri- 
cate and pressing and where the work 
to be done is greatest. ^^ hat feeling 
could he have but gladness at what he 
saw' Tliere was pleasure in seeing 
souls saved, in seeing the fruits of the 
Spirit growing on hitherto uncultivated 
soil, and In seeing a new feature In 
the grace of God. One of the fascinat- 
ing studies of that age must liave been 
to watch the n?w marks of God s power 
and grace, as His plans were revealed 
and His work extended. It was a stir- 
ring sight, this new type of Cliristian 
character in the composite city ot An- 
tioch. yielding a larger homag'e to the 
purposes of God. True to his tastes 
and his history, this son of exhortation 
Koes to exliorting. and the one point 
to which he sharpens all his teachings 
is that they must grapple Christ and 
their new calling wltli the resolute pur- 
pose of the deepest nature — the heart 
His work was evangelistic as well as 
instructive, and under his powerful ap 
peals the converts Increased rapidly. 
The explanation of his joy and of his 
own success In teaching, as well as 
the reason for his being sent from 
Jerusalem is given in the statement 
that he was a good man: and his good- 
ness Is Indicated in the faith that he 
had and the indwelling Spirit. The failli 
had that type of wholeness which 
makes one trust in God and trusted by 
God. Natural qualities of al'ig^^.^.f/^f/ 
were in the control of the Holy Ghost. 
4. Keinforced by Saul. , , , ,„ 
When r irnabas needed help to in- 
struct the growing throng of disciples, 
direct the activities of the new and 
preach to the thronging inquirers, he 
did not go baek to Jerusalem for an 
apostle, but went for the coming inan. 
Saul He goes after Saul, remeiiiber- 
ing his striking conversion and his 
fruitful work in Damascus; reinember- 
InK the fact that he had been divinel> 
appointed to the Gentiles as he had 
learned from Saul himself; remember- 
ing that he himself had already in- 

v"!ted something "nS^" * = ,.•■« I" h^^fad 
Ing those superb qualities that he had 
a glimpse of so fitted to the demands 
of the work In Antioch: perhaps re- 
membering the rumors that had been 
reaching him about the great works 
Saul has been doing over in Tarsus 
and the surrounding country for sev- 
eral years. Wliat has Saul been doing 
all the time? Working, no doubt, 
probablv studyingr the philosophies of 
heathenism, maturing his experience 
and cottvicUofts, Xouudiug iil» Ckri*- 



tian religion in his old home. He u 
ready for the larger work now. He 
rises on the world at Antioch. The 
man and his mission have nnet^ The 
Holv Ghost sent Barnabas for haul to 
intr'oduce him to his work, as he once 
introduced him to the church at -Jeiu- 
salem. The movement toward the 
Gentiles has been started from the 
right point, the motlier cliurch. the 
revolution has been made. Saul can at 
last lay his hand to iiis work in safety, 
and at last the right starting place is 

made lor liim. . *„i5„,.u 

For one year they work in Antiocn 
and it is not thouprht best to tell us 
but two things coneerning that year of 
labor: They taught much people; a 
new name was given to the new bod>. 
The former statement implies that 
these two made it their chief business 
to Instjuct the converts, whie no 
doubt the members generally did the 
evangelistic work. Tht term Christian 
applied to them iiad never been heard 
before It could not have been chosen 
bv the dlsdples. as they had not been 
using other names, and they ' were 
called' by others. It could not have 
been given by the Jews, for it was the 
Greek for Messiah, and the Jews wou d 
never have done anything that would 
liave implied that Jesus was the Mes- 
siah. It must have been given by the 
people in Antioch, not as a term of de- 
rision, but as a descriptive word to 
designate this new seel which was dis- 
tinct from the thre,; or four sects of 
the Jews. The word was appropriate 
and it is today the best word that lan 
be used of anyone. 

Antioch Helping Jerusalem 27-30^ 
••Now In these days there came down 
prophets from Jerusalem unto Antiocn. 
And there stood up one of them named 
Agabus. and signified by the Spirit 
that there should be a great famine 
over all the world: which came to 
pass in the days of Claudius. And t)ie 
disciples, every man according to his 
abilitv, determined to send relief un- 
to the brethren that dwelt In Judea: 
which also they did, sending It to the 
elders by the hand of Barnabas and 

••And Barnabas and Saul returned 
from Jerusalem, when they had ful- 
filled their ministration, taking with 
them John, whose surname was 
Mark " 

It Is not strange that he should tell 
hi« people in Judea that the famine 
was coming; nor that one of ^tlieir 
number should go up to Antioch and 
tell the Jewish and Gentile converts 
about it: nor that those^ ardent 
Christians should send them help. It 
was beautiful. It helped migiitily to 
unify the Jewish and Gentile Ciuis- 
tians. 



Danderiiie 




— , 



GROWS HAIR 

and we can 

PROVE ITI 

A ladv from Minnesota writes: 

"As a reeuU of using Danderme, my hair 
is close to five feet m length. 

Beautiful Hair at Small Cost 

HAIR troubles, like many other diseases, have 
beentrongiy diagnosed and ^ItoKf^her mis- 
understood. The hair itself is not the thing to 
be treated for the reason that it is simply a product 
nf the scalD and wholly dependent upon its action. 
The Icalr is the Tery soil in which the hair is pro- 
Seed mirtured and crown, and it alone should 
receive the aUention if results are to be expected. 
U would do no earthly fiood lo treat thestein ol a 
rTlant with a view of raaViug it grow and become 
S^o?e' beauti'ful-the so.l ^^ -^'ch U.e pla„^ grow, 

Ka^r ir.^ m' J.°t rJc^erv;'?ro;t1:nM^lr.;;^ •- 
to expect it to grow and become more beautiful. 

Loss ol hair is caused by the scalp drying up. 
or losing its supply of moisture or .n"*V"io^ 'nU Its 
baldness occurs the scalp has simply lost all its 
noudshment leaving nothing for the hair to feed 
Spon (a plant or even a tree would die under similar 
conditions.) ^ , . 

The natural thing to do in either case, is to feed 
and replenish the soil or scalp as the case may be. 
and your crop will grow and multiply as nature 

intended it should. ..,«„/<«, 

Knowlton'a Danderine ha. ■most wonder 
ful effect upon the hair gland, and ti«.ue« of the 
Icafp. It i« the only remedy for th. ha.r ever 
S?,cS;ered that i. .imil.r to the natural h.lr 
food, or liquid, of the .calp. , ^ ^ ■ 

It Denetrates the pores quickly and the hair 
soon shows the effects ol its wonderfully exhilar- 
ating and life-producing qualities. 

one 2'^-cent boUle is enough to convince you ol 
its great wor°h as a hair growing and hair bcauti- 
lying remldy-try it and .ee for your.elf. 

NOW at all druggists In three sizes, 

25c. 50© and $1.00 per bottle. 



WHAT THK .MASTERS SAY. 

A free cliurch in a free state, where 
evcrv man Is the equal of every ether 
man' before the Constitution, develops 
broad hearts: hearts that have des.ie 
to attend to the world's needs. Sov- 
ereign grace is best made known i>y 
sovereign man. A city freer in its 
spirit than Antioch was not to be 
found in that day. and here God raised 
up the church that bore so honorable a 
part in giving tlie truth to the world.— 

"" Tlfe' hour Paul had been _,wait- 
ing for had struck, and he 
threw himself into the work 
of evangelizing the Gentiles with 
the entliusiasm of a great nature that 
found itself at last in its proper sphere. 
Tlie movement at once responded to ti.e 
nresbure of such a hand; the disciples 
became so numerous and prominent 
that the heathen gave them a new- 
name — that name of "Cliristlans.' which 
has evf-r since continued to be the 
badge of faith in Christ, and Antioch, 
a city of 500.000 Inhabitants, became 
the i'leadquarters of Christianity in- 
stead of Jerusalem. — Stalker. 

PKRTINEKT QUESTIONS. 

1. Why does Christianity die when 
it is not missionary? 

2 What is a religious parasite 

3. What are the marks of a good 

rnflin '^ 

4. Why are Christians the good seeds 

of the kingdom? , ^ 

5. Why is it more blessed to give 
than to "receive ? 

Object to Strong Medlolnee. 

Manv people object to taking the 
strong' medicines usually prescribed by 
phvsirians for rheumatism. There Is 
no need of internal treatment In any 
case of muscular or chronic rheuma- 
tism, and more than one out of every 
en cases of the disease are of one or 
the other of these varieties. Wheii 
there is no fever and little (if any) 
swelling, you may know that t.is only 
necessary to apply Chamherlains Lini- 
ment freely to get quick relief. Try 
it. i'w »ftie bx »ii atUKSifiU. 



CDCC To show how quickly Duderin* 
rnCC acts, we will send a large sam- 
ple free by return mail to anyone who 
sends this free coupon to the 
KNOWLTOH DANOERIKE CO., CHICA60. ILL.. 

with their name and address and 10c 
in silver or stamps to pay postage. 




1' 



— , 





I 



A 



Sahiaji 



man ^uiiesj^ou io 



When going to California, wouldn't you like the per- 
€onal attention of an experienced tourist agent? One 
who knows the country traversed; who helps make the 
journey a pleasant one ; who takes special care of elderly 
oersons, women and children. 

The Santa Fe carries newest style tourist sleepers 
every day on three of its four trains between Chicago. 
Kansas City and California. The fastest tourist sleeper 

''"m ee"^ t^ilf a ^'ek these excursions are personally cot. 
A .:^ nVir de luxe folder. "To California m a Tourist 
Skewer,- feUs how co'zy the cars are. and how econom.cal- 

^''' ahfonr'homeseekers should ask for our San Joaquin 
Valley and folder, telling all about the gieatest '".gated valle> 
in the world, where intensive farming pays large profits. 

Until April 30 one-way colonist tickets 
to California are on sale at $34.75 from 
Duluth. 



,fc- 



C C. Carpenter. Pass. 
Agt., A. T. & S. F. Ky.. 
Metropolitan Life Bldg., 
Minneapolis, Minn. 



*J 





-> 



1 
I 

I 

^fcBi^JB|^fc~^~;.^iii i iiiNM ii%i iiiiiifaMJwwi 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: THURSDAY, APRIL 22, 1909. 



IS 



ii 



Most 
Complete 
Agency 



ft 



HARTMAN-O'PONNELL AGENCY, 



GENERAL INSURANCE an d BONUS. 



202-3-4-5 LONSDALE BLDG. 



r 



Fire. Lightning. Tornado. Windstorm. Fidelity and Court Bonds. AutomBUde, Fire. Theft and ColHsion Motor and GasoHne Boat. Yachts. Plate 
Glass. Burglary, Theft, Marine, Accident, Health, Life, Employers' and Public Liabdity, Live Stock. Etc., INSUKANLb. 



firrmiMn Alllanre lnMarance CoinpaiiT. 



I 






\ • 



"i\\ NfW tofk. N. Y. tOrgsiilM.:,! In 
" W Kroawr. iwmldwnt: th«rl«i O 
-u¥ AtiortJtsi' In »w*t>t •WTle* III Mln* 
■ inatlaiiliiiter >( Iiijtira:i<-« 

INCOME IN I9M 

■-rjW'ip*!* I 



I>rMnlii>u» 

ttl«ltli i!Ul.i ...•.-.-i™ 

tVl.«l 111. •"iw 



OISBURSCMENTS IN ItM 

Aai-xint pAlii for Imm* t 

( IIIIIJ1llll.tldn« HIKl t»T«*»i^-<€» 



Nrwark Fir« latiuranpr Companr. 



]..■ l-nl: rti*rl.-t M thury. i»e<To- 

Ufj A ., .. .*- .T» wrHce In Mtiiii«»>t». Lota 

lulaalMMf ar lit*uraiir«. 

eXHH CAPITM,. |i.M.(»>»l)«. 
INCOME IN 1906 



'•-•■■ ••■ • (ri'-ti-ft 



* : ■* 1 1 "> 1 



I .W.'.-.IT.JI 



"Pww. r**!. rw'iti 



OiSaURSEMENTS IN im«. 






fttTlilfTiiill «n.l lilt* 

! - ■ ' '' iimturlty >t leitis *.sit>u 

^!>'tl««IIIMlU 

Vital iaial:nn>MMiiM ■ • t 



.h,j:: ■' 



ASSETS OEC. il. iWiJ 
t.t ■ ■ • - 



AU «U>- 



b J. -.,-.•. 



'ill! ; J 



M.OVt.M 



Wmtern Aaaaraac* Coatpnar. 

rrliull>»l offlii". T'lFMi-.i. » aji i( .num.-!" ■-! '"itl- 
n«a III th» tnited rtlMw 1871 i H-m (KH.rg*. A 
IM. i.re«l(>.nt; C. r. l\>tUa.*»»miArj A»..rn?» U 
arr<HH »WTlr« In MlniiMoW. t >»iuiiil»«loiier at m- 
tuniu-e. 

I>F.I'«WIT lAPITAI., liOT.OOO M 
INCOME Tn 1903. 

Pirm • r liiin (•♦•rpetii*!* t I"'^ t ' '■ , 

llniii. ■•■»t 

rroBi ■•..' ■■•-..■■; ••«iri'<?i, , -■ • ' ' ' 

ToT^i »,K„mr r~uw.m'i 

OlSaURSEMENTS IN IM«. 
Amminl iwl.1 f.-r lo«sm I l.tM.««.f)8 



^ . ,.*.., .1,1 !r-.^ if >IT1 lT« 



,.,,,,,,., , t 3:.-i.-,H.n:'. 

ASSETS OEC Jl. !*•» 

I 1 ■.■» ■>tV> •»i| 
j< < 1 '..i 'ID 



'Ig-'ftM 

1 r-*{ «stat« 



it ' 



■. :■ 1^1 



I'ri'llll 



U»l.lii'» -t.. (..-(. 



Jill • 



1 I."-! 'J'* ::i 



LIA8ILlTie!« OEC. II. I90II 



LIABILITIES DEC Jl. »t«i. 



I.) 
■ 1 
..I 
I 



fXlu-m.-s 

AH ()lh.T illHlMiri«!inenU 

l^**a oil »<«liJ "" !H:»iu..., ' 

lltMU 

T ii.il Jlil><iiifiii*iit» 

;• ' lUlMirHt-nifUU orfi 1; 

ASSETS DEC 31. I9M. 

I!.....U Ji:.t *h>ek» C»«tl«l 

< i-h III .(Ti-- iii'1 I" U»n}i 
VciTiieil liiU'it.*l miJ ivii - 
Premiums tii r.jur*.; if ' •' 

lleiliirt iip«l»l ■l<-l«'it' <« ^ ' ■' 

lUWtlly ih-Tt^.i. 



Tat*l iidmllii^l j.<n -I* 
.\-,tf'.» ii'>t »'lniKt-U 



3lJ.:tW.83 

Ka.jji.u 

■iitii.rtr 

$ i.Bi;;.i-'i 4 1 

$ 141.721. 0(i 

I !i^):<..^t.l 18 

1 u.s*) :ii 

:i4.ii:u •id 

2JZ,563.7:» 

■M -Hit.:;:: 



.Meatrtarater Ptre laaaraace Company- 

Prlnrlp»l jffl.o. New York Cliy lOrnaiUofrt IH 
M.'«r I (Jeoigc B <.'r«wf'jril. vrwlileut. Jolui H. KMi. 
iw-wtarj. Attorney to accept •ervlcu Ui MlimenotJi. 
CoinmlMlinitt or Ituuntuo*. 



C.%.'4H CAPlTAf.. JSM.ODO.M. 
INCOME IN IMM. 



Pretnliuna other tliwi perpetutU 

Iti-iitH mill liilctwt 

Kroiu ail .itlier tourcw 



.1 2.41.1.501.00 
l.->lll.a(l.r»« 

i.ur.«4 



Total iuroovf .......$ S.57S.0SS.23 

OISBURSCMENTS IN 1908 

l>aid f ir I i*«'i % 



$ M : !•« I :>'• 



Amount . - . 

4 'i>mnil«.<loiu ami t>rokt*MgA 

.Sjlaiiu ati.l f"** of officer*. a8«<iU 

an'i wni)liiyw 

Taim. ft-«. rrni* and other rral Mtate 

<UCl>ett«<M •■ 

I>i»lJ«iJi> au'l liitT^it 

All ■ liier JUt>ur*?uieiiu 



1.645 



977.69 
121.70 



26g.218.o2 



124 



.132.02 
.000. iXI 
.)01.4«t 



T'lUl dUljurjcnienU 
Kxcoai of dU!jijrj<jment« »«« lii'-om« t 
ASSETS DEC. 31. )9M 

Value 'f reJl osiata owiuM I 



...I 2.0Si.2J1.4l 



0^,219.18 



•-,3 
3.1B 

J27 
4 

2«7 



727 .)5 
.-.."W 70 
.Uii.DO 
09T.07 
07 •..4« 



LIABILITIES OEC 31. 1908. 



Uwlli- 



.1 .■UltTU 



Tntal UittJIttiM lr»-l<ivlh«« ''M'U il 






im* BUSINESS. 



JUitNESJ iM MINNESOTA IN IMS. 

i 

- I 

I 






j -.n -;: 47 
1 , . . I -: ■(■. 

RISKS ANO PREMIUMS. I*'» BUSINESS. 

. . .. , ,, . „. ... . .... ., iii.t i:.-«i.o*i 

1 .•-■ H'l i;i,> 






BUSINESS IN MINNESOTA IN I90«. 

I 



il>liil 
Total 1U'<111'1.>< lt..-1'illti* ..lylnl 
Ni-t .I'iriiliH 



i,2i.<.;;r'i •'> 

'.•1.997.65 
.; «. (HXl.OJ 



M 



. 1 . 'Ml 



Ill till* (le- 



ihiV. 



I vi:i 1'. \> 



(.'wmoii*-- 



J.iHN \ UVlirl'J.KN 

(, .niniU-MPi-r >f I'nurjt' vi 1 



RISKS AND PREMIUMS. 1909 BUSINESS. 

Hr» rtiki writlrt. iltirlng lli.' .v-ir *' ^"'-■•"^''''.i'!;; ',.; 

rromlutiH i—wii'«l ttuT*iii i: 1) .ij.,.U.. .. 

.\larif... ai.l liilttiid rUkit wrl ' il 

tl.» v-mir :.).'.«7. :■<,.. oil 

Pr.miliiim r<w»i«*d lln*rc')ti *'j }l!l ' ' 

Net iini'.unt In furoe at Mi-l of l"'- -' '' »'i.i.l.'> '•« 

BUSINESS IN MINNESOTA IN iSOtt. 

.Mtrlrin 
Kir.- Klikl iin.l liiljiii.) \iiirfiitf 

UKka wrl.-- t ..■;':■..«'» Il.3i1.0".00 H " 
rr.>mt.:m, ■ ■ I - ^Vrtl 4.4:W.lO 

i: 2 »:'A II ■• "v-j on 

. ..-.'i: 2'SU-I :.:{.4:i'.'..;i 

M.. ". I.O.I 

■ IJ.'ii.irtfiK-iit if Iti*niraiic-«. 

Oial tli^ itniiual •taieinfiit of the 
for the year wiJlng l><? 
ilie alKivv U an aliatraot. 
: , , u-i 111 thU ilt-partmcm and 
,, ., JOHN A. HAllTIGAN. 

1 ■■initiu'.-<i'>ii«'r >f Ii'*'ir»!n'e. 



M >rt«ag« loan* 

Itoii'U aii'l uto-'ka owii«l 

( atti ill olTlrf ami In bank 

.\ivrue.l liitfrMt and r«ita 

Prfmlunu In <'onr*f of collection . 

I»eilu-t <p..lal .l^ponlw. le*» ».'l 613 4« «m .sa 

llaMlll) thereon 44.9M.SO 

Toul adiuliied aa-ieia I U.S'jr.67;'.iO 

AMeln not admitted J.>l.947.l» 

LIABILITIES DEC 31. 1903 

1 'npald liMjea ;iiid clalin« $ 

Iteli.Huraiii.'e resi-ne 

.Siljriti. eKDeinm. tales, dlvldenda and 

liitprf»t lu« 

( muiiiiailnn and brjkenme 

All other llahllille* 

I'apllal jlock paid U4> 



The Uverpool A l>ondon A «lohe In- 
surance t'ompanr *>' Xew %'urk. 

Priiiclpal '.iTli*. New York. N Y i Org.mlzetl in 
1«SW. » Henry W Katon. pruKlJeiit. tJeorgn \V. Hon, 
secrfUry. Attorney to arcept »er»lce hi Mluiirsota. 
«.'omnils«luner <>( iinu ranee 

LA-SH fAPlTAL. »200.000 
INCOME IN 1908 

Premium* other than jKHKHuaU $ 

limit* and Inlereat 

Profit on aal^ or maturity af ledger 
aiaeU and Ini-reaae liy adjiutmcnt In 
bO'jk »alue \tt ledger aiweU 



SIT.95T.9T 
24.890. 4T 



3,»TT.22 



Total Ini-ome 



$ 246.82.1.66 



OI<tBURSEMENTS IN 1906. 

Amotinl pild f '1 lo«<-» • 

t oa»inl»«lofi* All t UMl^>ra*e 

SiUrle* «ti.l fe-M of otri.era. agenU and 

dtuplo¥>!S 

Tan-*, fee*. reoU and other real eatale 

eipen*!"* 

IHtldend* ;»nd liilercat 

Uf<t oil *hIo t maiorllT of ledger aaeeU 
All oUier ilt*bur»emeiita 

TvUl dUliutajmeiili • 

Ktoes* of Iju-ouw over JUUuraemenU ... I 

ASSETS DEC. 31. 1908. 

Mortgage loin* * 

Hoiult and *to.-k* iwiiM 

Casli In office iiid li bank 

.Vivrued Intercat and rent* 

Premluiiu 111 courw jf TOllettlon 



li7.JJ1.19 
Si. \<ii.Vi 

S.08J.50 

li).0.->9.56 

10.00) 00 

C84 27 

ll.20j.42 

19T.346.86 



Franklin Fire InMnranee Companr 
Philadelphia. 

Principal offl.-e, PlilU.lelplilA. Pa. («)rgaiilw.l 
182yi. Alfi^ed K r»u/u-aii. pmaldent pro tcai: ICir* 
Cressoii. »e.n.-ury Attorney to acveiK »erTlo« 
MlimiMola, fommli*loiier of Xnauraiica 

CA.SH CAPITA 1.. $4)0.000.00. 
INCOME IN I90«. 

Prenilum.'i other tliaii perp«»ual* I 

PrRmliioM oji p.>ri>etual rl»k* 

Uenta and liitertat . . 

Kroin ill ither »ource* 

Profit < II aale or maturity of ledger 

aaaeta ■ ■ 



uf Pidelity 



C'enapany •< 



970.4^1.00 
a U«a.l.j 

I0<».i>s»8 '•) 
3.226.63 

1.872.19 



49.178.80 



,50.0i>«.0rt 

,■5^7 It.")'). 00 
83.i94.'J« 

4.0'»i<.:io 

97.380.il 



S.287.416.'.<3 

20.000. on 

2.0J1I 'to 

2S.00 1.0(1 

SOO.OU'I.OO 



'Pital Ujbllltia* Imludiug capital... • 2.328.20!>.78 



Net i'lrplo* 



I 1, iiJli. 102.7 i 



RISKS AND PREMIUMS. 1906 BUSINESS 

fire rlikt .^^ltt»•n during the year. . $282. ii«.96'>.0fl 

IT»mliim.> nv..iiod Iliereon ^lli.^.'Ji 

Net amount In f.ir.e at en.l of the year 4U,>.819.j. -.00 

BUSINESS IN MINNESOTA IN 1906. 

Plre IU»k*. Tornado. Aggregate. 
RUka «rttl«i . «3,9-i2.31I 0.1 $4:7.'M-. W $4.12'. U^j.oo 
Pr-mltiOM reiM. .^9.131. 68 2.705.22 «i-\->ij'\ 

l.,-sea lti.-urre.l 49.077 7< 117 81 ««';^;.?^ 

l.o«« pal.l . S2.H6-..-J4 117.84 i;i.U«.!..« 

Vni'l at rt»k 5 921.487 00 7I5.M2.00 6.914.O1S.00 

.SUte of Mlnii«»ola. Department of liwunnoe 

i Henrby < ertlfy niat the annual «t.ileiu.iit of the 
Waatrheal.T Klre Iiuurance lonipany. for the y.ar 
ending O.-'.-mlH-r 3l.*l. 1!»08. of whirh the above L* 
iin »i»tra.-t. ha* l>eei. r.H-el.e.l and filed In itila de- 
partment and duly appnjviil by "'*■,. „.^,,, ^., 
JUll.N A HARTir.AN 
t ummtnlotna- >f Insurau.-a 



m, l'i8.08 
DEC. 31, 1908. 



Total i.lmltte.1 aaneta 
.Vsaet* not adniltte.1 

LIABILITIES 
I'npald los*e* .itid cUluia 

It'jliHiiran.'e reserve 

.SaL^rte*. rvp<(Ni*»a. taxea. dividend* and 

liiiereat due 

* oiiiiiiliwloii and tM'okeragg 

.VII oUi.-r llabllitle* 

(.'apital *t.>--k paid up 



$ 762.933.T7 



18.473.00 

18o.'J4i.l6 

11.859 14 
l.itOO.Otf 

SOO.O'KI.OO 



Total ln.'<}me . $ 

DISBURSEMENTS IN 1908. 

Amount pild for liwi.-'s $ 

(•oniniL**lofi* and t)r-»k.^rige 

-Salarli-j and ftw* of Jtrieera. agenta aHd 

eiiiployflH 

T.HBi. r«ot. rent* and other real eaute 

espen.-'M 

I>lrld.>iid* and hiterest 

l>epo*lt i>romluni.'< relumed 

All oUiw Jlibur*t-niciit.* 

Total dl»l>ur»eme«iu $ 1.037 

Exert* of li 



l.a89.619.!>2 

.v.7.8i.-..;i 

207,374.11 

lOT. 590.0! 

37.649. SO 
44.01". JO 
31.17:!.S8 
7t.8t.9.:» 



.488 



•ome i'"r lUburseraein.* $ 
ASSETS OEC 31. 1908. 



52.131 07 



Value of r*il eilale awiitd . 

Mortgatff l.Mn* 

ISon.l* and *to<-k« iwneil 

(•(.sh In offlox ;tnd l!i bank 
,V.•^Iue^l Intereal an.l rent* 
Premium* In .-ourie of lolle 
.VU oth.-r a.lmltled asaeta. 



•lion 



20) 
46 

2.208 
lOl 

144 



,000 10 
,235.00 
.22.V 00 
,914. "5 

71 1. 02 
.078. «y 

40'.. 00 



$14,12: 0! 



Total ilabiUtU-* Uiclu.ling .-apital $ 429.652.93 



Total admit U\l aa*et* 
Aa*et* not ndmltti^l 

LIABILITIES DEC. i 

I'npal.l hi**.-* and .-Uliu* 

Iteliiaurfin.v reaene 

Hie.lalniable on p«rp.>'iial poll.l.^ 
.Salarie*. expenses. Laiea. .llvldeii 1-t and 

lnter«t due 

t'apllal JU" k paid up 



$ 2.7itl.,!7;..60 



& DepoMlt 
.>lar>'land. 

Principal -iffii-e. KalUmore. Md lOrganlr.ed l« 

H'i:» ' KdiTlii lV.irrteld. preuldent; Harry Nl'-odemua. 

*e.;rHary ami treaautrr Attorney i.i a..-c«pt aemice 

In Minnesota. ( ommLwloner of Iruurance. 

CASH ( aPITAI. $2.)<)0.)00(W 

INCOME IN 1906 

Pr.>inlniu« Ile<-elved — 

KilelUy and *ur.My $1.670.204 98 ■ 

T)tiii iipemhinH Imome $1,670,201 96 

Krom Inlaresl and renU 26.1.009 M 

From all jther vouroee 112.731, 70 

TotAl in -ome $*.04j.948.«4 

DISBURSEMENTS IN 1908. 

riaim* Paid - Net. — 

Fld.'dty and surely $508,617 79 

Net pal.l p.jll.-y hol.l.-r« $ 508.61T.r« 

Investigation and A.liu«iment of clalma. . . 80.885. II 

i ominlssl.ina «41. 406.91 

Olrl.ier.iljt to st.vkholder* !9<).000.»0 

s.il.irte.i if offl.-ent. ai!>iiU. empliyoa. 

.?xanai;er«' and linpettl.m feea 219, 196.lt 

.\U other dUbur*emenU 227. 168.76 

Total dlaburtemenu $1,719.4.56.84 

F.i.'es* of iii.-ome o<-fr .ll«b.irsement« . $ 296.489.40 
ASSETS DEC. 31. 1908. 

Vil'ie '>f rnal e.«Ule ..wiind • 757.000.60 

ColUteral L i»n* '*' "2*'S 

It'indi .111.1 st.K,-Ka iwnad 4.418. »89.06 

I'.uli in .iffii-e mil In l»ank 55O,:'.0I 18 

.\.'cr:ied tnt.fre«t an.l renU 2. OH. 02 

Premium.* In .-outAe of e.>lle.-ttoti 178.695.76 

.\11 .Ither i.liiiltiwl «*««t» 108.691.71 

Uoduct iprslal deiHjilt leaa $229,878.42 
U*bUUy ihereun 



906. 
$ 



'M.248.6a 
84 1.450 12 
710.469.19 

13.043 13 
400,)l)0.00 



Total tlabUllles Including capital ..$ 2.139.811 U4 



Net 



Net *.,rT.l.u » 3"3.«''8« 

RISKS AND PREMIUMS. 1908 BUSINESS 
Fli*' rtik* Britten during the year 



. $39,801,715.00 



Pn-mlum* recelvi-d llteroon 

Net aiii..uir. In f irce n .i-d <if tlie year. 

BUSINESS IN MINNESOTA IN 

Klri- risk* Tonia.lo 

UUk* wrttien $«.r..329 00 $74.1V».00 

I'ri'inli'.im rc-eheil 8.518.01 363 7J 

lAi<a« Incurred 5.62'.l.17 

Lo»*ea paid 5. 57 SIT 

.\mouiii at rlak 
.statu of MlioiB'*ota. 



483. 228. 31 
27,111 600.00 

1908. 

.Aggregate. 

$ 707.48JO0 
g.'Ul 78 
J. .129. 17 
5,578,37 



„in<ltu » 5.;i, 568.62 
RISKS ANO PREMIUMS. 1908 BUSINESS. 
Klre rUk.* wrl"«-n durliuj 'he year $ ^7.7 .6.. 12 00 
Preml.iuu re.Wv.M OnTe-.n .II',': , ' f 'I!! 
Net am.iunt In force At .-nd if th.. year.$141 22j.l'Jl 00 
... ,^j 



S13.6i«.5« 



Hereby tcrtlfy. 



.. 1.088.887 00 
D.nnrtmeiit of In*;irin.-e. 
That thr? annuiil *tateaienL jf the 
Llvi-ni-o'l & l.on.loti & til.ibe Insurance *-'imp.iny -jf 
New Y'rk for the year ending Decemlier 31*1, 1»08. 
of whleti Iho al«.VH 1* Jii abatra.l, has Iwen recelve.l 
.ind flle-l Ui UU* d.^partmeiit and duly tUP^I^J"' v* ""* 
JOHN .V, H.VKTIilAN, 
Commlaslimer of Inaur.in.e 



BUSINESS 

Fire BUk.s 
llUk.'t writfii . 
Premluraa pwvIv*! 
I.OSSW incutred 
Li>s*« |.al.l 
.State if Mlnnea.ita. 

I Hereby i 'ertlfy 



IN MINNESOTA IN 
$ 



2.47983 

230.7^5.6» 
3^3.911 4$ 



627.126 66 

•J11.584 IS 

81.145.95 

3. 000. 000 00 

$3,621,806.96 



I.576.i:»-i7 
22.115 82 
27.000 80 

nepartmi.jif of Iiiiuiance. 
Tliat the annual at.iteraent .)f the 



tYinklhi Flra Insurance I'ompany .)f Philadelphia, .or 
the year endtng I)c<eml*r 1U». 1908. of which the 
al»)v^ la an abstricl. haa ii-'.ii receive,! and Oled 
In tliU departmi-nt ind duly apprne.l by nn 

JOHN A HAKTIUAN. 
f.jmmls*loiier of lii«uraiii-e 

C.MU. E. NOKBECK. .Spw.-UI .VseiU. 

Minnt^apolis, Minn. 



Tiial idntit(e.l **«cU $5,609,095.11 

.Vsieta not a.llllUle^l $557,553.85 

LIABILITIES 
II alma adjuate.! and ji.ul 
rialiua hi pricmi ot adjuauueiit ji. I pi- 

pofe'l 

I'luina iiMlateil 

Tital unpaid claim* au.l expenses of 
settlement ' 

Hcliwuranc n»*erve 

All iilier llilJIitim 

CaplUl ito.'k paid up 

Ti'al llaliiUUt-* including tvipllal 

s.inilw* >vT ill !lablll'l..a $1987,238.14 

BUSINESS IN MINNESOTA IN 1908. 

Pt -ml ini.< lto..-ci»e«l l..i*^i» Paid. 

I.l,l-l(.y $51.723.1<* $29,525.17 

l^'.V.,, 2.7'.t8.58 450.06 

T,,tjU $56,521.77 $29,975.17 

.St.;ile rf MiioiesH*. Keparment >f Ii:*iiratice 

I Hereby r..rtlfy. Ttial the annuil staleniBiit of tlie 
FilaU'y Sl iteposlt r.im;iaiiy of .Marylanl. for the 
y.>ar en.ling I»e.-..inber 3l»t. 1008, if which the above 
U an alwiraci.. lias Ix vn receive.1 an.l filed lu lid* 
|.«>Hrtm<nt and duly apiirive.l liy me 

JOHN A HAItTl<;AN. 
< imiul^loner of liuurani'*. 



DETECTIVES 
WATCH BOY 

Mother Fears Divorced 
Husband Will Kid- 
nap Him. 




111 



.Hunotype t «mp«»i*Ui«n. 

Qiick work by Thwing-Slewart Co. 

ei 

l.rrlure mt Temple. 

_Y I,., V \!M,l.>tM t .III' ^l>t "I 

I 1,1 M,. will Ik- 'It'- 

\ ^^ .-nih 

:, . . -,. • ■ < 

u'<-i-»vli.. A. in,, - < ■' " I' '•■■ fV'iMi-ly 

irtf 



.!. \\ \ 



X. 
hit! 



\fww «*l>lf of Mniiip- 



.. I 1,; . 



rcir.i'iii.l. in different parts of 
.... City Tlif tlisitrict covered by the 
:.lH>UfHtion t^xtfiuls It.itu Tlilrtietli ave- 
! !.• \vi>!<t t.< W ...idlMiiii The lenue.st 
w ill prob.ilily 111- Ki :i"t'''l 
m 
Itetalulnic Wall FtnUhed. 
Tlie fr'if'i '>'"!-■ wall vt llie .subway 
■enlraiKe Hoo rallroail to thl.s 

lily WHS ' . led yeslerday between 
Sixth and KiKhth avenues west. Tlii.s 
U one uf the lar>?est pieces or the wall 
that retaiiix the tunnel work. The 
bench work of the tunnel is proRress- 
iiic vi-rv rapi'llv. there remainins less 
tSaii Ml" icet ut the lower pail oi the 
I Linne! m c unp!-'! .•. 



placed oil 
The new 

t" itiiii * French de- 

1 ri t.ii'.-.' hrmifli eii- 

II iH 

, .\mp 



\llll i:ie«-4 TreaMMrer. 

I im-etinK ot Ihe board ••( iln-c- 

iif I he fummercial club, lo he 

tomtorow noon. Ihe trea!*urer of 

be chosen. All of the 

tl;.' iluh were rliO.>4en 

..! tlif .iiriMt'OS la;*l 



.\1 

l.o-.s 

lii«ld 

the club wH! 

o titer off: 

at the n 

•■>;» ! n ! .1.1 .V. 



nue M. E. church held a banquet last 
evening at the churcti parlors. Presi- 
d.MU V. E. .Mct'a,>*kill. Superi.>r noriiial 
-school, spoke Oil the "Bad Boy." hl.^ 
address being tlie feature of the eveii- 
intc. There were about 1-a in attend- 
ance. 



ii 

•r 



i;iiierial»uirnt 

\\ till- rn;;:ir!an churi-li l"i 

' -lie 111 of the \\ 

-sioii Z'> cent>. 



l.ocN i«> .lail. 

I with !>«-M\ 



I;!1M'! V 



I 



i.H t 



i..t t! 
les ft 



l.iiliel l.enicue HeeJa. _ 

The n't;ul.*i ni.'ftinK; of the Ladies 

Indeliendfiit Lain*! !cai?ue was held la.Sl 

evenii'K at tlo- Kalaina/oo biiiMiiiK". 

\i.< li I) I ..\ai.l of Lakeside si>.ike to 

on ihf advanlaKcs of or- 

, If working women and a 

coniniuiiii aiioii wa.s read from Mrs. 

navnioivi ll-ibuis of i'hicaKo. urRlnK 

ti;,. ai' " 'l' s.one of tin- m^nilieis 

Hi ti . Ill i't' to be hehi at t'hi- 

l;i» 111 .>-i.i>t.nil>ei Tlie members will 

.-.•t Tuesdav afternoon of n.-vt week 

,1 the liome of Mrs. U. F. Barrows of 

Fiftv-einhtti avenue eti.-it to work on 

.1,.;. '..,,,ii ni,i.-ii 111)' nu-mbers are 

■ t i'.".^ Ill ■( 1 in.-.-t ii; 1^' u- li I 



% (TdU'l 4i>r S4»»rey. 



lU 








..lie. 








ifoin 








. ;'av til a 


vv . 






i li;c [ic\t 


rUli 
T 


tut. 


u 



Ulli (iiv*> lliiiii-r. 

I'nitarla.i church 
at the fominerclal 

ii 



\ 



in 



It was 



Klect Meiitenant. 

I! II' .if Fii'.l Wi.iid as first 

iripanv C, Tliinl Infan- 

la.1t evenhiK at the 

II ■ .1.1 V. ,nu'ed from first 
, I > 1 . ! i..i I ■ K will eJeci a first 
.,■":• . ■.lUiu l.'iii'.: 1 •■vv evening. 

♦ 

Voiip Only (hame to .\ttprid. 

V'-.r,l..s biii.l iU'\t .■^iin.lav Lycf'Uliv 



'I 



V*»ur Ti<*lv<'t-; 



-iiini.»ly 



\N .Mi.itn.ol ^c"*T, 

1 'i- ;- i:i.::., : • .' . 

.>n |)!atis II.!' afi ••' 
l;.Ii.i, 1 1 will lira 



K r -t . ; ' 1 



liHIH 



BANK CLEARINGS 
SHOW A GAIN 



lOd- 
! of 

,. V. — J .,-ind 
a:' lit Ka.^i 

1: T .■ IV..: Vt 



' 1 in - 



litt- 1 . 



i|hi>v linrliHiee llcHUx. 






will 

; hi'*m. 



men. 

I ••in .yf 

1 

1.1 M 1 «- 

.rcrnlsfs 

.] to 
..tkcn 



Modern Samaritans 

A larffe attendance of the niemliers 
of .Alpla ("ouncil Is desireil tonlKlit, 
Thurs.ia\ In tiear the report of .lele- 
gute.s til 1 1'.' (Ir.'iiid t'ouncil. Roth <le- 

irree.s .ii"'^ i uy it'-d 

WimKW \K.I.S4»\.I.. s. 




PEBSOiM 




HHiH S( HOOL (ONTEST. 

Orators and Derluimers Will Moet 
at BlaiiiP Schuol. 

Tlie declamatory and oratorical on- 
test of tlie hiKh schools in Northern 
Wisconsin will take place at the Blalnn 
high school tomorrow evening. Ash- 
land Ironwoud. Washburn, .Spaoner and 
the Blaine school are those wliich are 
reiM'esented. 

The Blaine speakers are Eimon 
Weiner in tlie oratorical contest, and 
and -Miss Laura t^'ote in the declama- 
tory contest. The two winners in this 
contest will go to the state contest. 
a 

\\ ill )love to New Temple. 

The Masonic orders of Superior will 
move into the new Masonic temple at 
Helknap street and Mii«liiit avenue >n\ 
\pril ::•.•. The housewarming will not 
take place until the structure is en- 
tirelv completed. whi<-h will be in a 
few weeks. The new building cost 
.about J.OO.OtMl. _ 

Extend the "Wliite Way." 

Treparations are being made to ex- 
tend the -great white way" ot decor- 
ative lights to Sixteenth street. In- 
.•stca.l of Belknap, as was originally 
planned. Accordingly. preparations 
began vester.iay for the removal of 
the wooden poles at the corner of 
Belknap street and Tower avenue. The 
iniblicitv committee of the Superior 
Coninier'cial club Is pushing the matter. 
a 

Will Build (>rand Stand. 

The directors of the Stiperior base- 
ball clui» in the Mlnne3ota-\\ isconsln 
Baseball leaue are planning on the 
erection of an up-to-date grandstand 
with a seating capH.-ity of l.OOO people. 
.Fust what grounds will be used by the 
.lub as a ball park huve not yet been 
decided upoju 

KX-SHKRIFKJ.UKSONDKAD. 

Oldest Living Resident of Kewee- 
naw (onnty Is failed. 

falumet, .Mhii.. April Z.:. — (Special 
to The Herald, t — Thomas .lackson. 77, 
of ..Mlouez, deputy sheriff of Keweenaw 
lonntv during the Civil war. died last 
nisfht. He had resided in Keweenaw 
lountv sixty-one years, or longer than 
any liVing resident. He had long been 
prominent In politics. 



ALL OVER 
BIT POUTING 

Rival Daughters of Rev- 
olution Candidates 
Are Confident 

Scott and Story Forces 

Active as Voting 

Approaches. 

Washington. April 22.— Even before 
nominations were made today the rival 
candidatv.-- :oi president general of the 
Daughters of the American Revolution 
felt that iv was. all over but the pout- 
ing. Ti.e campaign lias been conducted 
with a vigor such as never had been 
witnes.sed l.>cCore in the history of the 
organl^alioll and since tiie present con- 
gress began tiie election of officers 
was the absorbing topic of discussion. 

A beautiful, clear spring day made it 
poK>*il)le for the candidates to bring out 
their full strength, s..- that when the 
c.y.'grcs!^ was callerl to order the great 
aiu.loiium was packed to the doors. 
Iht f -lilt lies, which are set apart for 
daophtcrs. wh.o are not delegat-vs were 
fltitu eaily in the day, while the lobby 
was croWiied with daughters who 
show.'d genuine grief over their ina- 
bilitv to get inside. 

Mrs Stolt, administration candidate 
and Mrs. Storv. anti-administration 
candidate for president general, were 
on the ground early and their lieuten- 
ants activelv at work to the last 
minute, kept them advised of the slt- 
ufttion. 

Second only in interest to the e ec- 
tion ot a president general is the elec- 
tion of a vice president general m 
charge of organizing of chapels, Mrs. 
M.ises J. t»raper is the running mate 
of Mrs Scott, while Mrs, Mirand.i. U. 
Tuiloch has cast lier fortunes with 
Mrs. Story. 



Olobe sold at $4.50 and closed at »4 bid 
and $4.50 asked. 

L)enn-.\rizona was inaetive and 
closed at $2.^7 4 bit and $3.12 Me ■^'*}^'l'} ■ 
Calumet & Sonora $11,50 aske.J^ Butte 
& .Superior S.'i cents bl.i and Sb eent.s 
a.sked: Red Warrior $1 «7,Va »'IJ and 
rM2».i asked; Mowitza $1 bid and 
ji.l2Vi! asked; Carman. JV;'^.*^.^^' i*»'! 
11,50 asked; Savanna tL75 bid and $2 

^"BUck Mountain sold at 99 cents and 
closed at 9 9 cents bl.l. ^ 

SULTAN MAKES 
DEAL WITH FOES 

— 

Will Continue in Office 

But With Powers 

Restricted. 

Constantinople. April 22.— The Sul- 
tan of Turkey and the chiefs of the 
constitutional party have reached an 
agreement under the terma of which 
his majesty remains as soverign of tiie 
empire, but with powers .some-w.-hai 
more restricted than before the pal.i 
conspira'.y of April L". 



suffering liardship and want on account 
of hard times. Ten per eent of the 5,- 
000 000 skilled wo;-kers in the countrv 
•are' whollv or partially unemployed. 
For every skilled workman out of em- 
ployment two unskill.'d men are with- 
out work. Each idle workman repre- 
sents It is e.stlmated. a family of Ave. 
The fedeiatin calls upon union men 
to refus.i to work overtime in any tradw 
or Bhoii which happen.-- to be extra 
busy Engineering trade unions, with 
a metnberslilp of 15:}. .{(Kl. report 12 Pe«- 
rent unemploye^l. while shipbuilding 
unions, with a membership ot b0.6..1. 
have 25 2 per 'ent of th.dr members 
out of work. Other tra.les .show similar 

returns. 

— . • 

The Herald prim i today s news today. 
Herald want i*.l. i)lioiie.s ;:24. both lines. 



w 



— » 

L L' M I V I If 



Best Pianos 

and Most for the 
Money at 

KORBY PIANO CO. 

The Kimball Factory Store, 

201 E. Superior St. 



==« 



WEALTHV KANKAKKE MAN 

DROWNS IN FOX RIVER. 

.Milwaukee. Wis.. April 22.— An Even- 
Iii»r Wis.-.nsln spe.lal from Green Bay. 
Whs .^avs: Don .Vlarcott. :{3 years .ild. 
a member of one of the wealthie.^t 
and most, prominent families of Kan- 
kakee in. was drowned in l!ie i* ox 
river t.>day, after falling from tlie 

ioik 

• 

MlLLItWS UNEMin.OYHD I .V .iREAT 
BRITAIN. 
N'ew York Sun: Accorditig to the 
mangen-.ent .-ommittee of the r.eiierai 
F^d.Maiion of Trade fnl-yns in (Jreat 
Britain, more than 7.0')0.000 persons are 



<< 








iflFY 



" l-iiriit'd Willi l-'orKerj. 

.■; .11 -.-.1 wi;!. {•.< ia:u^ 
xnierlcan 
,;.■• .if H. 



YOUR CREDIT 
IS GOOD 

BLOOM & CO. 

Hi::- 1 \^>«i i'ir-«i stri^ft. 

%itd .*i*vr 34» t*» » per cent i»ii _^«>«.» 
IM KtH ASi:. t III! aaJ ^**- ""•" <««»"«««. 



Drunk: ::« DiO 



frill 

.V. 

ager 

H, 

rout 

ajiol 

E 

Jl i; . • I 

\< fi 



■ iniinaon returned loilay 
a N i.>u %\uh friends in tlie 1-:ih». 
M. Thompson, traveling fr.'ight 
It of tlie Erie is in the .-ity today. 
I^. M.1.11.- agent of the M.ni.m 
e. with luail'iuarters In Miiiue- 
is is III iMilutli today, 
l' ob-r, a.ssistant general frei!;lit 
: .,f ilie < jreat Northern iii'r.a.l. 
.•(. iiiiiin business. 



Write It D»*vn in Voiii- Hand. 



Vcriih'.^ band 1 ■ i ''iin n-'V 
afi.-i" .. ■■ ■'•! •■ ■■:i1t.g. 



11;. lav 



1 1 1 . O 1 1 1 u ,i^ 



1 >.» Vlii 



H:ink OfTli-er.. IHii<-il. 




■ V .1 I 

laiil 



Mure Teleplioae IJueM. 

'f|,,. ti.iar.i of public w-irk- 
. tv . w ■' " ■■■'■■ 
mUith ■! 

J.M,, I. : ■>'. Il"' : !-i i>^ion to il. . • 



FOR RENT! 

Ground Floor Offices in Rear of the 

NORTHERN NATIONAL BANK 



INQVIRC AT BANK.. 




yFEIBDiiR IM 



SCORNS RIOTERS 
AND MINISTERS 



Tli.>m:i.- lb. lines, a railroad swilch- 
iiir.ii 111 in7V, Dg.len avenue, lias a 
natural a\ersion lo doctors, so strong- 
ly nianifested tKal the authorities are 
lookiim' inio his mental condition. 

Several tlme.s h.- has been seen 
drinking water out of a stagnant pool, 
und it is claimed that he also drinks 
soapsud.s. He called at the office ot a 
Superior phvsiclan yesterday and tried 
to liilk the medic ..ut of business. 

Vfsierdav afternoon lie was taken in 
hand »)V the sheriff. He is being held 
for an examination as to ids sanity. 
He snvs that religion and medicine g.. 
han.l In hand, and there is no need of 
advif • friitn .Mther tiie prea.ther or the 
iloel.T. 

>!ens flub .Meets. 

The Me: .s club of tlie Cumming Ave- 




Buy a Tourist 

GO'Gart 

The Best Made 

The cart that always folds — it 
folds easily and quickly with one 
motion— ha.s springs — is finely up- 
holMered. Come.^i in nl«kel. nickel 
trimmed or handsomely enameled 
frames. 

An easy riding cart, the baby can 
rest and enjoy its ride in a Tourist 
becau.se the cart Is rOomy— the baby 
is not all cramped uy. 




NORTH BLTTE 
HAS BIG DECLINE 

Goes Off Five Points Dur- 
ing Early Part of 
Session. 

N Jrth Butte's sensational de. line was 
the feaiure of a dull copper stock mar- 
ket today. The bears began driving 
North Butte early, and the issue went 
oif live points or more during the first 
two iiours of the session, the low 
point being $t;').I2Vs, It rallied about 
a point an.l a half after ih.at. 

The rest of the market was dull and 
the .nirbs were also vei y <julel. with 
closing pri.-es a bit irregular. 

Nortli Butte opened at $65.50. de- 
.lined id $70,124. raliie.l to $62.75. went 
off to $61.25, rallied to $62. oO and 
closed at $'.2 bid and $62.50 asked. 

.'Amalgamated opened at $75.75. de- 
cline.l to $75.25, rallied t.. $75.50 and 
eTosed at $76 bid and $76.25 asked. Ana- 
eonda .ypened at $45. decliio^d to 
$44 S7\a an.l closed at $45 bid. Oreene- 
Cananea opened at $10.2".. declined to 
$10 12>.2 ami closed at $10 bid and 
$10 124 aske.l. Butte Coalition closed 
at $24 bid an.l $2 4,37 4 asked. Calumet 
& Arizona sold at $100 and elosed at 
f'j!4.50 bid and $l'h> asked an.l (Jlroux 
closed at $S,U4 bid. 

Superior & Pittsburg sold at $1,> and 
$13.25 and cl.ysed at $1."? bid and 
$1;1.12 4 asked. 

By reason of its weakness, Butte- 
Alex Scott was one of the features of 
the local curb. Sales of th't,'- P^'l 
-tock were reported at $6.62'.* and 
"closing price was $7 asked. The full 
paid A\i^\ Scott closed at $9 asked. 

Chief Consolidated was firm around 
! %\ 50 and $1.75 and closed at $L50 bld^ 
I Cactus declined Crom $:';.75 to $S. 2a and 
closed at $3.25 bid and $3.50 asked. | 



One tent a W*.rd Kaeh lui«e_rtl»n — Xo 
.tdvertUenienI l.e«» Than !.'» Cenli*. 

ff^Ti fn:^n^^'T?;Tr^'FCRNpm^^ 

rooms with or without boar.i al.so 
table board: gentlemen l""^^'*''*^;*, 
115 .Seventh avenue west. Bellevlew 
terrace. ^ 

LtjST— RED MF LLE y' COW WITH 
white face. Call 3158-A. or J. Olson, 
Fa i r tu .> !t t d airy . 

?^R~SA le":=^s"et enc l yc ) be 1 >I a 

Britannica (thirty-on.> .^'•>''^"1*;V ' 
«..od as ne w. Address R S. Het^ald^ 

har.lwood floors, etc. -XIT farK 
p.dnt- See Hartman ODonnel. agent. 
205 



Face and scalp treatment^ 

shampooing, manicuring: large stO'-k 
of first quality hair goods tna<ie to 
order at Miss M. Kelly^^oyer^Suffelj. 

HavV Cameron^Teuph.olsier your furn- 
ture. Both "phones. 123 1st .Ave w. 




MARRIAGE LICENSES^ 

Stanley Micliau.l and Ella Mclvit- 

"^'oberg .lacobson and Anna Elvardsen. 
William A. Hunt and Marie Sundby. 



DEATHS. 



WINKLER— Joseph M. Winkler lio 
Lake avenue south. ?-< years of 
age, died April 15. 



BUILDING PERl^5J5: 

To Harriet P. Warner, brick 
veneer dwelling at Wood- 
land •.; ••;•"■,■■.■',■* 

To Mrs. A. H. Florada. brick 
dwelling on East Tnird 
street between Twenty-sec- 
ond and Twenty-third ave- 

To* Whitney Wall & Co.. frame 
dwelling on Fifty-seventh 
avenue west, between Ro.>se- 
velt and Nicollet street.s . . 

To F H. Stock, frame dwelling 
on East Sixth street, be- 
tween Ninth and Tenth ave- 
n ues : / ■ ■ ■ 

To J n. Lane, frame cottage 
on' Pittsburg avenue, be- 
tween Forty-fifth and Forty- 
aUth avenues east »... 



7..'.<I0 



10.000 



1.500 



1,500 



500 



Inside 

the 

Piano 



Is v.'here an expert I'juk^ im 
defecla or merits of an instru- 
ment. .'\ showy case is n'>t an 
index Ut excellence Something 
nitire tangible is re ptirc-l t't 
jti.'.i^c its w.f^h KIMBALL 
PIANOS are the highest staii.l- 
',r.i i.t" merit PERFECT IN 
CONSTRUCTION. TOUCH. 
TONE, DESIGN and FINISH. 
.\lways the bcsl i)> every te-.l. 
We d'l ntt BUY the pianos, we 
BUILD thcni. an.l build every 
part I.t the srtnie tr.Mii the very 
best material. Vv> employ the 
highest class expert w.irkmen 
and control many v.tlnable pat- 
ented imprMVcmeiUs cxcin-ively 
11. cd in KIMBALL PIANOS. 
which makes the Kimball <>ne 
of tlic \V)iM"s leader'^ Our 
"FACTORY TO HOME" sell 
itig plan enables us to fu-nish 
oar customers the most for 
their money. 



W. W. KIMBALL CO. 



Duluth Office, 
201 EAST SUPERIOR ST 



^=1 



m 




•mr^ 






] 




THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD THURSDAY, APRIL 22, : 



L R. BONDY, Gen. Agt, 



rri\. 



tlnlHf I.if*' 



I nmnrtkntv 



MiXN'EPOTA 

4;oiM|iiiii7' 



W. M. PRINDLE 

Fire, Burglary, Plate Glass and Liability Insurance. 





W. M. PRINDLE, 
E. A. MERRILL, 
T. H. HAWKES. 



Um 



^ 



First Floor, Lonsdale Building. 



to- 



( nIi-il«intnD Imiiirancr C«iM|»«i»y. 

rrii- ■.-,■.,:•■ 

»*nlc# li» Mliii.t 



I nioB Marloe Innunince Company- 



Mechnnica' 



ati'1 Trade m' 
Conipani^M. 



Innurauoc 



rrlni-li*! I'ff.' 



V 



<('l>tM 



r. I C f» ( 1 R ji F M I N 1 S 



cuniKC ivi'f 



(•-,■•-' 



OSIT CAPITA I 
INCOME IN 



1908. 

.1 1 :i;»Ci •'!• 



iiut,.rlty rf K^iltrr 



!■ 

iiLlm-w In th« ITnltiU Ht»t« 

UiiiJ.iuin. »eMi»l roftnafcr in th. 
Mtinwy I*' »cc»i't 
-I, ... r cf Ii)»a»«nr». 



■cnUt iu Miu 



1 IICSIT 



.\nTAi 

INCOIHe IN 



itoa. 



I KfUin iuiil liiH"rf«t 
If. til ..:l I lUT K '.-r .' 



Ti'lal iiJi-"'"!* 

DISBURSEMENTS 



IN 



f 

I SOU. 

t 



1 4. 



72*,' 



To, 83 



.11 



(I cnl>tr rial «KiH» 



,:r aiuliJfir.? i.f l.-.li!M a»M«» 



ASSETS DEC. 31. l»tP 



ei.ipri 



Tiu; 



DISBURSEMENTS IN 



Amtunl r»l(l f«>r 
I tijuinl»'»ii'ii» »'"• 
Siilorlr* urul .'■■-> 

r. iil- 



Inki raur 

. ! rtl. tr^ 



t 

'.i08. 
t 



l.f<-M- 



„!..) 



,1 < ti.i I real «•^lkte 



All I'liirf 



tUtbuiKrmi'i.ii 



Tot*l 'll^: 



t:jii'»s» "1 



ASSETS DEC 

(>wnMl 

1 ll, t!l!.k 



r>.*-iiit I iM 



R 



1,*M 



31. It 



. tl. r. 



.rt«. 



Til 2M 43 
It) 4(>4 .'^ 

80 27: 07 

8ii,(:-.i.i'4 



<:<(. 222,10 
il4 122 CO 

S7 1«3.6; 

2«>.40l 11 
1(P4 <!24.47 

2».231»,,''»' 

-:.8 773.:.8 

;2,2«o,4n 



Ml 

44 
.3j 



PriiirStal oin< t Ntw OiiMinii. I.«. lOrpaulMd Ui 
18«'.' I Jamec Nuliolg. rrf*'"!*"' i II- '- K"'«tJ. 
wjeUn Atl.mrj !<■ »< <ri-l s*rvlre In Mli.nesoU. 
t'wuiiilssli'i.ei fl Jruuraute. 

I A<11 ( Al'lTAI.. J300.000.00. 



Palatine Inmuranoe Company. 

rrinrlral tifflie In tin- Vn'itHi f-'tale* >>w York. N. 
y. (C<'tniuK»i-«l bustiie.is 111 the l'nU«l MatiB HK)1. ■ 
A. H. Wlu.v gfiiCfitl nmiiuRrr In the Vnlleil Htates. 
Att< rney U- atwi t senUt In Mlrnmota, Ojinnuj*K:iti 
uf Iiijuianix;. 

UtPOSlT f'AriTAL, 1200,000 00. 
INCOME IN l»Oe. 



Prrmliims othfr 
nrnt> iin.1 Jtiteie't 
fVcni Kll otUtr »ou 



INCOME IN l»08. 

Itiaii i><rirtrHial» . . 



59ti i»l8.1'. 
38.tl3.41 

:oo.3«» 



■i ■'21 

44: 



Ttul i.iccm» » eS9,231.W 

DISBURSEMENTS IN 1908. 

r>alil 1( r U S90- 



Ariiiiir.I 
I'ciiiirilssit n» 
Sulu^l(^ and 

iiU'lcye* 
Tait». !•♦•. 

eiiierist* 

All i'll>*r al»l)at»nw*nt» 



and I'ri'Kfrage 

tern of tiffU«TB, asriits ami 

rente •uvl tithrr real ntete 



Tothl dietmnsinivuts 

Eiie«.i ol li«.oni€ o»er (Ustwrsfmi-iits . 

ASSETS DEC. 31. 1908 

Value «t n.i.1 i-tsiit 

Mortf.ige li'au* ... 

H. nils .Ttlll stirks lHVIJfd 

tiifch In office i.nil In tank 

Preml'iim In rt.uise nf oUkiIch .. .. 
I All ctlier admlueU as-tets 



rviu 6C1.79 
ill. 441. 13 

■( 418.24 

21 fi21.35 
30.787.07 

536.;i29 58 

102, 302.31 



rremums Mher liiA.. ft r.ittiitlf . . 

Keote and lnin«»t .• . . 

rn'fU i.n »ale «t mJiJuHt} of 

asftts ■ 

HeoelTwl from liuuio offlc* 

TutAl JncfBie 



ledger 



1,554 881. *:■ 
111,724.82 

417.30 

102,0S1.60 

% J 71.1'. 055.37 



Phoenix Asuuranee Company. Ltd. 

rnnolDnl cffke ii. ll.« ViUted States. N>w York. 
^^T T(--^^Lnc<^i tufines* In the VnlU.l HUle. 
Vi,-o .' A D Inlug. general nuiuf.ger Jn llie I nlted 
iut«. Attonio u accept «r»lce In Minnesota, 
lulEsloner cf Insurance. 

DEPC'HIT CAPITAL, $310,000.00. 
INCOME IN 1908 



Com- 



Sco««lMh 



1908. 



T. lul acluUttrt: .. ■ 
.Assets iH't uiliuittva 



»*e.4«i.w 



LIABILITIES 



LIABILITIES DEC- 

< «%eit 11)1)1 rt<ilM)»^ . , 



31. 



1 908. 



I 
J 
! 

A 



RISKS AMT 



PhEMIl M? 'w;5 f*r 



iS4,U: 
■Sff cc 



I'l.t'itl'l (■'•-••f 



|)f|H'>H 



}:■! )^^ i'2 
OEC 31. (908. 



':!■ (1(1(1.00 
;iti(! do i.oO 



T)'lai 



.g tai'ital 



4W,<'t'8 t..>i 



ToUl admitted komU 

A»!?et£ lot uduitlte<l . . 



.$67,600.70. 

LIABILITIES DEC. 31. 1908. 

li.fse* and lUinis . ■ ■ • $ 

\fir\t 

dividends and 



I :3.500.O0 
700.00 

•i:^ti.34i.ot; 

j;t 5'.'2.0.''i 

65.327.75 

100.00 

$ 1,042,561.70 



DISBURSEMENTS IN 

Am'unl raid fir l<*Be^ 

t'ouiml'iiiU.ni. and brpketage 

Salarit? and fee* vt (.moens, agents nnd 

eniplcyes 

Taxc». li»t>. rtnt» and otlieJ real estate 

exiienfcea 

Heturn Ifi lii'BJf ofticc 

.Ml tlhet (ilgburteJiient* 

U*(i <" sale IT lULlurity ol ledgtr 

»sect« 



1.116 018.00 

327 570. tl'-: 

100,532.43 

4P 404.71 

257 f22,'il> 
lll.OTO.f'J 

6.373.27 



Premiums ether than ptn*tuals. 
Ueil!' and Inlerevt 
Pruflt en Wklfe or 

assets 

rrom all other sources 



ni,iturltj cf ledger 



2.333,402.60 
yb,C10.43 

289. .'53 
92 344.10 



IN 



$ 

1908. 
$ 



Total income _'_ 

DISBURSEMENTS 

.Amount paid fv» 1<*^""- 
c'ommi»»i('n9 and lirtkei.-ige 
Salaries and (ee» of olTicers 

and employe* - 

Taie*, fn8. «entt .lud clbcr 

espenns . 

Return to h« me <'fri«e 

All otlier dishuisemente .. . 

Losa oc sale or maturity of letlg.i asae.s 



2,524 640. e: 

J. 283. 281. S3 
464, 258. «r 



agent* 



real ciital« 



223,1 



.81 



I'nion A >'ntlonal Inwornnce 
Company. 

Princiral fffire in the miU.l /'^\" "'''^{I'ifli 
Conn. iComiiience.1 business in the I nlte.i htate« 
1880 1 .laiiio 11. Krewster. general uiRiuiger 
fJdiwl States. AlUruey to accept fer>lce 
nesota, ronimlBslcneT cf Itisurance. 

PEI'OSIT < APITAL $200,000.00. 

INCOME IN 1908. 

Premiums ollwr tUm pca*tu.iU t ^ V^c ir?! n? 

Kents and Interest 168 41.0. Ul 

I'ruflt on salt ir maturity of ledger 

a*^"«s . 4 "75 00 

inm aU utlier sources * -'-' '^" 



in tb« 
IB Mln- 



168 460.1 
B7967 



'1 



-*• -■ 



t 

1908. 
$ 



Total disbursements 
FIxceM of dlsbttrsementi o»er income 



$ 1.087.592.9:"! 



218,537.55 



1908. 



rnpald 

Keinsuriiuii riscrte 
Snlarle- o.pensw. tBa«» 

ililertTt diie 

CapiUl stMk (lald UD. 



42.385.22 
402 518.82 

10.000.03 
300.000.00 



754.yO4.04 



Net 



»iin'i"-' 
RISKS AND 



PREMIUMS 
rllten dtirlne ti.t : 



1908 BUSINESS 

fir i'' 



itnl in force at )1h1 



'! the yejr 



BUSINESS IN MINNESOTA IN t! 

$ 



BUSINESS IN 

Marine ui.d InlaMi- 



MINNESOTA IN 1908. 



i.t n^K 



Total UablllUes including taHtal . . . I .,„, ^.. ,. 

Net vuH'lu? • 287.bj..6(» 

RISKS AND PREMIUMS. 1908 BUSINESS. 
155 ■182 :fc I ure ,-i,ks written durlr.F the year $81 27r '.''.U.OC 

Prcniluins re<elv«l thertoii . ; " 

Marine and Inland rtifka wrltlen during 

the year 

Premiums rn elied Diireon • •• • • 

Net i.mouiit In tcrce at end of the year. 

BUSINESS IN MINNESOTA IN 

Fire Illsks. Tornado. 
H1-K-. wiit1«n . ..|1 ilO. 028.00 $15 500.00 
Prtmli.ms reitited 
Ia !-se» Incurred. . . 
I.I— 'e« imlil 
Auuunt at risk. 



ASSETS DEC. 

Bon.is and m'< Ks i «nnl 

«iujl. l7i ifflie and In I'l.iik 

Accrued li.tere»t and nnts 

Premiums in ct.un-e of ullectlrin 

All other admitted assetf 
Deduct special ueiK«lt less $37. HO 
Uablllty thereon 



$81,700.48 
31. 



Ol 



:4 



4 It. •■( 

:'(.4.o«' 
^:;o 00 
i,(.i; ;<ti 
•-0,00 



t ■! ( ! t S 



!"M f. 



I 



i,i#IIIW'* 1 

■jr;,, 
I 
) 



IUl.)i: 



: A urn. AN 

.■r 1I.--..I •■ 



Iji In i<i.fii... i.l o! li.^uruii.i 
•f Ttiat the antiual statement 

,,,.e .i.nipunj for the year ending 

it whitii llie aU'ie 
,,..,! uuil lUetl In t 
^ u.i- 

Ji'll.X A HAinH.AN 
Commlfsloni 



of the 



an ab- 
depart- 



<>87.oy2.:>J 

2,315 109.00 

8.!»2«..'.!' 

62.172.302.00 



15,i2t'.22 
3641.00 
3 219,00 

975 87','. 00 



87.50 



lii-uruine. 



1908. 
Aggregate. 

$1,3;>2 128.00 

15 570.72 

3 641.00 

3 21!' CO 

32 000.00 1007 8117.00 

.SUte of Minnesota. Ifepanmci.t ol Insurance. 

I Hereby «ertlfy. That the annual statement of the 
\le.hinlcs' and Tradfrs' Insurance company, for the 
^.^r ending lK.-.n...r 31st. 1V..8, of «''![''»'',''''" 
U nn alstract. has been rwclv«d and filed In 
deiirtment and duly approved by me. 

joii.N' A >iahtk;ax 

Ccmrulssloner cf lrisura:ue 



Toul admitted assets 
Assets not admitted 

LIABILITIES DEC 

t'npald losses aid < lulms . . 
Ilalnitumtice rtKcrve .. 
Salaries, expenses, taxes 

Interest due ... 
fonindsslon and broheragi 
All other liabilities 
lH[*oslt capital 

TV'tal UallllUee including capital. 



$ 2 589 755.00 
57 f.02.8J 

2!i08."i.37 

327.0y5.73 

14,216.38 

y 

65 S8B.31 
$ 2,«ij2, 166.0:; 



101.653.80 

lO'.i.SOO.lO 

160 60'.'. 5(1 

6.175.0C 



Ti'tal dlsb\irs<>mente 



$ 2.438,193.01 



j.'icon.e over dlfbuJ«emen)s * 86,452.00 



I 2 



1908. 
$ 



dlddeuds and 



1.305 


374.17 
152.418 


23.131.00 

38.006.84 

34 365.27 

200 i'OO.OO 



.017.030 26 



$ {136 135.7f 

BUSINESS. 

|i7V.5Ii'.: 080.00 
2.1!'8 254.18 
.mount In font at end of the year. 209,801.1*3.00 
BUSINESS IN MINNESOTA IN 1908. 

Kirt Ilisks. TornLoo Agpri-gate. 
$2 495.070.38 $82,400 00 $2,577 476.38 



Net suri.lup 

RISKS AND PREMIUMS 1908 

Kite risks »rttteii ilurint: the jeir 

Premluui.- n.cned IherHii 

Net 



Excess of 

ASSETS DEC. 31 'MB. 
Bonus and stocks owno.l. 
cash in office and In L.anU 
.Vf.-rued interest and rents. 
Premiums in course of coile<l.i i- 
All othtr adinltttcl assets . . . 

Deduct tpwial deposit less Ji. -h' -'0 
liabiUty U.treon 



Total admitted assets 

Assets i.ot admitted 5' i- 

LIABILITIE8 DEC. 31. 1608. 
Vnp.iid losst« jnd claims » 

lleii.surtince resent 
Salaries, expcTiSes tiJc- „).i.l. m^^- -uO 

Interest due 
All oUitr ll.ibllltles 
Lieposlt capital 

Total liabilities includine capJtai. . 

Net surplus 

RISKS AND PREMIUMS. I9C& 
Fi« rlfks written during llie i^M 
ITemlauis received thtrcon 
111 lorct i.t end 



,590. 307. Ce 

221.041. 82 

.34.175 42 

355 7 33. 08 

7,551.67 

32.059.10 

182,897.45 



103.717.00 
1.8fct,056.'J0 

:•, 18^.42 

- .10.70 

3i0 000. 00 



Toul Income .,.>.„ 

DISBURSEMENTS IN 

.\mount paid fi r lc.sst> 

Commissions and brohtrr.ge 

Salarits and fees of olHcer*, agenta and 

etnploytiS 

Taxt-s. fees, nnts and other real tstate 

exi'dises 

■Return to home office 

All other di^ihursiemtnls 

Loss on sale or maturity of ledger assets 

Total disbursements 

Extets e.f Incomi tMr disbuivtments 

ASSETS DEC 31. 1908. 
Value tif real ettau t/w:ied. .. * 

Mirtg..ic leans ■ 

Bonds and stecks t-wned 

Cash in office and in bunk 

Accnied Interest and rtnts 
Pnniiunis in ( nurse of collee-Ui . 
All oilier aiiiliilteil assets... 
Ueiluvt «p<«'l''l deposit lew $33...:35.10 
Uablllty theretn 



2 159,299.62 

1 ('95 138.2* 
421.678.88 

^23,270.2* 

81 788 96 

22 641 83 

ir.f, 124. la 

5 244.01 



$ 1 905 986 2S 



253 313.3* 

90 706 41 

4 2'.i 812.50 
3 '.'Oil, 707. ©• 
168 r,-5.5JI 
6:^ 548.*» 
150 068.98 
301 778.84 

94 544.81 




I* 



ii 
t 

4 



.$ 2,397 274.14 



Total atlmilted assets , •,,„ j,.. 

Assets not admitted _'„ ^,. 

LIABILITIES DEC. 31. 

Unpaid losses and cl.-.inie ' 

Ueinj.urance riser** , , .' 

Halailes expenses. taxes. ui'ldenili 

and Interest due ■ 

Conunisslon and brckerage 

All oilirer Uubllltie^ . •• 

Deposit capital 



$ 5,0511.752.48 
50 
1908. 



156 360.48 
1,901,041 84 

32,835 81 

00.090.34 

115 107 8} 

'iOO.000.00 



«« t 



Total liabilities 



iniluiUng tapual .,* 2.465.436.26 



this 



388.83 



Risks written 

I're-niluuis rn'il 32.279.38 

Losses incurred . 15 .'^21.ii4 
I^'ssi-s paid 16. -IT'S. i5 

State of Minnesota Department 
1 Hcrtl.y l^rtity. Tl.„t the an: 
Palatine Insurance r(.nipi.ny. feir 
-ember :.lsl. 11'08. <i wliJch the above Js 
Mia.t has teen recelxeel and fUed Ic this 
ment and only appro,..: ly^^me^, ^ „;,hTK.AN, 
Commis-dontr of Insurance 



32.668.21 
15,321.04 

16.455.15 

of Insurance. 
Jill statetnent of the 
the year ending De- 
an al>- 
diepart- 



Net iuntunt 

BUSINESS 

Fire Iiisl^s— 
Risks written 
Premiums lecehed 
Uisses Incurred 
Iiosse* paid 
i^i^Hite ol Mlnne!Sot:i. 

1 Herety Cert II y 
Phtienlx Assurance. 
Ing I'ecen.t'er fist. 
at*tiact, has been 
partmeiit tnu dulj 



IN 



i.f the 
MINNESOTA 



$ 785.617.31 

BUSINESS. 

$287 327.1104 f(i 

3, 2f 4. 593. 12 

year 414 771. 870. ((' 



IN 1908. 



$ 2.881.840.(0 

49,009 ■'() 

30,607.45 

30,406.4:. 

Department ol Insurance. 

'n.a; lie annual ftatement of the 

Company Llel <or Ih* year end- 

1008 ef which the ab( ve is sn 

lecelved and lileel In this de- 

appro^ed by me. 

JOHN A. HARTIOAN, 
Commiselomt ol lasurauc*. 



Net surplus 

RISKS AND PREMIUMS. 1908 

Fire risks \Mlttcn daiing tJic yeas 
r'remiums received thereon 
Net ameiint In (tree i.t end ol the year 
BUSINESS IN MINNESOTA 
Fire Risks— 



$ 2 594,316.28 
BUSINESS. 

$:-J0 020 140.00 
.'r 327. 138.01 
3.34 500,423.00 
IN 1908. 



$ 4.604 358 00 
61 105.00 
4'. 810 00 

45 552 (lO 
8.610, 14'J 00 
liepanmei.t il liisuiunce. 
ri.i.t the annual stiiteine lit of tno 
Nutii n:il Insurance company, fog 
ve.ir enidnp Deceml*-r 31st, 1908 of wlileh 
_ has t-een recene-el and llleu 

rhisdei-artiiiwit and duly "/^^fj^^y *h'"4tI<:AN. 

Ci'mmissloiier cl Insurance. 



Risks written 
I'rcmiunifi rweiM 
Letse* Inci.rreil 
Li'SEes paid 
Aiuounl at risk 
Slate of Mliiiitaiola 
I llercly Cerllly 
Scet;lhh Cnhn & 
the 
aloee is ai. alistract 



h« 
in 



H. A. WING (Si COMPANY, Ageivts 






:-S 



iN l^^^^^.£!^C'T* "* 



It. i" IM Vv ,. . 

.%f[rU>iiiiiir»l 



jil. -Aj 



Inauranere t ompan? 



Cminfy 



iompauy 



of 



Prrniliirr.g 

r . ■ . 

l; 



FJre Inmiranee 
i'hiladelplila. 

" .. !'Uilj.!clphi.i. Pa. ie)rg;.!,l.'e<i u. 
IC Peck I iffideiit . t: A 1j*». sex 
. to ..c.cpt senile ir Mti.iiesoU. Coili- 
viiraore 
Ml CAPITAL • 

INCOME IN >'.'X,t. ,,^, ,.,,- 

than i.trpcluiili* $ J56,.".i,.<* 

,.. I .1.1.^ .. 4.275.20 

45.9'.4.2C 

1.004 '.ij 



1 thrr 



iii.004. 



I iij. 



$ 407. 804.85 



■tMENTS IN 



I 
1908. 
$ 



DISBURSEMENTS IN 1908. 
1,1 i',,r it.*>'s $ 

■ -■ K) ^.l^•l 

.■.M..t- ..►■ 



i:4.8'.3.f.8 
•'(■' '84,78 



H. Hill 
Mlnnetoia, 



Lunibc rmen'M Innoranee Company. 

I^incipa: e.fflce, Phllaaelphia Pa. H'lcamz^i 
1873.) Unis I'avls, president: ttUver 
taiy. Atliii.ey to aicept senlce iii 
uustilcner of Insurance. 

CASH t APlTAL. $250,000 00. 
INCOME IN 1908. 

I tl.er than perv.eiuals $ 

11. p«rr'eti.iil risks 

inttiest ■ 

Ihtr sources 



in 
se.ie- 
Coru 



Premliiros 
I'reml.ini" 
Rents mid 
From all 



Pnlil on »ule te maturity of ledger asseU l. .v~- 



e. .57 v21 

5 406.07 
7 '.'84.7!' 
Hi:. 00 
1.262.2 



Tutal Inejome 

DISBURSEMENTS 



341.345.2i 



IN 1908. 



h 



E. D. Field Co. 

Local Agents, 

203 Exchange Building 



r., ui uiebursei.-" 

|.-_.,,,.^„ ,,f Tf>r(>iDe ''• • • .. ' 

ASSETS DtC 

1- - ,. , ' !,;A .sta,(.: (■'"■ne..l 



nil' .•!'<' r 
ASSETS 



llsl'lirrtlliCl is 
DEC 31. 1908. 



\ Mi'l 

>t. r' 



.11. l!»U«. 



45,06!t, 

'Si ■•■ ''• 



fe#.<-TOrli>- li»»Mraii<?e t cimpmty. 



p.. 

A 



SO 






Ttii.! wlmltltd assets ^ ■ 

LtABtDTtES DEC 

.JlliS 



31. 



t 

1908 
$ 

iind 



,\il iiUiti auii. 



'ks owiie. I 

i Ill I .-! s 

i rents 
, I.f colle- 

.ll.il assets 



IMi 200, 1'O 

58 70O i.o 

710.28'J.OO 

«,1 •.81.06 

; 385.57 

: . ,-,13, 5-! 

;. 696.31' 



Irokeiage 
tl officers. 



agents 



Anic<i?il I'I'HI '' ' 
( oii.nilsslon» a 11.1 
Salaries and fi** 

e mployes •_ • • 

Taxe-s. fees. r«nl» auel iiiner real estate 

rxi>tn>e«i . . 

Dttidenils anil Interest. . ^ ■ 

U*s .n sale or maturity e.f ledger a»-.is 

All other eUsbursemtnU- 



lie.2f'l 

71,430 



SprlnK Garden Iwsaranee Company 

Frincipai otliit PIuImk IpOia Pa- i<«il-'i".'i'' 'i 
1835 Cliiieiice F.. Porter president. Ldu^.ra 

Uoff secretary. Atttriey to acceTt temrt n. 
netoU, Corafoissii ner if Insuiance. 

CASH CAPITAL. $4('0 000. OC. 
INCOME IN 1908. 
Premiums other then pcn^i'ials I 2 '•. : 

Pn-mlums e.n perr^tual ilsks ' 

Rents .nil. Initrtst 

From all other s< ur.es ^ 

Profit n sale e>f inaturllj of ledger 

assets 



Ill 

1., 

.Mji.- 



s' ;o!i.oi 

j,5j'j.3o 
11.110.54 



!«e\» England Life Insurance Company. 

Frincjpai I trice Rottoi.. .M..s«. ilM.n"rHlnl i"-'- 
Commeme^l b'asiness 1843.. Alfred l> J'o^'/^,")^ 
Ident J. A. Harbey. secretary. Atle iTiej tt acieiH 
seivioe iii -Mlnnenota. <-.miiassln.ei el Ins'^runcc. 
INCOME IN 1908. 



1 P. 929. 00 
16.512.34 

>(, O.'.O.OO 

1 1.60.00 

2.'i. 739.31 



Ifi 27 ( ,'.(' 
3, 04 3.. 1 00. 60 



I 



Tl till adiiiltteel assets. 
ASkCtj I.ot admitted 

LIABILITIES 

1 ■•..;,, I >M» and .lali!..- 
,f II serve 
i.U- on i*rviiu«l 



t\ use 
DEC 31. 



(.i.li.ies 

.Ihldcmls 



$ 5,n7 406.16 
1908. 



r ,'tn,.t-'if ME MTS IN 



I 

• 908. 

1 



A.i vli.. 
(■;.l luil 

Total 



. k I'.il'I 



Total Uatillties ii.-Iudlnf capiul i 



RISKS *N0 



PREMIUMS. 1908 BUSINESS. 



., l;;illMI 



r apital 



$ 19,852.52 
275.915.0'' 
iO 1 455,41 

n,.l 

- S..38.(il 

t. 083.58 

248.87 

40( ('00.00 


1 <1 

$ :.t, •-■12.72 
BUSINESS. 

Ji: 507 291.00 
47.< 52."i.*.'6 
.,r <S 8'.4.i:'O.0O 
IN 1908. 



Telal dlsbuneroeiiU 

>i.e«9 tf Income i'«er disbursements . 
ASSETS DEC. 31. 1908. 

Value .f real B»tal«s owned 

.Mirtpaiee lo.ms i* 

Collateral 'tiar.s 

Ht.iids and sUK'ks owned 

l^ash In office and In bj.nd 

At < luetl Interest and rents 

Premiums In ci'urse of iolIecUon 



282 963.21 
58.382.08 



93. 400. CO 
160 975.00 

i:j.ooo.oj 

1 275 494.00 
34.973.6C 
20.803.32 
30 929.62 



Total income 

DISBURSEMENTS IN 

Amount paid foi It'ssi- ' 

Ccmmissions aiid brokerage 

Salaries and fees of officers. agenU and 

employes ■ ; . ■ ■ 

Tuxe^. fees. r«ito and other reU esUW 

esten'es 

r>lvltlends rid Interest 

All other aisbutsemcnls 



$ 211' 
1908. 



857.92 



979 285 31 

427,853.58 

140,776.70 

53 121.61 

24.000,00 

101.721.95 



Fli?l years premiumt 

Dividends and surrender values atl'lied 

W purchase paid up insurance. 
Consldir..at!i fti original annuities 

supplemei tnry contraclf 

contingencies 
Hcnewal prciiilums 



and 
Invclving lile 



Total prenuum incouit. 

Rents and int.rest 

Profit tn sak or luaturtt: 

assets 
From all other sourtes ... 



Total 



H'.n t 



"orSBURSEMENTS DURING 

Death claims am: niatuicd mdcwments 
Aiiiiultle* and premium notes 'old by 

l;ipse 

sunender values to iK.Ucy ht.ldtrs 
Dividends to policy holders 



54 5. 273.86 
137,425 86 

5.055.22 
5,767,479 6'.' 

6 455,234.63 
2.107.384.08 

76 087.50 
:-4 348.52 

J 8,673,954.73 

1908. 
$ 2,810.752.02 

il 217.68 
>i;-2.401.23 
•Jb5, 965.50 



Relnsunu.ce reserve •,.•,, ,, 

Salaries, e\peii»e9. tuxes, dlvidenels and 
interest due ...... 

lomndsslon and brv ken.ge 
All other UablUlies 
Capital stock paid up. . 

Total linblllUcE Intludit.ji lapln.! I 



271.463 51 

9 215 4T 
11 648 3T 

5 812.24 
400 000.09 



''-'ms'KS AND PREMIUMS. .908 

Fire- risks v.r.ttin during tiie yeal 
rrcmluins it.cjvi.l thtHiij 
Net ami ml in " >'< •'' 
BUSINESS IN 
Fire. 'Risks— 



727 



5'j2ie 
524.42 



$ 84 

BUSINESS. 

. .$57 617 522.00 
6'.'8 830 07 
,11.1 it the year $42 440,573.00 
MINNESOTA IN 1908. 



Iirsl 



TVital disbursement* 



lis burst roei 
31, 



Total adrolltetl asseU. 

Assets not admitteti 

LIABILITIES 

I'npal"! losses and claims 

Reinsurance reserve 

Heclalmulle on pen-elual |H'Ucles 

Salaries, expense*, taxes, dividends 

Interest due 

.onimlsiiicn and brokerage • 

All either liabilities 

Capital stock paid up 



. ..$14,758.62 
DEC. 31, 1908. 



and 



.8 1,620.575.60 



24.479.70 
'264.218.03 
201. 830.00 

2.400.42 
2 084.71 

142.77 

250.oao.oo 



Excess of income cur 

ASSETS DEC 

Value cf real estate owued 

Mortgage U ans 

Mends ami stocks twned 
Cash In ffflft ami In bank . ■ • 
Accr.if<l Intcre'-t and rexils. . 
I'remiums In course cl ct.liecilon 
All other ailmitletl asset* 
Deduct special tieposlt 
liability tberet.n 



its 
(908 



1 726.750.15 



Uas $35.l«3.re 



387,098.77 

4« 865 OO 

JOO 627 5(1 

,214.700.:iO 

9!) 959.42 

L375.51 

383.770.0li 

a,4ii.04 

36,906.24 



Tttal 



Uabllltle* Including . apilal I 746,146.53 



BUSINESS IN 

Fir. 



MINNESOTA IN 

!,V-K- T.rna.l" 



lijo- 



B>' 



I he a ix 

Hied in 



L.EC- il. 



t90t 

t 




'''" RISKS AND PREMIUMS, 1908 
Fire risks written during the year 

PrrmliuiiS rtiti'ctl Ihereon 

Ml iin.ouut in f'T.-e at «"'^';' 'i^^;' . „ 
BUSINESS IN MINNESOTA IN 

' ' '" ' II 503.215.00 

' 25,429.00 

16,060.00 

16.837.00 

I 8M. 501. 00 

. .. pariineiit of Insurance. 

;i,at lbi> annual statement of the 

i.cr Company of Pldladtlphla. Pa.. 

ig Detcml«r 31st. 1008 



$ 883.420.07 
BUSINESS. 



■'''^rVsk's'aND PREMIUMS. 1908 ..^.,,,„,,, 

the year $jj,4..4.010.0( 

363,072.7! 
47.360.784.00 
IN 1908. 



of which 
klistracl. has been received and 
rtment and duly approved by roe. 
JOHN A. HARTUJAN, 
Couuni'slontr of Insurance. 



Fir.- risks wnti.ii iieinng 

I'remiums receiveel thereon... ._ 

.Vet amount In 1< ni at enil "' '''♦; JfT, 
BUSINESS IN MINNESOTA 

Fire Risks— 

Hl..ks written 

Pre mlums received 

Lt*se.s ii'curreil . . 

Losses I. aid I 

.Amount at risk 

State tf Miiine»ot.-v. Depariinent 

1 lirrebv Certify, 'lliat the an — 
I urn" mi • n> Inst^ranrt company, for the year ending 
'-"'"list 1008 of which the al-ve is an at- 
! U;u received and filed in tlUs 



$ 763.865.00 

763.00 

3.768.00 

""'... 4.866.00 

■|" 1775.350.00 

I f Insurance, 
annual statement of the 
for the year 



Total adirJIted as/iets. 
AsseU not atlmitttti 

LIABILITIES 
Vnpaltl losses and cialrn* 
Relnsurarice n»erie. . -^ 

Keclaimable on pen>elual polleieB 
Salaries, expense*, taxes. 

Interest due 
Capital stock paid up 

apital 



$ 2-813,813.00 

..' $55,329.27 

DEC 31. 1908. 

* 



dividends and 



Total iiabUilies including capital. » *. 



337.404.27 

1,405,189.80 

317 626.60 

30,000.00 
400.030.00 

$ 2.090,220.73 



Total paid pclle-y holdei- 
Commissions and tonuses i 

vear'? premium 

Coirmisslons t n renewals . . 
Commuted renewal commissions 
SiJaries and allowance* for agen<lt.a 
Agency suitrvlslon and other expenses 
Medical examiners fees and InspecUon 

of rt.sks ■ ■ ■ 

Salaries of officere and employes 

Legal expenses 

All otlner lilsburscments 



$ 4.6i9,336.43 

222 689.02 
311 265.61 

5.895.3'.. 
114 231.08 

7,548.33 



$ 750 000 00 
11.570 90 
9 114 91 
10.410 73 
1141,621.00 
l>er*rtroent of Insurant e. 
TliHl the annual statement of the 
lomliany. ffi H't >'••«' em'inB 
of which the above Is an ab- 
Mract has Iten tfcelved and filed In Ibis dcpurt- 
roent ai.e. duly ..pproved by^mr ^ „^„„^.^j, 

Coiunusslooer ol InsuraDce. 



Ilisks written 
Prcmlims icc«i>". 
Lossts Inci.iieo 
IX'SSOB paltl 
Amount at risk 
Slate of Mlnnestta 
1 Hereby Certify. 
Old Coll iiv Insi.i.ince 
DecemUr 31st. 1008. 



end of thi year 



f 3'23.5t»2.3e 

BUSINESS. 

$245,631,817.08 
3 030.807.7" 
:2 101.118.11 

I9(<8. 



De>enil*r 

stract. li. 



de- 



part u;.i 1 



iuly approved by me. 

JOHN A. HARTI(;AN. 

Commissioner ol Insuran.- 



Net surplus 

RISKS AND PREMIUMS. 1908 
Fire risks vtritttn durt:ig the >ear 
Pniuiums rcceiveil Ihereci 
Net amtunt In lorct at 

BUSINESS IN MINNESOTA IN 

Fire Rl^ks— « 

Klski- written 

Premiums re<«lve<l • 

Ix'sst^ Incuneid 

lit'ssei paltl 

Amount at risk. . . ■ 
State . f Mlnri'-'St'ta. 

I Hereby, lertify. i..». ...» —■■—,,,„,. ve&r end 

^BrS'^rBJl'^Hifr 

and duly ''H'roved by^.me. „^,^.,j,.^^, 

Commls.-ioncr ol Insurance. 



Tttal eiisburMmeDle 

Excess of income over dlsburferiierits 

Value of r«*l estaU owned. 

Mongage. loans 

Collateral loans 

Premium notes and policy loans 

Bonds and sttH^ks owneel 

Cash in office. Unks and trust 

panleg 

Accrued InUrest and rei.is 
Deferred and unpaid prenu uns 



48 442.61 

192.054.75 

1.104.25 

508.857.70 

I 6,041.426.16 



1908 



$ 5.262,616.76 
76,520.<7 

• "" 31.712.32 

29.534.54 

•■;;■;■■;;;;.. 6.783.441. oc 

Derartment of Insuranee. 
Th«l the annual 



Total admitted asseU' 

LIABILITIES DEC ol. 

Net value of outstanding policies . . 
JYesent value tn supplementary contratla 
anil canceled policies 

Claims ilue and unpaid 

Claims adjustetl and nol tUu- aM. un- 
adjusted and lept rieil 

Claims lesistwl 

Premiums paid In advance 

Dividends due pt UcJ holders 

All other Uablllties 



2 632,528.57 

2 428 380 00 
11.388.4:^3.34 
581 000.00 

5 024.110.20 
26 0'j4, 012.00 

878.463.20 
374 611.0) 
201.505 41 

$ 47 .'jCI, 705.34 

1908. 
$ 43.144.811.13 



C. H GIDDINGS, 

GENERAL AGENT, 

311 Lyceum Bldg , DULUTH. MINN. 

John Hanoook Life Imenranee Company. 



Frinciial onit. Host.n. -Mass |t>r»anl'e.l 

I8'i2 ) Stephen U. Rhodt* preslilcnl . WalK.n 
Cri^ker se<ttl;.rv. Attorney to »tH-ei>t atmee 
Minnesota, Commissioner of Insurance. 
INCOME IN 1908. 

First vear .; preml.ims • 

Divldentls and suncnilei values applied 
to rurchasfc paid up Insuiance and 
annuities ■ 
ConslderaUon for original annulUes. 
and supplementary ir.nin.'ls involv- 
ing life Cl ntli.Fcm 11* 
Renewsl premium* 



In 
h. 



982.141.98 



181, 897. 89 



5 12c 00 
1«,9'.0 238 96 



'farf 



statemetit cf the 



IP? 437.78 
t;.'"i,213.57 

215.200 48 

5 0(10.00 

51.006.00 

1,610,410 40 

165.276.48 



Total pit-mlum income 
Rents ami Interest 
Prt.lit on salt or matarii;. 

Friiu all otUer sources 



Mii'i 



18 108 308,17 
2,388,213 03 

21 005.40 
29,38397 



Total iiKOinc 

DISBURSEMENTS 
claims and maiureci endow 



Total 11a 

tt.iJJit 



;ilities oi, 



policy l,(.liiirs' ac- 



pttrtment 



All 



u titer 



AI 



ASSETS DEC 31 



l9Cb 



» k. f P K f M I L' M S 



?Pti 



t 4.1 o:t. -'s 



Harper-Shields Go. 



General Insurance, 

506 Setlwood Building, Duluth. 



tear tu.'.ing De.emUr Tlst. 1908. of whU;h the al*.vt 
Is an attract hus been «>oeived and fUed In this 
uepariuient ami. duly ""^"j^J^? a°'%,,„t,c.AN. 
Commissioner tf Itisurame. 



Globe Sc 



■ I'. 



Rl- 
Pf 
1... 
I,. 



.■■It. <;s 

OOJ.27 



KutKer'a Fire Insuranee Com 
pan J. 

..(Tl. I Nf" Vi rk. N. Y 
C. lamesoii. pre^fl.lent 
-.,,,i..v Attorney to ax'tpt 
ci.miidssioner il Insun.m;e. ..,^ „„. 
CASH CAPITAL. $400 (»00 
INCOME IN 1908. 



I 



itiifiu.;/!-.! 1" 

Lyman t andte 

sen lee In Minnesota. 



Cl«y of New York Inaurance Company. 

Irinip*! office. Niw York. N. Y. lOrganlzed In 
1..('5 . Major A. White, president; t). CairoU Irenth. 
se.retary Attortiey to accept senlce In Mlnni.ota, 
t'ommlisloner of Insurance. 
e.ommi SI ^^_^^^ CAPITAL. $200,000.00. 

INCOME IN 1908. 

Preinliin« • Uwr than perpctuala $ 

lleiiis nntl interest 

I'rora all t ther soiircee 

Profit on sale or maturity of leelger asseu 



Bank 



Uith," 

County 

nesota, 

virions 

States 

before 

ized to 



Du- 
the 



can Exchange National 

in the City of Duluth. In 
of St. Louis anel .^tale cf Min- 
ha-^" complied with all the pro- 
ol the .'Statutes of the United 
reeiuired to be complied with 
an association shall be author- 
commence the bueiness of 



Gross dlvislblf 
EXHIBIT 



Siirplus 

OF POLiCIES. 



$ 44.459.376.00 

28. 44 



$ 3 502.2 
1908 BUSINESS. 

Xo. Amount 



DUPING 



$ 20 547,092.57 
1908 



aiitl preiulum notw 'I'ld by 



326.062.75 

28.050.73 

1.48 

5,883.30 



.iaed MietB, 
ii.liiiitteil 
LIABILITIES 



J-" 
DEC 



1908. 



a r. 



Coll,JiUli,^ 



HAliTI'..\N 
. r .'t I.is.ir.i!.. 



(la. 



Cl:., 
Ir. 



44S 44l. t> 



iirt .,|l,ir tli..i. i"^i| i'.ials $ 

|(. lijv and tiiteie.-t 

From all other sour, es 

PirlH '■" 'tile ir miitnrliy i>r ica'cr 



H. I. PINEO, Gen. Agt. 

408.9 Burrows Bldg. 



Priaii 



Muliinl lite iBsiuraiiee O.mpaii?. 



A'A •-.U-', 



T(.i 



■1.1* IN 



DISBURSEMENTS 

., tl r l"s.-" 
- anil bp.kentge 
,.d fees <I ifflctr^ 
ttiiployeT. 
fftt, renis .. ' . i in r rci. 



$ 

1 908. 
$ 



and 
Taxei 

expenses , 
Dltldeii.ls and 






• r 



nterc-i 

lislAirsieiuei.' 

. .liursenirnt^ 



2.084.530 02 
1.38,567.50 

lOei.ooo.oo 

2.184.50 

2 415.201.11 

1 7 67.250.63 
■.•.9,831.7' 

88 t01..54 

.;4 844.07 

l»(i,0(l('.00 
iOi,721.24 



^""""■SUbuRSEMENTS IN 1908^ 

Amount paltl for losses ♦ 

Commissions and brokerage ■ 

Salaries -nd fees ol t.fflcers. agetits and 

emploves • • -^ ■ ■ • 

Taxes, fees, rents and other real estate 

U^s^'^aTVale or maturity of leeigrr assets 
All ottier disbutsemitnts 



8 300.900.26 



Total dislursements 
i-:xceM cf 



EXHIBIT OF POLICIES. 1908 BUSINESS. 



,1' 



f. 



'l-Our-ciiii 
ASSETS 

, . , .-l.iii 



DEC 

W llCil 



ji 1908. 



l: 



li..- 



.<)' 

ItO 



BUSINESS IN 



MINNESOTA 



i8 
IN 



Mii.jiint. 



s-:i>:' '"aiw 

I. an.l sUH-ks i.wri««l 
111 office and In bank 
.,1 lull rest ai.el rents 
im- In ce.ur>ie of rollecib 
oilier iidmitted ■•■■-■ 
Deilnct special dep. 
UiitlUty t lure I- 



All 



$ 2.522,348.22 
$ 107,057.11 

7i !)4r..(i|. 

73".200.0i 

3 4'J6,080.5" 

15:;. .•.94. S3 

21.852.00 
700.218 83 

40.576.66 

3.'i.0«6.8r, 



iU-biir'-en;i Ills over iniome . 
ASSETS DEC 31. 1908. 

Bciul* anil stocks ov« ne.1 

Cash In office nnd In bank 

Atcrueel UiUrest and rents 

Prtmlums In course of collecllon 



205.361.4'J 

58, '.(82. 57 

46,982.05 

16.508.96 

9.656.73 

25.366. 28 

362.858.10 

1,937,84 

628.45.1.00 

51.646.78 

3.145.83 

74.580.65 



Is 

business 

Section 

nine of 

the United 



NOW THEREFORE, I, Lawrence O. 
Munav'. Comptrolier of the Currency, 
^o hefeby certify that the ''Arnencan 
Fxchange National Bank of Duluth," 
in tc City of Dululli, in the County of 
St. Louis and State of Minnesota, 
authorized to commence the 
of Banking, as provided in 
Fifty-one hundred and tixty 
tlie Revised Stalales e 

"*Lkm'verslon of The American Ex- 
nliantre Bank of Duluth. 

IN TESTLMONY WHEREOF witness 
niv hand and Seal of office this Third 
day of A|.rll.,m.9.^^^ ^ MURRAY. 

Comptroller of the Currencj^, 
<«?eal of the Comptroller of 

rencv. Currency Bureau. 

Department.) 



Policies in force 
tf the year 

Priides in force at .• 
year 

Net increane 

lssue^d. rcvlve.l and 

during the year 
Tet-l teniiinattd durii.t! 

By death 

By maturity 

By expiration 

By surreimer 

By lapse 

By denTcast 

BUSINESS IN 



at beginning 
, , ! the 



75.707 $17S.e72,32J.O0 



78 537 184 913.858.00 
. 2^0 $ 6,041,538.00 



;ht ye-e.r 



increased 

. 7.230 $ 

841 

.218 

. . 300 

.... i'ii-i 

. 1.870 

18 

MINNESOTA IN 

So. 
beginning 



f(,ne during 



the CJur- 
Treasury 



Policies in force at 

of the year 

l.'suwl during tht year 
Ceased lo be in 

the war. Iniludlng tn.nsfer 
In loixe DtC. 31. last -^ 

Incurred daring 



668 
346 

500 

514 



17.965.246.00 
11 '123.708.00 
■^ 390.:-05.00 
460 528.00 
1.020.784.0:;' 
2 835.875.00 
3.012,157.00 
1.204,069.00 

I90U- 

Amount. 

5, 125.214. 0C> 
586.082.00 

1 072,621.00 
4!638.675.00 



aK'o's 



ile« 



and claims 

claims settled during 
unpiUd Dec 31 . 



and 



Losses 
year 
Lt'se-s 

year 

H«ses and claims 
Received for premiums . , 

>Urinesota. Dtiariment of 
CerUl^ That the _ 

ending l'^"*-""*^ ■ l^.. ^^,^,^,5 .,„d filed In this 

duly approved ly me. 

JOHN A H.\BTl<iAN. 

Conaulsfioner of Insuranee. 



State of 
I Hertly 



an atiftract 
department and 



the 

J 40.072 00 

tlie 

41,072 00 

l'J8.0'J 

[[.. 15.846.152.00 

Insurance. 

annual sUt^ment of the 



Death 

ments 
Annuities 

laj..se 

Buricnder values' to poUry liolderb 
Dividends tt ptilicy holders 
Dividends to itmpany 

Total paid ptllcy holilers 
Divi.iends held on drjHs^ll s.nt'.d 

during the year 
Commissions and btiiuises 

lii«t year's premium 
Conmilislons on lenevvals. . . 
Coicmissltns on weekly premiums 
Sil-ric- ai'l alliw antes fir agen 
AgencY supenlsioii and otiier expenses. 
Mwllcal eiamiiitrs tees and inspecU.m 

eif ri«ks , ■ 

Salaries ol t flit ere and employeu 

Legal exienses 

Agents l-tlances thaigtu 

All olhtr disburse ments. 

Total disbursements 

Exc«s of l^-- -Vs"DEc'Tr"ll08 

Value of real estate cwn-.tl 

Mt rtgape loans 

rreiiiiuBis ill tes and policy 

Bonis and stctks owiietl ^ . ,„ 

Cash Ir. ofTlte. t«.nk6 and trust com 

parde* 
AiiTuetl interest and n'f'"' 
Deferred and untiajd ^reiniuuis 
Detluft balances held 

banks 

All other admitted assets 



5,046 



93 



6 206 17 

802 680 18 

l,5:i6.'.'6S 44 

15 580.44 

J 7 «07 075 15 



I 



off 



1 810 20 

404.2!'4 89 

507 227 22 

1 044 e;|i|, 23 

842.34(..S2 

83,02029 

289.200.08 

638 345 2T 

3 384 4T 

3 047 71 

1.280 607 80 

8 13,415 948 79 



loaiis 



in suspentied 



7,131,14378 

>671. 113.^8 

17 784,26'.) 83 

3,656 308 72 

28 858,108 94 

947 362 94 

7.'.9 l'J2.83 

1,357,076.23 

5 138 04 
73,055.88 



for fourteen 
in that city 



A New York man rode 
hours in the street cars 
the other day tor 10 cents and w-hen 
llie ejvi. , j^^ ^^^^ ^^^^ transfer left. 



he stopped 



Arthur J. Reeves, 

General Agent. 



Total 
Assets ! 



T..|f.l 



,1 



Tn)l*l in.- CO* 



[■ 



Dentil 



I.MENT8 DURING 

lUiiturtil •i.tc'.v- 

l,..r<-rtilii'i, r.i, t. 



Ilml 



50 : 



ill I. .1.1 I" 

, ,, ff.' uml 



iliilms ultled .luriiil-' 



121 

.'m 

; the 
$ 

t lie 



20>2i> :'(■ 



ilmiiti. - • ■ 
1 a.l:iiiile.l $7. 

LIABILITIES DEC. 
I nraltl lossee. ami claims. . . 
Itelosiiraiice r«»en« 
Salarit'. exi<:-ii-e». 

li.tt rerl tlue 
c..ii.iiils»lon ami l.n..ker>.>!. 
, , . iher llabllltle- 
1 slock paid ui 



$ 4.532,370.90 



ellvldends and 



40.186.70 
269,610.57 

2.300.00 

22.5<J6.8J 
200.000.00 



.r.;i6 72 
31. 1908. 
... .$ 



taxes. .Ill blends and 



admitted assets ■ -^ • . • » 

,<.l atlmltled ^'V^'^vLL 

LIABILITIES DEC 31. 1908. 

I'nrald lossts and claims • 

Reliisuramt reserve 

Salaries, expense*. Uxes. 

Intenst due 

All other tlabintles 

Capital stc k paid UP 

capital t 534. 894.12 

$ 222.838.14 
BUSINESS. 

$58 153.682.00 
'548.600.88 
52.383.446.00 
IN 1908. 



Total IlatlUtles including 



Net 



,,1 i 



r. I., 



366.644.00 
1,648, 073.30 

12,00<' ('0 

20 548! 16 

2P5 000. 0) 

400.;)00.00 



Net 



llablUUes including capital 

siiiplns 



I 2.751.265.52 



IN MINNESOTA IN 1908. 



I 



1 1. !l,: 
Its. U. 



,d oin. 



46,t>^.7 ' - 

108.7O8 ^i: 

11,783.71 



Mcvuva* tai. — 



llccilve.1 

8 tilt e of -Mi 

I HiTi*'> Cirt;* 
I.,;m. M;.t'..il ' ■' 
. m1i..i! Uectuit I. 
■.1. ji'Stract hii- 
lalliutul and li 



l...|,..lluii 



I '( the 
111.- year 
,.|.ov< Is 

ll.is de- 



-e .ompiiiiy ."i 
i SI. if whjrti the 
. ived antl liletl In 
•eel by mc. 
JtiHN A HARTK.AN 
CtiiuiuiBSiviier vl Iwuianct. 



RISKS AND PREMIUMS. 1908 

Fir.- rl-iks wriUen .luring the year 
Vrciuiuins reclveel Uicreon . 
Net :im. un: In force at end of 
BUSINESS 

Fliv Rlsks- 
RIkKs written . 
I'roiiiluros lereieetl 
Uissts Inc.irreil 
Losses p.vld 
Ani'Ui.t at risk 
Stalf of Mlitne»ot;«, 

I H. relv Certify. 
Uiut;« <t Kulgu » 



% 1 781 105.47 
BUSINESS. 

$203. 2.'.8. '.75.(10 

4.032 004 28 

the vear 253 010,874.00 



RISKS AND premiums! 1908 

Fire risks writ'cii ti'.jring tlie year... 

Premiums received thereon... . 

Vet amount in lore at end of tiw y*-"' 
BUSINESS IN Mir 
Fire Itt-ks- - 1,003.345.00 

Risks written • 14 160.24 

Premiums re. tlviel 7 57!* '.tC 

Losses Imuittd ■ a|l6'j!«>8 

OiartrMlniiesVi:.. i.eparimei\rorinsiirsnce. 

illerebv Certify. That the annual state-raent tl the 
I Hereiy . en y „„„r„,H* iini,«iny. for the year 
i'.to8, e.f which the alove Is 
nd abstract, has 



Cltv of New 

Hitting Decen,l,r >^';-,;^,; — i.^j ,,„u filed In this 



department and duly *«'l'«';,Vi^^i,"''„.u,TIC.AN. 
Commlssltmer 



(f Insurance. 



1 



15". 3.-.2.00 

25 04 :v 83 

'27.008.(!(; 

22.876.06 

1.242.013.00 

Department cf Insur.ince. 

•Pial the siinual stall ment of the 



jaTurJit* eJniani; for u* j betn made lo appear 



TRE.^SURY DEPaSmENT OFFICE 
OF COMPTROLLER OF THE uTR- 

^'^^vSsklngton. D. C, April 3. 1909. 
WHEREAS. By Batlsfactory evidence 

presenteel to V'- .^-^-^i^i^^^.^-.-iin^i- 



Do not worry over your GRAY 
BAIRS. 

^rlll restore them to tbeir NAT- 
URAL COLOR, no matter how 
long the hair haa been gray. 
Yon will he surprised how 
anickly the change Is made, how 
permanent the result Is; how 
luxuriant a growth and healthy 
a head ol hair you will b«\«- 
Thousands are proving It dally. 

IS NOT A DYE. 
Cl AND 50c. BOTTLES. AT DRUGGISTS. 
Bay's Harllna.Soap 



OFFICES— Ryan Bldg., 
Bank of ("oiiimerce 
apolis. Minn. 



St. Pi.ul, Minn.. 
Bldg.. Minne- 



Total r.ilraltted assets . 

Assets no; •"'"'IWVt.cc nrc 3i 
LIABILITIES DEC. S». 

Net lalue of outftan.Ung IfU'le*^ 
Prc-ent value on supplenientary 

inicts and euntelleiel poUcK.s 
Claim* due and unpaid • 

Claims adjusted and not due. and un 

adiusttd and rept-rted. 

Claims re.sisted . . 

Premiums tmld In advance 
Dividends tl'ic pcUcy h- Ider- . 
SlHcinl cojitlnge-m pcUcy le. r.. 
All other UabllUltS 

pollrj hoi.Uis 



$ 8f .855.238.70 
37 
. 1908. 

.$ 48.646 439 00 
cein- 

366,957 00 
4 729 00 



!■ 



159.644.09 

10.7 40 50 

103 254 58 

f,37 081.11 

:-.45 cro 00 
337,534 74 



Total UablUlies on pouo """•", ^0,711.938 98 

account , 

, J 143.209.71 

""^POLICIES. I9C8 BUSINESS 



L iJlvislble 
EXHIBIT 



Old Colony Intiurance 

Pnn.ipal offite. Ht.^'';'- M='^' 

UKt.i Ransom U Fuller „-„.,.. service 

etretary. Attt niey 7c acetpl servitt 

Minii«i6o;a. 



Company. 

(i'l-paiiized 
president , 



Charles 



Ml. litre* tecrelary. 

Houpe. i.,,„,„>sioi:.-i If Insurance. 
C^SH (APITAL. $40. 000. 
INCOME IN 1908 
Premiums ether than icrpttuois » 

Renis ai'U intere-.t _ 



Policies In 
the year 

Policies In 
the year 



OF 

(t n e at W-ginnlng e.f 
force at citse eif 



402.107.;'0 
30.583.70 



$ 

1908. 
$ 



officers agents 



Total i«'""^«',gBi,RSEMENTS IN 
Amtunt paid I.r losse* 
C-Mnml-sit lis aid brokerage 
Salaries and fees ol 

T^.'{^«''"n'^ •«<^«»»'"^«*'«^" 

cxpen«e-s 
Divldentls and Interest 
AU other disbursement* 



432,601.75 

225.204.84 
UC lOi.i'S 

26.401.24 



,\cl Incieatc 

Issueil. revlvtd and 

during the year 
Total teriiunaled 

yisr 

By death 

By iiiiit~.rity 

Hi expliaUon ... 
By surrender 
By lapse 
By ditieasc 

BUSINESS 



tji< reOMJd 
during the 



No. 

Ill 337 

121 287 

9.950 

21.289 

U 



Ami unt. 

$18ci 825.088.00 

190,538.174.00 

8 15.713.066.00 

36 730,607.08 



utm 



IN 



at 



Total disbursements 



I 



cures Eczema, red. 
ro^Jb and^hipPt'i bands, and all sJ*''' ^isea^s. 
keeps .kin fine and «.ft. ^^c dropc.sts^ Sard 
2c. lor Irce btvoks, "The Care of the Skm, I be 
Care ol the Bair " _ 

Phlio eay Spec. Co.. Newark. N. J, 

W. A. ABBETT, 



Excess 



of income o"' 1'*i';i^^%'?"",L. 
ASSETS DEC. 31. I9C8. 

CtiUateral loans 

Bontls and sleeks ovned ■_ 

Cash in office and in bimk 
Aicnieti Interest and 
I-rvmiums la cour* 



rents 

cf coUcctlon 



15 
16 
24 


248.43 
iiOO. .* 
.554 76 


417 


605.25 


15.086.50 

117. .500.00 
582 080 00 

30 297 00 
6,965.43 

75.274.15 



PfiUenes in ftine 

cf tJie ye>;.r 
Issued during the 
Ceased to be In 

the year 
In foive Dec. 31 last 



i30 
■90 
■ • • ■ 7(, 

i Ci4 

8 (i42 
1 
miNNESCTA IN 

.N't.. 

beginning 



year, 
force 



during 



3.784 
638 

330 
4 092 



20.017.521.00 

1 277.008.00 

'155 377. 00 

:«l 048.00 

2.180 GOO. 00 

13 277 84<J.0O 

4.0'j6.453.00 

1908. 

Amount. 

5.813 480 00 
1.157.093 00 

549.344.00 
6.421.229.00 



Total admitted assets 
.^..ets net "^'j^'^'-'.T.tS 
Unpaid toMm acti ilaim* 



$2,171.80 
DEC. 31. I90& 



$ 812,116.58 



35,442.5! 



and 
and 



rlaims 
el.-ilros settled 
unpaid 



during tl* 



Lt^sses "•■•> "»*.«. Incurml 

year 
Losses 

ye-ar - ■ ■ . 

l>HM.eB and claims 
Reecived for pivimuius 
sule of Ml.nesii" I,'-' — y-„,^.^j ,u,em«.t ot the 

1 Hereby lertify. ,"». u^e ,. , ihe yea* 



during the 
iW. 31 . . 



36.531.00 

32310 00 

2.000.00 
194.182<M». 



Department of Insuian.e 



j.ihn iia.'«-'\'^»' ';'*":!"r 



ending l>t.ietaUr : 1st. 
and abstratt. has U* 
department and duly sppio 



i.M'8 of whiiii Uie aU've 
tmlvetl and filed In 

,,nl by me 
JOHN A UAltTUIAN. 

CoiwulMiutt*^ of li*»urauca. 



!• 







PP 










_c 



THE DULUTH EVENING HER^LI?: THURSDAY. APRIL 22. 1909. 




73 Feet oi\ Ernst rirmt Straeit 

The atii.w lot. ar- ir. the bt-at yart of the east end residence dislrict. 

E. W, MARKELL, 306 Lonsdale Bldg, 



CHEAP HOMES 

«IIIM> Slx-i'.)..iri h<>u.s.\ in liiisinrsa 

block. Pioolor. Stiai) for some 
onf. 

frofMi Slt-r....!!! house. full lot. 
\Ve«l eml. 

f; nil liou.se, Kiist end. 




FARM LANDS 



161 ■»»▼«•« '»fi K'"! n* 



«RE 8fST INVESTMENT FOR YOUR SAVINGS. 
RmI L>k« County, MInnetota. 

II mllw *f.iitlipii»t of 
■■, •- - I I, on 

■■ Im- 



•,,l .,(. Liktf aimK In HublMitd 
If tikin at once. Itil* 

County. MinnMOtk 10 «rr«M 

i 1^ Hiid Ijani. four mlkn 

v; ne»i siii.M'l anil 

Terrm. t-Ot< c*j.li 

■,.Unc*. i ,i.-iir>. iMT c^nt. 

FARM. CARLTON COUNTY. MINN— 

~ fitmi 



ON DULUTH RCAl CSTATt 
CORPORATION ( PRIVATE FUNDS 



ARE YOU IN THE MARKER [fOR 

A HOME? 





n old house built from 15 t<425 years afro. 




RAILROAD NEWS 



r.ry^^ too 'which are on the ''for sale" list. We own,>oti»e fme lots in 
S^lde.' Xormaf school distr.ct and central and wdl build to suit 
you. If interested call at once. •- •• 

The Minneapolis Construction Co. 



ST. PAUL. 



MINNEAPOLIS. 
515 Burrows Building. Zenith, 529. 



DULUTH. 




,.f 



r the 
ruike 

■CVU l.it ,(;....J iK.ltHf 

$22 p«r arre. lecoi», 
:, jyare at 6 pvx I'vut. 



l.sAI \11 U. liRABI OKD. 

JIJ-2U TORREY BLDG. 




90x100 Feet In Endion, 
Below London Road— 

»250 

R. P. DOWSE & CO. 

im Provlde'Dc* Uull«llu«. 




WE 
WILL 
BUILD 



Aoror<l 1 ti B to 
y<jur plana, a 
home to cost 
$6,000. or great- 
er. We do not 
require much cash 
fli^e 



Call d,l 





CHEAP LOTS 
$50 



Cash and balance |10 per 
mnnth williout interest 
win buy a lot 25X140 fee 
M, riu'.stiT Park divUU.n. on Ninth 
r Tnth stii-et and Thirteenth 
*"^ Thf-sf are lieaulitiil 

\i with sidewalk 
and our price Is 
Look at th. -m 



;i venue ea^ 

Kvel lots. 

to Kfiided . 

\ fry r'*H><oMal>le. 

tUst, tlun call and see u.-; 



Frsinkfort E«»y*6"«''«y 

M, M. mftAK'mmVrM. ^ > I 614-51.% paiiadio nifiK. 



Martne, Aeei»l«'iit Mnrt IMntc Cilann 
Inniirmiee roni|»«ii>. 

\\q 1 N'orihern 

LIABILITY 

i):Utv ln.-<iirance 

ive r:ilf.s and 

I I U -■* [. I! I e 1 1 t > t ■ ; \' 1 C t' - 

uis IlKure on yi>ur bu.'.inests. 

Dunning & Dunning, 

am vAiA.xitio. 

Zemili «m. O'd 425-R. 



I Few Snaps in Lands 

Xm aewa of i»i»«l tliatot landa aboiw » 

ill.., i.Hii:iwe»t of Pin* SlBlloii. aiid about I* 

lit,' . -uiuth. partially liivprwT«ti hs hmmt 

nn \ atJoul IS acrea ckaml. Tlmb«i 

:. mad tu pai t9t It I»Tl«e. HOW p«t 



»y 



W. R. 1». about % miles 
U. N. I*/ . an BJi<"«ll«nt 

fiirni. «injili UIii; on »i>*-- 
>r Ituii u«. iTl>;». II. SO 

■■ I'l '■ Lake. t<€»t tort* 

,-t »ci». Timhet 

, No tw>ul)l« t«' 



8 now lillllla. 

AL. KUEHNOW 

715 Torrey BIdi 



map These Do Not Suit You We 
Ir Have Others That May. Come 

and See Us. 

St (MM) Six rooms. c<-in<>tit founda- 

* Uon. electric lighl^. ''■"I^^'^.mTv 
througliout. rough plumbing, ci y 
V-.,,..- unlit 1305. i:a--.i ScVt-ntU 

«"Mio ~ n rooms. ga.'^. hath. 
hardwood lloors small barn. Kast 
Sixth street. Properly l«i good 

St -too Five rooms and pantry, 

'hardwood floors, wired /or elec- 

rlc llKht- Housje heh.K h'^Ht- <; ^» 

be finished In three week.s. K.uit 

Ninth street. 

We Write InnnrantT l« 

panlrn t>uly. 

CHAS. P. CRAIG & COMPANY 

nOI-r>l>4 SeiUvoud llldts. 



A-1 Com- 





BARGAIN ! 

S5800 

KI«?ht-room houue, Oxford .«?treet; lot 
fi''uxl33 f«et; water. Kf«s, electric 
HKltt: hardwood ""«'•? •P'if.'r'J^'?!" 



hath; Kood Imsement; 
tlon ; liarn. 



stone founda- 



!PlJUORD,HOW&CO. 

309 Exchange Bldg. 



Two West End 
Bargains 

SI 600 !::;^M;v^'"fe^''^^ 

Third street monthly payments. 

AilirA Utivs 10-room houaJe and 
lalaU h>t 50x110 feet: city 

•u.>r and sewer - Is 125: 11.150 

,'.sh. balance 6 !.• This prop- 

, rtv is worth al ,< 1.000. 

Julius D. Howard & Co. 

MONF.% TO i.O\^. 

Rent Kwtate — Loans — lumtraoce. 

•.:i« Wewt Superior Street 




Seven 



>..,«.... room house at Lakeside— 
1 modern plumbing, electric light; lot 
' 60X 10. Rents |30 per month. 



Let Us Show You ! 

$5000 






FOR SALE ! 

\ fine level lor m, .^Ixlli .^tr.-.-t, b.-- 
tween Fifth and Sixth avenues east. 
upper side; city water and sewer— 

$900 

EASl TKItMS. 

R. B. KMOX & CO. 

1 l^«ciiaiiKr BulldioK. 



ARTULES OF IXtOUrORATION 

— OF— 
(ONSEUVATIVH RKALTY COM- 
PANY, 

W ,• 111- undersign, d. lo li.^reby as- 
sociate our.selves together and adopt 
the following articles lor the purpose 
ol formins a corporation under aivi 
piuNuaiit to the laws of the Mute o. 
Minnesota. 

FIRST. 

The name of this corpora tl'iii ^''i^^" 
he "fONSEHVATlVi: KilAl.li CU.M- 
I'ANV.- 

SK<;<.)NU. 

Tlie Reii.ral nal'.ire of lli<> business 
to be carried on l>y this corporation 
..,hali be the buying, selling, owning, 
leasing, lioIdinK. handling, mortgatfing 
and otherwise dealing in lands, tene- 
ruents, hereditaments, bonds, notcb, 
mortgages and other real and personal 
property, and the building liandling. 
Milling, owning, and otiierwise dealing 
ill buildings, houses and otlier strue- 

t u res. 

THIRD, 
rincipal place of transacting 

il,^ .•AXftin of said corporation shall 

be the trity of Luluth >n the County 
of St. Louis and Stale ot Minnesota. 
FUL'RTH. 
The luun. .- and places of i.-sid.'no.> 
ol' tlie person.s so associating to lorni 
said cori.oralion are as tollows, lo- 

^ Whitney Wall. l>u)ulh Minnesota. 
H H I'Jielps. Uululh. Minnesota. 
I.oiijs Kamstad. Duiutli. Minnesota. 
iN.lin Tliomson. Dulutli. Minnesota. 
H J. .Mullin. l>uluth. Minnesota. 

FIFTH. 
The management of tlie affairs of 
Uiis lorporalion sliall lie vested in a 
board of directors ol live persons, wlio 
s|i;ill he stockholders in ttic corpora- 
iiMn any three of whom sliall eonsti- 
tute a quorum to do business. I ntil 
the first annual election the following 
persons shall compose the board oc 
directors, to-wil; 

Whitney Wall. Duluth. Minnesota, 
n H. I'helps. Duluth. Minnesota. 
Louis Ram.stad. Duluth. Minnesota. 
rolin Th.>mson. Duluth. Minnesota. 
H .1. Mullin. Duluth. Minnesota. 
The annual meetings for the election 
of directors of said corporation sliail 
be held on the lirst Tuesday in Janu- 
ary of each year at the office ot the 
corporation in Duluth. >V"n*T fivti 
such hour of the day a.s shall be fixed 
by the by-laws or by tlie order ot the 
board of directors. 

SI.KTH. , ,, 

The offi.-ers of this corporation .shall 
he a president, vice president, secretary 
and treasurer, and ihe following per- 
sons «hall constitute the fi'ft offices 
of I lie corporation and shall Imld office 
until tlie tlrst annual election and 
until their successors are elected ani 
((ualined. vix: 

Whitney Wall. Presiden . 
H IL I'helps. Vice President. 
Louis Kamstad. Secretary. 
Colin Tliomson. Treasurer. 

SEVKNTH. 
The amount of the capital stock or 
this corporation shall '^^- ,P'|>, ^^''^V; 
sand Dollars ,$50.ooO) 'livided i n o 
Five Thousand (5.000) shares of Ten 
Dollars (»10. each. The capital stock 
.h.'iU be paid either in ca.'<h oi piop- 
, itv acceptable to the board ot direct- 
.,1- an.t in such amounts an 
times HS the board of dir. 
.Utermine and designate. 
KIOHTH. 
The liigliest amount of indebtedness 
or liability to which this "Vl'Vn*^ 'bl 
shall at any time oe subjected shall bo 
Two Tliousand Dollars .|i'.""0.. 
NINTH. 
In case of the death, resignmnm or 
disuuulHicatlon to serve of any ottl. ei 
*dUector of this corporation lie 
so caused may be filled l>y the 
members of the board of 




BEGIN WORK 
VERY_SOON 

Construction of Cuyuna 

Road Will Commence 

Within Sixty Days. 

Grading Will Be Done 

From Both Ends of 

Line. 



Active work on the construction of 
the Cuyuna Iron Range railroad, tlie 
new line that Is to connect Deerwood 
tind tiie Cuyuna range with the Head 
of the Lakes, will be commenced with- 
in the next sixty day.s. The companys 
contracts require that the road shall 
be In a position to handle tonnage 
from the new range by June or July of 
next year, and to complete the line 
within the required time it is neces- 
sary that tile 



SHORT LINE 
TO CHIGAGO 

Wisconsin Central Line to 

Twin Cities to Be 

Improved. 

Will No Longer Be Con- 
sidered a "Weak 
Line.' 



117-119 West Superior St. 

Bargains in 

Suit Cases 

On Third Floor 



SUBURBAN HOMES! 

HIXTKU'S TARK — .Now slx-ronm 
house modern.' Owner inu«i« sell 
mX oner. Come and make us an 
'iffer on this. 

L.\KK*illlK — Now 6-room hou.se. 
ni.Mlern in *>very way. Price 
93.7UU. Easy terii«. 

New ti-room house at Forty-seventh 
avenue east, near London road; 
stri'-tly modern, $4,600. 

OTHKH HOMK.S AT «' ^ «:'"»»' — 
ranging from »1.400 to »7.."H>0; o\\ 
easy terms. Lot. V^TM to »7.'.0. on 
easy montiily payments, call and 
let us show them to you. 

J. B. GREENriELD, 

;{0« Burro»v» Bldat. 




HOMES 
WANTED 

We have daily inquiries for Hotnes 

in all parts of the city, all graUcs. 

We can ^"^H your Ilou-s** or Lot 

quick if you list with us. at a fair 
price. 

THE HARRIS REALTY CO. 

r>;iS Manliattun Hhlsf 




at such 

,t - slial! 



«U' 

vacancy 

remaining 

liirectors. 

LN WITNESS WHEUF.i'F. 

hereunto set our hands and -seals in 

fipMcate at Duluth. Minnesota, this 

15th day of^^Ap..h ^;V D. l«o. 



We have 



WALL, (.Seal.t 



GASOLINE 
CARWANTED 

Fonddu Lac Residents 

Are After Better 

Service. 



work be begun at the 
tarliest possible moment. . . „♦ 

Grading crews will be started at 
both ends. Track-laying will be com- 
menced at tlie Rabldt lake end to en- 
able the company to use its line at uie 
start as a connecting spur to t le 
Northern Pacific and facilitate^ the 
transportation of niacliinery and sup- 
plies to llie mines. „„j^ 

Several surveys have been made, 
and the company has the choice of 
several routes. The line will start 
from the Mississippi river and cro.ss 
Rabbit lake at its narrowest point. 
From thence it will run southeasterly 
and intersect the Northern Pacific at 
or close to Deerwood, The road will 
probably run from there direct to the 
Head of the Lakes. It will lie single 
track at first, but with grading suffi- 
cieiit for additional trackage when 
needed. , ^^ 

The rapid developments of the range 
and the frequent locating of new de- 
i.osits. has made it difficult to decide 
on the most feasible course for the 
main line. A belt line from Doorwood, 
tapping the mineral lands both north 
and south of the Northern Pacific, is 
being considered ami numerous spur.s 
to properties which will not be touched 
by the main line, are included in the 

About forty acres have been pur- 
chased for the Eastern terminals. This 
sives about half a mile of water front- 
age and more land will be purchased 
as lieeded The road will be equipped 
both for heavy ore hauling and pas- 

■""'There^uSittle doubt that tlie Soo will 
build into the range C'>""try as soon as 
possible. It is a comparatively short 
distance from the main line of the Soo. 
soutli of Mine Lacs lake to he range 
and surveys have been made with a 
view to running a '^^anch either to 
Brainerd or Jonesville and bidding loi 
d share of the traffic. 

Deerwood and the surrounding coun- 
try are Just now experiencing a land 
boom of no small P'oportions^ Iron 
lands are practically out of the mar- 
ket Mineral finds are so frequent tliat 
property owners and would-be buyers 
are.kept m a state of constant expec- 
tancy The new town of Cuyuna. near 
Kabljit lake, has several store bulld- 
iigs a postoffice. hotel and other slruc- 

i.fes. Tnd lots are ««V'"^ .^^Pv'^irtl 
that would have purchased 8e\eral 
acres of the same land a few years 
ago. 

TRAIN EMPLOYES 
IN CONFLICT 



Scramble for Desirable 

Runs Is Causing Bitter 

Feeling. 

Fond du Lac. Wis.. April 22.— Wis- 
consin Central trainmen have already 
come into conflict with the trainmen of 
the Soo line over the 
ployes. The Soo men 



ft 



Close upon the heels of the acquire- 
ment of the Wisconsin Central by the 
Soo comes the story of the decision by 
the Soo officials to shorten the mile- 
age of the Wisconsin line between St, 
Paul and Chicago. 

It is said that this will be one of 
the preliminary steps taken in the 
effort to bring the Wisconsin line from 
the second class to the position of a 
standard line. 

According to the story of the con- 
templated plans, as they are told in 
railroad circles, the route of the Wis- 
consin Central, or the Chicago division 
of the Soo. as that road is known since 
the consolidation of the two lines, will 
be shortened sixty or seventy miles by 
constructing a cutoff. One of the 
drawbacks of the ^h'^^^o "iivis on of 
the Soo is that tlie road takes a longer 
route to Chicago than the otlier Chl- 
cago-St. Paul lines. Thhs objection 
upon the part of the traveling Pub he, 
it is said, the officials ot the boo pro- 

'^Tltir Ihe'dTstance of the Chicago 
division sliortened. and tl»e . J""^;* 
brouglit up to first-class condition in 
every way the former Wisconsin line 
would rank with the other lines run- 




By mistake a shipmetit was 
sent u? from the factory and rather 
than return same at an expense to 
them, we will sell them for the 
manufacturer at wholesale. 

Matting Cases $ 1 .85 

Matting covered ca'^cs, full size 
frames with Rood leather handle 
and corners, bound on all edges, 
value $2.48. special ^ 1 Q C 

Leatherette Cases 95c 

Imitation leather cases, with leath- 
er corners, made to sell A ^/% 
for $1.35. special at ^^\* 



C^" 



ning between St. Paul and Chicago and 
would furnish added competition to 
the present traffic between the two 



pr 

U has been the intention of the Wis- 
consin Central officials, from the Ume 
the short line between Diiluth and Chi- 
cago was planned, to make the former 
Wisconsin Central line between thlt^ 
city and Ciilcago a first-class line in 
every detail. Since the acqiiirement 
of the Wisconsin Central by the Soo. 
these plans. It is _said have been even 



r 



DIAMONDS 



n 



We have a large stock of tmre- 
deemed Diamonds, which we will 
sell at greatly reduced prices. 
KCYSTOMB LrOAN CO. 

Id Weat Superior Street. 




further improved uj.on, for the reason 
that the Canadian Pacific will make 
the Head of the Lakes one of its 
strong terminal points, and the route 
from Duluth to Chicago will give a 
.splendid outlet from this city, and will 
furtiier strengthen the position of the 



Canadian Pacific in the' traffic affairs 

of the West. 

• 

Be«l Trealinen* for Coldn. 

"Most ordinary colds will yield to 
the simplest treatment.' says the Chi- 
cago Tribune, 'modest laxatives, hot 
foot baths, a free perspiration and an 
avoidance of exposure to cold and wel 
after treatment." While this treat- 
ment is simple, it requires consider- 
able trouble, and the one adopting it 
must remain in doors for a day or two, 
or a fresli cold is almost sure to be 
contracted. and In mariy '''"'Vu^Mpr 
pneumonia follows. is it not hotter 
to Din your faith to an old reliable 
preparation like Chamberlains Cough 
Hemedv. that is famous for its cures 
of colds and can always be depended 
upon 



? For sale 



•uggists. 



ADDITIONAL SPORTS 



ADDI 



in thhs city from Browerville this aft- 
ernoon. Kev. John Kromolicki, who 
is in charge, has made elaborate ar- 
rangements for the occasion. All oi 
the Catholic socieUes of the city have 
been invited to meet the bishop at 
the 3:10 Great Northern train from 
where ha v.ill be escorted to the St 
John's Polish church. 

In the evening there will be a re- 
ception at St. Mary-s hall, when a»i 
elaborate progra m will be gi ven. 

Mr F. G. Frills. Oneonta, N. T., 
wmes -My litlK ^i\^■\ was, «'«»«> 
benefited by taking F"*^/ «„^0[*Ji*^ 
laxative and 1 think it Is tne uem 
^emedv^ for constipation and liver Dou- 
ble " Foiev'8 Orino Laxative s bett 
for* womcnand children, as, it Is mild 
plea.^ant and effective, and is a splon- 
d 1 spring medicine, as it cleanses the 
.system and clears the complexion, Foi 
sale by aU druggists. 



Negauiiee Has Fast Team. 

Negaunee. Mich.. April 22— (.Special 
to The Herald. )-The Negaonee indoor 
baseball team is considered about the 
fastest organization of jts kind In the 



upper peninsula, it having again won 
a decisive victory over the crack Isii- 
am early in the week, 
nderstood that Negaunee will 
trongly represented this year 
arquette-Alger County Base- 



\ 



$5500 



H H. PHELPS. (Seal.) 
H J Ml'LLIN. (Seal.) 

LOLIS F: AM. ST AD. (.Seal.) 
COLIN THOMSON. (Seal.) 

Sealed and Delivered 

in Pr sence of 

P.VLMKR. 

MAIIONEY. 



Six r'- 
ly III 
W 



.nl In 111 St 



In F^ast end. strlct- 
,1 location. 
I large number ol 
\ houses up to 110,000. 

C. H. Braves Sl Co. 

Suite 200, ist National Bank Bldg 



Money to Loan 

B, 5V4 and 6 per cent. 

Insurance 

Old Reliable Companies. 

Estate 

Monthly Payment Plan. 

Cooley & Underhill 



:oti-io- 



.11 Exehan«e BullillnK. 



FOR RENT 

Second Floor. 12 and H Second 
Ave. West— Over Edwards. 
For Business or Residence. 

LITTLE & NOLTE 




Siprned. 

K. L. 

J. D. 

State of Minne>ola. County of St. Louis, 

?^rthis 1-th dav ..f April. A. IX 1909 
nt Duluth in Sl. Lou.K Count.v. In the 
S a e of Minnesota, before me. a notary 
p. tlie in and for =^"'^,.,^"""*y «";^ 
sie personally came Whitney \V a I . 
H H Phelps. Louis Kamstad. Colin 
Thomson and H. .1. Mullin. to me wel 
k'nowr?o be the same P^^^yr;,."^,"/^^ 
•ind who executed the lotegoing 
..rticle'* of incorporation and they sev- 
"a 1 "acknowledged that they executed 

s.me as their ^^^^rlx^H.^^Kt 
Noi.uy Public. .St. Louis t:o""ty Mnm, 
Mv Commi.-.slon explre.s •.'"•> -1-./^,^', 
.Notarial Seal. St. Louis CountN , Minn. » 



OFFl<i 



.»F RFXHSTKR OF DEEDS. 
State of Minnesota. County of St. LouH. 

iThereby certify tliat the within in- 
.^t rumen t was filed in this office for 
record \prii 21. 1909. at 9 A. M.. and 
wa« duly recorded In Hook 9 of Misc.. 

"■'''■'' ""• M. C. PALMEU., 

Register of Deeds. 
By THOS. CLARK 

Deputy 



Want to Reach the City 

Earlier In the 

Day. 



A gasoline c;ir may be put on the 
run l)etween Dulutli and Fond du Lac. 
according to residents of that village 
wlio have, for some time, been after 
tlie Northern Pa.ific for l>etter service, 
especially during the spring, summer 
and fall months. 

As it is now. there are but two traln.s 
each day. and since the travel on tlie 
short line has become greater on ac- 
c.>unt of the brancli boat club being 
established at Spirit Lake, and the in- 
creased popularity of the village as a 
Niimmer resort, the residents and olher.s 
who have occasion to use the line, feel 
that tiiey are entitled to better serv- 

Should a gasoline car be put on. the 
advantages would be many. in tne 
first place, while tliere are but two 
trips made each day at the present 
time the car would make at least six 
or even eiglit when tlie travel gets 
heavv in midsummer. It is impossil)le 
■It tliis time to reach the city beiore 
s 30 in tiie morning, and as many men 
are required to »)e at tlieir office at i* 
and even earlier, they cannot enjoy the 
privilege of living at Spirit Lake or 
F"nd du l>ac. ' 

Tlie residents ua.Sf 
that they would like _ ^- ,^ ^^^^ 

eseat 



rights of em 
have been de- 
manding rights on the new acquisi- 
Uon to tl.eir line. But a.s the W scon- 
Vin Central men are for the most part 
V unger than the Soo line emp oyes. 
tie tnove is being bitterly fought 

If the Soo men are granted their 
demands under the "^^v organization 
rules the old men would iia\e tie 
right to the better runs. This would 
lan licap tlie Wisconsin Central men. 
putting most of them on the northern 
•inii western divisions. .. , , , 

^"Local men claim they will fight de- 
cidedly against the granting of an> 
^uch rights to the .soo men 

An attempt -""^ "i«'^'* to get the 



pemig team early in the week. 

It is understood t>>-tt.^.«:eaimee wi 
also be " *'" 

'iJall*^ k-agu"e."'"Sever"al"new players liave 
ilready been secured and arrangements 
ire being made to secure the sei vices 
f Tate Seibenthal. who is recognized 
bv tiie majority of baseljail entitusiasts 
who have seen his work in the box 
To be one of the best pitchers in the 
upper peninsula. 



Opening at St. Paul. 

April 22.— Today is 
'- il. and it w 

the St. 



St. Paul. Minn.. 

hall day in St. f 
the more exciting because 



baseball day in St. Paul, and it will 



•aul team will meet its old-titne ene- 
n.fi known as the -Millers.- irom 
Minneapoli". The contests^ between 





was met with immediate protest on the 
part of th e Wisconsin Central men. 

Rheumatliini. 

More than nine out of every ten 
cases of rheumatism are simply rheii- 
maUsm of the muscles, due to cold or 
d!imp or chronic rheiimatisni. In such 
?;L!?^s'no int^rnal.treatment .sj;equlred. 

T 
Li 

is 

Qu'Vkb- lf"r''elieves the pain and sore- 
ness The medicines usually given in- 
ternally Ojr rheumatism are poisonous 
Lr very strong medicines. They are 
worse than useless in cases of chronic 
riid muscular rheumatism. For sale by 
all drugg ists ^ 

CALl MET WOMEN TO 

DEBATE ON NE>\SPAPERS. 

Calumet. Mich., April 2 2.-( Special 
to The Herald.)— Friday vmI be 
•Newspaper Day" at the Calumet 
Wonv n's club regular meeting to 
bV held in the Y. M. (.'. A. assembly 
hill A paper on "The Making of a 
NvVvspaper • will bo read, followed by 

debal^ on "Is a Local Daily a True 



i',e«e two teams are always attended 
.'much rivalry l,etween the "rooter.s 
f^ ^VhV.th cities The weather is 

cleTr Cl\ "cold north wind is Jjlow- 
?ng and the temperature wa.s at the 

frfezing Poi"t .^'^/ly > V-^n m Jltll 
trfime was called at •> •;>0 , P- . '" v ): ;,' 
MkTor Lawler in the pitchers box to 
throw the first ball. 

W agner Arrested. 

Tii..oi.,,.-D- Pi Anril 22. — Hans Wag- 

P ttShlllg. 1 a.. J\vm --• VTutir.nul 

ner champion batter of the National 
/ague was charged with exceeding 
speed limit in his big autornobile 




During the spring every one wot i< 



be 
ney 
tonic 
strain 



would 
Kid- 
needed 



to the kidneys after the 



extra 
winter, and It purifies the 



it 



W^h^J^^- 



FIND FORTUNE IN 
A MISER'S TRUNK 

St. Paul Man Who Fooled 
Relatives as to Fin- 
ances. 

St. Paul. Minn.. April 22.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — Cash and securltlea 
worth $50,000 have been found by two 
nieces of Jacob Roth, an eccentric con- 
ti actor, who died Sunday at St. Jo- 
seph's hospital, leaving tlie request that 
he be buried at an expense not to ex- 
ceed $60. He had that much, he said. 

Roth was buried from Assumption 
church Tuesday. Afterward.s his two 
nieces went to his former home, 841 
Rice street, and there, in an old trunk, 
discovered the cash and securities. 

For tliirtv years Roth liad lived In 
St Paul nio"st abstemiously. He never 
rode on a street car. or spent an un- 
necessary penny. No one knew any- 
thing about liim. He was 68 years old 
and unmarried, a native «f ♦-« '•'"»" y- 
He went to the hospital '".'^^arcli after 
.some months of poor health. HIb two 
nieces live in the Buckingham apart- 
ments. _ 

COLVILL STATUE WILL 

BE UNVEILED MAY 29. 



Cannon Falls. Minn.. April 22.— At a 
recent meeting of the Colvill monu- 
ment committee, C. W. Gress wa-s ap- 
pointed to confer with the commis- 
sion which ha.s in charge the placing 
of the statue upon the hero's grave 
in Cannon Falls. The surviving mem- 
bers of the First Minnesota will hold 
their annual reunion May 29, and It 
was decided to arrange for the unveil- 
ing on that day. The statue ot the 
Gettysburg hero, a replica of the one 
recently unvelUd In the state capitol. 



a feeling also 
a later train in 



State of Minnesota. Department of 

I'^'he'i'ebv certifv tliat the witliin In- 
strument was filed for record In this 
„ffi< p on the -JOth day of .April. .V D 
1M09 at 9 o'clock A. M.. and was dulv 
recotded In Book R-3 of Incorporations 
on page ^^S.^^,^^^,^ ^ SCHM.NHL. 

Secretary of State. 



the evening to and from tlie city 
declare tl.at the service in its pr 
, undition Is very unsati.sfactory. 



Tlie Northern Pacifi.- officials ..».-. 
the matter under cn.Mlderation and tlie 
chaiK-es are that l>eft)re the rush ot 
campers toward the .'summer cooling 
smTbegins. quicker and better serv- 
let- will have been established. 




H Tivian" The "musical portion of the 
program is in charge of Mrs. Mary T. 

Hoar. 

Marrlen Uuliitli Woman. 



Tiiesdav tlie marriage of 

luesaav. i ,e _ ^ ^^^^ j^^^^ Lorna 



A substitute Is never as good as the 
original— therefore. in.«lst on getting 
what you ask for. A dealer who i.s al- 
wavs "wanting to sell you something 
iust as good Is not working for your 
in u' resets, but for tlie extra profit he 
hopes to make. 



TakrM Two Harbors Job, 

Brainerd. Minn- April 22. — tSpecial 
to -nie Herald.)— I. C Manville. gen- 
eral secretary of the Brainerd \. M. ( . 
t\ has resigned his position to accept 
ili'at of physical director and boys 
secretary of the Two H. arbors associa- 
tion. His resigraMon. takes effect May 
1. and he will leave at that time for 
his new flelii. 



Henry 

i:'"SSher ''of'^ DuTutH!" The" ceremony 
was perlormed In the presence of a 
Few immediate friends. The happy 
couple have gone to St. Paul to live. 



It is pure' The sealed lead packets 
of "Salada " guarantee your tea free 
from artificial coloring matter. dusL 
dirt and all foreign substances. Ask 
your grocer for It. 



GOES SUDDENLY INSANE. 

Farmer Loses His Reason, Attempt 
ing Mulder and Siiicide. 

Foley. Minn.. April 2 2.— Pat Grif- 
fin a Glendorado farim-r, was ex- 
amined for his sanity in probate court 
here yesterday and was committed to 
the in.sane asylum at Fergus Falls, 
where he was taken by the sheriff. 

Griifin went suddenly insane Sun- 
day afternoon at his home. He seized 
a kn^e and attacked his wife attempt- 
fng to kill her. In this he did not 
succeed and so made an attemp on 
his own life. He put the knife to his 
own throat and succeeded in severing 
his wind pipe, but the knife was torn 
from him before he could 
Jugular vein. ^^^^^^^^^ 

POLISH PRELATE WILL 

VISIT AT ST. CLOUD. 

St Cloudy. Minn.. April 22.— (Spe- 
cial'to The Herald.)— Great arrange- 
ments are being made to receive Rt. 
Rev. Paul Rhode, auxiliary of the arch 
diocese of Chicago, who will arrive 



s to .'^tand on a massive pedestal, on 
I knoll overlooking the cemetery. A 
field cannon will be placed on a small- 
er pedestal a short distance in front 
of the statue. 

♦ 

V\mt Misht Train. 
Brainerd. Minn.. April 22.— (Special 
to The H;rald.)-The first fain for 
International Falls on the new night 
service of the Minnesota & Interna- 
tional railroad went up Monday night. 
The train consisted of a 



combination 



baggage and mall, smoker, day coach 
and sleeper besides the business car 



was thirty 



minutes 

rom 

but 



cut the 



^e"\^t'^BrLinerd; the^tVain f.^ 
the Twin Cities being late in here, but 
the new train made its running time 
easilv The first train left Interna- 
UonaV Falls Tuesday on the return 
trip. 



6-5-4- 

BlAKlUSTAi 





MAKES NEW SCREENS OF THE OUO 

,. . ^ur i^.aUr Ui. >n i liavt- It. occ 

The Kelly Hardware Co. 



•m^m k 






nlpW^ 






^4. 




^^^ 
VI' 



•« I 




IS 



1 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: THURSDAY. APRIL 22, 1909. 



: 



■■■= 



IW* 



WHEAT PRICES GO DOWN 
WITH CRASH IN AMERICA 



Chicago Market Breaks 

Four Points— More 

Than Three Here. 

Stop -Loss Orders Are 
-Flax Very 
Dull. 




■.ntruct K"'a«U. , u.il.s. Ill '.a,s. 

.-ipts of wlieat .It riiiraKO. 

:^ ., .i nuluth todav wt-re 14» 

130 tarsi la8i wt-ek 

.rrcsponding day u 



WlKSlt- 
Si 



-M:iV $1.21-. 
I, $1 



\\ 



iir- 



iiiul 



■\ ' 


„ ; 1 *T> _^. 




1 today. 




d afiei- 




St. last- 




of trad- 




i.M,'Ut the 




siip- 


111 


II If way 


:f t 


very vne 


li:l 


I nt,»' one 




.,,-...^ f> 



-May, 



.Tuly. 

• -s ',, ru' 
July. 

.luly. 

.luly, 



calls 11.21% and J1.21 '^^^^,^^:,^ „,i 
iniioneo Ju V ups were Jl.i-'flt ^»P" 

dow r$ 07 r, 1.07 4. J107 and J1.07^.. 
Following Is the weather forecast for 

''^nfi^olr und^Indiana-Generally fair 
weith;; except probably sl^owers in 
txtrtme soiith tonipht or T^^^^y-.^^^. 
Missouri— Partly cloudy in northern 
prubabTy Uowers in soulliern ton.ght 

'l.ower'Michigan-Partly cloudy to- 

"'f'm>er"^ncMpan-rartly cloudy to- 
n,Kh/ and Friday, with probably enow 
tturiies near l-^ke Superior 

Wisconsin and Iowa— Generally lair 
tonisht and Friday. ♦nnicht 

Minnesota-Oenerally Ja»':„.^„''g'no- 
and Friday; warmer In northwtsi lo 

'"'North an.- South Dakota, and Mon- 
,ara-<;cne.ally fair tonight and I'vi- 

""^;.l^;:sk^-r^Uy'.^io"<»y tonight and 
^'^?f^a^l"^^i:tl;a^t.!niRht and Fri- 
day ^^ith probable showers. 



» ««„ ,. |,..l|i, ,,,. f.,«* «>u,.....f« r | .« »« *f *»«HMHMHBi 

THE MARKETS AT A GLANCE. 



pr. 
I 
4 : 

in ( 



vvtiicli 



Duluth May wheat closed Sy^c lower. 
Chicago May wheat closed 4c lower. 
Minneapolis May wheat dosed 3%c lower 
Liverpool wheat cables, IVsd to 2ysd lower. 
Duluth May flax closed 1/20 lower. 
New York stocks, irregular. 
Boston copper stocks closed lower. 
Duluth curb coppers, irregular. 
Chicago live stock is steady to higher. 
Cotton is steady. 



it 

n 
a 

a 

-it 

^f 

^^ 

n 
a 

a 

it 



ADVANCES 
INjrOCKS 

Market Started Up at 

Opening and Rise 

Fairly Maintained. 

Profit-Taking Sales Took 

Only Fraction Off 

the Prices. 




1871. 



ZE.\ITH 14«4. DULVTH 

RKFEREN'CESi 

National Bank. _ 

Flr«t National Bank. 



City 



MARTIN 

ROSENDAHL 

& CO. Inc., 

Capital S50.000.00. 

Copper Stock Brokers. 

414 WEST SirEKIOR STREET. 
102-103 M.%NHATT.\N BLDG. 



Duluth Copper Curb Market. 

N. S. MITCHELL & CO., 



Z02-204 



Private Wlren. 
City riioneii ISOS. 



MANHATTA>' DLILDING 
Referenoem 
CITV NATIOXAI, BANK, 
nulutb, Mlim. 

APRIL 22nd, 1009. 



Private 1.onK Dlntance. 
Pbonea 1U57-1805. 



Bid. 



Afik. 



My own wire* to the Copper coun- 
1r?'. Also eonnectlonii to EaMtern 
>Iurket«. 



Till RSDAY, APRIL 22, 1000. 
Biitte-Alex Scott In 



|«,,,,,>>,»M. o «* «4 .. .«««« t»t*««»«*»»*.>»»» «» » f«« »*»»***«* 



$ 1 .^ , t,> 
\1 1 > 



S.-ptcbn)er. $18.02ii.. l.-.r.! - 

■■.'. .Uilv. flO,47Vi©10...(' >• !■ 

!>s M:i>', $y^*>t*- -'uiv'. 

$t».s2'i fUirlcy — 

llye — Oasli, S*»»c. May. 

\nrll |!*.60. Timothy—- 



THE COPPER STOCKS. 

The following are the closing quota- 
Ucms ot'o.pper slock.s at Boston today^ 
reported bv Paine. Webber Ac Co.. Koona 
A Torrey buildintj: _______ 



tlment pi'e 



;'!'< ><.'iv; 



Bid. 



Asked. 



lower 



No, 



In 

Iv 

TI- 

Iv ■ 

It. 

3- 

Cii 

l.( 
St 



r m i ; 

3r lov 



." 1 ''» # '* t , , 
Mo. 4 whiit 

-• 



>. 11 hern. | !.;::;'.«' 

n $ 1.21 >^# 1.-4 -U . 

t'orn — No. 

. ,iie. 73c. No. 

No 3 whit*- Hilts. 



;>4'(< 55 '4 



THE M1NNE.4P0L1S MARKET. 

Weakness Prevails W itii an I nder- 
tone of Nervousness Apparent 



.Vlinneapoli*'. Minn,^ -April 22.— J-enti 
•niMU was beansii from tl..' '>\>v\ 

■ r wtather and irin 



. V. 



VViTl- ii'Wi 



> r' .■ 1 1 ' 1 1 • . 



The 
**st 



CO! 



ti 

Ui 



tl 
w 

CI 

\. 

I r 

6< 

11: 

»' 

IS" 

,/' 

t 

!■ 

«»' 

f : . 
ft 

1; 

6 . 

(' 
I 



I 
1: 
(. 




lu-rvi.iis 



undertone. 



M.t 



t Jl 



C.'l 



$1 
fl 



was still 

, 1(1 ]ove- 






$1 



■n 



were 

.■er tl- 

.<5 1 1 1 li 

IV: 



"d- ,?5 - 



.Uf- 

1 rii.«t 

•JU \\ ■•• :i;|""-K 

-■' \^ low. Il.iy vt HI 

UU*.'^.! 1. !'.♦•'■». Jl"l.^' 

hicii $1.23: low. 

t. % CaPh wheat was 

1-1' later 

tl. 

top Riades*. 

'llKht. No. 1 sold for ?,c 

.. \r;iv .anion and No. - 

No. 1 

.irrlve, 

. ,,, $l.U"u 1 -■' ■' 
\,. wix'at. $1 



AiiialKanialt'd 

Anacoruia 

Adventure 

Ahmeek 

.VUouez 

American Telepl one 

Annrican Zinc .... 

A I la 111 u 

Arcadian 

Arizona Conuio r> ,ai 

Hi'trolt' 

lio.'-ton i'iin!««ilidult d 

Bo;;ton-«.''>rbin 

Black Mountain . . . 

Butte Coalition .... 

Butte & London 

Caluuut & Arizona. 

t'ahnnet & Uecla. . . 

t'entennial 

Con.«olid.it' .1 .M. 1 ■ ill 

Copper H niK>- 

Cumberland Ely . . ■ 

Dalv \Ve^t 

DaviK Imiv 

Dominion <'.i'i.. t . . 

Ea.«t Bun. 

Franklin . ... 

First N.i to'iuii .... 

Giroux 1 

lira n by 1 

(ireeiif Canaiu-a i 

Hani ^< '^nsolulaied . [ 

.. - - Helv- 
firmed isle i. . 
Millers j Keweenaw 

Lake Copper 
La yalk 



movement 
fa- 

■ ■oks 
iivt- days. 
.i;i appnr- 



!«. 



-16 



76 «4 

160 
39 



II >4 

4-: 

15 
12 
20*4 

"24»i" 
40 c 

100 

610 
31 
2hc 
77H 

■ 'io ■ 

6 '4 
lie 
14», 

15 '2 



New York, April 22.— Prices started 
up with the beginning of business at 
the stock exchange today. The trans- 
continental railroad stocks were 
prominent. Union Pacific, Southern Pa- 
cific, Atchison, St. Louis &„t^an Fran- 
cisco second preferred. Norlolk At 
Western and Southern Railway pre- 
ferred rose large fractions. Chesapeake 
& Ohio 1 and Minneapolis & St. Louis 

^'outside of a rise of 114, in Union 
raclfic there was practically no re- 
fiection in the active stocks, but the 
vigorous advance in the industrials an.l 
mine railroads. In fact Reading 
.showed heaviness. reacting a point 
from its best price. Mackay company 
improved 2'-^. American Telephone Ai 
Telegraph and Metropolitan street 
Kailwav 2. Great Nortnern ore certifi- 
cates 1%. Colorado & Southern first 
preferred 1'4. the second Preferred 
American Beet Sugar preferred 1*8 a"' 
the common, Delaware Ac Hudson. VMb- 
consin Central and North American 1. 
National Lead fell l-'i- , . . 

The price movement was sluggish 
and rtuct nations showed Its uncertain- 
tv. Gains of a point or more were 
made bv Southern Pacific. New \ ork 
Central." American Can stocks, Ameri- 
can ice and Allis-Chahners Preferred. 
Atlantic Coast Line declined 1 Lacka- 
wanna sold at «n «fi^»"'^'Vf'^ ''oni^ 
Chicago. St. Paul, Minneapolis & Oma- 
ha declined as much. Bonds were 
of rnn 4? 

speculative sentiment w-as more 
cheerful as there was a brisk demand 
for Union Pacific and other representa- 



now in Htrong- 
rr liaudM tbuu ever before. Look at 
the people who sot 911 nnd 9\'2 for 
the part paiii. .Vearly all thiM money 
Im read} to ko into the market a 
.No matter what thv 
Kardiug the 
Scott 
name. 
eaiiNe 
me 



■loney 
HK'alu. I 
ly re- I 
leH of 



you 



ten 
Mntd: 
won't 



to tbink they lOMt 
i»etter 
until 
a real 
treast- 
a prop- 



Stocks. Crex Carpet jumped o*. 



*>1 ■ ■■ 
M 



Con."*tili>lait. d 



•lib' 



n-r 



Mav 



,1 the niai 



It; 3 



May 



I' 

F.. 
low . 
f I 1 ' 



to 
I 
I, • 



11.63 \. 
, ars today 
:^ t;4 Continued 
.1 f^trong demand 
:k*t :ii:d prsct'S ad- 
o "ln<iu;rv waf^ ihc .«trun^est 
Kr' malfing barley. . This . '"-^ket 

I iietiJ. ' ,.,,;,.. 

..ns. The 

?J;n,^.nd was far in excess of the sup- 

■ ,f';r?*"" •'i^t^nv'^Brafi^Vn 

I ""iA'JP-"^" demand at 

' ,. V-^st ..ness in the 

"market. Pi h '-^ decliii- 
_;n and Ka">lern inquiry \v 



i' 



.1 ; I I n ^ 
1 ( ..pi'.-i . 

K a 1 1 

. vv k 

.la Tons . . . 
:,. ...da I'tuh . 

Newli'">us<- 

Nippi'^iiiji 
Nortli Built 

ojitiway 

Old r>i>ininion 

< isceola 

I'arrott 

Fneu Ser 

y uir;i V 

Saul. I I"'' 

Sliall hoii .... 

Shoe .Michigan 
Superior Coppc 
Superior A- Piit 
Tamarack . . . 

Trinity 

I'nited foppci 



yo 


KMfl 


10 >s. 


1 :■-! 


:t-^s 


2(1-* 


141^ 


9*8 


1 6'- '3 


1 '* 


15 


12*^ 


61 '2 


20^ 


2'« 


3 ',8 


10»i 


62 «i, 


l-U 


r. '1 I ■ 


J- '4 


129 


1 33»^ 


8 


So 


1 2% 


1 14U 



New York, Chicago and St. L(^.y.>s 
Union Pacific and Southern Pacif'^ -- 
New York Central 1^,. Nortolk & 
Western m and Texas & Pacific. S. 
Paul. Great Northern P/ef erred Amei- 
ican Sugar Consolldattd Gas and Pitts 
burg Coal 1. Amerl<an Hide & Leatiiei 
preferred. St. Louis Southwestern and 
Colorado Ai Southern yielded 1. 

The market closed Irregular. The 
advance carried up Utah V^PPV-^fti'i 
Pullman 2. Colorado Fuel 1*4 • ^^ n»t**'l 
States Steel and Cleveland. C. C. & 
St. Louis IVi. Amalgamated Copper an. 
Sloss-ShefTield Steel 1'4. the preferred 
■iU and American Smelting and the 
Republic Steel stocks 1. Profit tak ng 
.vales took a fraction off prices, but 
the .selling was not pushed far. Heart- 
ing was an exception, giving way atain 
to near the lowest. 



N«w Tork Mock auotailms 
by Piper, .loiinson & Case. 



junilsheU The Herald 



Car Foinulrj 
I.<n'omotlNe . 
Couon Oil . 
Smelttrs 



.•^I'lirg 






United Fruit 1 l^i's 



S. .Mining 
S. Minini-' 
S (»il . . 



M.I 



d 



New York 



(iraln. 



\\ 



.at' 

1 . 1 n 



1.U«>rii<Hd <;rnl 



» i. 

n 



M.ty, 



OS 



.%mrrieuu 

ImUiih. ' 



W 



h.nl Mnrkrl!*. 



^ ik 



I. ■ i, a i I '. " " 1 ■ 1 ' • ! 

Victoria 

Win 

Wo ; 

Wyanu.'i 

Yukon tJold 

."Xrizona-Mi. higan . 

Anieriian ."Vagina w 

Biutf-.\le\ Scott. I 

.io full paid . . • ■ 

I^.-toii Fly 

. - Hallaklava . . 
1 .■ \- Su|wrior . 
Cluct < ■ ■ ^ 
('a«'tuv 

. " 1 iV . 

■t * 

j Carman . . . 

Clo'iin;-" 

CI I ft" 

Cv>l)l.i-i '■: 

Cordova 
I nenn-.\ri;-' 



46 

46"s 

31*4 

5\, 

45 v.. 
4H 
4-'V4 
14a 
2 '•• 
4''' 
I'* 
3 



14 '4 

!v:.c 
1 1 



41 

134 
41 
14 

I2I2 
135 
46'i 

47 

'J •> 

o — 

.- li. 
40^1 

4rt 



146 



Si 

.M. 



■t itiftn:!) * 



lol.llit' 

.a i;o.< 



l^c 
17 



:<c 
4 

s 1, 



- ■■4 



14;^4 

>^^C 

' 3»^ 
1*S> 
131^ 
2'Jc 

1»2 
1ft 

2-^» 
l'« 
I'-* 
3«* 
12c 
44 
h"'8 



v. 



fii.li -nl' 



I <iiirvrt«.v. 



THE 1 HH A(iO M.UUvET. 

Wheat Prices Break Sharply: Ad- 
vance on Covering By Short- 



ti.cn 



I 

If-" 

t! 

tl- 

A 
(1. 



i 

i 
t 

July dr< 

rlirn-d t«, 
to 11 12. 

"iff. 1 

1 
I 

1. 
« 

t e 1 1 a I i 1 

Oaf," 



prices 

.fuly «le- 

than 

to dur- 
,i of last 

■ , > : ; c 

prc- 

a.lvaiu'f'l 
shorts, 
iiillut-ncc'tl 
of a bear- 



CWeaKo « oni. 



o,,:- 



and Pork. 

M 1' 



Pork. 
Mav 



■ rtli Lake 
,io C.ipper 
Kawhide Hoy 
i;.d Warrior 
- 1 11 .Vntonio 
-,i\anna . . . ■ 
ISnattu.-k . . ^ 
Sup. ri.'i A.- • ■ 
T..r,oi.a!i .N'.'V. 
1 \\':i< ■ en ■ ■ . • 
I Wo! vtMirif & 
Izc'iiith Lead 



loi.c 

,<la 

.\ri^ui;a 




3 

U« 
f.lc 
7 

lie" 

2'i. 
11 

15»i 

90c 
7 '4 
3>4 



STUCKS— 



.Mlis Clii.lui(r« 

• .•.nmlgauiaieil 
.\fnriicui> SuBur 
.\m»rl.-«n 
.Villi rl<'iii 
Aiii' riian 

.\miTi<Mll 

.\n.iconila 

.\trlilsiiii 

il" pf il 

iumm..re ft Ohio 

(Viitral l.e-'llicr 

Clii-s.ipi'ttke & olilo 

«-ia.MgiiOt W«*itom com. 
Cliic8lto-<Jr.^at Western A. 
Ciac:u;ii-«:r«;it W.sttm B 

<•.. M. & St. Paul 

C..I1 ni.lo Fuel *» Iron 

Coliriulj Smtlicrn 

Coii-olldat«'<l <!a» 

Caii.iiU;.n P.i.-mc 

I)eliiw*re & Mu.isoii 

1»ct:ht Sc Itio Graruie ... 

DUtlll.M 

p.. S. .S & A 

Krle ' 

do 1st rM 

ill. 2ml pfil 

fiivKt Nonlum 

Orcut Ncrtluni Ore 

Illinnl* Central 

Inter- Mft 

I(,wa Cciiir.nl 

Kansas «'ltv Suullurn . . 
l,<Milsvllli- *£ Nii»liville . . 

Mctliaa Central ••••• 

\!ls--<.iirl KiUi>!is & Texiis 

Mis-..iirt Pa.-lflc 

N.i.U.ii.il I.eail 

Ni« Y-rk i'ciitral 

N.rf-.tk »S: Western 

Ncrih .Miieri.-aii 

Nortlifni I'.Klfl.' 

Oritarl'i At W.^t.-ni 

Peii)i»>l\ai.ia 

I'miiU'' fJas 

Frt-jxcil litfxl Car 
It.pitjll'- Steel ft 

rt< pf.l 

HcM-h I»l«iiil 

.t.. pfU 

lltaclii T 

sl.iss-Slicfricld ... 

S.Ki IJne 

Soulhtrri Halhv.iy . 

<lo pfil 

Si.uUier'i P.iolflr . 
Te'iiu*s<'ce i'cpper . 

Te-\;.s Pailflr 

'niird Avenue 

T\%ln City 

fi. 1(111 Pacific 

I'tah Ciipptr 

f. S. Steel 

do pf.l 

Wabash 

do pfd 

Westiiighouse .... 
Western fnion . . 
WUi-oii!.in Central 
do pl.l 



I Open. I High. I Low. | Close. 



11441 



7Vi 
l.'>0>i 

176V4 
I8:i\ 

38 >« 



JH 



25^1- 



paperN nny 
heavy pureliaHeH 
Mtook the fact remalna the 
Vou have loMt no money be- 
you never had It. It renilndM 
of the fellow who Kald to hiM 
frieud: "Let me take 910 for 
mlnulen." The other fellow 
"Wait ten miniiten «ud 
need It." 

^oiiie Neeui 
money. Why, boyx, > ou are better 
off to hold your Seott atock 
next ChriiitmnM, for thin in 
liiiue, plenty of money In the 
ury, good ninnaKement anil .. , 
erty located umouK^t minCH worth 
etl<K».4KN».00O and d<» <iot over look 
the fact that the Butte-.\lex !>cott 
mine In worth a few miiliouN. 

The company haM nothiuK to do 
with the market of the Htock. They 
are in the miuiue biiMiueNM and you 
will nee iu«ldc of a Nbort time that 
thiM iHNUe will be more aeti^e than 
any on the board. I will wager 
|ll,<M>0 that the *1! paid Mtock nell-i 
above l|li-0 before next CbriMtman. 
It Hbould Kcll at 935, but to be nafe 
«ve will Kay 9~0. It may beglu In a 
day or m«». Common NCMMe will tell 
you It cannot Ktay down. It a miu- 
iuK company has to suffer on ac- 
count of a broker quitting buMincHU 
then we may an well all quit spec- 
ulating. 

Kven our enemICK are now tnkluK 
on Butte-.\lcx JScott Mtock. Why 
Khouldn't theyf U it not the besit 
buy on the lioardf They are payiue 
top notch priceN for it and If they 
want to Hell you any cheap stock 
lake It, It In an abwolutc cinch that 
vou have to make big money. The 
full paid at »IO sivex you the prop- 
erty for f«0<MK»0. which Im over nix 
llmeR IcwM than the Hallaklava in 
now- nelliuic fur. 

Many of j ou have got your profltn 
ou the part paid. .\ow In a dandy- 
chance to get again an much In the 
next %vcek. The part paid i..» scarce 
and hard to find. I believe It will 
Melt pretty near the full paid In the 
next few days. The quotation)* at 
the present time arc hardly a cri- 
terion of the market. Au order for 
2,000 NbarcM of the part paid would 
eauilv drive it up to »12. The full 
paid In a little different and can- 
not advance ko fawt. but a 2,000 
Mhare order Khould eniHlly drive It to 
$14. Do not forjfct the people were 
all paid for the 9'^ Scott nnd this 
money l» In the market rinbt now. 

Some of the papers are not doiuK 
iuKtIce to the people on Butte-Alex 
Seott stock. They do not under- 
stand that they are making many 
who have all their money Invested 
In this Issue sacrifice their stock, I 
am here to tell every paper in this 
eit> that they are dolnic wronie and 
'allthev have to do Is to send men 
to Butte, .Mont., and see the mine 
nnd tbcv will and out their mis- 
take. I own a large block of stock. 
Much of this trade has passed 
ihrouKh mv office. Many people havx- 
left their stock with me to have It 
transferred. I have to do so gratis. 
\o one In this city has worked 
harder to briuK about a blis success 
for this compnny tbau I have and 
let me tell you to your face that 
It Is the blBKCst success ever 
brought to Ouluth for many and 
many a day. Ilcmember the stock 
Is worth about f40 a share In real 
^nlue Now, then. It Is up to the 
people to believe me or to gather 
their Information from what one of 
our local papers would Imply. 1 he 
people who follow me make money. 
I trv to treat them fair and square. 
We 'owe no one a dollar who can 
not »5ct it If It rlBhtfully belongs 
to him or her. 

We do not run away from our 
trades like some of the blKKcr of- 
fices have done. It reminds me of a 
lot of sick cats. Kverybody likes a 
man v^ho will stand back of bis 
trades to the last dollar. 

tilve UK vour business. Ave are 
as safe as any of them In all kinds 
I of weather. 



.American Saginaw. .. 

Ariz.-MichiKan 

Black Mountain .... 
B.-Alex Scott full P<1 
B.-Alo.\ Scott $2 pd.. 
Butto & Superior. .. 
Butte-Ballaklava .... 
Calumet & -Arizona.. 
Calumet & Montana.. 
Calumet & Sonora. .. 

Carman 

Chemiingj 

Cliff 

Copper Queen 

Cortlova 

Cactus 

Denn-.Arlzona 

East Butte 

Globe Cons 



3.25 


3.50 ' 


1.2.5 


1.37 


.97 


1.03 




9.00 


6.50 


7.50 


.84 


.87 


14.25 


14.75 


100.00 100.50 


.18 


.20 


13.00 


14.00 


1.37 


1..50 


17..50 


18.50 


2.43 


2.56 


1.50 


1.62 


1.37 


1.62 


C.25 


3.37 


3.00 


3.12 


14.50 


14.75 


4.00 


4.25 



& Sonera. 



Greene Cananea 

Keweenaw . . . • 

Live Oak 

Lake Sup 

Mowitza 

Nipissing 

National 

North Butte , 

Bed Warrior 

Rawhide Royal 

San Ant -lio 

Savanna 

; Sup. & Pittsburg. . .. 

Superior & Boston... 

Shattuck-Arlzona . .. 

Superior & Globe.... 

1 Tuolumne 

I Warren ......... 

' 7fMiith Lead & Zinc.. 




Hf 







.W.LEE&COWIPANY 



Paid Up Capital, $.'.0,000. 



INCOUPORATED. 

Resources Over »250,000.00. 



Capital, $r.o,ooo. _I_«^ ■*—■•*% 

BANKERS AND BROKERS 

Private Wires to Iron Range, Copper Country, and all Stock 
Exchanges, both East and West. 

410 W. Superior St., Duluth, Minn. 
Both Phones 2003. 



APRIL 22, 1909. 



Ariz.-Mlt'higa" 

Black Mountain . • . - 
Butte Coalition .... 
Butto Ballaklava . . 
Butto-.Mcx Scott . 
Buttc-A. Scott $2 pd 
Butte & superior. 

Cactus : ; • • • 

Calumet & Corbin. . 

Carman 

Copper Queen 

Chief Cons 

Cliff 



Bid. 


Ask. 


1.12 


1.25 


.96 


.98 


24.00 


24.25 


14.75 


15.00 




8.50 


5.50 


6.50 


.90 


.95 


3.37 


3.50 


1.25 


1.37 


1.25 


1.37 


1.50 


1.62 


1.37 


1.50 


2.50 


2.62 



Bid. 

3.O1 

10.0 

3.7 

2.3 

4.3 

1.0 

62.0 

.5 

.1 

2.0 

15.37 

12.75 

.88 



3.001 


10.00 


3.75 


2.37 


4.37 


1.00 


62.00 


.58 


.10 


2.00 



Ask. 

3.12 

10.12 

4.00 

2.62 

4.62 

1.06 

62.25 

.62 

.10 

2.00 

15.62 

13.<»0 

.92 



1 Denn-.%rlzona 

I Greene Cananea . . . 

; Globe Cons 

, Lake Sup. & Sonora . 

1 Live Oak 

i Mowitza 

1 Nortli Butte 

National 

Rawliide Royal 

Red W arrior 

Sliattuck-.'Vrizona . 

Sup. & Pitt.shurg. . 

Superior & <il<>be . . 

We hardly think It ^^'^ «« ,«;^L",V.« "Vo "oUe" {.«slness***n T bu"s'lncs: 
press, we do think It ««««* "^,VVvbi\,,sb to deal with a strictly 

like way from *«'«»^;,«*Yo take care «f «"d cleur their t 

hj^nii<> «vltli ample oap'iai 10 !••■»» «.«■•»- 

as those of their friends nnd clients. oo-partnersblp to such 

»• *^ve hav«- ""♦ '•"'" "•• V'"^ '•" wrvertisemenls and hot air flotations, bat 

Immense P«^l»"r.|ons simply <m«.l^^^^^^^^^^ dealings and advice. 

our »'«»>, ;^V%ur business, and «"««*•"« J^^/hir.,'"',; '.boroughly and thus 
In tke future With a house, that you look •"*'""' ratln« wHb Hrad. 

;,rot*^t yowrHclf from auy P*"-/"'- I^ne and our banking friends in both 
street and Dunn that Is '•^'^^'V"**" ""%V"t references as to responslblllt j. 
tlAs city and on the rauKC w^lH '»*•«"' 7",, "fid capital of $.'0,000. and rc- 
\Ve are an incorporated Arm ,V'*^ "^:^';;ij;"„«„ such lt.st nlKht .bat we 
sources of over *fXT; ?.? ^t s.^u e of our "oose cash to caruinK Interest, 
felt that we would like to sii s.».i.r 



■^ 



I 



reliable 
trades as well 



I 



mMHIiii h 



to 



In conclusion, we V, "^ ^n square dealiuK, and because 

"^ our motto is "«^^ ««•• for cash, .inleKH «thcrwl,.c nrrauRcd. 
^"""^Jve rfo"nr bf.sinessr«'"vvlll la return guarantee you 



we have 
all costs. 



the 



service 







Iron. 



With our own private wire 
connections with New York. 
Boston and the copper countries 
of Michigan. Montana. Nevada. 
Utah. Arizona and Mexico, we 
are the best ^QUiPPed to give 
you quick executions on all the 
Lading local stocks of any brok- 
erage house In the city. 

PAINE, WEBBER & CO., 

813 WEST Sl]Pli:RlOR ST. 
Torrey toullding. 




•Kx-.Uvidend of »% per 
Total iliire*. S'i.^.KOO. 
M.'Me.v, 2'<4 pel "*»'■ 



Of lit. 




Duluth far Inspection. 

., 4; N„. .: i.iirUjtriJ J: 
IT 1; >'o. 1 iltiniin !■: 

,,..," 1. Tutal ' f iluniin. 

■ Tear. 2i>. 



H. 
last 



tniek t<Hla.T. ot- 



itis 



1 1 n 1 1 
an t 



,f prevliiut! ut< k. 



;t 1 



$1 n 

Tilt 



.Ma- 



ll 



..111 

'I,- 

a 

,;.al 

Tiu; 

u lt!l 

!a- 

I lid 

ak 

!ii':'.l 



mm) ON THK FLOOR. 



<;os>ip of the Tradiiis Room and the 
Pit. 

u- in Ni'tth T'fiki.ta 
,,. , ,.tr,-il \>ii<-~' ''f Miii- 
lud tl.*- tl>"M T!ie 

■en riUUtr .-ni.!} .mil tlie 
(,nt.iin!< 100 rmuii tio.<<t 
i.iriiitrs lu put 



or tl.e noi i^i •■ 
nes'^'ta lias r>':i 
•weaiti'-r lia-"- '■ 
ground still ' 



The tottou Market. 

\«.w York. April 22.-Tlie cotton 
mark.t opened at an advance 01 4ru9 
points and sold 9tJ 1" points net higher 
durinK the earlv trading. Prices held 
wUliin ircir a points of the best during 

*'^i/lv^.":'u-ed steady., Closing bids: 
Atrt- 1 10.30; May. 1<'.32; June 10 32. 
.lulv 10 33:'.\«gust. 10.21: ^>Pteml>er 
111 I"- tutnber 10.11: November. 10.08. 
eJemlV;, fO.08; January...lO.OO: March, 
VV-* Spi.t Mulet: niiddiing upland^ 
ib«:.: mi.ldling gulf. 10.90. .^ales. 100 
bales. 



.lay 



Com and AVbeat Bulletin 

!h- r.wiilv fi'ur iKuii^ iiuliiit- .il ^ •' i"- 
Afril rj 



Thu re- 



st Paul Livestock. 

«;t Paul. '.Minn.. April 22. — Cattle— 
HpreiT.t.« 200; steady, unclianged. 
Hoes— Htceipts 1.000; 5 to 10c higher; 
ranle 16 "oft/ 7.00; bulk. $i;.<»5^i 7.00. 
S,,eep— Receipts. 300: strong and un- 
changed; lamb s, unchan ged. 

Treasury Balances. 

Washington. April lij— Todays state- 
ment of the treasury 'balances in the 
Keneral fund, exclusive of the »ioO.- 
000.000 gold reserve, shows: Available 
cash balance. 5127.792,910: gold ;0"i and 
huUion. $46.11S.09C; g.-ld certificates. 
$37,S80.o60. 

Chicago Livestock. 

Chtriec M.ril •.'::.-Catlt- tt.'.-elpts .(.Unutwi at 
->m,0 ^rto teady: beeves. $t.:0(« O.&fl : Te«* steers 

SSrnK^et^i^ioo ZT.r: llght%6.70,«7^3fl oiUed. 
»r<;Ma: 4V heaTv. $6.;'.'.in7.43: rough, ih.H.ni . .10 

f?, k of sa .s $7 i:.(.'7.:C.. SlM-ep-Hereipts estlniateil 
u -.000 m«rke tmmg: nalbe. $3.6o.« ti.OO; we^terr., 
tUo(«6 0r yearlir.gs. $6.00(«7.in; l>unbs. i.aUve. 
»5.40(sr. («8 "ti; we-lfin. $r'.4n(5 8.10. 

THE PKODl'CE M.^RKETS. 



Fred H. Mcrritt, 

BliOKER. 

Stocks, Bonds, Grain 

328 W. Superior St. 




STATIONS. 



Tempera- 
ture. 



Kate 
_f»lK 

^^ 

c ; 



c c. 



New 

i firmer 



Hi 



In tiie 



ir 



.thL.' 



• lit l>> 1 



lu-u- liiKli mark for 

rn for Mav delivery 

un profit-taking 

ic sin 111 p In vvhfvat. 



firm vvtili pri« . 
.■r. with Ma\ ;i t 

ing at 72e M;i--- 



time 



t ht 

I t 



' il u 

• wer 



li' 



1 1-' 1 1 1 

tlie start, 
wheat an.i 

to i|)C hiplii 
. ff t , I .■. r, "k • . 



Tl 'i 

-'.■•:• r« 
11 a- 

but 

•i.rn 
I at 



til 



■X 



1 1. 



! 

Wh'-. 

(•firti 

1 

Jiai I' :• 

Car 1. 
1 of colli 



1 '.(lo 



14 

5 a 



A 

inr 
The 
iiigln^r. 

pTIH-ntS 

■.'1 ttOO 

7 :...". 00 

131.400 

174.500 



21.300 
tars, with 
cars, Willi 



to permit 

^^Tn^inrts ,.f .>^oiUh Dakota and the 
extr.m". soutluru part of Minnesota, 
some seeding ha;- b*"!, d<m.-. 

• • • 

Arirpntine sliipments of wheat tins 
^^y^:;n'^stlma ed^t^JOO^OO ..u. The 

./,,,| !.,,- It..- . ..ir* >pondinK v\-..k last 
year. 2.i.S » 
Argent! 
mated at i.'j' 



.III 



■lit? 

I Ml 



.f corn are e.«ti 



Minneapolis puts 



w » re 



tl.l7>-j and 



Randall, Gee & Mitchell 

Grain Merchants 

Duluth MinnBapolis-Winnipeg 



N>w \ork Money. 

York. April 22.— Money -on call 
'•rnz^'i, per cent; ruling rate. - 
per cent; offered at 2'4 per cent Time 
ans Quite active and slightly firmer: 
,0 days. 2h,(ii2^^ per oent; 90 ^r^-,^^ 
per cent: six months. 2*4''" 3 Pf« .f^*-"*, 
Cio«e- Prime mercantile paper. 3i^?t4 
pei-cent. Sterling exchange ^r*-""?- ^'^Jl 
actual business in bankers bills at 
$4 W 30 'Tf 1.86.40 for 60-day bills and at 
$4 87.55 for demand. Commeicial bills, 
$4.8.=.^.^i4.86«>. Bar silver. ..1-Sc. Mexi- 
can dollars, 44c. Government bonds 
firm: railroad bonds steady. 
■ 
Midway Horse Market. 
Mii,.ie...lA Tr.ii.-lir. SI. Pnul. Mlin--. -\pril ^- 7 
lUmtt Ik Zinunenuai. rfp.rt: Tra.Je U on h MettU> 
hMl" nn-tier* ami fnrm maren an.l rhunki. are 
•i7il%e Tlie l;nHe .."TerliiK* of Wg l»'r»es oouslgiie.l 
in fi».m II.- l.'Mh'K ''»mv» ra„t with •"«•>•'•>'"» "-'^ 
" oiiviMier. wlK. ."re f-r Mer>l.e rather than flesh 
nU fii.i-h Sexeral PiUr of extra heavy young luulfs 
were si.Ul |o l<..-nl l>re\vlnB InttnMs. I/oa.l» were 
bllle.1 to Oberon and Velva. N. 1' . Al*raeen. >». I».. 
,Tiul Ogtleiinliiirs. N- Y. 

liralters, '.xlru 

Praft'Ts, rlx'lce 

l>rA(ler^. coniinoii to go" 

Karni mares and hones, utra 

Kami mares atul hor-es. rholee 

Karm njares. i-ommyn lo gooil 

IHUvery 

Iirivers and saditltts 

Mults, accordlug lu tU« 



Aiexun.ina 

raiuplA'll 

("nioksti.ii 

Priroit fliy 

HalM.nd 

t>tiiiiieupoll8 . • . 

.Montevideo 

Nev* flm 

Park Uaptds . . . 

Koclifi'ter 

Wlnnehagn City. 

Wortliii.gton 

.Vmenla 

l(oltlne.->u 

Langdoti 

Uirimore 

IJsbon 

>Uiioi 

IHrnhina 

.•MienUtn 

.MilllwMk 

Xtitihell 

llenUleld 

iUlsra irrk 
Devils I.ake . . 
Itiiluih 
Humn 



Pt. 



.rt. 



.Ft. 



.Pi 

.Pt. 



.Pt. 



Pt 
. .Pt. 



rioudy 

flear 

t'lear 

ChiUtly 

..Clear 

Clou.ly 

. .Clear 

Cloudy 

Cloudy 

. Clear 

..Clear 

Cloudy 

Cloudy 

. .Clear 

..Clear 

Cloudy 

...Clear 

...Clear 

. . . Clear 

...Clear 

...Clear 

...Clear 

...Clear 

. . . Clear 

. . .Clear 

.Cloudy 

. ..Clear 

. . .cUar 

. . . (near 

. Cliiudy 

CU.udy 

. .Clear 

..Cleur 



Prices v»ere unchangtd today. 
The f(llr»lng Quotations vvere 
.(.-.•retary of the f''<^'l"'gy.^|l^|;«'^ 

Creamery prtnta 

Tubs 

neucvated 

Ladles ' 

Packing stock 



furr.lsbed liy the 



Knsb eggs 




EGOS. 
CHEEsii 



tLa Crofse 

JMi'orluiid 

tPhrre 

tst. P.aul 

Winnipeg 

KUondivle 

RKMAUK.S. , „ ^, 

Ilfiht rain or snow fell over practically all dls 
,rlcu.«cm Missouri. .Nebraska and the great, rpor 
Wm .f the Pnkota.. K.eerJng weather pre;"!'" "• 
'AlnneJcU. Wl.con.ln. low. Neb™jka^^an.,^^t.>e D. 

^"^'>*- Luoal Fore»a»ler. 



Full cream twins 

Wisconsin flats 

Block and wheel cheese 

Umbiirgcr. full cicam 

*''''"^*' honkt: 

New fanej white clover, ptr lb 

<;o. per case. . . -j^iJ^" gyHlp.' 

Virmont. per lb.. 

Maple syrup, lulb ""kCTs". 

hniberts. P" lb •• 

^t[;^;v^^:yiv,^;,^WaiiAits:wib 

Cwoanuts. per do» 

Bri.-iU. per do» 

Mixed nuts per ID 

Peanuts, per lb 

chestouts. per ll> 

Lnesxuuia. t~ FRUITS. 

Bananas, per lb 

Malaga grapes, per keg 

Dat«. hard, U-lt. bc.x.... 

Dates, fugar walnuts. 10-lb. 

KlBs, Smyrna. 10-lb. U.x 

rigs. Callfcrola 

Oranges ' 

Lemons. Calif crnia 

Limes, per bos 

Grape fruit. p«.r box 

Apples ••• 

Cranberries, per hw 

Florida pineapples, t^er ci-ate 



30 
28 
26 

n 

16 
20 

IS 

15 
17 
19 
10 

IT 

1 SO 

IS 
L 35 

14 

iS 
18 
50 

2 SO 
12H 

8 
12 



1) 



@ 



S3 

SO 



17 



10 
IC 
18 
20 



Money to loan on 

Real Estate Security. 

Building Loans. 

W. M. Prlndle & Go. 

l,ONSDALE BUILDING. 



PIPER^t 
JOHNSON 

est CASE 

BROKERS 

MEMBERS: 

Boston Stock Excliangc 
New York Stock Excliange 
New York Produce Exchange 
Clilcago Slock Exctiange 
Chicago Board ol Trade 
Mpls. Chamber ol Commerce 
Duluth Board ol Trade 
Winnipeg Grain Exchange 



I - ■■ 

mmmmmmmmmmmmmmMim 



400 



102 



.411 Chamber of Commerce and 
>cw York Life Arcade, 
.Minnenpolla. 

Pioneer Preim Dldg., St. Paul. 
Grain Exchange, Winnipeg. 



DULUTH: 

Temporary OlJice- 

18 3rd Avenue West, 

R. G. Bubbeli, Manager. 

BELl PHONE 7S). ZENITH PlIO^IE 71) 



box. 



$16J(n240 

120VI IB'i 

65(?lKi 

14n«i ITO 

. 110taI3.'i 

60(0 lUi 

, 12.'j(a2n0 

. 12.i;p18j 

. 110^245 



4 

00 
IS 
10 
25 
85 
75 
75 
00 
00 
00 



& an 



4H 



25 

23 



Horseradish, per ^*'l •■•■:•;, U', LI' 
lied Glolje onions, new, per lUO lbs. 

Potatoes, per bu 

Hrown trtnr.s • 

Swt-et poUlocfl. per bu 

fleets, per bu 

Nfw carrfts, pec bu 

Turnips, rer bu 

Kagas. per bu "• 

Parsley. p<!r do? 

oyster plaat, per dc^^^...^.^.^^... 

New apple elder, per keg 

Black raspberry juice 

Orange, clurry or pea^^.^..^.^^^.... 

Choice, per lb • 

•^^'^'"^''"'••'""tRESSroPbuLTRT 

Springs per lb 

Hens, per lb 

Turkeys, per lo 

Ducks, per lb 

««"^- '«*"' Fisii; 

Pike, per lb 

I'crch, per lb 

I'Tcsh salmon, per lb 

Pickerel, per lb 

Wliite per lb •• 

Fresh lake trout, per lb 

Herring, pit lb • • • • • 

rinioUiy. per ten 

upland. No. 1, P*' »»«> • -^J^ - 

Shorts, per ton 

Bran, per ton 

t**^^- "" "'' MFlAm 



3 50 
5 SO 

3 30 

4 
5 

18 

17 

25- 

18 

14 



7 

11 

7 

9 

11 

10 

10 00 

9 99 

25 00 

25 00 

56 



Id 

@ 
& 

<9 
@ 
as 



10 

18 

19 
IS 

10 

8 

IS 

10 
12 



noth 

ROOM •^•B,' 



'Phones. 14«5. 
FHOEMX BLOCK. 



J H. ROBBERS. 

Copper stocks and Bonds 

Curb S«oels» « Specially. 
Listed Secnri<le«. 




U«wr.c- lone horn?. r,(« ir.Vi,-. l-i.tatui-*- Market 
Me^^ choice to foiuy. $1...5(" 1.07; fair to good 
$10u"(olo3. Poultry-ilarkot ea.sy: uirkeys. 17c. 
chicke-n' He: springs, ir.c. Ve.il-MarKet neady 

neighls, 6>i(lTc: 8.- u un-found vvtlgh :>. .HUl^. 

Eminent Italian engineers, some of 
wliom have already performed more 
marvelous feats, now >^eriously propose 
the construction of a barge canal over 
the .Appenines an«l Alps mountains. A 
«vstem of tubular canals >s the idea. 
As one barge a.-cends another barge 
descends. 



Uita. ^ 



GUKliN VKGETABI.es. 



12 50 
4 50 



<a 



T Indicates inapprrrlable rainfall. 'For yesterday 
tl-or twenty four hours ending 8 a. m. rsth meridian 
lime IMlnlmun. terapomturc for l««l»e lK)ur* tud- 
inB 8 a in.. 7")th meridian time. 

VOTF— llie arerage luaxlmum and minimum tem 
peretures ai;d the aierage rainfall are made up at 
e«™ center from the actual numl« of reports re 
celvcd. The -state ol WMther" U lb4l prtTalUni: 
ftt lime of oUenallou. 



Wax beans. P- r b»>«iiet 

Pie plant, per box. 

CucuniUrs. hothouse, dw: 

Fancy Golden Huu" celery 

Endites. per bu • 

Lettuce, hithouse, pt- bu 

HadUhee. per do2 

Long ntdlslus. per ttc* 

.•<pting. per lo 

Tomatoes. .1^ ^^'''^^^i^iJH^. 

Pumpkins, per doi ^ 

Hubbarl sguiivli. per doz. 

Cat>bage«. per cwt 

Ualuis, Bpanish. pu cmia 



50 

1 2S 

3 00 

35 

•1 00 

1 25 

7S 

IS 

17 

3 00 

1 5« 

1 90 
• 00 
S 00 



4 50 

5 St) 



4S 



10 

llH 
12Vi@ 
7 ^ 
13 @ 



11 



13 
10 
14 



• :» 



Beef, per lb 

Mutton, per lb 

Ijird. per lb..... 

Pork loins, per lb 

Veal, per ub 

Lambs, per lb 

■ 
Xeiir York. 
NVw York -irril i;2.-Hutttr-Market barely steady: 
>«.w *"/".;, ^^'.'.kuEr-b «p.^ttrn fa<tory firsts. H'ta 
X Ch^e-Market' firm: re«-eip..,- l.t;94; „e« 
,ilte full crTam. lair to best, .-olored. 13<?l..c; do, 
Jfd.e li-^TlH-i!'- Eg8s-.Market less firm: receipt.. 
mV^T casff: «.«ter,> fii>.U. 22^22^c: do. stc-ouds. 
^•4,"2K; southern firsts, 2Hs(>.:!2c: do. s«-onds. 
20>itts21c. 

C'blcaeo. 

Phtraco April 22.- H<itttr— Mark<>t steady: crearo- 
erS 22^2^: nirles. 10*. 2>. ':cgs -Market ste.idy : 
nr^s •-!, prime firsts. 22c. Cheese Market steady 



It is asserted by a traveler that 
"the best cigaret tobacco in the world 
comes from Macedonia. »'^«^„J''«',i^*'f^ 
tobacco (When it is ^f »'a"7,. «\ ^i| ' '" 
Piirnnpan ciearcts f omes fiom Aiace- 
fonik'^ and tlf^t when it does not come 
from Macedonia it is said to come from 
there. 



*- 



No Matter What 
You Want 

A Want Ad in this pa- 
per will meet the eye of 
some one who can sup- 
ply it. 





frnffftm 



^ 







1 _ _ . - - - ■■ 1 


r—_ f 


1 

i 




1 


1 




/forth(JermanJ^oifcL 

f/»«T EXPRESS «EI5yiCE 

fLYmiOUTM-CHEHBOURQ— BREMEN— IC 
[ Wm .»«« Or"» A;.ra -T ! Un.f.i.riue Wi.i . 
Itu«ir Wm II 1U> 1 , fe<.ill» 
rWIII-SCIIEW PA««EltGEB SERVICE 

PiYMOUTH-CHERBOURO DIRECT— 10 AM- 

• fir, .-i, .;,.,:! A;.-: :•■ Prt'ii Kr.-t'lK-h nm M(i)8 



■EOITERRAIIEIIM SERVIOE. 

OIBHALTAB— NAPLES— GENOA. 

S«lUng «t n ». m- 

•K„ Albfrt April -i* ■ lurt>»r.:»«« J*" ! 

Mwrltmr . M%j I IWtMu (m«I M»y i • 

•Cklln at' Alglnm 

Nsrth Otrnan Lloyd Tra»t»l»rt' Chtelii 
0«lr*«»it 4 C«.. A«*nt*. S Bro«dw«y. N. Y. 
H Clauucniui 4 Co. 95 OcarliorH St., Chieago, 
or tht iMal agent In your elty. 



IIL. 



KUll .SAJ.E— IC 111 HT- ROOM HOl'SK 
with all modern cunvenienc-vs. To 
■ I il with owner. Zenith "phone. 

FoiT'^ALE — ,eigmt-ko',)m: house. 

Weat Diiluth. Bireet Kiaded. r.>m<-7it 
walk, water, electric Hglu, $-■.'"'". 
. : *.ims. JL>. W. Scutt. 18 Mci.aba 



III 

I 



.L 



T> EUROPE i> COHFOin 

■V TU svriM snAMEas of tbe 

American line 

AtliDtic Transport Line 
Red Star Line 
White Star Une 

WMte Star-Dominion Line 

■BOULAa 8AILI«ti« TO 

Great Britain, France, Belgium, 
and the Mediterranean Countries. 
. rt;Li. FAaiicvLAaa osTAWABiJi rsoK 



i-'Olt bA 
new li 
hirge . 
J. u. : 



lUtl». 

tniiiit li. 
1> W. 



; TLY FINISHED 
iiiipriJVements 
I luc Allan. Only 13.700. 
I. 201 ExcUan«« build- 



16-ROOM HOUSE, FOUR 
VVtril DuiuUi; reins >60 a 
I'rUe. $:i.»0'). Make lermi». 
S-utt. li Mesaba hhick. 



< A 1 



cell tr. 

ivncr 

i'ol; ; 
li.irdwu 






Ml- ST BE SOLD. FINE 

■ s, lor two famlliea. 

1 ,«• light, l-'.oou, very 

tsi I'uUith; $30« cash, bal- 

inonthdly. Harris Iteally 

5aa Manhattan huihllnu. 




lu57- 



-FIVE- ROOM CMTT AG E. 
„ . Iluor.-< ihruughuut. 1021 
rievvnth street. Zenith 'phone 



IF YOU LOSE ANYTMIMQ— AdTfrtMa It 

here It will Iw returied V you If »n hoQMt 
p»rson find* It. K»m»r«ble recoveries aro 
brouglit atwut ncrj il*i; through UU* column. 

IF YOU FIND An'^THINO IjrtDg It to lUo 



HERALD OFFICE. 



advertised. 



G«t a cUlm cli«ck. H»v» It 
BetUIm It If the uviai>r iloes not. 

THE LAW — "Krcry iktiu.t wUo shall ftnd 
I'jst property uti'lor rirrunisl»n'-e« wlilch ■»»• 
Urn kn< wlolgt or menus of limulry as to the 
true ownrr, wlio shall apDri>prliite suih prop- 
crtr to hU own use." or to the use of another 
p.rv'.ii not enilUed thereto, without , li»»l:ig 
am msJe reasonable effort to lliiii tlie ov»u«t 
ami restore Uie property to Ulm, shall l>« 
guilty of larctuy."— SeiUoa OcM. iUtU^«J 
l^ws. MinueaoU. l»l>6.- 



BUSINESS CHANCE— FOR SALE— 
Grain elevator, 40,000 bushels ca- 
aclty, on Soo line, Carnngton, N. 
three other elevators in town- 
one independent, two line houses; no 
trades. Address B. L. Kussell, 
secret ary, Carrlngton. N. P. 

WE WILL. SELL YOUR BUSINESS. 
Duluth locators, 401 Providence. 

BUSINESS CHANCE — PRINCE RU 
pert — Terminus of Grand Trunk 
Pacific. First official sale of lots 
commences May 25, at Vancouver, B. 
C. : terms, quarter cash. For maps, 
etc. write C. L>. Rand, agent for gov- 
ernment and railway. Vancouver, 
B. C. 

BUSINESS CHANCES — FOR SALE, 
rooming house, twenty-four rooms; 
golden location. See Duluth Locat- 
ors. 401 Providence building. 



X, 



FOR SAI 
lage 



II. 1 1 < 



II. t. 



'MHJM COT- 

alf block 

il ;g^ts. Ad- 



liAlLKOAD TIME TABLES. 



"UK SAl-t 
ty- ninth a 

this week 



■ t;.>TTAGE, THIR- 

vvest, |77(>. 1325 cash, 

C. L. Uakowsky &, 



-* Co.. 201 Exchange bulhllug. 



DIJLIIH. MISSABE & NORTHERN 
RAILWAY. 

Off lev > «MI WeBt Silver lor St. 

'Pbooc. 909. 

Wcr 'og, VlTiftnla. Eveleth. 

I aa. ••Mountain Iron. i 

•*;ii>.,iMa. ••Biwablk 'Ti-lO AM. , 

for Hii..nui^. Virirlnla, 



FOR SALE 
stjuare r<,>ot 
Inquire «- 



- SIX-KOOM HOUSE, 
Si\'v-U!>t avenue west. 
■ ■■cet. 



',1. 



.•3i50 PM 



For vi; s""«*> ^■'•-•k, Ranler, 
S'ort Fiances, Port Arthur, 
Beaudelttf, Warroad and 



. . .....:.... ,-;..:E AT 

■againon. 20o icel ironiage. 
...m hiiiiae; bath and closets; 

fooa condUloa, overlo-ikiiig lake; 
l.«f"». D. W. Scott. 1>> Mtauba block. 

. . .""-IIaT ~A~Gi'lEivT "'^'baRGAIN. 

uu -...^/ terms, renldence 227 VS eat 

Third street; 11 rooms and laundry. 

tw> i.*iih f.i.ms; modern In all ap- 

water heat, gas and 

VViUiain E. Ricliard- 

K .veil a. I J fe«- I. u! :'l 1 !- i=; 



sou, 



Wliinlp«« 

•Daily. ••Except Sunday. 

Cafo. Observation Car. Mesaba 



•TtlO PM 



Range 
points. Solid Veatlbuled Train. Mod- 
ern dieepor through ta Winnipeg. 



THE DULUTH ft IRON RAN&E RAIL- 
ROAD COMPANY. 

VLnMIM')N UOUTE." 



"THE 

ijate. I 



Alfl«#b 



I 
• 7 SOSMl 

•l.l»»niH 
f7.45 Ml 



\1 



• Ually .actpt 



kaUt lu.cf, l>:> U"- 

boas. Ti'iwvr, fay. .\'iri'r» 
Blwttljl*!, Mi-Kliilw. St""ta. 
Ikteleth auil 
VlcKuJa. _ 

iuudajr. ftttiudai oaiy. 



I « 12.00 m 
f, «e 30*ni 

1 t»-« "■ 



MONEV TO LOAN. 

DO \OV NEED MUNEY? 
Money lt>an€d In Duluth or Superior to 
g., ■ .jui security, also 

r. hoiHvu. wagons. 

is.;aii.L3; a..<;3u.ately conlidential. 

and Bel uur rates and terms. 

weekly payments as de- 

;uim1 api.lKUhi. I'ClUiiod. 



SALE — MISCELLANEOUS. 
(Continued.) 

FOR SALE^^TvOoIT' AND IRON- 
worklng machinery; sawmills, edgers, 
lathmllTs. saw tables. surfacers. 
sliaipers. Northern Machinery com- 
pany. Minneapolis^^ ^___ 

* 

* 



LOST-J3 GOLD PIKCE, ATTACHED 
to scroll. $5 reward for return to 
1731 West Second street. ^ 



tHiCKliftlNG. 

FISCHER, 
FRANKLIN 
PIANOS. 

EASV PAYMENTS. 
HOWARD. FARVVELL & CO., 

120 East Superior Street. 

Phones; Zenith, 1478-X; Old. 

17r>''-K. VV. J. Allen, manager. 

Fred R. Mann, expert piano and 

-. uii>i-' organ tuning. . . . .^ 

FDR SALE^SOME THUROUGHBKED 
French poodle puppies. Call 114 t irat 
avenue e ast, flat 6. 

FOR SALE— CHEAP. SOME HARD- 
wood furniture. Including two stoves. 
Call noon hour or between 7 and » 
evenings. 102 4 Ea.st Third street. 



t 

TV 

a- 



FOUND— LIGHT SINGLE DELIVERY 
wagon off Thompson road, seveii 
miles from West Duluth; owner call 
Dorsse farm, at Anne, P. O. Prove 
property and pay for ad. ^^___ 



LOST— SCOTCH COLLIE, FE.MALF-;^ 
color, sable and wliite. » months old. 
•Phone. Zenith, ll<90. Return to R. 
W. Jameson. 122 Eighteenth avenue 
west, for reward. 



BUSINESS CHANCE- BOWLING AL- 
Ivys. double with all equipments; 
used Borne, but In good condition. 
Price. >150. F. O. B. Iron River. Wis. 
Address Kopplin & Kopplln. at ship- 
ping point. 



FOR SALE— TWO liUGS. 9 BY 

f,.t. almost new, and some 
pi . rs of household furniture. 
Sfi'jiid avenue west. 



oi; 

ell. 

Call 

Monthly or 

tirwu. No 



FOR^SALE— 40 ACRES IN TIMBER: 
al.so 40 acres cultivated, railroad and 
depot In center of ss'iie; two wells; 
furnished house, coat >.:.60u; good 
stable; three milch cows; granary 
and complete farm machinery, t wen- 
miles from Duluth. I'art caslv 



LOST— C E RT I F 1 C A T E NO. C 2 3 4 9 
f.ir two shar.s preferred stock of 
United States Steel corporation. Ifi 
the name of W. A VanGent. It toiind 
please notlfv W. A. VanGent, box 
15, Hib bing. Minn. 

Er>ST— BRINDLE BOSTON BULL Pl^P; 
about SIX months old. PItone -OJJ, 
or return 410 West Superior street, 
for reward. _____ 



FOI ' N I) — li 1 : 1 N 1 » L F. 
quire h'-ad porter 



HULL PUP. 

I lie ."Spalding. 



IN 



ly-six 

1,-; • -'■ - 



WESlEliN LOAN CO.. 
&21 Manhattan Building. 
New 'phone. »ao. Old phone^ 

R A'f ES. 

chatleln. 



1036. 



DulDlh &!lorthern Minnesota Railway 

Oiri«««. ai« Lonat»*l« BJdg.. Uuluth. 

Trains l0«v«» 

1: 

turning 

H; ■■■■-■ •' 



SPECIAL Sl'RING 
on your salary or 
Yovi <et-- 
flO in 40c weekly. 

Izv - Soc weekly. 

li'} i.u^ i^H 11.20 weekly. 
This pays both Interest 
Other amounts same _ 
All transactions strictly private, 
DULlTil FINANCE CO.. 
aadlo Bldg. 



fl.60 monthly. 
|3.2U monthly. 
14.80 monthly, 
and principal, 
proportion. 



Knife River. 20 miles out 
: U. every day. ^^ ' ■ ' 

of the train !•. 
■ amlh. at 7:3U a. m. ^-j 
ions are made at Knife 

<; ,tlltt }r> 1 )ul >itli 



it" 



»tmtm iMitU. U»l Uuut flaiiU.,11 



l.nion 

lit 

lU UlM 



MONEY '!■ '- "^ PIANOS FUR. 

nil are i ^ "^"^ nxture-i 

at low ia.>. .. -.uall payments. 

A liberal discount if paid beloro due; 
business .■.miiiir-ntial. 

YOU .ET IT TODAY. 
Security ige Loan Company, 
401 FIRST iS.VliONAL BANK BJUDG. 
Zenith iiUone, 612. 



■ easy 
ufrice. 



t«»rm. 



Inuire J 75», 



FOR SALE— WHITE W YANDOTTE.S'. 

be.st stock known; Cockertds. >2 each; 
t>KK». |2 per getting. S. L. Smith, 
4;;'>i) AlcCulloch street. 



FOR SALE— THIRTY BEDROOM SET.S, 
carpets. rugs, folding beds, side- 
boards; also ranges and restaurant 
furniture; must be sold at once. Ill 
M'est Fir.1t street. 



FOR SALE— ALL OF HARNESS STOCK 
of James Cullyford must be sold this 
month, good chance lor harness- 
maker to buy in supplies at 15 cents 
im the dollar. 412 West First street. 



PERSONAL. 

DIAMOND QUEEN 
A Monthly i:egulator. The 
very best remedy we know 
of to protect women from 
trouble, diseases, sickness 
and serious operations, 

iiighly recommended »« * 
cure for Intlammation, Ll- 
ceratioii-s. Leucorrhoea and all diseases 

of the pelvic organU. ^i''"'^'-*', 'f;.''." ,^Vv 
box at drugstores or by inail bccuiely 
wrapped. Dnlutli Medicine Co., f. o. 
Box a2tJ. Duluth, Minn. 




BUSINESS CHANCES— LAMB MARINE 
Engine, beat on earth, for sale by 
T W. Wahl. 208 Lonsdale building. 
Our representative will call, upon 
•phone message. Both 'p honea, 431». 

BUSINESS CHANCE — FOR SALE— 
' Business property and stock locatea 
in Grand Rapids. N. D.; the only gen- 
eral store doing $22,000 to $24,000 per 
year on J. li. V. Ry. ; good location; 
good water, and a splendid opportun- 
ity for a hustler with about $10,000 
capital. If you are wanting a busi- 
ness where everything is good, call 
on or write Deisem & Franks, Grand 
Itapidb. N. D. 



it 
^^ 

u 

it 
if- 

a 
a 

H 
it 
n 
n 
it 
it 

a 
u 
it 



»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»**»****»***»**********************s 



— DULUTH'S— 
PROGRESSIVE 

FIRMS 



u 

u 
it 
it 
it 
it 
it 
it 
it 
n 

it 
it 

it 

it 

n 



Just 



Something is Always Wanted. 

what it is. who makes it, sells it, or i 



does it, and where it may be obtained. 



r 



it 



it 
it 



»»»») l l»»»*»*»»****»»»»*»*»«***»»»********»************ 



ATTORNEYS. 



William Marx. Attorney at Law. 510 
Burrows bldg. Zenith 'phone 384-A. 



L. U. C. 

selor. 



Titus, LUB. 
610 Torrey 



attorney and coun- 
bldg.. Zen. 134a-D. 



BUSINESS CHANCES— FOR SALE. SA- 
loon in the thriving town of Bovey; 
good reason for .selllgn. Address. 
Box 306 Bovey. iMinn. 



PERSONAL— WANTED TO BORRO\V\ 
$2 000 on good security, from private 
parly, for two or three years 
Addresa F 327, Herald. 



terms. 



WANTED TO TRADE— REAL. ESTATE 
for automobile. Call at 521 Board of 
Trade^ 

Bl .SINE.SS CHANCE.S— FOR SALE— 
Hotel Just off Superior street, doing 



tirst-class business; 
tire, account of ill 
R 360, Herald. 



owner 
health. 



must re- 
Address 



FOR S-VLE— POOL HALL. CHEAP IF 
taken at once. 561 9 R alei gh street . 

BUSINESS CHANCE — STOi;E IN 
country town for sale, fifty miles 
from Duluth. on Northern Pruiflc 
railway, good opportunity. Address 
S 16:^, Herald. 



BLACKSMITHS AND WAGON 
MAKERS. 

U^Tseshoelng and repairing — Devaney 
& Jordan, 20-22 First avenue west. 



BOAiS AND LAUNCHES. 

All kinds bdilt to order and for sale; 
also gas engines. H. S. Patterson. 
Railroad street and Sixth Ave, west. 



IMPROVED SHOE REPAIRING. 

GOI'HER SHOE WORK.S— Shops 10 Ist 
avenue west and 12 4th avenue west. 



KODAKS AND CAMERAS. 

Eclipse View Co., Inc.. 30 4th Ave. W. 
Develops and finishes for amateurs. 



COAL AND WOOD. 



City Wood Yard. 
J. D. O'Connell, 



Prompt deliveries. 
Prop. Both 'phones. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

i..,ii.tii Vnirlneering Co., W. B. Ration, 
Mgr Vis Paulmo Bldg. Specifications 
mt-pared and construction superin- 
tended for waterworks, sewerage 



etc. 



PEK.^'NAI.— Mi:S. LONGTIN OP 218 
East Third street Is now prepared to 
ali^r suits and garments ot a 1 kinds. 
Seven years' experience at .silberstein 
ai Bondy company. Will give prompt 
alien lion and no^dtsappom tmen ts^ 

PERSON A L— H Allt' DRESSING 
lor, for sale. D 17 2, Herald. 



PAR- 



MONEi 



NORTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD 



T'.J LuA.\ 

tlUii:Seil 

K-nilal. 
, , r:i.,ui' 



.Id furni- 
\NY. 



RENT— STORES. OFFICES, ETC. 

FoK RENT— SECOND FLOOR (JVEK 
Edwards Art store. 12-14 Second 
avenue west. Suitable for busines.s or 
residence, bath; heat. $'.0 Call at 
Little & Nolte. 

Fnl; 1;i:nt 



-WELL LOCATED STORE. 

.,!i;von Kit and basement on East 
Superior street. Whitney Wall com- 
uauv Torrey building. 



•'7,30 tmj 
• ».1S imj 

Lmive. i 
f S 00 am! 



ST. PAUL 
MINNEAPOLIS 



.\rmi). 

1" 1 : , i4 am 
' *f. U} pia 

- ■ ** I 

I '^m am 

I t2 »& mn 

. t L'uioa 



21"). 
. 1 . . I 



,;«!<., 



l.-.a 

Mone>' 
Otlie: 
o U I : 
in ti' 



W , 



uli 

lone 



N 



orth-Western Iine 



•I it!)' 



?>up. 

people and 
ines. wllh- 



vNY AMOUNT 

:i iiiip!"Ved real 

t. U. Greeiilield, 

. iN.-> .MAi>i> ON 

ttnibe! . laiiiis. Guaranty 

(/••K 416 Lyt-'um. 



XT— NEW BRICK STORE. a09 

i:p.'rlor street. Two 4-/«»""i 

,f. i M irs. W. M. Prindle & Co, 

FtMi liENT— SECtiND FLtXJR OVER 
9!ore, 127 East Sui>eri<«r street, snii- 
' ' <r husiness or IlKht 
i.urposes .\pply to 
.7 East Superior 



PER.^oNAI HAVE CAMERON RE- 

eover your furniture with leather; 
both 'phoiies. ^ 



PERSONAL — THOMPSONS KOLA 
Tablets will make a new njan or 
woman out of you. Kola 'lablets 
will do for you what no other lem- 
wlll do; they will overcome and 
of lo.st vitality; 2&c a bo.K. 
5 |)oxes for $1 by mall. Closson dc 
Kelly, agents. Sea ttle. W a sh.^ 

"pFiiS* )NA 1.. — Foot specialist; corns ex- 
tra- ted 25c; inverted nails and bun- 
.?d Scott. 17 E. Sup. street. 



edy 
cure 



FOR RENT— ROOMS. 



FOR liENT— THitEiO 
ed rooms, furnislicd 
keeping, gaa, water. 
751-M. 



LARGE HEAT- 
for light house- 
light. Old phone 



FOR ItENT — FURNISHED Itt.ioM 
With large alcove, with or without 
board. 1220 East Fir st atreet. 

FOR RENT— FURNISHED ROOMS. AT 

Merclianls hotel, from $8 and up. 
310 East Superior street. 



DENTIST. 



Dr W H. Olson, 222 New Jersey 

All Work guaranteed. Both phones. 



LAND FOR SALE. 

We always have bargains In wild and 
improved land. List with us. E. H. 
Hobe Land & L'ber Co. 10 5th av. W. 



LOAN OFFICE. 

Money loaned on all arllcies of value. 
Clly Loan office, 524 W. Superior Su 



LYCEUM SCENIC STUDIO. 

Photographic background painted to 
order, decorating all kinds. Lyceum. 



LAUNDRY. 



DRAYING^ 

O L. JOHNSON. 
General draylng. 1924 W. 2nd 
1824; stand 20th Ave. W 



Model 
the 



Laundry, 126 
work. " Old. 



E. 1st 
2749-U 



St. -We do 
New. 1302. 



& 



St. Zen. 
Sup. St. 



EMPLOYMENT OFFICE. 



Nat' I Emp, 
1882. "Wi 



Co 6 S. 5th AV, W. Est'b. 
get the men. Pkones 37b^ 



FOR RENT— ONE FINELY FUR- 
nished room, suitable for one or two; 
all modern conveniences; five min- 
utes' walk from new courthouse; 
price moderate; call evenings. 631 
West .Second street. 



loiis cur 



PEit.SONAI.- — Electric cabinet 
baths. Knauf .Sisters. 24 W 



Turkish 
Sup. St. 



-FIVE ROOMS, 

924 East Sixth 



WATER 
atreet. 



FOR REXT- 

and sewer. 

FOR Tt ENT— FOUR ROOMS UPSTAIRS 

at 210 Ea.sl Seventh street, electric 
light, water in yard. $8 per month. 
Ztnlth 19J9-D. 




MINING ENGINEERS. 

ED WIN J. COLLINS, Consulting Min- 
ing Engineer; mines examined, geo- 
logical reports on mineral proper- 
ties; 16 years practical experience. 
1008-9 Torry bldg. 



MUSICAL MERCHANDISE. 



W W. Seeklns. 302 E. Sup. 
flowers and floral emblems^ 



St. Cut 
all kinds. 



FAMILY 



THEATER. 

DAILY 



SAVOY — NEW SHOW 

feature pictures. Admi.ssion 
afternoon and evening. 



OF 
loc. 




FOR ItENT— TWO SEPARATE FUR- 

nished rooms; reasonable rent. 18 
Fifteenth avenue west. 



Fur garments 
ty. Dululh 



made to 
Fur Co. 



order a speclal- 
327 W. First St. 



Boston Music Co. 
ty. 121 W. Isi. 



Mall orders a special- 
Old 2787-M. New 673. 



PROFESSIONAL. 



DR. MITCHELL, electro-magnetic spe- 
cialist, has positive cure lor kidney, 
slomaL-h, liver, heart, deafnoES, blind- 
ness, piles, se.vual weakness, all fe- 
male troubles. 325 West First street. 



PLUMBING AND HEATING. 



!■ ' 



manufac- 

J. F. Gor- 

streeU 

NT— S MALL G ROC ER Y STo 1 : E 

will, fixtures, cheap r.nt < Md 'phone 

751-M,. _ 

, I . I . , ; vl-l >\- j.;sT M IC H 1 
cnHiiDir.sinti buildlng for I 
load track. Burg itc 
ladio building. 



Ilawku.-T, 



--'I". 

:1- 
I'al- 



PERSOXAL— THEY TELL THE TRUTH : 

— liie Prophetic Mystic SyinboKs— 
N.w original, entertaining and edu- ] 
catlonal. Price. $1.00, by registered 
mall 15 cents extra. Address Agnea 
Baco n. Duluth. Minn. R. F. D. No. 1. 

Personal — Manicuring, massage, scalp 
treatment. 813 Torrey; 'phone 94>»-X. 



FOR RENT— A YOUNG LADY WANTS 
room mate; light housekeeping al- 
lowed; also one small back room, 
ciieap. 19 East Third street. 

ToU RENT— NICELY FURNISHED 
room, lake view; suitable for one o» 
two gentlemen. 208 West 
street. 



Thlru^ 



I 



1,,.^ VV , ui^-CHwrt il. 



vny am 



U' 



DULUTH, SOUTH SHORE* ATLAMTIO 



a-^j tcrnis. 



No. a 

A..U. 



P.M. 1 



No. I 
A.M. 



f7.4i| 

U.osj 

rl.isl 

18.55 
t7.4S 



Ar.. 



• i.OOjtf 

• 5. IS 

A.M. 

• 3.40 

•8.31) 
•3.30 

•4.a« 

• 10 

•s 



. DulutU . 

Si.il»eriur . 

iloug!uoo 
Calumet . 

bh^trmliig 

Marqaette 



.Ark 



Lv 



•lO.iOl 

*I0. 13 
t>.M. 

•10.30 
•9 40 
P M. 

•12.25 

• 1 1 . !(0 
•3- JO 
•B.SU 

• iii.ua 



Ho. a 

P.M. 

TrTsi 

i«-40 



A.M. 

T7-S3 



UPHOLSTERING. 

When Cameron dues your upholstering 
lt*» riglit. Boili 'phones. 12.1 Is t A. w. 



FOR RENT— STORE. 110 EAST FIRS-T 
street, with basement suitable Ipr 
painter. plumber or cari. enter 
work out rent. Fulton, 
building. 



415 



to 
Lontidale 



li^iirRENT---BARN. REAR 920 EAST 
First street. Apply to W. C. Sher- 
wood .a: Co., 11!< Manhattan bhlg. 



FOR RENT— BARN. WILL 
liold twelve horses, fine 
$12 per ntonti 
Mesaba Block. 



J. 



EASILY 

condition, 
Abrahamson. 17 



PERSONAL — LEARN HYPNOTISM. 
Free .essons and particulars. Box 
152 Estherviiie, Iowa. 

AND PAPER- 

IGIS-X. C. Gill. 



PJ 



;R.S0NAE— J^MNTING 
Zenlt)!, 



h a nglng. 

PERSONAI.— OLD .MIRRORS K^^ll- 
vered. St. Germain Bros.. 121 r irst 
avenue west. 



FOR RENT— PARK POINT, TWO NIC! 
furiiislied rooms for summer; break 
fust served for two gentlemen, 
suitable for light housekeeping, 
dress B 310, Herald. 



or 
Vd- 



A.Vl. 1 i' M ) 

ta.so •? "■ ' 

P.Xi A ■ 

ta.oo; •- 



M;n treat 

New Yt'rk. 



I A.M. 1 P.M. 
...AT •? 30 t'O-IS 
P.M. A.M. 
...Lf •7.001 t8 41 



J., t > OTT. 1:2 Ls' Av>-. W. Hotli -ulioiu-a. 

BOARD WANTED. 



RiM..„ -vND 1'." 
employed 

It; 1 r h 111-. 1 k 



\ IM ) 



• I>bU». 

Tralin Nut. 



I Otlljr 
T aud 



eit<i>t 



suudajr. l>tuUi« caf 00 



\vaxti:t>— L.\i>Y 

Ml 

ill 
, iofer- 
M 387, 



Htraid. 



PRIVATE HOSPITAL. 



THE fiREAT NORTHERN 



tS.iiu ^"" 
♦3 2'. prii 
• II 10 pm 
• 8 *S ami 
•B.S5 pm| 
tZ to P«n 
ftt.OO am 

■""•I>mUi, 
raadt at '■> 



STATION*. 



I .Arrlie. 



ST. PAUL 
and 
MINNEAPOLIS. 

CT'joliatoii. Unmd Forks. 
Mcniaua Mid Cua.it 



) 



>i;v:iit Ul'kcT, Hlobh 



J 

Virginia 



IS. IS »m 
*l.35 pm 
• 6. SO am 
•8.35 pm 
•7 IS am 
tl2.30 pm 
' 10. IS pm 

.> itUai^er* 



i .Maleruit 
I )uftdi-ntial. 

iufanlii. Mrs. K. 
K A.Hliland. Wis. 



1 :11S WILL FIND 

; i-onrlnenieiit at 

■ St of doc- 

. or adopt 

ilew.-s J~o Sec. Ave., 



M. .-V. I 



MILLINERY. 

*jx. 3;io ^ea^^TTourth hn\ 



MRS. HU A NOT. 114 WEST FOURTH Sf 



SEWING MACHINES. 



"The Domestic" for 
rlinnge; repairing 
West First street. 



sale, rent or ex- 
a sjtecialty. 121 
Old, 2 7 87-M; new. 



vFi>< H \\.-;oN GRADUATE MID- 
wiie. i.iVial-^ complaints. 413 Seventh 
avenue east. Old phone la94; /.en- 

Ith 1225. 



lltiUt. .Sl>.i,.lil.4 iwlcl 



HOTCLr LrCNOX 

Moat thoroughly equipped In the 
Morthwe-st. Sanltati'm perfect. 
El!R«»PEA-\. tl.OO AND UP. 
A.UKttlCA.'V. #2.00 AND UP. 



i'riv.ite home for ladie« before and 
duriiiK confi'i.-tnent; expert care, 
everything !i>ial; infants cared 
for Ida I M. D.. 284 Harrison 
avenue, --^i. i'aul. 



Minneapolis. 



* .v;n 



ITAL FOR LADIES 
confinement at 108 
City 'phone 9537. 



HORTICULTURIST. 

PENDEliGAST. the pioneer horticul- 
turist of Lake Superior is still here 
ready for business and wishes to 
say to all who will warn choice 
hardy shade .or fruit trees, shrub.s. 
vines or bulbs, that he will be ready 
to assist them In selecting varieties 
that he knows are best suited to 
climate, soil and season for Duluth, 
and will superintend setting and 
pruning. Send postal card to R. H. 
Pendergast. 4327 Puleston street. Du- 
luth. and he will call. 



FARM LANDS 

FOR SALE — FARM. 48(P'aCRE.S. 
near station, 20 acres cleared, house 
root hoiis*- well. 150.000 feet good 
timber. nearly all cut into logs. 
$4.ioO. Uelmbaugh & Spring. 1103 
Tower avenue. Superior^ 

n.R SALE-^EXA.< LANDS— vSEC RE- 

larv Wilson of the department of; 
agriculture says: "If 1 were a young 1 
man 1 would pack my grip and go to 
Texas" We own and offer for sale 
well-sel.'cted fruit and garden land 
located at Dayton, thirty miles from 
llou.ston. in the heart of the Texas 
fruit country. Low prices; easy 
terms. Write for further Informa- 
tion. I'erry <t Swansen. 804 Palace 

building. Minneapolia. Minn. 

CAS H BUYS FO RT Y 



FOR RENT— NINE ROOMS AND BATH 

823 East Third street, suitable for 
one or two families; nice front yard 
and view, newly altered; rent $35 per 
month, including water. J. Abraham- 
son, 17 Mesaba Block. 



FURNACE AND SHEET METAL. 

Work done on short notice. liurjell & 
Harmon. 308 E. Superior St. Phones. 



FURNITURE RECOVERED. 



Let 
334 



Forsell do your UPHOLSTERING, 
or phone ^en. a-iJ. 



E. Superior St. 



FURNITURE AND PIANOS. 



FOR RENT— FIVE 
East Sixth street. 
Fourth street. 



ROOMS 
Apply 



AT 621 
lOo W^est 



Polished and repaired. 
Hill, 336 E. Sup. St. Old 



Thompson 
'phone 282s 



& 
L. 



FURNITURE AND STOVES. 



All kinds at lowest prices. 
First avenue west. Zen, 



Shapiro, 12 
'phone 1032. 



Geo. McGurrin 
Old, 815. 



Co.. ;i2'J E. 
JOBBING, 



Superior St. 
New, 983. 



PAINTS, OILS AND GLASS. 



k 



The LilUe i'alnl Man says: 

KUerwln-Williams Is the beat. 

NORTHWE.STERN PAINT CO. 

323 W'est First SlreeU 



PRINTERS AND BOOKBINDERS. 

Merritt & Hector, ilallway and commer- 
cial printing. 112 W. 1st St. Phones. 



PLASTERING AND BRICKWORK. 



Estimates 
'phone. 



furnished. VV 
1224-A; old 



J. Darby. New 
'phone, 424-M. 



FOR RENT — STRICTLY MODERN 
furnished room at 123 First avenue 
west. 



FOlt RENT— COZY FRONT 
Park Point, gentlemen 
Call Zenith 'phone, 2061 
day. 



ROOM ON 
preferred. 
X, during 



1 OR SALE— $100 

acres 01. land if taken 
Manlmtlan building. 



quick. 225 



MUSIC. 

PHl>NoGRAPHS AND MUSICAL IN- 
struments. Send your orders for 
Dopular songs and records to Ai'unu 
Music company. No, 6 Hast superior 
atreet, Duluth Minn, 



tOR SALE— THE L.\ND DEPART 
ment of the Duluth & Iron P.ange 
Railroad company la preparing to 
put on the market a number of ten 
and twenty-acre tracts for poultry 
farming and truck gardening at 
Meadowlanda. Tiiese lauds will be 
well ditclied and drained and sold 
on t asy terms and long tnme. For 
furtiier information, address Land 
Commissioner, Dulutii & Iron Range 
Ittilroad company. 512 Wolvin build- 
ing. Duluth, Minn. 



FOR RENT— THREE VERY DESIR- 
able furnished rooms. single or 
suite, line location, rent reasonable. 
1215 East First street. Old phone. 
2773-L. 

FOH RENT — ELEGANTLY FUR- 
nished room, suitable for two; all 
modern conveniences. 217 Second 
avenue west. 



FRENCH CLEANER AND DYER. 



re- 



Zenith Valet. 213 W. J«^ '^^o^.^l^^n^.u 
and tailoring. Old ihii-i* 



pairing 



HOME BAKERY. 



bread 



The Zenith will furnish you 

pa.siry. Zen. 1879-D. 427 E. 4lh St. 



FOR RENT — NICELY FURNISHED 
room; lake view; suitable for one or 
two gLiilletnen, 208 West Second 
street . 



MUSIC ANl» Ml HICAL 



Nicely ■ 

Uiot 



CLIFTDN HOTEL, 

321 Wtst Flr»t St. 

tt ,ir!.! m'«t L-?iitr*l piaoe In the city. 
mi frf'ill 50c up. 
ir au'l t>ath In each room. 
MMC GAIN. Prop. 



Mr.-^" H Olson, graduate midwife; 
vale hospital, 328 N. &Sth Av. W . 



pri- 
ze n. 



r 



H' 



MRS. 

wlf< 



LADIES DURING 
\V. K. Cody. 508 
Minneapolis. 

aWnX^RONG E^-Gmd uale¥ nild- 
■ 2018 W. Sup. St. Zenith 1894-D. 



al for 

ment. :>^ 
i.ake sti ■ ■ 



The Miller 

SaS-224 W. ituperlor St. 

American and European Plan 

infty Home-like Rooma. 

JOHN W. MILLER, Prop. 



[State 

s.s- 

Ir, 



of Minnesota. <'.>anty of St. Louis. 



If I'r 



I '..'irt. 
Estate 



of Zolmon 



New 



RATISS, »2.«« AND •2.«M». 

Hotel McKay 



Cor. Flrat 



Street 

Weat. 



and Fifth 
Duluth. 



Avanue 



The i.elitiou ot A. J. Braden. repre- 
HfmtlnM among other things that the 
cLVm TlbTd by^.tm in the abox^ mat- 

*- r ^^;ir mial' .^o^ul;rof uJe adl 
i,»r of said estate as having 
u.e.. i-^Hl. wa.s in fact "^^er paid, and 
that for reason."? stated in said petition 
te order of this Court, allowing said 
final account, and the final d«^<'r^i' ot 
di.stribution. should be vacated and set 

^''^IT !-> ORDERED, That -.mI petition 
be heard before this Court at me Pro- 
ate Court Room.-? in the C'ourt House 
In Duluth in said county on Monda> 
the 17th day of May. 1909, at ten 

o'clock \ "' ' 'II persons Interested 

in said ; I in «ald matter are 

.mured at said time 
ise. If any there 
should not be 




INSTRUME-NTS OF EVKRV 

ai-siTlyiiou Jjllaiin phiMio- 
(mptu. iMUid anJ ur- 
c h e s t r a tnstrumenta. 
pla'ioa aitJ urgaiii liiS- 
walil WriiTUAAKU. T 
tiij 9 »'lr»l Avtiiue We«t. 



STOVE REPAIRS. 



WE CARRY IN STOCK REPAIRS 
f.)r 10.000 different t-toves and ranges. 
C F Wiggerts & Son, 410 East Su- 
perior street. Both telephonca. 



FOR SALE— SIXTY-ACRE IMPROVED 
larm near Adolph station, 30 acres 
cultivated ; buildings, horses, cows, 
farm implements. J. D. Bergstrom, 
417 Burrows building. 



FOR SALE— FORTY ACRES FINE 
farming land, near Pike lake, cheap. 
401 Providence building. 



WANTED TO BUY. 

We buy furniture and stoves. Joe Pop- 
kin. 22 W. 1st St. Zenith 1857-X. 

WANTED TO BUY- ~ 

wheel chair. W. 
dry. 



-A RUBBER TIRED 
L. Vale, Yale laun- 



here! 

and 

b" 



allje:ns 
ulce.rine. salve 



fi»*u_rt CL.e forCnronio lloera.IJone llcera, 
§<-r«Trulo' »Ulc«rs.Vaico»eUlrera.M^re.ir- | 
l«li:i.«»r»,Ffver8->r.>a.0.ii.|fr«'n«',B1i..m I 01- , 
■oninB. WhIt«.Sw«lHnK, »-<«««on«-<l y4.>ur.d^, 
allsoreio.'loiitjst* Ulu^ 1'. sltlveb nevrr talis t urM 1 
also <;ut».Barna, Boll*. F.lr»n<», t a'bunel.'B, | 

^ jTaIXKN MJDIOlNK < O . ST Paul, MiwM, I 



this 
the 



^ ORDEKi:i> KrKTHi:H. That 
oidfr be served by publlcatloii In 
I)uluth Evening Herald, according 

V'aie'd Duluth. Minnesota, A|):il 21.st., 
' ''^' ^'"^ *^'^'^:j* B. MIDDT-.^rOFF. 



I. Seal. I'r 

Minn ) 
Duluth Evening 

and May 6. 



Judge of 
)bate Court. St. 



..lit. 
ounty, 



Herald. April 22. 2». 



BOARD offered! 

CAN ACCOMMODATE TEN OR 
twelve boarders; excellent board, ele- 
gant rooms, everything new; strictly 
motlern; two blocks from new court- 
house. Old 'phone 1573-K. 

BOARD OFfIoRED— WIT H LA RG E. 
airy, well furnished roorna; strictly 
modern; reasonable rates. 701 West 
Second street. Old 'phone 1573-K. 



FOR RENT — GOOD ROOM AND 
board. $20 per month. 326 West 
Third street. 



FOR RENT— ROOM 
Zenith phone 1140-X 



AND BOARD. 



GOtJD BOARD AND RO<3M FOR TWO 
Bentlemen. 326 West Third street. 



Room and board — 301 E a st Th ir d 8t 
Room and Board— 318 W. Second St 



FOR SALE — i.'HE.VP, 40 ACRES ON 
Rice Lake road, short distance from 
poorfarm; considerable hardwood 
timber. G. A. Rydberg, 411 Torrey 
buildin g. 

FOR RENT— SM.\LL FARM ON JEAN 
Duluth road, four miles out, very 
reasonable terms to right party. Call 
at my farm on Tiseher road, or write 
me, care of R. F. D. No. 3. Duluth. 
William C. Sargent. 

WHOLESALE BARGAINS — 12.800 
acres in Montana at $5.75 per acre; 
40.000 acres in Texa*. at $1.75 per 
acre. Jay P. Morrill. Palace building. 
Alinneaiiolis. 



WANTED TO BUY— HIGHEST PRICE 
paid for second hand furniture and 
stoves. Silver, 229 East Superior 
streeL Zenith 2287-X. 

WANTED TO BUY— HOUSE AND LOT 

at Lakeside, about $2,000. Address 
P. O box 599. city. 



HAT MFR. and cleaner. 

^^;;P'57"'9n^nsbrugger, successor to C. 
VoUand, 24 First avenue E. 'Phones. 



HAY, SEED AND FARM^MCFTY. 

C--''^;^"''7^^:^7TeTL"T2T"vV^^ 'Phones. 

'Make Lakeside Tuesdays and Fridays. 



ROOFING AND SHEET METAL. 

Vv^TnT^execnUed^romptly. Burrell ik 
Harmon, 308 E. Superior St. Phones. 



SIGN PAINTERS. 

Duluth Adv. Sign Co. p»lnt all kinds 
of si;fn.s. 2o7 West First St. 



TURKISH BATH PARLORS 

Guaranteed 



menls. 



cure, all rheumatic all- 
Kasmir. under Hotel McKay. 



VETERINARY SURGEON^ 

(J Forsvth. Lyceum Sale & Board- 
ing stable. 14-16 West First street. 
Zenith, 691. 



DYE WORKS. 



DYEING 
best and 



INTERSTATE CLEANING & 
t^o "17 E. Sup. St. Ihe 
mo'pt efficient plant in the city. Our 
motto is: "We do it right— and ready 
when promised. Zenith, thirty. Du- 
luth. twenty-rtve-thirty^ 



WiU^TED • TO BUY— A GASOLINE 
launch, 28 by 36 feet in length. 5 to 
7 foot beam. 6 to lO-horse pow»-r en- 
gine. State lowest cash price. Ad- 
dress 1*. O. Box No. 76. 



WANTED TO BUY— GOOD RAT TER- 
rler pup. Address F 331, Herald. 



WANTED TO BUY— OLD CLOTHES 
and shoes at 719 West Superior 
street. Zenith 'phone Ib87-X. 



TkNITH city dye WORKS— LARG- 

"^^st and mist reliable. AH work done 
Work called for and de- 
Phones: Old. 1154-R; new. 



In Duluth. 
livered. 



1888. '232 East Superior street. 



nevv. 1191-A. 330 E. Sup 



ing; 
1202-R; 



t. 



'i^Znh^i^tern Dyeing & Cleaning Co 
reliable dyers f'''^.^{tul Aw^ 
Northwest. 15 Lake Ave. 
New. 1516; old. 1337. 



oldest 
cleaners in 
north. 'Phones: 



BURKE BROS.— Most tJP'to <if ''t 
^^cleanlng ^estabhshm^ent In^^^t^he 



22 East Sup. 



dry 

city. 

257. 



WANTED TO BUY— IF YOU WANT 
to sell or buv property, any kind, 
anywhere write the Northwestern 
Business Agency, Minneapolis Minn. 



WANTED TO RENT. 

WANTED TO RENT— TWO WOULD 
like one or two furnished rooms for 
light housekeeping, must be neat. 
Call 310 West Fourth atreet. Zenith 
■phone^ 2 194-D. ^___ 

^^r^^;^K^_A HEAVY TEAM FOR 
th»*lr "keep" for the summer; best of 
care guaranteed. William C. Sargent, 
R. R. 3, Duluth. 



HlRhest price paid for cast-off clothing. 
xVI Stone, 213 W. 1st St. B ell 1834jvL. 

WANTED TO BUY— A LARGE OR 
small tract of land for Investment. 



I 69. Herald. 



CARPET CLEANING. 

J^^^^^'i^i^JGurE^'ARPET CLEANING 
Co Sinotte & Van Norman, com- 
pressed air cleaners and rug weavers, 
both 'phones, 1701-03 W. Mich. St. 



FOR SALE— COWS. 

w^ihtJkTroad of fresh milch cows 
Thursday April 22. 821 Fourth ave- 
Zenith phone 170b-D. 



FOR SALE— HORSES. 

^''^ORSES^HORSES HORSES HORSES. 
Wc are leaders in our line and can- 
not be undersold. Our mollo. "quick 
sales and small profit." We have 
40) to 600 head of horses on 
con.'^istiug of draft horse.s. 
mares. delivery horses and 
We can sell you one horse or 



from 
harvd. 

farm 
muled. 
a car- 



load Auction every Wednesday at 
130 p m. Private sales daily. Fart 
time given If desired. Take mterur- 
ban cars from either city. Kariett & 
Zimmerman. Midway Horse Market, 

St. Paul. 

WORK- 
alao 
and 



nue east. 



FOR SALE — S. 
rived with a 
cows. 1219 



M. KANER JU.ST AR- 
carload of fresh mllcn 
East Seventh street. 



FOR SALE- 
S. Weddes. 



FOR 

young 



-FRESH MILCH COWS. 
1516 West Supe rior stre et. 

"cow 



SALE-FRESH^^^Mlum ^^^^^^ 



Jersey, 



CARLSON WILL AR- 



cows. Tuesday.^^^Aprll^^SO.^^ 



West Twelfth 
1654-D. 



phone 



FOR SALE— A PAIR OF tX>OD 

ing horses; weigh 2.900 pound.s; also 
two young mares. W'.'ght 1.400 
1,600: 5 years old. S. M. Kaner. 1219 
East Seven th street. 

FOITSALE^A^BUNCH OF HORSIW 
Just arrived in West Lmluth this 
morning, good working horses, good 
driving horses and Ko...d farm mares 
Will sell at a bargain, part term.s 
given if desired. 608 North Fifty- 
sixth avenue west. 
3001. 



Zenith phone 



FOIt SALE— A SMALL DELIVERY 
horse, $40. tiasser's barn. 



l.'<jR SALE- FIVE 
rubber-tired buggy 
West First street. 



HORSES, 
bargain. 



ONE 
211» 



FOR SALE— TWO PAIR OF HORSES; 

weight 3,000 pounds, or for rent In 

city. 4723 Magella n street. 

FOli SALE— NEvTTiELlVERY TEAM. 
4 vears old. weiglit. 2,400 pounds: 
guaranteed sound and gentle. 
West Fir.«t atreet. 



508 



.^H ■ 




WATCHES REPAIRED. 

Guaranteed Main Spring, $1.00; watch 
cleane.l. $1. Garon Bro.« . 213 W. 1st. 



ASHES AND GARBAGE. 

hauUd. Dick Barrett. Zenith 'phone. 
1274-Y. 



PHOTOGRAPHER. 



FOR 

go 



LATEST 
to Chnste 



A>fD 

iSf'Il'S. 



B i:sT 

L'5 W. 



PHOTOS. 

Sup. St. 



STENOGRAPHERS. 

TYPE W RITING. STENOGRAPHY 
copying. I..enox hotel notary. 



A-ND 



GRACE BARNETT. FIRST NAT. BLDG. 



ASHES AND GARBAGE REMOVED 
John !.,arson. 1711 London road. Old 
'phone 1390-K. Zenith 1488-X. 



KE.MOVED -iiUST HOLMGREN. 
London road. Old 'phone. 3$1-M. 



1»06 



LIQUOR HABIT CURED. 

Prof J. B. Fl.<?setr«n Antl-Llquor Cure; 
guarantees to cure'the worst habit- 
ual drunkard in twd weeks, or mon- 
ey refunded. Np (linger to health. 
Investigate. Testjinonlals. advice free. 
Call or write 815 West Superior Hi. 



OPTICIANS. 

C C STAACKE, 203 NIiw"jERSEY 
"building. 106 West Superior street. 
Wednesday and Saturday evenings. 



OF FRE.=1H 



^^OK SALE-CAR^^OAD ^^ . 

ikke shore. Jacob Parker. 



milch 
east, near 



C. A. 



PIANO TUNING. 

TnTEGORYTzBamZPHONET^ 



HOUSE 



CLEANING^ 

liED 



WE GUARANTEE OUR 

Killer. Wlrth's Red Cross drug 
13 Weat Superior street. 



BUG 

store. 



FOR SALE— TWO HOR.SES. W'EIGHT 
1,200 lbs., each, 5 years old, will 
work single or double. Ca > »' H"** 
East Fi fth atreet. M . J. W^lddes. 

FOR SALE — DRAFT. DELIVERY, 
farm mares and drivers always on 
hand at our new stables, 3o8 Baat 
First street. Ahso wagons of all 
kinds. L. Hammel company. 



PUBLIC STENOGRAPHER. 

''~l^^RRELi^XY<!^uS^' 

■phone 2380. 



L_ GRADING, SODDING. SEEDING. 



PICTURE FRAMING. 

^U^STAv'heNNECKE. 211 E. SUP. ST. 



FOR SALE— BLACK DIRT AND SANDV 
loam. Horace B. Keedy. 1709 Londoii 
road Old phone 1390-K; new. 1488-X. 



PUBLIC STENOGRAPHER 
West First street. 



206% 



TENTS AND AWNINGS. 
POIRIER * CO.. 108 a Superior 



au 





M 




ailllfcMMWmiNIIMIIIi a ilWl wil l M 





i 



DULUTH EVENING HERALD. Thursday 



APRIL 22, 1909. 




THE BOOK=KEEPER WHO HAS BUSINESS IDEAS WILL ADVERTISE IN 

THE HERALD WHEN HE WANTS A NEW JOB ^ ^ * 





mmm. 



One rent a Word Ea<*h Inscrtton. 
Ho Aclverlls-*niu*iit Ltsi» "":?ilJ:^j::53fr 

'^ Popping 

BY TELEPHONE. 



•phi 



New 
Phone. 



C.%T MARKETS— 
H. .1. Tfl»-n ....... 

11. Tk !■!■>. 
%l \11UII> — 



Pit I 



«i I' y 



BAKKitlF-S— 

The Bon Ton . . 
WUOU — 

W. S. Elllngsen 



23 


isa 


479 

441 


479 

267 


i:43 

163 


1027 
163 


20-L 


11Z8 




1730-A 



One Cent ft Word Each Inscrtiou. 
W^vrtisfuifiit Lass ""^^ij^^s:^*^^ 
i^OR SALE — klSCELLAN EOU S. 

i^I^ SAlS^^SafSST OfflOK fU "Pi- 
lule. uixUUfvts iiiia eugint-era sup- 
uiivs. iviM'wrUers unU suppuea. J. »• 
LV^. 4*>tJ VS. '''H^. »XJ>vnlij)tujn^^ 

~ ' SALfc: All 



imy 



Vu-usf at IK'l Katst J- «.»urth 
uiail -Uay h ttl a spfcial iov\ 

.>.i.t> liut iiiuspt-ctive Uuyers 



( -rn .'111 

Bll'fvl 
II t ii'c I 



\\ 



I- .\i. K.iy. 



REAL ESTATE, FIRE 

INSURANCE AND 
RENTAL AGENCIES. 



.vin building. 

.ngv building. 

'. ivuiidlng. 

.. .i^ng« Bids. 



lor luaiuuig. tsucn 
moil n lain iinn, ftc. 
ousviasuii, t>ux ■♦•♦. 



TKiiiOri. ia:.Al>i 

as fcinuce. mapkc. 

Aaaifi't Cnaiies! 

Ariioiu. .\i:uu 

. .-^__^_ K 1 M tl A uiTln A.\ ua NOW 

d mrecl Hum taciory lo your 

i\u c-iivas»vr», iiu agents, no 

prolU» lor you lo pay. Come 



One Cent a Word Each In.sertlon. 
\o .VtiyertiM'nicnt l^ess Than 15 Crnts. 

HELP WANTED— FEMALE. 



—WANTED— 
A lady of refinement as com- 
panton and houst-keeper; must 
uiidtrstand cooking:; reierences 
rtiiiiired. Call at once, 131 Eaet 
Sfcond street. 



noil 
home. 

dt-alers' ^ — . - , , „.. 

>ii vu vour own accoru and «juj. 
l"iano Co., Hits Kimball laclory 



Koi-l'V 



t>.--rii«r Klretjt. 



FOR RENT-FLATS. 




.BLE 

in t! 



MODE UN 
• Kimotill 



FOlf SALE — BA, A.\.' ^'>,^;.VJ 

doors. Combinailoiis cUang-'d. «-nri«- 
li« Litho Co.. Onristitj buUdinK. 
agent.s <.■ H.i'l ."■. 

ae Luiio. Oo. 
i oi stuc-AaUressograplis, Edison buai- 
iifsa FlK.no«iapUs. Aduuig .Uucuint-;.*. 
uxtiow niecnanical devices. cniiaue 

Kcu'alle-^Desks. Cbalre. Y. & E. F U.ng 
deviceu, oince Furaiturt: and btauoii- 
ery. KVL-iytninK ior 

CUri.- 'iiio. Co. 



all flriit 
iood as 



W^yVXTED— CUMl'ETENT (UKE ' FOK 
g«-iieral housework; small lamlly. 
Rlrs. Gall, 417 Twenty-third uveiiue 

eiint. . 

MRS. SOMERS- 
17 Second Ave. E. 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion. 
No Advert l.soment Less Than 15 Cents. 

^ wmT 

17 





WANTED — GIRLS, 
employment office, 

WANTIOIWGOOD STRONG 
general housework 
East Third street. 



GlltL FOR 
small liimily. 11 



the ollice. 



ton rr-ii-i^ -THE NEW iiU.\OEarf 
to -carl, positively imo»l loiumg go- 
tut t maat., cost* uu more tiiau oruin- 
aiy KiiiU. 'Jan «r send for lre« book- 
:iL baylia A Co., Uututli. 



noust 

! Tl V f ; 
. ilr««t 



Hour. 



utl tfAEE-ONK -Ux l.V'EHETT 

piano, u»eii a year, m t^picuaid con- 

oulon; u Laigaiii ai »1S«, lermB, *1«' 

-i aiid ♦«» pel month. Jtiench Ai 

cit. 



WANTEI^— GIRL FOR GENERAL 
iKHisevvork, family of three. Apply 
at once. Mi.ss Horrigan, Christie 
buildiiig. Fourth avenue west and 
Ftret street. 

WANTEU— DINING ROOM GIRL 
Washington restaurant. 614 West 
Superior street. 

WANTED — GIRL 
hou.-^ework; must 
East First street 



FOR GENERAL 
be good cook. 1131 



SITUATIONS WANTED— 
FEMALE. 

SITL'ATION WANTED— PLAIN SEW- 
ing to do by the day by a handy 
pt-rson. M 3h6. Herald. 



SITUATION WANTED— WORK BY 
the dav of some kind; washing and 
ironing, by an experienced hand. E 
340, Herald. 



SITUATION WA.N'TED— YOUNG LADY 
desires a pos=ltion, general housework 
in a snuiU family, excellent refer- 
ences. Addretss E o3e, Herald. 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion. 
No .vavertisenieut Less Tlian 15 Cents. 

HELP WANTElS^MALE. 

WANTED— COMPETENT HELP AT 
once. If you had the opportunity to 
better your condition at once, wouiu 
vou consider it? We have opened 
an office in Dulath for the purpose of 
securing first class men. capable oi 
rilling various ponitlons we liave to 
offer retail or wholesale. For par- 
ticulars, call or write at once. 
Metropolitan Business Service Co., 

Ilooni 1, Mesaba Block. Duluth. 



WANTED— BUSINESS MEN DESIRING 

experienced or inexperienced stenog- 
raphers or accountants are requested 
to call at the National Accountants 
and Stenographers' Bureau. Minne 
sola office at Duluth Business 
versify, 600 Christie Building. 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion. 
No Advertisement Less Than 15 Cents. 



FOR RENT— HOUSES. 



FOR RENT - 
room liouse 
street. 



- FURNISHED 
at 1021 East 



EIGHT- 
Second 



FOR RENT— 623 EAST FIRST STREET. 
8-r.oom modern house; $35 per month. 
Mendenhall & Hoopes, 209 First Na- 
tional Bank building. 



Uni- 



WANTED — GOOD FILER FOR 
resaw, must understand the 
planers and box factory 
W. H. Rleckhoff 
luth. 



company, 



BAND- 
care of 

maciiines. 

New Du- 



WANTED— COMPETENT COOK WITH 
references. Mrs. B. E. Baker. 6009 
Tioga street, Lester park. 



liar, 311' 



.in UTM CENTHAL- 

haidwood 

Wahl ik 

:>aiii,g. Bo III 



II! 
I- 

tib 
|. 

i 



b 

SI'' 

To't 



Fu i . 



I' 

FOR 
Hat; 

r ■ 



Fof: 



AT WITH 



raie InvvSiaifui 



tukf. ^ SAiTe— ONE TWO-CYLINDER 
li-iiorte power ^a.^oiine t-ngine, com- 



i; 



w 



i (.' 



iiv >i 






>.\l.^:- 



>\\\ 






w lieei. 
n-i-l. 



Imiune 



OR !• : 



in pt-ftcc'. 
sell, bill t-. 
only three 
Board ■ ■ ' 



ruunni^ 



W. A Alc- 
t.uynieni.s If 

.iT .«Ucvl 

U'.'iitJE POWER 

equipped wilti 

i-i.i. lop extra, 

<i lul'v^, iCf.li> 

' '. ■Ml!'. i.'ur 

.>uld not 

..,..,, •■ I'.xed 

J. S. . «*^'" 



WANTED — 1.ADIES— I WILL DO 
hairdresslng and shampooing, etc., at 
your own liomes. Old phone 633 - L 

WANTED AT ONCE— WOMAN COOK, 

small hotel; wages |1 per day. Ad- 
dre.sis Napolian Cardinal, Arbor \ ita. 

Wis. 



WANTED AT ONCE— COMPETENT 
girl for general housework. J16 
East Second street. 



WANTED — EXPERIENCED DINING 
loom girl. L>elmonico cafe. 



SITUATION WANTED— POSITION BY 

experienced office woman, who un- 
derstands bookkeeping, short liand, 
typewriting and geni-ral office work. 
Address M 386, Herald. 



SITUATION WANTIJD— A REFINED 
American lady with girl 2 years old 
wishes position as housekeeper; thor- 
oughly competent. 25 East Third 
street, upstairs. 



SITUATION WANTED— A YOUNG 
married woman wants work, places 
to go out washing and ironing, or 
house cleaning by day or week. Ad- 
dress 110 Twenly-seventli avenue 
west, basement. 



WANTED — AUTOMOBILE REPAIR 
men, drivers and owners to ^r^ad, 
"Practical Treatise on Autoinoblles, 
a complete description of all gaso- 
line, steam and electric cars, includ- 
ing their operation, management and 
repair— it is up to the minute. Ad- 
dress Lyman, 217 East Second street, 
for particular s. 

WANTED— MA^'HINISTS AND Ap- 
prentices to get a set ♦of iractical 
ilachine Shop Work," Just put. You. 
address and I will call. Easy pa>- 
ments if desired. Lyman, 217 
Second street. 

WANTED— 100 
at Esterly's 



FOR RENT — EIGHT- ROOM FUR- 
nished house, from May 1, 616 East 
Fourth street, $45 per month. Dowse 
& Co., 106 Providence building . 

FOR RENT — SIX-ROOM HOUSE, 
Spirit Lake, ideal summer home, with 
garden space. |10. Scott-Kreidler 
company, 315 Central av enue. 




W. M. 



SECRET SOCIETIES. 



MASONIC. 
PALESTINE LODGE NO. 79, 
A. F. & A. M. — Regular meet- 
ings first and third Monday 
evenings of eacli month, at 
8 o'clock. Next meeting 
.-^pril 19, 1909. Work— First 
degree. Andrew C. Volk, 
H. Nesbltt, secretary. 



FOR RENT— STORE BUILDING. DU- 
luth Heights, seven living rooms, $lb. 
421 Providence building, old phone 
770-K. 



FOR RENT— BEAUTIFUL WELLFUR- 
nished house for rent for six months. 
Old phone 5098-K. 



East 



MEN TO BUY Watches 
Spalding Hotel Jeweler. 



FOR RENT— SEVEN- ROOM HOUSE, 
two bathrooms, hot water heat, thor- 
oughly modern, fine location. East 
end. $42.50. Whitney Wall company, 
Torrey building. 



IONIC LODGE. NO. 186. A. F. 
& A. M. — Regular meeting 
second and fourth Monday 
evenings of each month at 
8;00 o'clock. Next meeting. 
Ai)ril 26th. 1909. Work— - 

Second degree. Clarence B. Miller, \v. 

M.; Hugo Burgo, secretary. 




KEYSTONE CHAPTER, Na 
20 li. A. M.— Stated convoca- 
tions second anii fourth 
Wednesday evenings of each 
month at 8:00 o'«lock. Next 
meeting. April 28th 190d. 
Work— Regular business. -^»"'^"^^„^- 
Undorhill, H. P., Alfred Le Richeux, 
secretary. 




FOR RENT— SEVEN-ROOM HOUSE, 
201 South Seventeenth avenue east, 
$3 5; hardwood floors, porcelain bath, 
steel range, furnace. Water paid by 
owner. Pulford, How &. Co., 309 J:-x- 
change building. 



SITUATION WANTED— PLAIN SEW- 
Ing or Ironing un* washing. 321 West 
Fitth street. 



WANTED 



— GOOD 
.-work. 



\\' 



,. — COMPETENT, 
stenographer. B. 30 



GliiL FOR GEN- 

142S Jefferson ^t^ 

T: X r E Ki - 



i'UK SAl 



,.;W $1(M> PIANO, 
leaving city; sell 
on easy terms. 



T- FlNt:>i" 



ii.-j^i 



FLAT. $22. 



illGHT-iatoM I 



■■■•M SUNNY 

nil East 

1113 East 



never i. -'■ ^'er 

for ab ; price. 

to ! I''"''J'.- 

^....... . . icNiTL'ici: .\Ni' i..i:A>t-: 

tlilrtecn-room house; live minuit» 

VI !k r.'.iii l.us?iiK-ss center; exceileni 

!,Ts; ciieap it taken 

I'liiv : limc»8 I'ta- 

Adaresa D 372 



WANri-:iv-.v GIRL 
liousework: three 
London road. 



I'OR GENEIiAL 
in family. 5817 



W A NT HP- 

til iiou-i 

e tree I. 



^GOOD <}1RL FOR GENER- 

vv. ik. 1120V4 East Second 



SITUATION WANTED— LADY BOOK- 
keeper desires position; experienced; 
best of references. B 803, Herald. 



SITUATION WANTED — BY 
position as cook in private 
house; can furnisli 
Herald. 



WOMAN. 

boarding 

references. M 389. 



SITUATION V» ANTED— YOUNG LAD^. 
emplovcd, desires places to work for 
board'and room. B 312, Herald. 



WANTED -YOUNG 
with houj^.wnrk. 
Fourth stM- t. 



GIRL 

Apply 



TO ASSIST 
1508 ife East 



FUH 
of 



W \ NTEI>--C< )M I'ETENT GI RL: ONE 
that likes cliildren. Call 422 North 
Fifty-eighth avenue west^ 



s»i-iii I or 

IK raM. 



1 1' i i J 1 1 ^ . 



■ . t ■ N 



irth 



street. 



FOR 

photo 

at once. Ad- 

Ciirisman, Two Har- 



- i.E — PHOTO OUTFIT 
making penny pictures and 
i'i>«'i.ii», cheap '1 taken 
,V1 U. 

.1 mn. 



1 



,P_FENCE 
fulh avenut; 



POSTS 
wesl. 



WANTED— A GIRL FOR GENERAL 

housework. 232 Fourteenth avenue 
east. 



W A NTE I )- COM P ET E NT Gl R L 

general housework. 712 East 
street. 



FOR 

First 



SITUATION WANTED — MIDDLE- 
agod woman desires work by tlie 
day as laundress, and first-class 
housekeeper, best of references, 
dress E 333, Herald. 



WANTED— RAILWAY MAIL CLERKS. 
Salary $800 to $1,400. Examinations 
in Duluth May 15. Common educa- 
Uon sufficient Candidates frep^^a 
free. Write Immediately, l-iaiiKun 

Institute. Rochester. N. Y. . 

WANTED — STENOGRAPHERS AND 
'bookkeepers wanting P^f'tions should 
register at the National Accounianls 
and Stenographers' Bureau. Minne- 
sota office at the Duluth 
University, 600 Christie 



FOR RENT— SIX-ROOM HOUSE, water 

furnished. 420 Seventh avenue east. 
$22 per montl). Dowse & Co., 106 
Providenc e building. 

FOR RENT— 1604 EAST 
street, eight rooms and 
wood floors, liot water 
range, best condition. J. 
216 West Superior street. 



SUPERIOR 

batli; hard- 
heat, Igas 
D. How aid. 



DULUTH COUNCIL, NO. 6 R- 
S. T — Regular meetings first 
and third Friday evenings of 
each month at 8;00 o'clock.- 
Next meeting. April 16, 1909. 
•Work — Regular business. 

Andalla W. Torrance, T. I. M.; Alfred 

Le Richeux, recorder. 





FOR RENT— FOUR -ROOM HOUSE AT 
321 East Fifth street, upstairs. In- 
quire Bloom Co., 102-4 West First 
street. 



WANTED — 
hotel. West 



PORTER. 

Duluth. 



Business 
Buildin g. 

PHILIPS 



FOR RENT 
modern; at 



— FIVE-ROO.M 

412 East Eighth 



HOUSE; 
street. 



DULUTH COMMANDERY NO. 
18, K. T. — Stated conclave 
first Tuesday of each month 
at 8:00 o'clock. Next conclave 
will be held Tuesday, April 
27. Work — Drill pilgrimagd 

to Minneapolis. C. E. Peaslee, E. C; 

Alfred Le Richeux. recorder. 



SCOTTISH RITE— REGULAR 
meetings every Thursday 
evening at 8. No meetlns 
until further notice. 
I'ooley secretary 



WANTED — GOOD PRESS FEEDERS. 
O. F. Collier Press, corner 
west and First street. 



at once. 
Fourth avenue 



WANTED— MAN FOR INSIDE WORK; 
no experience required; steady Job. 
Yale laundry. 



Ad- 



SITUATION WANTED 
Ing and ironing by 
Third street. 



—TO 
day. 



DO W 

2218 



ASH. 
West 



l-uK .»^ALl':-~l{UCK S'l-tJlCL ICANGE. 
With KWi^ altachmeiii hh 1 watei 
heater, .ill m good condition, |j.. 
1119 East Tiiird strtet.^ 



i„..\Kr 



Ft'Ui:- 



FOR SALE — UNIVERSAL 
ice box and bed < 
ni Park ten act- 



range, 



STEEL 

i!I at 7 



FO 



Fi 
t 

1 ' 

) 



b"'Ui. 1 
t'l li 
strti. I 



A fi- axc;ed 



W U J 

M : 



.\LE— Cu\^ 
■^11 it ill' If 
, !K-i-a!d. 



lor 



IK LI VERY 
jlgnl delivery. 



ATKH 1 LAT, WEST 



i- ' 



SALE— .-V $1' 
$nt If lakvT-i 



oiial 

„i!lnp 



ri.VN'J CHECK 
>f,< f >'!■ iniike 

" ' ,ild. 



WANTED— TAILOR AND TAIU'RESS- 
es for ladies' tailor* d garment.s; nmu- 
but competent lielp need apply. J. 
M. Gldding & Co. 

WANTED— KITCHEN GIRL, WEST 
hotel. 1915 West Superior street. 



SITUATION WANTED— A YOL NG 

lady, who has taught school wishes 
position as lady's companion; can 
give references. Write to XX., care 
of J. Freml, Hinckley. Minn. 



SITUATION WANTED— BY YOUNG 
lady attending normal school, as a 
nurse girl or to assist witli house- 
work, in exchange for room and 
board. E 332, Herald. 



WANTED— A COAT MAKER. APPLY 
Frank Jellnck. Bayfield, \N Is. 



WANTED- A MAN WHO ALREADY IS 
taking care of several lawns to take 
cafe of one more. Call at 71- East 
First st reet. 

WANTED ' T'ltlRKR GRADER TO 



FOR RENT— EIGHT-ROOM HOUSE 
With large lot in Woodland. W. ,^\- 
Allen, West end, Zenith ph one 1048. 

FOR RK:NT— 14 27 EAST SUPERIOR 
street, eight rooms and bath; strictly 
modern and in be.st of condition, $45. 
J. D. Howard & Co., 216 West Supe- 
rior streeL 




J B. 



FOR RENT— COZY COTTAGE OF SIX 
rooms, all furnished, on Park .Point. 
W'. L. Jackson, 512 Burrows building. 



FOR RENT 
321 East 
Bloom Ac 



—FOUR- ROOM 

Fifth street. 

Co., 102 West 



HOUSE. NO. 

downstairs. 

First street. 



— LUMBER GRADER 
tally and grade back of small 
Adress M. J. Bell. Bellwood. 



WANTED-GIRL TO -A-'^SI.ST WITH 
housework and care of children. 414 
East Third street. 

" TlELP WITH 

; Scandinavian 
Fouth street. 



WANTED— GIRL TO 
general housework 
lireferred. 1805 East 



\VANTKI> - EXPERIE.NCED ^^TRIP- 
p.'r!s Duluth Ciar company, 118 >Nest 
"ligan 



street. 

-GIRL ABOUT 

licusework. 922 



HAI{- 



Mic 

WANTED 
general 
street. 

W ANT E I .I^'l TC H EN 
l.ouls hotel. 



IS, TO DO 

East Fifth 



SITUATION WANTED — A YOUNG 
ladv wculd lik* position as book- 
keeper; experienced and can furnish 
best of references; employed now. 
Address M 383, Herald. 



SITUATION WANTED— BY WOMAN, 
any kind of work by the day, or 
washing to take home. 4 Eleventh 
avenue west. Call after 5 p. m. 



SITUATION WANTED — WORK BY 
laundress; washing f»r Ironing, or 
otiier work, by the day. R 362, 
Herald. 



SITUATION WANTED— WASHING OR 
plain sewing by the day. 2122 West 
Fourth street. Zenith 2024-D. 



mill. 
Wis. 

WANTED— YOUNG MAN ABOUT IS 
to deliver packages. Call 104 li-a^i 
Fourt h street. 

WANTED— A LIVE. UP-TO-DATE 
fraternal insurance society desires 
experienced deputies who can pro- 
duce business. Good terms to right 
parties. Address box 125. Duluth, 
Stinn. . 

WANTED— $36 A WEEK AND EXPEN- 
ses to men with rig to Introduce pou- 
try and stock powders. Grant com- 
Dept. 148. Springfield. 111. 



pany. 



FOR RENT— SEVE.N- ROOM HOUSE, 
with all conveniences. 224 Four- 
teenth avenue east; rent $31 per 
month. N. J. Upliam company. 

For renF — 425 east fifth 

street six-room house; bath room, 
gas for lighting and cooking. A. A. 
Fider, 912 East Sixth street. 
Third avenue west. 



23d. 
trudo 



ER, NO. 25. 

n Star. Reg- 
second and 
evenings of 
7:30 o'clock. 
Friday, April 
Regular bu.'-incss. Ger- 
W. M , Ella F. Gcarhart, 



ZENITH CHAI 
Order of Eas^ 
ular meetings 
fourth Frhfay 
each moijni at 
Next nicfting. 

Work 

Rates 



secretary. 



cr 18 



EUCLID LODGE. NO- 198. A. 
F & A. M.— Regular meetings 
second and fourth Wednes- 
day evenings of each month 
at 7-^0 o'clock. Next meet- 
ing April 28. Work-Stcona 

degrfc. Martin J. Murray, 

Dunleavy. secretary. 




W. M.; A. 



W \NTED — A good singer or a 
act for Wednesday's feature 
West End Star theater. 



special 

nights. 

Phone 496. 



milLS AT ST. 



IIUOM Fi 
231 



.AT 



MOL- 



CU 
ri< 



j.-uer hie. roUlop 
.'uul $275 National 

-old at once. 

i West Supe- 



\NTED— GIRL TO LEARN HAIR- 

dresslng and manicuring at Miss »*. 
K<tly'.w. over Suffers. 



V siicel. 



F' 'K 

*iit 






\V1'- 



TllEltED 

.r top, 
... at »H. 



OAK 

used 
321 



vv.sl 



FOft KENT 



BRICK FLAT. 



,iusua.ic 



ALL 



1*1 

niiiii tv 

FOR Ri 
room I' 

fri|:'cf:f 



Fi 



.\! I-'I-.\T 



■ 1 - »i! 



:.t 

. „Y 
I . 



also 
ircss 



M: el well KITCHEN 

: hix montliir, cos-l %'i^', 

U'ldjiig -^tct! couch with mat- 

lt'31 East Filth street 



\V v.\ ri'l. — G1P.L FOR GENERAL 
hV.u.-.-wi.rk; small family. Apply to- 
night, 4318 East Superior street or 
Zenith phone 631'.'. . 



WA.\TED— EXPERIENCED GIRL FOR 

gem-ral housework: t;ood wajres. bll 
W<.odland avenue /-i.'il) 'phone, 
1431 -A. 



SITUATION WANTED— YOUNG LADY 
desires position as bookkeeper; ex- 
perienced; best of references. B 303, 
Herald. 



W \NTED— OFFICE BOY; MUST BE 
Eiglith grade graduate. Address 
wholesale, Lo ck drawer 773. 

W\NTED— PANTS AND VEST MAK- 
er. 2409 W^est Superior street. 

WANTED— GOOD COAT- MAKER AT 
$7.50 for sack coats; steady 



once. . 

work. Address G. 

box 221, Hayward, 



F. Hagen, 
Wis. 



P. O. 



-EIGHT GOOD HlVEb OF 
" 10 South Flfty-eiglitli 



FCiR S.-VLE 

bees. '• ■ 

a v e n I ) • . 

plmTALE- : liv'-'^- "■ ^'^ '^'•^^'^lJl{t^,: 

-,, , i 1 1,1, ."■ ■ ■ . ,> 'ifi, in ni »i- 

JT, ' ..verhauled last fall; 

};^' . lalled of latest type, 
also seCof puncture- proof tu^s. t-all 

Zenith 4209. or old 4bJ&. Abk lor 
Jchii. 



WANTED — GIRL, 
I'ourth street, t'at 



AT 

D. 



118 EAST 



WANTED AT ONCE— KITCHEN GIRL. 
Clarendon restaurant. 



Fui: 

bk 



SALK--"N'r 

.•r'iX i- 

C. Si. ..-- 



DIVING 



ROOM 

i.Ki.*t't. 



TA- 
Call 



every I ; 
tat>- CI' 



k. 



!.■< >K 



KI-;.\T — 



Dows^e At 



Es- 

T~ 
Co., 



FOR 

«.> 1 1 e ) 
wrilt 



SAL!-: 



VlKl«.;Hr PIANO 175; 
:on and one Oliver type- 
,111 15 over Oak Han 



CloUuiig biure. 



WANTED— C«^)MPETENT GIRL FOR 
general housework, two in family; 
lower flat. 212(i Jefferson street. 

"WANTEl* — COMPETENT SECOND 
girl with references. Apply 2401 East 
Fifth street. 



WANTED— A NURSE GIRL AFTER- 



noons, from 
Fifth street. 



3 to 



5 at 2010 East 



SITUATIONS WANTED — MALE. 

tn7uATIO>r"wANTED— STORM WIN- 
dows taken oft", put screens on also, 
wash window. «. 208^ West Third 
street. Zenith ' phone. 1820-Y. 

SITUATION WANTED— FIRST-CLASS 
engineer, best of references; can do 
anv kind of boiltr or other repairing. 
Ha've full set of tools. A. Hendrick- 
son. Evansville. Minn., R. R. No. 2, 
box 46. 



WANTED— Men to learn barber trade; 
illus. catalogue free. Moler Bar»)er 
college, 27 E. Nic. Ave.. Minneapolis. 

WANTED— TAVO SALESMEN. Christie 
Litho graph company. 

CLOTH ES^CLEAN ED & PRESSED 

Suits pressed. 50c; pants, 15c. Ladies* 
skirts cleaned and pressed, 50c. ^en. 
1S52-X. J. Oreckovsky. 10 4th Av. W. 



FOR RENT— DESIRABLE NEW FIVE- 
room house at 1022 East Ninth street, 
key next door. 

FOR RENT-FOUR- ROOM COTT.VGE. 
hardwood floors, electric lights, 
pump; can be occupied year round, 
2920 Minnesota avenue. Dowse oc «-o., 
106 Provi dence building. 

FOR RENT— NO 1310 EAST FOURTH 
street; eight-room house, with bath 
and hardwood floors; rent $32 per 
month. N. J Upham company. 




degree 
leavy, 



DULUTH CHAPTER, NO. 69, 
R A M—Meets at West Du- 
futh first and third W-ednes- 
days of each month at - .-« 
p m. Next meeting April 21st. 
VvV.rk— M E. M and P, M, 
W B. Gctchell, H P.; A. Dun 
secretary. 



rai-t-'TH 



rfcordlne wiretorj; A 



28 I O O F— MKET3 

e^^iiiig Rt Oiia Fellcwt* 

nortli. :.'«xt raecUn» 

Worlt — Pusli"<*f W. H. 

K„n.Ur, .c^^e y.nc,^«i.. ^13.^-5: 



LODGE. NO. 

fvery Frii!.'y 
"hall 18 Lahc ;i»*init 
Alirli 2? 



Minnesota Tailoring Co. Goods called 
for. 118 1st Av. W. Zenith 1284-D. 



JOHN MUELLER, 208 West First St. 



FOR RENT-8-ROOM HOUSE EVERY 
convenience. No. 3 VV est Hfth 
street. $28 per month. Dowse & Co., 
106 Provi dence building. 

f:^ RENT— EIGHT-ROOM HOUSE^ 

* all conveniences. 1202 East Third 
street; $40 per month. Dowse & Co., 
106 Provide nce buildi ng. ^ 

^:^ RENT- 614 EAST SECOND 
street, water, heat, large rooms with 
fireplace, hardwood floors and finish 
bath room, good basement. Old 




big 
'phone, 



room, 
2754-R. 



SITUATION 
restaurant 
outside of 
aid. 



WANTED— FIRST-CLASS 
cook wants position in or 
city. Address M 394, Her- 



wTnTED— A YOUNG LADY BOOK- 
in grocery store, one who 
Scandinavian. Address E J41, 



keeper 
speaks 
Herald. 



SITUATION WAN"rEr>— BY' YOUNG 
man as assistant bookkeeper, stenog- 
rapher or collector; has had some ex- 
perience; good penman, accurate, 
honest and reliable; willing to begin 
with low wages for advancement. A 
1 references. S 353. Herald. 



FOR SALE-SEC<JND-HA.ND L'ESKS, 
chairs and table. H. W. Coflm . 



F< 



Wfti'i 



First 



FLiVT. 

;-d- 
•<t 

street. 



M TWO 

.- .V llaw- 



FOli 



building. 



Full RENT 
room fl'ftt 
cold V 
locate' 

Fourth .-rtrccl. 



.•r ;:crv.<:e 

..ta flats. 



I FLAT: 

Co.. First 

f^"--VEN- 

i and 

I <-ntrall.v 

118 East 



Fi.'li 

and 

_pl>- 

I . 
d,. 

East 
21 



SALE— STOCK <»F 

h-M. tares; in gii' '1 ■ 
.\l 380, Herald. 



GROCERIES 

•rall";i Ai>- 



SALE- iRirSEHOLD FUltNl- 



WANTED — MIDDLE-AGED WOMAN, 
or newcomer, for general housework; 
Kood home, at 620 Fifty-seventh ave- 
nue west. West Duluth. 

WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework; Scandinavian preferred. 
Call at 326 Tenth avenue east. 



I'recoiid 



t ; 1 1, ct. 



Zeiuiu puoiie 



— 2 2 -FOOT «ASl.>LINE 

luUy equipped, at a bargain. 

A! worth building. 



launch. 
Room £' 



hi' a n'u , » . 
M. I'rindl' 



ROO.MK AT 13 
t. stcond floor: 

.;,. \\:.v 1. W. 

' i 1 n g. 

1 { "es T - F 1 V E - 1 ■; U U M iit^A T E D 

]o«. Weat Fifth street, flat C, 

$27.50; possession May 1. , W. M. 

Prin dle & Co.. Lonsdale building. 

FLAT, HEATED. 

r.ifi East First 

" , I, I'riii- 



I--( >i; .-•.\Li-:-^.v 

Hfc'. >l:ll'iM:t> 

diainett-1' t" i 
depth., ty E 
ft reel. 



I'EEl' WELL DRILL 

lour to ten Indies 

.. t' or more feet in 

I'ulph, 323 West First 



W\NTEl>— COMPETENT GIRL FOR 
general housework; good wages. 1810 
Ea st Fifth street. 

WTyNTE - EXPERIENCED SKIRT 
and waist maker.«. La Ferte s, -4 
West Superior street. 



SITUATION WANTED— STEADY JOB 
of any kind by young married man, 
in or out of city. M 377. Herald. 



SITI'ATION WANTED —COMPETENT 
office man with years of experience 
in credit and collection department; 
general bookkeeping; best of refer- 
ences: bond if necessary. Address 
M. W. 5 West Superior street, old 
'phone 1553. 

SITUATION WANTED— AS JANITOR 
or watchman by straight, honest, 
sober man; good experience. B 314, 
Herald. 



MEDICAL. 

LADIES — $1,000 reward! I positively 
guarantee my great successful 
"Monthly" remedy. Safely reUeves 
some of the longest, most obstinate, 
abnormal cases in three to five days. 
No liarm, pain or interference with 
work Mail, $1.50. Double strength, 
$2. Dr. I>. M. fcouXhington R Co.. 
Kansas City. Mo. 

LADIES— DR LA FRANCO'S CO.VI- 
pound; safe speedy regulator; 2oc. 
Druggist or mall. Booklet free. Dr. 
La Franco. Philadelphia. Pa. 



FOR RENT— COTTAGE FU RN I.sH ED 
or unfurnished on Park ^ Point. We 
are headquarters for Park Point 
homes! Burg Ai Hawkins, Palladio 
building. ^ 

FOR RENT — TEN-ROOM HOUSE, 
Chester Terrace; be.st condition; 
steam heat; hot and cold water; $70 
per month. J. D. Howard & Co., 216 
West Su perior street. 

FOR RENT— 1431 EAS-T f^ECOND 
street- nine rooms and bath; not 
watlr'heat; strictly modern;, $60 per 
month. J. D. Howard 
West Superior street^^ 



K. o. T. M. 
nULUTH TENT .NO^ 
WidnMila.v evening at 
West Fir^l ttrett. 
lome. A. J. Anderson 
Ea>t F'-urli flrett 
onl keei'ti. OJTke 
m. tc 1 P tn. 



1 MEF.T8 rVEUT 

M»rca'>ee liall, 234 

VlBlUiip iiiembtrj vrl- 

ci.ium-'ii'<'*''' "*" 

J n. CifciiiieAU. rec- 

ir. hall. Houre. 10 •. 

ZenlUi phcii* »ei-X. 




,r.,T^riKrv*^'LODGE ' KO. 105— MEETS 

W ■ A E. PiirliiB, rcco'Otr, O. J. 

T.'id. finandtr. '^17 i^i- 



Flflb 



Mur- 
stret. 




der. 121 Flist atWi-e west ^ 



& Co., 216 



FOR RENT— MODERN EIGHT-ROOM 
East end home, with barn. Burg Ai 
Hawkins, Palladio building. 



w^JT JJJ.JXT — FOUR-liOOM FUR- 
nished cottage, Minnesota Point for 
with piano, etc. E. D. Field 



SWEDISH MASSAGE. 

X E^llANSENTMASSEmT^'Tori^^ 
'jersey building. Old 'phone 1826-K. 



Mrs, 
o 



H. W iking, Swedish massage. Flat 
2018 W. Sup. St. Zenith . 1894-D. 



season, 
company. 



HOUSE, 
Lon<1on 



FOR RENT— BIGHT-ROOM 
modern in every respect, 5515 

month. Dowse At Co 
building. 




I O. F. 
rOtiKT COMMERCE, NO S283. 

■' Nest regular mwnng. PHdaj. 

C A. CsrlsoD. C iv. " 
n. H. 



strf el- 
May Tth. 



INDE- 



W. 



ariclal 
lace P 



MOPEIlN SAMARITANS. _ 

F(Ti'l>rs hall, rirel sifK^i "",..„ „, a 

A. Ntlfon G. 1?.; Lucj 
ST. A. 0»U, fln- 

.... rni t'lrvt iNau.'iiaJ Bank builiilng: Wal" 
tfril^e, r.Ol H'^Lf^'"'!., Samaritans invited. 




rhur?>lay; i^i'i 
foul til Trn)r?U:iye. 
M. Purdy. !>• G. 
01 First NatJo 
WelllBinlc?. s<rU<-. AU 



road; $30 per 
lOC Providence 



HOUSE. 



FOR RENT — SIX-ROOM 

with heat, hot and cold water, gas 
range: thoroughly modern 
cated; East end; $»'-••., j. 

Torrey building, 



well lo- 
Whitney Wall 



company, 



MAKIA OKINDERENO. GUADUATED MASSEUSE. 
Ur. Averdson's Institute. Sweden. Zenith. 844. 



WANTEn— KITCHEN GIRL AT ONCE. 
Hotel McKay. 



FOR SALE— SPANISH AND PLAIN 
leather, imitation leathers, furniture 
coverings and furniture upliolstered. 
Cameron, ihe upholsterer; workshop, 
123 First avenue west. Both 'phones. 



WANTED— GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework, must be neat and reli- 
able. 512 East First street. 

GIRL FOR 
1411 London 




WANTED— COMPETENT 

general housework. 

road^^ . 

WANTED— A GIRL FOR GENERAL 

houTework 515 East Seco nd str eet. 



FOR 
Hat 



FOR RENT— 6- ROOM 
hot and cold u-. t,. 

street. 146. I 
;,:ie & Co., 1..' 



FOR 

ni- 

Api'i} 
Tor rt 



KBNT — SIX-ROOM FLAT — 

■ ' t and cold water fur- 

vrood floors and finish. 

. I i ip' .ate Investment company. 

building. 



UPHOLSTERING & REPAIRING. 



For Sale— Typewriters, sates cash reg- 
isters, cabinets. Edmont. 116 W. Sup. 



FOR SALE— TICKETS 
cheap, to Everett, 
Thomas Brooks, 
tor. Minn. 



FOR SALE 

Wa.«h. Apply 

Proctor hotel, Proc- 



WANTED— TO SELL UNREDEEMED 
nledifes- 25 spring overcoats and 
cravenettes; &« suits; 25 small sized 
coats and vfsts; 40Ct ladies and 
Kcnts' watches; 50 violins; 10 mando- 
lins; 10 guitars, etc.; all at great re- 
ductions. Keystone Loan company. 
16 W'est Superior street 



W^VNTED— GOOD GIRL FOR GEN- 
eral housework; five in family: no 
washing: good wages. 4218 Lombard 

street. Lake side. 

GIRL; ONE 
West Fourth 



WANTED— COMPETENT 



who can 
street. 



cook. 29 



WANTED— GIRLS 
alls, shirts, etc, 
preferred. F. A. 



TO SEW OVER- 
, experienced help 
Patrick & Co. 



WANTED— TWO SALESWOMEN FOR 
a specialty. Christie Lithograph 
company. 



FOR SALE- THOROUGHBRED SINGLE 

comb white and brown leghorns, also 



STOVES REPAIRED 

twre ■ ■ '-rtd and 

H. Joi Vernon 

'phone -luv-Y. 



AND FURNI- 

repaired. W. 

street. Zenith 



eggs for hatching from same. 
W e-'t Seven til street. 



3708 



CLAIRVOYANTS. 



Madame Sterlinsr. 
Card reading t.tic. 



palm reading 25c. 
114 E. Superior St. 



ARCHITECTS^ 
FRANK L. YOUNG & CO.. 201 Pal. 



Bldg 



FOR SALE— 

CA: .1 REGISTERS. 
We manufacture a cash register 
every two minutes. Liberal allow- 
ance for exchange of registers. 
Call and see our 1909 models. 



THE .NATIONAL CASH REGISTER 

COMPANY. 

E. W. Ru.«sell, Sales Agent. 

425 West Superior Street. 

Zenith, 817. Bell. 2585. 



WANTED -LADIES TO CALL 

tlon Army when you have old clothes 
furniture, etc. Old 10o3-K: new 



SALVA- 

lothes, 
2134-Y 



NEW YORK FEATHER DYER. 

Feathers cleaned, dyed and curled; 
work guaranteed. 421 E. 1st St. Zen. 
'phone 1219-D. , 



FOR SALE— REAL ESTATE. 



FOR SALE— LEAVING THE CITY 
must sell central property, large ren 
tals. Time Is mone 
for Immediate sale 



'&• 



Win sacrifice 
326, Herald. 



<C'oiitiiiue« on vage 17.) 



FOR SAYE— LOT ON EAST EIGHTH 
street, $25 down, balance $10 month- 
ly. This Is a bargain. C. L. Ra- 
kow3ky & Co. 



LOOKING FOR 

What You Have 

Thousands of people will read over the Want 
Ads of this paper tonight, some looking for a position, 
others to rent a house, flat, apartment, or room, or to 
buy or sell real estate, automobiles, horses and 
vehicles, and thousands of other articles. 

If you have a vacancy or any article that you 
sire to sell, put a small ad in tomorrow's paper. 
It is not necessary to come to the office 
•phone, either line, 324 and bill will be 
later. 



FOR RENT— EIGHT-ROOM 
hou«e 212 Ninth avenue 
quire Stryker, Manley 
Torrey building. 



MODERN 
east. In- 
& Buck, 



de- 

-just 
mailed you 



FOR RENT— 705 EAST FIF^l^H ST.. 5- 
room house, good 7"<i'»/«»' ^^^f^ 
near by; rent $1L D. W. Scott, lb 
Mesab a block. 

FOR RENT— S-ROOM DWELLING, 
Forty-flfth avenue west and Rene 
street; water, etc.; rent reasonable. 
Dlckerman Investment company, oil 
Lonsdal e building. 

FOR RENT— 4^07 TWENTY- FOUR-TH 
avenue west, $20. Porcelain bath, 
hardwood fioors, five rooms. Little 
& Nolle. 




rORESTERS— 



rNlTED ORDER OF _ 

at V. O. F. liall. 
west and Flrat 



N(irth 



UCASurtrr 632 



Star, 
nd fciirtli Mondays 

-7;r Tt. uTn:\: R.. 2 Osbon,. 

iVlcMk- E M. Stewart, Be<refarv 

ave.rue we.t: H. B. ,You.^. 

fti.et; 1732-K. old vim«- 

INITED ORDER OF FORESTERS-- 
C^un E.sum i'tar, No 86 meete 
fvery flnt and ihird Tuesdays at U. O. 
F hall. etTner Fourth avenue wMt and 
First Btn^et. A. L. Foitcr, C. h.. 1U« 
'""^Nrth street: C. E. I'"'^'. ""u'S' 

sureri"! street; Uarry MUnea. 

wLtl.rop Wock; Ze.aib 'phon* 



F.a*t 
a We?t 
Room 03, 



FOR RENT — NINE-ROOM HOUSE 
and bain at 1231 East Third street; 
$55- possession May 1. W. M. Prindle 
& Co., Lonsdale building. 



IMFERI.Vi: t^WP NO. 2206 - MEET3 
«t IT O V hall Fourth «%enue west and 
First street, second and fourUi Tuwday* 
of each month. 

F E. Dorcmus, consul. 

c' P. Earl, elcrk. Bex 411. 




NORTH feTAR LODGE NO :-5, K 
Meet« everv Tuenday evening at K. 
i all 118 W»4t ifui>erlfr street. 
nMwUng Tuesday. April 27. Work 
rank VlslUng Knlghta welcome. 



Dworshak. 
H. & S. 



C. C, L L Sparks. 



of P. 

of p. 

Next 

-TlilnJ 
Louis 
K. of 



Either Phone 324 



F^H^lENT— COTTAGES A"!- PARK 
Point and Lakeside. Flats furnished 
and unfurnished. C. L. Rakowsky 
& Co., 201 Exchange Bldg. 




ClJiN STEWART. NO. 00. O. 8. 
Meets first and third Wednwdaya 
mouth. 8 p m.. at W. O F hall 
Fo-.irtli avenue west and First 
nvular meeUng May 
McKrdght. chief 



C — 

each 

come* 

S?i Nurt 

5. Alexander O. 

Don Mi-t*nnan, »e<Te- 




w 



1 



4 



tary . Jotm Burnett, 
413 First NaOonal Bank bulldU»«. 



(Isandal tecretary. 



CARPET CLEANING. 

iLj5crmc^''cLEAmNG^'c^^ 

Sales agents and operators of the In- 
vincible Renovator. Carpets, rugs, 
upholstered furniture, mattresses 
etc cleaned by direct suction. Third 
Ave E. and Sup. St. L. G. Bradley, 
Mgr Old phone 1213-K. Zenith 2013 




ROYAL LEAGCE. „„_., 

ZENITH fuLNClL. NO. 161. ROTAIj 
L*«gue-Meeta in Uha' haU first a^ 
Uilrd Monday evtoing* at B o cIoUl Q. 
L. Hargraies. scril-e, care 
Shoe company; W. W. 
•are of Marshall-Wells. 



of .Vonhern 
Doctti. arclkoa. 



A. 




TIMBER LANDS. 

^HELDON^^MATHElT^^ 309 
Fist National Bank bldg. 'Phones. 



TLMBER AND CUT-OVER LANDS 
bought: mortgage loans made. John 
Q. A. Crosby. 209 Palladio building. 



WOOPMKN OF TUB WORIJJ. 
ZENITH CITY CAMP. NO. S.— MEETS 
ererr seecnd and 
tlie old Masonic 
Haugen, C C. ; 
720 West FHili 
Forsyth, clerk. 



fourth Wednesdaja at 

temple, fifth floor. Jolio 

A. -M. Holmes, banker. 

elr«*t, flat E; Robm 

817 Eatt Second »lre«k 





buy Standing timber; also cut-over 
lands. Geo. Rupley, 322 Lyceum bldg. 



PATENTS. 



PATENTS — ALL 
See Stevens. 610 



ABOUT 

Sellwood 



PATENTS. 

building. 



First 



ZENITH CITV TF„NT NO 
KraghU of the Modem Maccal>e«. 
every sewnd and fourth Friday 
of each nicnth in Ma«al*e 
West First street. C, R. 
mander; C. H l.o;.mi8, R- 
ZeiUth 'phon« 2243-1. 



1044. 

meet* 

eventns* 

haU. 2-ii 

Foasett. com- 

a... 1C30 Wm» 



') 









I 'T T'T>'— ■ill 



I 



I 




lATJ, 117 



ROYAL ARCANT'M. Pululh Coundl, N(k 
H83 meets hist and third Friday rren- 
li.gB Elks' liaU. Clinton Brwola. ••»> 
refary 401 Burrow* building. 

Mesar-a Courcll, No. l'.H3. meet* flrt» 
aiid third Wednesday evenings. Columt>t» 
hall, WfSt end. A. M. Johnson. t«ci*> 
North Twtntleib avenue west. 



1 



^ 



* 

m * 



iiillll 



^^, 



\ 








DULUTH KVF.NING HERALD 



TWENTY-SEVENTH YEAR. 



LAST EDITION. 



FRIDAY, APRIL 23, 1909. 



TWO CENTS. 



LERDERLESS AND AIMLESS 
WAS THE SESSION OF THE 



LEGISLATURE JUST ENDED 



Fortunately There Was 

a Governor to Correct 

Its Errors. 

Nearly Four Months of 

Fuss and Feathers, 

Do ing Lit tle. 

All St. Louis County Bills 

Passed and Inimical 

Bills Stopped. 



4 FrwM •• 


Riita 


C'wrrr»ip«ii«t4Mil . } 


Bt. I* ' '' 




■ ■ ' ' " ' '* ' "^ t ■ ' ' ' 


The H- . . 






•Ixth seasum 






ture ff^'i P" 
has f'l' 




V fairly wlwn t 
' -prctlve t 


Is uva: 






FiT at tie IS 


Uir!i- 


lillil ill thr ' 


■tan-'-- ■'" "• 


i . ■ ) 1 t 


v.T\'l...il-.' 1;. 


In 




<,'f p«^' 


It 1:> 






tfie *=: :- 






at- 






ne.'- 




: rust ii * 1 ' 1 1 ' . 1 ■' ' 


d>-: 






trgiMii 1 u I ■ 






thtr*' nre 






tli'- 






lea1,4-tl tin- uri 








RIDES ON 
COWOrCHER 

Roosevelt Travels Fifty 

Miles in Africa 

That Way. 

The Former President Is 

Delighted With the 

Experience. 



Makindu. Brltisli Kast Africa. April 
23. — The ept'Cial train that left Mom- 
basa at 2:30 yesterday afternoon, bear- 
ing Theodore RooseveJt and the mem- 
bers of his party to the ranch of Sir 
Alfred Pease wn the Athl river, pulled 
in here at 6:30 this mornlnsr. 

The travi-Urs are pnjoylng tlic trip 
imnicnst iy. Mr. Ko.)sevelt. F. J. Jack- 
sun. acttnK Kovernor of the pri>tec- 
torate; K. (' ScIouh and Maj. .Nfi-ariis, 
rode on a broad Stat attath.-d t<» the 
cowcatcjitr of the locomotive from 
MonibaKa as far as MacKinnon road, 
a distance of fifty miles. 

The visitors are delighted with the 
experience, and Uooseveli v.as dee|)ly 
impressed with the marvelous scPnery 
that unlolded itself to liis views. \ oi 
was reached last night, after which the 
party turned in. 

Tlie other passengers of the ep eciai 



NIAGARA FALLS, FROZEN, 
SLOWLY YIELDS; DYNAMITE 
TURNS ICE INTO RIVERS 

Gigantic Frozen Cakes 

Tiirob, Preparing to 

Surrender. 

Great Peril Menaces LeiV- 

Iston and Lowlands 

Are Flooded. 




LIEUT.-GOVERNOR EBERHART. SPEAKER ROCKNE. 

Who Were Uniformly Fair to Northern Minnesota, as Well as to All Other 

Parts of the State. 

ex^iwWewart 

of nevada is no more 



to 



(Com In 11 • ii 



( i 1 > i 



ROOT OPENS THE 
LAW CONVENTION 

Wayne MacVeagh Speaks 

on Peace Work at 

The Hague. 



pi. 



Last Man Lincoln Wrote 
to Dies in Wash- 
ington. 

Death Follows Operation 

on Republican Who 

Joined Democrats. 



ai-t . 



William A. St. \\ 

( :.-iii If '"t II \v II li ' 



,: tiff 



■111.- 1. 

• l!l W1 



was <'ii 



-♦ " 

It 
ill 




t€': 

V€-I ^ci' "■ 

which at 

tr/'.*:' - 
ff 
ti- 
ll' 

Ae a Ju 
tRkirig \> 

1 Til 1 :i' 11. 

New Y. 
Wa-.'ne ' 

at The 



liiive 



\v 1 1 1 1 



j»rt>l- 

! ot- 



I. 



ja.^'iatinn, the nature of 




(Continued on pacre 4. first column.) 

NINETEEN ARE 
DROWNED AT SEA 

Norwegian Boat Edith 

Sinks After Collision 

Off Christiania. 

Chrlstlanla. April 2?..— Nineteen per- 
sons were di owned off Christiania last 
night by the sinking of the Norwegian 
.-ueamer FMltli after collision with the 
liritish steamer Oxford. „ >• , 

Those who went down with the Kdith 
are the captain ami hlw wife, one pas- 
senger and sixleen members of her 

The Kdllli. a vfssel of 869 tons, was 
last reported at i'hristiansand. The 
Oxford Is of »0J •."lis and 1^ owned In 
Hull. 



View of the Cornell House Surrounded by Huge Masses of Ice Over Sixty 

Feet Above the River Level. 

REvSioi^Siitr^ 

ELECT MRS. M. T. SCOTT 




WILLIAM A. STEWART. 



* WKSrON STICK * 
^ IX ilLi>J^.,-iO\VV * 

* THAT rrilKS J.VGS. * 

X ■# 

* ntviaiu. 111., \r»rii 2S— Ktl- * 

* wuni I'a.VMHi XVcsk.ii. thr iioltsl « 

* pciloMrian. was straiiUt'd in llu* ^ 

* III lid Imto yt'sienlay. Tlu- K«»iii;t * 

* wa.s UHi U*n\y ami tlw veteran * 
^ ua.x lorteU to -ikiuI tli«> (lay lure * 
^ instead of pr<>eee<llpiK on to M^ 

* IllooiDinutoii. «*^ Ih- l«a<l inlend«Hl. * 

* The tlay previous Weston u a Iked * 

* in llliniils nnuk up to lii*« kmvs * 

* in the mitlst of a soaking ileliiRe. * 

* lie had ir<M»I)le with his attendant M^ 

* yesK-nlay ami let him g*t. lie also i^ 

* had H tilt with (he autonudiile M^ 

* rinii whleh has Iseen M-ntlin;; a * 

* inaehine with hini. and aniiounees * 

* that Ik- Is yoliifi haek to the oUi- * 

* time horM- and ImKgy- * 




No Government Aid 
People Along the 
River. 



Niapara Falls. N. Y., April 23. — Slow- 
ly 1-iut surely, one of the most wonder- 
ful blockades of nature known to his- 
tory is surrendering to one of the most 
forceful weapons of violence within 
the use of man. Niagara Fall.«, yes- 
terday, a solid ma.«s of Ice, fantastic- 
ally and wlerdly frozen, has yielded to 
th'* bombardment of a ton of dynamite 
aimed by the ^tate■s engineering force, 
and l.r<.ad rivers aie gushing h«;re and 
rapidly -Idening and interming- 
eigantic cakes of ica 
ili and heave, elgnal- 
ingg capitulation to 
inliind. 
'irtach was made 
at YoungKtown, 

•cutiil <'<iMniin.> 



there, 
ling, while 
now and t' 
ling the' 
tiie in 



II 



llllnolsan Wins Most " 
citing Contest ** 
Ever ' 

Mrs. L 
Awake All. 
Ing Re\ . 



oNe' week 



Second I'robihtlion Debnlr. 

Milwaukee. Wis.. April 2:?. -The sec- 
ond of three debates on prohibition 
between Mayor David $«. Kose, Milwau- 
kee, and Presid<'nt Samui-I Dickie. Al- 
bion. Mich,, college, will he held n 
orchestra hall hi Ciiieago on the niglit 
,)l' April 30 at S-.'a'clock. 




■■|<-M! 



Will<'il 



I, iifst t'l.l iiinii. ,t 



and A' 



1. •,/.'< e 

n-y of 

witli 

arbl- 

ir of 

.1. 



(ALIFOKM.V PKiJFKSSOK 
F(H{ WISrONSIN IMVKKSITV. 



F'ai.,,. Alt. 
Hul.vri.'h 

V'TMl V. 
I*,:, v.. ,.f 

a 

I i 



li 

tlie Ian 
#Prof. A I 
lion 
llutx 
confl .. : 
book ol: 



' ':» i 



I'l 



H. 



SORRY STATUE 
IS DIJPLICATED 

CitizensofLincoln'sBirtli- 
placc Glower at Wiscon- 
sin University. 



ol 



Ho<in»T 

this 



of 




Kv. Apii! ::t.^-riti-/.ens 

inU- town. Ili^t<•^i. f<ir i.-inj,' 

• .Xbraliain l.lii'"!" -""f 

.1 tl)iit on the i,amp<i» 

'.'.,' f,',s-,T-iiv ..f \Visri.T«sin if t.. be 

^'''mVu ni tl^'ir f.m...is Weineman 

. iitatue. 

. . .1 eman em v« .1 

town s.iuare "( "'"'f.; r ',;; ,,avr the 

n..tan i>!'.;-rXr 'the'^lrst'm.idlng 

\ (l;e riglit, how- 
,, .nid the I'ni- 
tu liave thlw. 



I THE LID IS ON. 



Washington, April 23.— Mrs. Matthew 
T. Scoti was today elected president- 
general of the Daughters of the Amer- 
ican Hevolutlon. .^he was the adminis- 
tration candidate and won in ilie most 
exciting election the daughters ever 
held. Mr.«. Donald McLean, retiring 
prcf ident-general. lay awake until 1 
this morning awaiting the returns, and 
most of the other members of the so- 
ciety got little .sleep, so great was tl'> 
excitemetit. A miscount of votes 
caused mucli delay and wrangling 
among the thirty-two tellers. Mis. 



.5 Now Planned to 
Begin Thent on 
April 30. 

Mercer. Pa, April 23.— Anticipating 

the return of true blTIs .against Jamw 

H. Boyle and Mrs. Boyle today. i,n tile 

[charge of kidnaping Willie Whitla, 



^^^OUffNMENT ■' 



the 

i.,l at 



CASTRO ORATES 
IN HIS NIGtiTCA P 



pt. Xnt-/* April J^i.-^Tlie Steat 

I" 

a 1 1 1 



.d that a country, which 
. nt» of blooil ill t'lf 1 ausu 



\ 

t 

1 

Wlit'ti ili.'-y apt 

1 J * ■ ' " ' ' 

< 

Ol tlH" ' 

! '. 
\ 

Seek. talkJ. 
Bef"i«- ''• 



,\ii ;iiliiti:t t'- 
iidirnali^ts l- 



jol 
■:n: 



abal 

t t he 

f ttie 

• 1 at 

, ■•me- 

avf im- 



pMVSil' 

•n his 



n iTiin- 

■■•-> «tiH 

lli, al. 
from I 

n ol IK< ■■■:"■ 
.-■fro apl" .1 1 ■ -l , 

■ ,luFin>i the I turn t' 
ijent Iv on I Frane. 
I 'Ti a n 1 ' : 



lould join 

. He tlien de. !;r 

; the ship had i' 

tiie operation v 

• 1 is condilion v. u 

,1 tliat he must 

,.r^. ileal attention. 

.tsked regar-litiK t'l" fntuf 

'-idi-nt said Ik- 

..nsldered him- 

Wlien Inforined 

MM lit gave him 



pUUi.H tin,' del 
had mad«- nv 

self a ?■■■■«■■■■■■ 
that f 
full 111 - ■ . 

■•But 1 am not fr..- 1( 1 dfsire lo re- 



i.\.,i .1.- 



h^rur. 



an.l 



a iinot. 
-f 



In spile II 

t k ti •'• w w 



■'pi.iy 
iiit-« in 



tl 



lUItMlllii 



meddling. I 1'^' 
inuv-c, v:.*.-iio said lie J «-i* 



th.it l.r did 

ng to do, It 

, i, ui 1 t«'> I'lans to 

His 1 ■ was taken 

, fd nu .1 I rain and he 

tlie capital. 

the VeisaiUe.x said 

iM vva.'-- brtiught on 

• at Furl <le FraiKc <lf 

.11 allowed to make 

i.la he would soon 

un aiiny l" overthrow his 




(<.'<.ntinued on page 4, first column.) 

TAFT WILL OPEN 
THE YIJKON FAIR 

To Press Button Con- 
necting W\\\\ Seattle, 
June L 

Seattle. Wash., Apiil 23.— President 
William H. Taft will press the kiy 
that will open the Alaska- Yukon- 
I'aelflc exposition at 12:30 p. m.. Se- 
attle time. June 1. 

At the .name moment Mayor Mct^lel- 
lan of New Y'ork will fire the shot that 
will start the New York-to-Seattle au- 
tomobile rare from New York; every 
whistle or noise-making contrivance In 
.<^eattle is exitected to extend a greet- 
ing to the New Wurld's fair. 

Ktreet cars will stop two minutes 
;ind busines.s will suspend :or tliat 
space of time. 



plans have been made for the begin- 
ning of the trials on Friday of next 
week. 

The Mercer county authorities are 
greatly worried over an alleged at- 
tempt of Boyle to commit suicifle. 
Boyle was found in his cell in in* 
agony of convulsions. Doctors were 
suniinoned and worked until his condi- 
tion improved. Excei.t that liis illneB3 
was such as would have resulted from 
sonic powerful drug, nothing can be 
learned. ^ 

SALVATION ARMY 
MEN GO TO JAIL 

Threaten to Fill Ail the 

Cells at South 

Bend, Ind. 

.South Bend. Ind.. April 2.-?. — '■We'll 
fill the South Bend jail with .'Salva- 
tion Army officers," declared MaJ. 
William Kscott, division manager of 
tiie Salvation Army, who arrive«l here 
todav to take t harge of the campaign 
against tiie police rule that the Army 
siiall not hold meetings on business 
corners. . .. .. , 

-ICverv officer In the country. he 
continued, •will volunteer to go to 
jail here, just as Capt. Brooke has 
done." , , ,„ 

^'apt. Brooke, who was sentenced to 
jail a few days ago, and whose wife 
and children, agaipst tlielr protest, are 
free under suspended sentences, con- 
tinued to hold religious meetings with 
other prisoners and says his imprison- 
ment Is of good effect. 



MASSACRES MAKE 
ARMY OF WIDOWS 



Beirut, April 23.— The Armenian 
population of Antioch and vicinity has 
been partially wiped out In the mas- 
sacres of the last few days by fanatical 
Moslems. There are thousands of des- 
titute Armenian widows and orphans 
still In the district, unable to get away. 
There is no security anywhere in tiie 
vicinity of Antioch. 

The situation at Alexandretta con- 
tinues critical. Beiian is .sti 1 hold- 
ing out against the tribesmen that .sur- 
round it. Beirut Is <iulet as yet. but 
there is great tension between the 
Christian and the Moslem populations. 
Troops are arriving here, and the 
authorities are taking forceful meas- 
ures for the preservation ol order. 
Many people are leaving Beirut for the 
i:ebanon. The British cruiser Diana 
came Into port today. 



Would I>e|>«»«e »»ullnii. 

Constantinople, .\pril 2::. -It '« i»;- 
pnrted that at a secret session <;f tJ'*' 
national assembly In .San .'^tefant yes- 
"eidav ir.0 deputies voted in favor of 
the deposition of the sultan. , ,„„ 

A cablegram received here today 
from MersMna sets '%% ^""^'"f'^^Vs^ 
that Henry Maurer and D. M. Kogei s 
American missionaries were killed 
during the rioting at Adana. 

The sultan appeared upon the streets 
of Constantinople today and was greet- 
ed bv the people with cries of adora- 
tion ■ With a mask like a countenance 
and his head sunk between his -stooped 
shoulders he acknowledged the saluta- 
tions of the throng by curl nods. 

MaRsarrpM .\re Rtiglnir. 

*' Tarsus. Asiatic Turk. v. April 23 — 
The rioting il at orleinated at .\dana 
broke out here April 16. Several Ar- 



menians were killed, the whole Ar- 
menian quarter was burned, and the 
churches were sacked. Over 4.000 
refugees are still gatiiPied In the yard 
of the American college. Their con- 
dition is pltialile. Tlu- missionaries at 
Tarsus are safe, but liiey are still ap- 
prehensive for the refugees. Massacres 
are raging today in tlie neigliborhood 
of an American village, and instant 
relief is needed. 

■ 
All the VIllHKeM Deniroy^d. 
Alexandretta, April 23— Fugll ive» 
who have arrived relate that all the 
Armenian villages and settlements lu 
the Alexandretta district are being de- 
stroyed. Nearly every Armenian 
dwelling has been V>urned by the la- 
natical Moslems and the Armenians 
still surviving are living in the open. 
half-starved and in great fear, es- 
pecially of Friday and Sunday. 
■ 
HnMMla .Mo\e>i Troops. 
St I'etersi.iirg. April 2:?.— Tlie shah 
of Persia, liaving failed to rxitlfy the 
royalist commander in Tabriz that an 
armisti.e had been granited. Bussla has 
ordered the viceroy of the Caucasus 
to dispatch troops to tliat point by 
forced marches. 

> 
Squadruu I'litu le Sea. 
Sebastop'.l. April liS.- Tlie active 
souadron of the Russian Black sea. un- 
der command of Admiral Bostrem put 
to sea todav. The destination of the 
vessels Is not known 
s 
Refuftees' <oudlllou Mtwerable. 
Aleppo. Asiali' Turkey, April 23.— 
Manv refugees have arrived here from 
the Alexandretta district. Their condi- 
tion is miserable. Intense alarm exists 
among Hie Armenians still alive of a. 
recurrence of the attack.s upon them. 



I 







— iiiri'Wili t' » 'H— »«— «<li 



■^ ' M r «< 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: FRIDAY, APRIL 23. 1909. 




# 




OF ¥0y QQM 





inaihl I 
hr'h — ; 
terns, 
leadi" 

at . . . . 



jmlarity •»! our -tiiiininii" new models in suits and toj) coats f«>r sprinj:^ 
ing^ by leaps and bounds — a tremendous "hit" with exery youui;- man 
;i them — 'SOCl I'^F^ " Clothes for clever }oung fellows, who de- 
ne original fasliions — and a ho^i of handsome st\des for the elderly 
dl new. 'ip-to-the-niinute pat- 
and such fabrics all from the 
■ lofhcN makers of America. 



■.liowini:;* 



to ih'» '>e troni 



»15 to % 



With scores of clever styles to choose from at $10.00 to $12.00. 



MmVaiHl Vimntf M-zn's Top <.'(>;»<-, m.:nl.' < 

ly nil u'lxi], („'i)v.-M <,'i>>th. m Un* latf-^t - 
tail a: ■ 'luality ''Tv: 



)f strict- 

lllU'lr of 

.■ h;»nil- 

$10 



Pirn's uiid Youns ^leii'H IlaiiKHittts, for rain or 

shin- : i-'>|..rs l>lHck and gray, in I'lain or stripr; 
evi IS- rlirt'iiil wool: puarantei d rainproof; cut S- 
It.rh.'s l.piip; with full HWffi' and t'xtra br",i.l 
haiul-paitdtd shuulderH. full box back 
and .strictly hand-tailored, all sizes. 
Sjxeial at 



$10 



Confirni. •-^n Clothes fOF the Children 

The iiriportant part tlii> '■'\ s in the outfittinj;- of Duluth's rising o:ener- 

ation i^ admirably demoii>tr<. the tliron-s >f thrifty i)arents who always 

trade at our great Juvenile l)t, Just now we are outfitting" hundreds of 
**lr ' -*o1ks*' with Ciuifirmation v itlie^ — Su|)erh show- 
iiiu M >lumi''^ ^ 'H'w sini> — the \erv >anie suits that 

■II* -« 

otlier^ ^e1! uj- * ^(ifA) with one pair of trousers — \\'R 
(ll\ I- \OV M.LTHE MOST BIvM'TIFrL ST\-IJ-S 
— W ITH TWO PAIR OF TR( )USEkS— at 



out tit t 111 j^ liundreds ot 



We Fit the 

Hard to 

Fit. 



# 




Superior St. 

at Fourlli 

Avenue WesI 



• 



LEADERLESS AND AIMLESS 
W AS THE SESSION OF THE 
LEfilSI.ATUHE JUST ENDED 



irnm i>afir* 1 > 



;tk<„- !,;,t:s; 
u 



-OW 

! 



'e. Alino.m invarl- 

-.ii>ji r;i!i sum*-tldnK 

i'.)w ti .'.,•, up his 

! ,1 \ Die vid- 

• tax, of 



.^ ■ ■ ' - 

t\ . n livt:' minutes 
■ m ton : ' I v 

tax n]' 

.It 

-■ ^ii^'ii-^r-i i he 

;butf. what 

■■! >"tlorem 

local 

th,- 



iii.><try 

1 1 ..I li a 1 1 > oody 8 

n; in short, to 

.. . ■■■■ '.:>vi,,i' a V>ig 

. ti ai 

,■ i 1 ay 

, , I are 

i«i llie saiiif pDjioitioii of the 

thf'lr proptTty as the p€»ople 



Till 



tor ;i 
of th. 



xt'd 



c.> 






nta < 



unsiubstantial the 

■ ■-: :- - •'<- i.s. The 
ultli few 

•-■onvinced 

.if NortheaHtern 

thfv still per- 

bill in de- 

in their dl.s- 

.s lU do as well 

•rely convert! nf? 

good that caiiif 

■ ure ' was that the 

iiole state wa-s inaile 

' ' knows tliat 

.• b>Ki«lat lire 

te 

: ... ; 1 1 - 

•rnor Jahn- 

i result will 

tliaii would 

!',,-' tminaKe 
• legisla- 

•o 
)t 

.i.'lT. .\i!Ull.-- 

r,. i-oiiiH out 



:it 



lent <i. 

,.; r«»t ! t 
w .•Iriy :»«i>arate«l ' 



Me 



le 



Invite Your Frlonds to 

dino %vUli yon 

SVNOAY eVKMI.MO 

ni the 

ST. I^OVIS 



31^ 



.-^t L 



a 1 1 . 1 n 



this rn.itttr Though many member."? 
>^illl r..-r8isti*d In voting for the ton- 
\ I'ill l>ecause of real or fancied 
fi'in their constituents if they 
\utcii I'th.-rwise. it is beyond ques- 
tion th:n the arRuments and per-sonal 
work of the mernl)er8 from St. Louis 
county actually did convert a majority 
ot both branches, and these men will 
in mo.st cases pro back to their dis- 
trlct.s to say that while in deference to 
home sentiment they voted for the bill, 
liome sentiment i.x mistaken and the 
tonnage tax principle is wrong. 

The r.'viiir^ show that it is worth 

whilf t strouK men. evi'ii against 

their 1' il Inclinatlun. into the 

leg-i.slaturt>. The Duluth delesation 

was respected, admired, consulted fre- 

MUently. and 11 had a lar>fe iniluenceon 

i>tli"r matters of state-wide Importance. 

' made frjjnds, friends of the staun- 

^t kind. Wiitm hostile resolutions 

led in the closing hour.s «)f 

. tiiese friends formed a 

pi. Kfi uiif clear across the chambers. 

ready to repel the enemy. 

The Duluth delcgntlim is entitled to 
the warmest thanks of the communi- 
tiee it represented, and the practice 
of sending strong men, having been 
happily begun, shouM l>e continued. 
' • • • 

Tlie fact that no aiteinpt was made 
to pass the tonnage ta.K bill over the 
givernor's veto showed how well aware 
its advocates were of the change in 
sentiment that l>ad come about. Many 
of those who had timorously voted for 
the Idll. against their own convictions, 
were only too willing to support the 
.vrovernor. and if the friends of the 
hill had brought It to a vote, it would 
li.ive fallen far short of a majority in 
either body. 

• • • 

One of the most Important local 
measures passed in the last hours of 
tlie session was Itepresentative Grants 
bill allowing rural and city electric 
lines to make mutual traffic arrange- 
ments. This bill was introduced to 
make it po.ssihle to build an electric 
line through the farming country back 
of Duluth, In order to provide trans- 
portation of the farmers' products to 
tlie Duluth market. There was strong 
ojipositlon to measures of this cliar- 
aeter, and tlie fate of the bill was in 
iloubt until the end. 

One of the last bills passed was 
Itepresentative Pongdon's bill allowing 
cities of .the first class to condemn 
land an«l establish parks and pnrk- 
ways outside the clt.v limits. This 
was Mr. Congdon's pet measure, and 



Flabornte Men a. 

lift Brosaic Orchestra. 

\nierk<an. Kuropcon 



I .\ni 




t ■ 












liir-fil rnens- 


(»■ 












well. 


T; 

h. 












..•ith- 


1. 












• be 

we have 

' ned bet- 




il 


dirl 


- 


Hul 


il 


>lH>uld also be 




■■<> 


1 tl 


1 1 


the 


campaign of edu- 










the 


eg 


stature by the 










n w 


bic 


h this countj- 


3''n! .1. 


wn 


in 


,1 


inuarv. 


has gone far 


toward 


turuln 


g 


public 


senlimuut on 



BARGAINS IN 
USED PIANOS 

Vose& Sons ..$140 
Hallet & Davis $150 
Ebony Case $100 
Steinway Square $50 



HMkimriRwcLLira 





1 



One Week From Tomorrow Everything 

in Our Annex Must Be Moved! 

But Liberal Price Reductions Must 
First Reduce the Stocks. 




Girls' Coats 



Box and three quarter lengths tiS ^ i^/\ 
-regular prices $6.50 to $7.50. \^ 0« v/va 

Sizes 8 to 16 



Also $8.25 Coats at... $7.50 

Plain colors and mixtures in very attractive styles. 

Small Children's Coats Much Reduced 

White Serges, light pin-stripes, Pongees, and Serges 
or \\'orsteds in plain colors, shepherd checks, or mix- 
tures — for instance — $6.50 values at $5.50, and $5.00 
values at $4.00. 

Girls '& Misses * Tailored Suits 

lj>'^qr f\f\^'^^ regular $29.00 values. Two- 



Worsteds. 



piece suits in Serge, Satin-Cloth and 



Regular $25.00 values in shepherd 
checks of various shades at 

Regular $17.50 values 

ill mixtures at 



• «••>•• 



$22,^0 
$15.00 



A 1 0% Reduction is Offered on All 2II?I:Sr^n"? Wash Dresses 

Tliis includes beautiful styles in Sheer White Dresses, lace and embroidery trimmed, as well as 
Linens, Ginghams, Chambrays, Swisses, Lawns, Dimities. Batistes and Mulls— from 1 to 1-i Acars. 

Children's and Girls' 

Lingerie Headwear Y^ Off 

Lace and embroidery trimmed styles. Sale prices 
from $1.00 and Up. 



Special Line of 

Infants' White Wear V^ Price 

Including little Dresses, Mull Bon- 
nets, and slightly soiled white woolen 



garments. 



Fancy Silk Hose 

Vi and 1/3 Off 

A small special lot of plain 
and embroidered Silk Hose, 
worth from $l.r.O to $9.00 per 
pair (some slightly .soiled*. 

Chihlren 's Fancy Hose 
at 15c 

Itegular price 50c per pair. 



Muslin Underwear 
at Vs and J^ Off 

Large special tables of hand-made and 
lace trimmed Skirts, Drawers, Corset Covers, 
Chemises and Gowns. Former prices 50c to 
$10.00. 




First 



■s" 



it was desired by many citizens of 
Duluth. 

Among the local bills passed were 
the following: Giving St. Louis county 
commissioners traveling expenses; au- 
thorizing bonds for the completion of 
the courtliouse; fixing clerk hires in 
i;'- offices of the county auditor and 
treasurer; increasing the salary ot the 
special municipal .iudge of Duluth to 
j:!.000 a year; broadening the powers 
of the Klv municipal court; giving tlie 
Kleventh Judicial district an addition- 
al judge to hold court on the ranges; 
authorizing bonds to pave Garfield ave- 
nue; providing a county examiner for 
towns, villages, school districts and 
(diarllable institutions; creating a 
courthouse commission; lixing salaries 
of coin reporters In St. I.ouis county; 
fixing salary and clerk hire in the of- 
fice of judge of probate; Increasing the 
salary of the Iron range county .attor- 
ney; authorizing sewer construction in 
Virginia; authorizing cities and 
counties to Torretis their land titles. 

Representative Austin's bill allowing 
cities and villages in the iron country 
to take in outside territory passed. 

.Senator T. M. Pugh's bill allowing 
$.j.000 for a boatbouse for the naval 
militia and reorganizing the naval 
militia staff became laws. 

A measure that will be important in 
future sessions is tiiat by Representa- 
tive Congdon. providing that laws ap- 
plying to cittt>s of the first class sliall 
not be applicable to home rule charter 
cities unless they specifically so de- 
clare. Mucli watchfulness was neces- 
sary this session to prevent the bond 
issues and salary increases for the 
Twin Cities from applying to Duluth. 

While there was no reaiiportionment, 
Representatives Buck and Congdon got 
through a law which gives one of the 
two representatives from tlie Fifty- 
first legislative district to Lake and 
Cook counties, a matter that has been 
long desired. 

• • • 

The failure of the legislature to pro- 
vide reapportionment of legislative rep- 
resentation is a crime of omission that 
cannot be forgotten. There is absolute- 
ly no excuse for it except the selfisli- 
ness of the representatives of Southern 
Minnesota. It is unfair to blame this 
up<m the people of .Southern Minnesota; 
tlie blame belongs to those lawmakers 
who feared that Just apportionment 
would crowd some of them out of their 
places. 

The representatives of Northern Min- 
nesota Worked hard for reapportion- 
ment, but they were outnumbered. 

• • * 

One of the most important products 
of the session was the creation of a 
commission to investigate the subject 
of compensation for injured working- 
men and to report a proper measure 
to the next session of the leg-lslature. 
While this is one of the most valuable 
results of the session, it is one that 
confers little credit upon a large ele- 
ment in the legislature. 

The bill was asked for by united lab- 
or and capital, whose demand was pre- 
sented to the legislature by Governor 
Johnson in a special message. Because 
this message came from the governor, 
the Republican "steering committee" 
immediately began a campaign to de- 
feat tlie plan. Various half-»iaked com- 
pensation acts were proposed, and an 
attempt was made to crowd one of 
them through, though it was opposed 
by both labor and capital. All this for 
ftar that the- [>emocratic governor ol 
the state would get some credit out of 
it if the measure really desired by the 
whole state should become a law. 

In this connection, one of tlie most 
ridiculous features of the session was 
an attempt by some of the Republican 
members to play politics. They began 
the session by determining to "put the 
governor In a hole." and to "stop this 
busintss of a Itepublican legislature 
fetching* and carrying for a Demo- 
cratic gov'?rn»r." The result was that 
every move of this character redounded 
to the credit of (lovernor Jidinson and 
plunged the p-irtisan ltepul>lican8 in 
rlie legislature deeper and deeper into 
confusion and disgrace. It is fair to 
say. however, that the substantial Re- 
publicans of the legislature stood firm- 
1\ against all attempts to play peanut 
politics. 

« * • 

Among the more Important measures 
which became laws were the following: 

Creating a &tul« departmeut ot 



banking, separating tliis work from the 
public examiner's office. 

Provision for the new state prison 
and the manufacturiuB establishments 
there, $2,^50,000 spread over ten years 
in equal annual installments. 

New inheritance tax law. 

lieductlon of the mortgage rcKislry 
tax 50 cents per $100 to 10 cents i.n- 
$100. 

.State license and regulation of 
automobiles. 

Granting authority to home rule 
charters to adopt the commission plan 
of citv government. 

Setting apart 1,000.000 acres of land 
in Northern St. Louis and Lake 
cdunties as part of an international 
game preserve. 

Anti-cJgarette law, effective Aug. 1. 

.state aid for ten high scliools in- 
stalling departments of agriculture. 

Legalizing .Sunday baseball. 

Asserting the state's claim to min- 
erals underlying lake beds. 

New act for protecting the slates 
forests from fire, including the em- 
ployment of forest rangers and the re- 
(luirement that lumbermen burn their 
slashings at the end of the cutting sea- 
sun. 

State license for peddlers outside the 
three large cities. 

Teachers' pension bill, applying to 
the three large cities. 

Probation system for juvenile de- 
li mjuents extended to the whole state. 

Torrens system extended to the 
whole state. 

Uniform bill of lading act — in tlie 
opinion of many one of the very most 
important measures passed. 

Limiting saloon licenses liereafter to 
one for each 500 people. 

Recjulring railroads to keep track 
of freight charges paid in excess of 
rates established by the railroad com- 
mission, and to refund them if tliey 
lose in the courts. 

* . • 

Though the session lasted lOS days, 
there were but 90 legislative days, or 
da>s on which tlie legislature could sit, 
and the house sat 79 days and the sen- 
ate 71 days. 

* * • 

A measure that will be widely criti- 
cised was that paying the members at 
the close of this session $500 each in 
salary, wldch was not to become due 
until next year, under the salaiy law 
passed two years ago. 

* * . 

The .T. N. Johnson bill. requiring 
railroads to get the permission of the 
railroad and warehouse commission 
before issuing stoclis and bonds, passed 




UfyniM I N9, kr t. i. tMpB /UYOtoiii Af nqi, Wi rnWKi. (<L 



Ihe hiuise lj\it slept in the senate rail- 
ri>a<l committee at the close of tiie .sos- 

Mun. 

* « « 

More than L'.OoO bilLs vver i'lccJ 

and 58 S were passed. 

« * • 

It was expected at lie Ix-siniiuif; of 
the session that llie alj.'^ence of rail- 
way passes, and tlie substitution of tiie 
salary basis for tlie per diem basis 
in the payment of members, would re- 
sult in a shoiter session, and tliat tliero 
would be fewer week-end adjourn- 
ments. 

The session took up the full constitu- 
tional limit, whicii was one day longer 
than usual because Good Friday was 
a legal holiday this j-ear, and hadn't 
been before, and there were at lea.~l as 
man.v long week-end adjournments. 

An attempt was made to pass a pro- 
posed Constitutional amendment, limit- 
ing the session to sixty instead of 
iiinet.v days, but it fell between the two 
iiouses at the finisli. 

* * . 

Though the legislature started in to 
"put Governor .lohuson in a hole," 
it ended by adopting most of the sug- 
gestions in liis annual message, in- 
cluding the following: The separate 
stale banking dei)artment. the new 
prison plant, local .scliools of agricul- 
ture, the re-enactment of the com- 
modity rate law of 19t*;, with the pen- 
alty clause eliminated; the BlckneU bill 
allowing shippers to recover the over- 
ciiarge wliere state ri'ivi are upheld in 
llie courts. 

* « * 

All attempts to change the primary 
election law were defeated, and it 
stands just as it has stood for several 
sessions, though many Republican 
members — and a few Democrats — start- 
ed in determined to repeal it or to 
make radical ciianges in its pro- 
vision.s. 

« « • 

The attempt to put public utilities 
under a state commission failed, but 
considerable sentiment was created for 
it. and it will be tried again next 
session with better chances for victory. 
« * • 

The "pork barrel" road appropria- 
tion of 1907 was perpetrated again, 
witli the annual appropriation raised 
from $200,000 to $300,000. Tliis money 
goes into a grab bag. and is cut up 
among the members witli some atten- 
tion to equality, but absolutely no at- 
tention to state-wide road improve- 
ment, the state highway commission 
having absolutely nothing to do with 
its expenditure. 

* « • 

One important drainage measure 
went through, empowering the state 
drainage commission to make a topo- 
graphical survey of the various water- 
sheds of the state with a view to 
l>iitting drainage upon .an economical 
basis and to preventing overflow from 
one section injuring another section. 

* • • 

Among the ollls killed were the fol- 
lowing: 

County option. 

Local optijn for fourth class cities, 
tender 10.000.) 

Thayer bill for stamp tax on deals in 
future.^. 

Rjorge tonnage tax bill. (Passed 
but vetoed.) 

I'^xtension of primarj' law to state 
officers and I'nited States senators. 

Women's sulYrage amendment. 

The L^e bill to prohibit treating. 

The "midnight lid" for three large 
cities. 

Creation of new state land depart- 
ment. 

The twice-a-month pay day bill. 

The bill placing public utilities under 
file railroad commission. 

Abolition of capital punishment. 

Regulation of patent medicine sale. 

Swanson bill to abolish tubereuliii 
test for cattle. 

Making railroad Commissioners ap- 
pointive. 

Bank deposit guaranty. 

Creating state forest, fish and igame 
commission. 

Creating county boards of education 
to elect county superintendents. 

Thayer bill prohibiting discrimination 
In sale of lumber. 

Constitutional convention bill. 

County plan of caring for insane. 

"Naturopathic" board bill. 

Gross earnings tax bills for public 
utilities. 

UiKliway commission bill raising 



-il'.-inles 



( ]■ 



road tax to % mill. 

Rills making telephon" 
common carriers. 

Uniform text book bill. 

Cass Lake norma! .^eiioo: 
but vetoed.) 

Indian w^r pr-n.^i'io bill 
but vetoetl. » 

Kxemptlon of crciii 

Distance tariff act 

i;i-ai>portlonment ■■» ;■ . 
tricts. 

Tlie six-round boxing i.iii. 

"Loan sliaik" bill. 

Bill i)eJinitting tioi ' ' lul;9 to 

sell liquor. 

Amendment to .tntl-ii.i.-^s i.iw exempt- 
ing policemen and ttreinen. 

STILLM.\.V II. niNGHAM. 



id 



m 



19- 




Had Sixty Boils when but Six Months 
Old— Was Annually Attacked by 
a Humor— It Looked Red Like a 
Scald and Spread Over Half Her 
Head — Both Troubles are Cured, 




m^^-<i 



NO PRAISE TOO HIGH FOR 
THE CUTiCURA REMEDIES 



"When my little Vivian was about 
six months old, her papa had a boil on 
his forehead. At 
that time the child 
was covered with 
prickly heat and I 
I suppose in scratch- 
' ing it, her own head 
became infected fof 
it broke out in boils, 
one after another. 
'^~. She had about sixty 
'^ ,io all and I used 
Cuticura Soap and 

/Ks^ \^ \ Cuticura Ointment 
I • which cured her of 

' them entirely. Then, 

sometime later, her little foot eot sore 
between the toes. Being afraid it was 
salt rheum, I spoke to our d</ctor. He 

gave me a powder which dried it up, 
ut soon after it broke out behind her 
ears. They cracked half way around 
and the humor spread up on to her head 
until, on several occasion.s, it wa.-< nearly 
half covered. The liumor look«Hi like a 
scald, very red with a sticky, clear fluid 
coming from it. This occurred every 

fear. 1 think it was toward the spring, 
always bathed it with warm water and 
Cuticura Soap and af>pIiod Cuticura 
Ointment which never failed to heal it 
up. The last time it broke out was 
when she was six years old. It l>ccnme 
so bad that I was discouraged. Then 
I procured a bottle of Cuticura Resolv- 
ent wliich soon cleared it out of her 
blood. I continued the use of Cuticura 
Soap and Ointment with the Resolvent 
until she was perfectly well. She is now 
about eight vears old and has never 
been troubled in the la.st two years. 
We also find Cuticura Resolvent u good 
spring medicine and we are iust giving 
the cniidrtm Cuticura Resc'vent Pills 
as a tonic. We do not think any one can 
praise Cuticura Remedi 3 too highly. 
Mrs. M. A. Schwerin, (JV4 Spring Welia 
Ave., Detr»)it, Mich.. Feb. 24. P»08." 

Complete External and Internal Treatment for 
Every ilunior of Irraou, rtiUdrtfii and Adults roa- 
sIbUi of Cuticura suym (25c » to ri.?an^ tne skin, 
Cuticura Ointment (50c ) to Heal the 8kln and nitl- 
cur* ttesolvent (iOc ). (or In itie form of Choi-ulat* 
Coated Pills, 25c. per vial ot (Ml) to Purify the BliXKt 
Sold tbroucliout tlie \«or;d .Potter Uru« A Cbtak. 
Corp , Sole Props , Boston. Mftaa 

«rM*Ued Free. Cutlcur* Book on Skla DlK«na 



f 



I pii aiii . — 1 




mr 



1 



'Ukr' 





■ 

1 










— ' 



iHigBiiiai 



■ 



MMlllliiiiilllll P 



•ma-*'. 















I 


"X/ 






,. 








1* 


i 








\ 



r 



^ p ■ ■ . > I ■ . I, — I. ^ 'II - • ' ■ 

■ 

■ 

t 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: FRIDAY, APRIL 23. 1909. 




Exceedingly Good Garment 

Values Brought About By 

P reparations to Move 

Ladies' Separate Coats 

Scrcres and C'cvcrf;, in models HI<o the cut <J | S QQ 
here slimvn : regular .■il9.-"0 and sfl'l.yO values V(» -«• '-^ • ^ '^ 

Scrrcs. Worsteds and fovcrts, in hipless or iftO^ 00 
fitted .1} les. Regular )i=2!),r,U and $32.50 values af • V/»^^» ^ ^ 

B/ocAj Broadcloth Coats 

Knee or lull len.ulli styles, lined to waist. $22,50 



Kxcccdinulv tiood value at 



• • • • • 



Broken Suit Lines 
Are Blue Penciled 

AVc have ueecled them (nit, lakino- everv odd luiniher, and 
every -l\1e tliat h>r one reason or another, we'll not reorder. It 
make- alM.ni a hundred and fifty suits at very decided savnigs. 

48 Suits Regularly $25 at $1 9,50 
40 Suits Regularly j'fM at $25.00 
55 Suits R efTu larly j^Us aj $35,00 

Silk or Woolen Trotteur Dresses 
at $12,50 



Regularly 
and Up 



Clt %l^ J. VaOL/ Values 



Regular 
00 




Colored Net 
Waists at 

Former prices ^()..')0 lo 
$8.00. Staple colors and 
new shades. .*^iniilar to cut. 

Messaline 
Waists 

Fancv Blouse styles in 
evenint;" shades — Jt''<i'-'>0 to 





S uperl) Millinery 

New Models at $5.00, $7.50, $10.00, 

$12.50, $15.00 and $18.00 

The millinery values offered for Saturday will un- 
doubtedly eclipse' anything shown at the Head of the 

Lakes. 

The models are superb examples of the millmer s 
art, rich, exclusive and conservative in their beauty. 
The assortment is, if anything, better than during open- 
ing week. Be sure to inspect these variously priced lots. 

Hats for Misses ^^^ at $6.50 

Tomorrow we make an extensive showing of ^^^^ latest 
style hats for blisses. The^ values average $10.00. 
Choose tomorrow and pay S^6.50. 




$10.00 values 
at 



$3-50 



Lingerie 
Waists at 

$3,00 



Worth 
toflO 



Dress Skirts 
at $5,00 

Regularly $(J.'")0 and 
$7.50. Xatty gored styles 
ill Black i*anama. 

Messaline or Taffeta 

Petticoats 
at $3.75 

■Regular $6.75 values. 
Black and colors. 

( Xo "phone orders.) 



Lingerie Dresses Reduced V4, Vz and V2 



Perriris Gloves 



Correct Dress 



Bpet-ial values at $1.00 

first Quality Kid '*"'?? 

ITwo- 



$2.00 



nil rttl'>i- 
valuo. 

ppring Siieilcs $1..>0 

Three-fta.Hp, blark iind whit' . r. g- 
ular $2.00 value. 
AH gloves sold umh r tli- i*t;uhir 
Perriu guaraiitte. 





Neckwear 

Puritan Toliars — Laundend ."nd 
lingerie styles, ut loc, 25f. :i5c and 
up. 

Mull Jahot.s. Bows and Tics — t-ni- 
11/ hrmih'vc'l collars and Iiii^li crochet 

X'eiliiig.s at 25*' — regular 35c and 
&uc values — black and cohas. 



F4rst 



St. 



Do Not 
Neglect 
to Read 




W.L Douglas Shoe 

Ad on Page 8. 



LAST 
CHANCE. 



RESUME WORK ON 
BOTH OF DRIFTS 

Rogers-Brown Company 

Keeps Up Work on 

Cuyuna Range. 

Cuyuna. Minn.. April -3. -(Sv'-'ial to 
The Herald.}— The k.,.k-' ~ • r.r.-v., (ire 
company l.;-s res unit- a wuik vii botli 
drifts at tie Jnine. For >.nne lime 
work on the soiiih tlrili I as l.'-m « is- 
' ^i,Mu.l. wluh' work i.as h.. n p.uj bed 
iV, ,ft which was running t"wa'd 

" ii„i. t.f the second shaft. 

..Ill t.. -ii.ont ninety (eet noriu- 



DLEHWOOD (KLEHHATKS 

I»KATH OF lUOKliE .\(T. 

n.ii-w.M'.l. Miriii.. A|ull L'::.^ (SiH'.ial 
to Tlie Herald. I -l>eerwo.)<l ceLt'taiei 
tlif vetoing; of the tonnaKt- ia\ I'Ui 
TiK s.lav with an cnihusiaMU not ex- 
< iM<l.(l ■ in any phu <> in Minnesota, 
^llou^'ll there may have been more peo- 
p].- Ml ..thcr places the rejoicing was 
nut more sincere, nor was there more 
noise per .apita. All the available 
fireworks in tiic tit\ were purchased 
hv the enthusiasiir < iti/.'iis. Hells 
\vere riuiK. Knns fired and a t<-.miuir 
Fourth of .Jul\- indiitsed in. 

FOl R WEEKS STMMKK 

SCHOOL .\T FINE RIVER. 



thv 
wbif 



weft of tli» iiri-s« 



tl. 



J.'hn 1' 

bui idinj; -.- ■•. 
Oppell. .Stors; 
was lif-ri"' \'^ 
itock 

Keii 
SO' neai'li' <. ■■ 
move the p 
next w>"ck. 



Ill shaft- . ,, ^ 

lias decided t*' 'r- "uild 
np into a nw • "r 

, so that he n<. . - "n: 
1 , lust- to the mine at 
,h.v a I'l niKht. 

his store 

and Oiiarles 

, M- W.'i.s <'ipmpany 

,1 V 1" >fii liirn the 



has hi> • 
.1 tiiat 
• ami 



t' 



l.aildin:Jr 

• -■ lo 

it 



'ft^'SWft'S Bellcloas 

of Vanilla has the fine flavor of the fruit. 



Walk. 1, > .iw. . April i;:!. .Spe.aal to 

The Herald. I — t'as.s rotnits is t" hiive 
a four weeks' term of sunnner sch..ol 
this vear. and t!i«- session is iKing 
vvidetv advertis.-d ly Siipt. Hall. 

Prof. 1'. e. Kenntdy of .St. IVter wdl 
conduct the -school and lie will sur- 
rotind himself with a valuable corps of 
assistants, which, the .superlntenden 
savs. will make tlie t'ass <ouiity .scnooi 

one of the best «'•»'"'"-.,. ^'^^^""•jli,!''^ 
teachers in the state. 1 lie sessions 

will be held at I'lne llicr. commenc- 
ing July 5 ami co ntiniiin;- to July .iU. 

SE( ONO ATTE.MPT SlCrEEDS. 

disappointed in Affair of Heait, St. 
Paul {i\r\ Takes Life. 

St. I', ml, Minn.. .\pril ■2;i.-'--Mary 
I'oris I, M'.rrl.-. 17 \fais ohl. killed 

; iliiK the heads of 
, : . ;, - :i the apartments 
I'ran<»*s Johnson, a sclniol t« a< to r. at 
t;il Cttitral I'ark vesterday. 

It was her ' attempt to end 

i,, r llf'-. Tw ••.<;- apo .she was 

f/'uiol In a .TiiHal ivnditlon from tak- 
iiiij aoinu kina ul poison at Miss John- 



s.,.,-s :,.,in.-. .i.:.i \\ :i-^ '■''■ ' ■ a phy- 

sician. , , , ^ 

\n iniha!>p\ h'M' at'fiiir is thought 
to li.na' imp< Hcd the gii 1 to self- 
■ U'sirui lion. althooRii her secr.-t was 
uc\er disclosed an.l n.v.T spoken of 
iiv lier to lier frie iols. 

KILLS WIFE \\\) SELF 

FOLLO\VIN(i A ill ARREL, 

Cr.lart-l'iM c- Wis. .\iiril 23. — Special 
to 'Pi,,. )! I'liaiics (;..tl.schalk. 

.Ir.. and In-- \\ 1 1 e ucra f-uiial dead in 
their room last nlph:. A disihaiged 
revolv. r on tlie floor indicated that 
(;ott.s< halk killed his wife and then 
.sliot liimsclf. The conjde had <iuar- 
reled frequently and it is presumed 
that the shouting followed such a 
tiuarrel. , , , . 

Their onlv ( hild, a I'oy. w-aa not at 
home at the time of tlie sliooting. 

Kai-iiicr Owet. Much Money. 

Mankato. Minn.. April JS. — Uernt P. 
Hanson, a farmer of Highwater town- 
ship, fottonwood county, ha.s nled a 
petition in hankruptcy. with $18,i>00 
liahilities. of which %-2.?.(>» is ''f ',"'"♦'''; 
and assets of fi:! ^<'0, including |o,10-i 

ilalmcd as exempt. 



Mankiilo %. M. t. A. !«ie»Te«nrj . 

Mankato, Minn.. April lio.— 1-. M- 
Deerhake. assi.stant secretary of the 
Minneapolis Young Men's <:hri?tlan as- 
sociation. lia.« at eepted the general sec- 
retary.ship of the local Young Men's 
Christ Ian association, to succeed A. <'. 
Graw. who leaves June 1 to hecome 
general secretary of the I.a Crosse Y. 
M. t'. A. Mr. l>eerliake will take up his 
work June 1. 

. • 

!<ine« PliyMieinn (or 81,000. 

.Menominee, Mich.. April -:!.— (.'Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — Suit for $1,000 
damages for alleged mail-practice has 
been Instituted by Scott Thompson 
against Dr. Kdward .>^awbrldge for al- 
leged failure on the part of the physi- 
cian to cure 1dm of an injury to an eye. 




Soinethin({ New In 

LIFE INSIRANCE 

ASK 

THE Prudential 



INSURANCE COMPANY OF AMERICA 






Boae Offic*. Newark, N.J. \ 



ROOT UPON 
NATION LAW 

Senator Addresses Con- 
vention In Washington; 
Cites Drago Doctrine. 

Recalls the Early Day 
Reverence for Amer- 
ican Judges. 



Washington. April 2.1.— In opening 
the third annual meeting of the Ameri- 
can Society of International Law to- 
day, Senator Kllhu Hoot of New York, 
the' president, took for his subject 
"The Relations Between International 
Tribtmals of Arbitration and the Jur- 
isdiction of National Courts." Particu- 
lar reference was made to the Drago 
doctrine. Senator Koot contending that 
submission to international tribunals 
iinpli.s no impeachment of sovereignty, 
Koot admitted that the riile that, 
where tliere has b»-en a denial of jus- 
lice in national courts, llieir decisions 
are not to be held coneluPive. and arlji- 
tration or other further action may be 
tailed lor. had been injurious in Its 
iff.'ct. It involves aspersions iipon 
government. Intputations upon hlgli 
officials, and tends to destroy good 
feeling beiwten nations. 

SubmlMKioo lo Arbitration. . 

"The belter rule would be to avoui 
the danger of denials of justice and 
to prevent the belief that justice has 
not been done, which must alway^ 
pos.sess the parties dP/<?af^*l.. '" ^^ 
tribunal suspected of partialit>, said 
he "by submitting to an iini>artial ar- 
bitration tribunal all such cases as are 
liable to be affected by the considera- 
tion I ha^e mentioned.* i ^ „v- 
The reason of such a rule, he ex- 
plained, would require that when such 
?ases had been decided already by 
national courts, and the Impartial jus- 
tice of the decision seriously ques- 
tioned, they should be resubmitted to 
an arbitration tribunal, not tor proot 
that lust ice had been denied, but for 
rehearing on their merits. 

Hoot argued that In controversies 
the only question is "What is justice 
in this case?" "Sovereigns and pres - 
dents, ministers and department offi- 
cers are not insulted by a provision for 
a .ourt to ascertain what is justice, he 
added, "because the common setise of 
luslice recognizes that their relation to 
the questions which arise between the 
government which they conduct, and 
others, la such that ihey cannot well 
be impartial." , 

The statement was made that the 
same rule could not be Ignored in ar- 
riving at what Is just in an interna- 
tional case. Circumstances such as 
the general state of feeling, the re- 
sources of the country, and the politi- 
cal importance of the isssue. were cited 
to show how Impartial international 
decisions might be difficult to obtain 
without arbitration tribvinals. 

"If recourse to arbitration is a re- 
flecf'-n upon national courts," he said, 
"the' people of the United Slates have 
been strangely obtuse. Nowhere in 
the world, surely, is greater honor 
oaid to the courts of justice, yet we 
have embodied in the fundamental law 
which binds our states together a rec- 
ognition of the liability of courts to be 
affected by local sentiment, prejudice 
and pressure." 

Ucvered Their JMd|ee«. 
Root told how the proud independent 
sovereign commonwealtiis like ^ "" " 
elnla, I'ennsylvania. New Y'ork and 
Massachusetts. which forrned the 
American Union, revered their judges 
"Thev were prepared to give, and diu 
eive "to their courts a degree of author- 
it v over them and their executives and 
legislatures without precedent In the 
history of free government, but they 
also revered justice: they prized peace 
and concord and friendship and brotlj- 
erhotid between the states and their 
citizens When the ever-recurring 
question arises between submission of 
controversies to international arbitra- 
tion on the one hand and insistence 
unon the lurlsdlctlon of national trib- 
unals on the other, the nations who 
look to the framers of the American 
Constitution as an example of high con- 
structive .statesmanship and wisdom, 
should not fail to tlnd in their judg- 
ment matter to arrest their attention 
and influence their action." 

PREPARINii JM THE LOGS. 

Men Cloai'iJi^ Way for Immense 
Xunibei* Coming Down Mississippi. 

St. Cloud, Minn.. April 23. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — The Mississippi & 
Hum Hiver Boom company has a large 
irew of men at work below the dam 
clearing the way for the immense Jam 
of logs which will pass through here 
from Little Falls some time next 

'"T^ie'crew of sixtv men arrived In the 
citv Mondav in their wanagans Kight 
teams were put to work. Severa 
tl,ousand feet of logs are being I'laoed 
into the middle of the stream The 
men state that there is a jam of about 
l-'y O0it.('00 feel ol logs at Helle I rairle. 
.some miles below St. Cloud, which has 
lust started on the move. Another 
large jam is moving about ten miles 
north of Minneapolis. 

\fter the men complete their work 
l.e'low this city they will be Put on 
the river between St. t.'loud and Lit- 
tle Falls. Several hundred housand 



Artistic Suits Are Pouring In 



$32.50, $35.00 and $45.00 

It means that S. & B. lines have distanced all others in public favor this season; it also 
indicates that more women are wearing S. & B. Suits than ever before. 

Glance at tlie New Lines Tomorrow 

T. .,i-.v V>p thit vou have been AvaitiiiL for tliis pnrticulai- display. . ,, . . . 

The Tines at- *35 00 and $«.C0 offer variety and goodness cond.incd. I'or n,s.ance, I.ere .s 
not alone early half a h«ndre<l different Suit n,ode!s. b-,,t a re|,resentat,on ol every des.r.dde 
fXk'.such -.s^Ser.ves. Diagonals, .Mannish Worsteds, Saun Innsht Cloths. etc.-?32.50, 
$35.60 and $45.00. 

Early Summer Wraps Dresses Jn^JilkanaWool 

^-— =-===—- $21.50, $23.50 to $35.00 

Xuincrous pretty styles in Pongee from $15 to $25. 
In pretty Foulards the prices start at $18, then 
$21.50. $25 and so on, 

Dres'^es of Satin and Messaline start as low a-, 
$15, and go as high as $75 for the coslumts an'l 
deini-drcss styles. 

In Wool Dresses we show perfect fitting styles 
in serge, panel back and front, artistically braided— 
$23.50. 

Dresses of satin solcil with not yoke, collar and 
sleeves, trimmings of braid and butt«>ns- $35.00. 

New Arrivals in Linen 

Waists 
From $2.75 Upwards 

Plainly tailored .styles in reliable linens that u ill 
launder "satisfactorily. 



TailoreJ Cravenettes $25.00 

Ae know of no more desirable garment than these 
smartly tailored Cravenettes. a wrap for mostly all oc- 
casions, an ideal outing or tounng coat-new mode s 
'n c^xf<.Vd and tan shades, new panel back and surplus 
front— $25.00. 
^ ^ -r^ ...•^ 11 /^ ^^ For the 

S. 5f. B. ^College Coats miss 
$10.50 to $24.50 

These styles shown in our Junior ^<^«:'.',7- ,'^'"'^.';:," 
garments for girls of all ages, from the child of 6 >ears 
to her big sister at college. 

Tailored Coats and Reefers for children, at $10.50. 

Seven-eighths length Coats for girls in otir special 
"college" styles, in serges, mannish worsteds, diagon- 
als, etc., from $12.50 to $24.50. 

Tailored Suits for Girls 

$12.50 and $15.00 

Tailored Suits for girls in mannish suitings, braid 
and button trimmnigs— $12.50. 

Smartly tailored Junior models in blue serge for 
girls from 12 to 17 years, at $15.00. 

Summer Frocks ior Girls 

$1.50 to $8.50 

C..mplcte showings of Tub Dresses fur .^irls in the 
correct Summer weaves, such as madras, zcphvrs, 
Scotch ginghams, etc. 

New Corset Models 
$1.00 to $5.00 

The "Redfcrn," American Lady, C B A La Spirite, 
Warner's Rust-proof, etc.. are now ready for -V^'"/ '"- 
spection We suggest that you have your corset fitted 
here free of expense by our expert corsclicre. 



Saturday Specials 

79c Pair for $1.25 Gloves 

A full line of Glace Kid Gloves, in all color'^ - 
regular $1.25 values priced for Saturday at 79c pair. 

Special Neckwear Values at 25c 

For Saturday we offer a strong selection of ikw 
arrivals in Embroidered Collars at 25c each. 

Hand Bags 

Every Hand Bag in stock, black or colored, ^ off, 

50c for 65c Hosiery 

A special lot of Lisle Hose, black and colors, plain 
and fancy— 65c values at 50c a pair. 





1 
I 



H 




■WiiiiiMiii— I i 



feet of logs are In the Jams whicl. 

HUGE ELECTRIC CRANE. 

Recent Acquisition of Northern Pa- 
cific Brainerd Shops. 

Bratnerd, Minn.. April 23.— (Special 
to The Herald.)— The Brainerd North- 
ern Pacific Bhops recently received a 
nine-ton magnetic locomotive crane. 
The machine is mounted on standard 
gauge trucks and can propel HS'^lf to 
fnv Dart of the shops or yards. The 
machine resembles an ordinary steam 
crine Ixcept that instead of a, set of 
erappl in g hooks it has a heavy circul- 
! r^'Xs of iron which can »>e '■harged 
with magnetic electricity at w i. 
When the current Is on the crane will. 
U itBaid. lift a mass of iron weign- 

'"ft"wa*8Yn"'use in the yards near the 
depot vesterday and a large crowd 
cankered to see it work. It was only 
a short time in unloading a carload of 
o„fiV..h froes lifting them with ease 
Ind puSihem on the freight house 

platform. ^ 

BIHER AND CHEESE 

INDUSTRY GROWING. 




ire center Probably a dozen cream- 
erfes have been established the pa^t 



Wherever there's Pain 
apply an 

Alloock's Plaster 

The standard External Remedy 



few vears. and others will go ii\to com- 
mis.slon this i-pring. Two of these new 
plants are at Manlstique. in t-chooi- 
craft countv, and Kudyard In Chippew.^ 
countv. The Kudyard creamery will 
begin" operations May 1. It has a ca- 
pafity of 1.000 pounds of better per 
day, although it Is "(•?, t'^Pe<^\^,*^ ,J''f/, 
the supply of milk will permit it o 
operate at full capacity at the stiiit. 
Milk from some 500 cows has been 
contracted for. 

R0AD-M.4K1NG PLANT. 

Iron Mountain. Miclu, Will Improve 
Adjacent Highways. 

Marquette, Mich.. April 23.— (Special 
to The Herald.)— Following the exam- 
ple of Marquette, which for years has 
operated its own rock crusher and 
road rollers in constructing its own 
macadamized streets, the city of Iron 
Mountain. on the Menominee lion 
range, will .-^oon have one of the finest 
road-building plants in the JA est^ 

A vast depoHlt of rock suitable for 
paving purposes has been acquired S 
mile south of the city and there has 
alreadv been erected at the ^ te a 
crusher guaranteed to treat Irom twen- 
tv to fifty tons of stone per hour, de- 
pending upon the size of the material 
8u.er Equipment will be a .« team road 
locomotive and roller of 50-norbe 
power capacity and a train of six steel 
dump cars of a capacity of Ave tons 
of crushed rocks each. Some $15, lOO 
will be expended in street construction 
this season. 

WILL TH.\NK GOVERNOR. 

Brainerd Commercial Club Likes 
Veto of Tonnage Tax Bill. 

Brainerd, Minn.. April 23.— (Special 
to The Herald. »— The Brainerd Com- 
mercial club elected eight directors 
Wednesday evening for the full two- 
year term as follows: Mons Mahlum. 
A G Trommald, W. H. Cleary. J. C. 
Janiieson. H. F. Michael. G. A. Keene. 
F H. Gruenhagen and Con O Brien, 



Judge George W. Holland and II. \V. 
Linnemann were elected for one year 
to fill vacancies. - „ t> 

A committee consisting of u. It. 
Wise. George D. La Har and G. A. Kecne 
was appointed to write to Governor 
John A. Johnson in behalf of the r'.ub 
expressing its appreciation and thanka 
for his veto of the tonnage tax till. 

FARGO FAIR IN .RLV. 

Annual Interstate Show Promises to 
be Up to Standard. 

Fargo, N. D.. April 23. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Secretary Wilson an- 
nounces that the Interstate fair will be 
held July 26-31 this year. 

The Winnipeg fair will be held two 
weeks earlier, the Grand Forks fair 
comes in between, making three bl(f 
shows in succes.sion. The North r>akofa 
state fair is on wheels and this year it 
goes to Grand Forks. In off years 
Fargo puts on an Interstate fair that is 
just as large and attractive, except tlie 
city does not have the state approi.ria- 
tion The management has gotten tlie 
run "of things and each display is an 
improvement over former events. 

Fargo is to have a double-header race 
meet this spring, as the opening week 
of the Central circuit will be here June 
1-3, and the closing week during t!ie 
fair The circuit in'^lndes the best 
towns in the state, and a large nuinter 
of horses from other states will be 
here- one Kan.sas horseman announces 
he will spnd fouvteen harness liorFes 
to make the circuit and get In shape 
for the large Eastern races later. 






- 




I 




< 










DEFECTIVE PAGE 






F 

■ 

! 




^4 



I>yspeplets| 
Catarrlets 



If ^-««lft by M*^ -Mi Ifw Ooo«1. 



QnVlcIf rpl!iT» Rom 

machjiearthurn, 
uM». ituUallothar 
an.i .iysp«p«i«. Sugar- 
I>ru«gii»t» or by m»tl. 
<riv« insunt r«li«f la 
Smml Oat*rrh - »llaF 
i I. tl Mmmatioa, ha»l 



Builders* Hardware. Me- 
cbanics' Tools. Fine CuUery 

QUAYLE-LARSON CO. 

23S«con4 Avcnoe WwJ. 



WANTS PART 
OF PROFITS 

Lydia Becker Sues Mar- 
tin Rosendahl, Local 
Broker, for $25,000. 

Says She Introduced Him 

to Butte- Ballaklava 

Officials. 



Lydla B«cker has br<;iught BAiit 

f^ •- --n.lahl. stock 

;n.!ming that 



BORG DIDN'T 
WANTTO DIE 

Thought He Did. But Cold 

Water Changed His 

Mind. 

Jumped Into Canal and 

Then Yelled for 

Help. 

ATf! Burg, a laborer. In an attiMiij)! 
to , last night Jumped from Itu- 

n>ii... • ■' '!i» Quluth canal l>iit ;i.s 

he £el* ■ iter closinat ah i 

i hv aid riv.>l \V;int t'> 'Uv ;ui.i 

.idly ror lulp. Waicliinan 
Tiiuuipsou of the Bovernment engi- 

. V buiMing: h.^tLt-.l his cri.*9 and 

: !i;rii ii-'U. ater. H-' was 

:\ j.r:i;'..-d '.ip .it ti.e «'■''"-■'''>'«''"*• hulJiling 
iiii'l iHt.T was taken to tlitj fulice 

>iii.-.l his a.tluu bv saying 

• r to 



he w I 

.>t W<K 

obi. lit! 

nif ii.is 
ii\ . ■ 
Ir 

auo 

ri.il II ~ 



A 

l.-t.' 

fli 
11. 



1" V 






r 



:t jjayu 



.lit . ■!,"*, iiai-l -I- :v 



I 

I : ... 



u«; claini.-i iiiin 

loi- whom ked. 

■,-* to piiy hiin. The 

lh been trying his btat 

T' but liu."4 failed, 

beat way to do 

...l.-i wau-r there is a 

1 ; .ii- t );•■ canal plors, 

! hu did 

t) i-llinl» 

..■h lilt.- ^ liian 

iliijve \- He 

■ 1 lij ., . '::in tilt- 

lu stuK.l in llie 

!v f.ir bflp. If 

I riv fvl siM.n tho 

.IV.- \'"fr. .>vf»r- 
1 falU-n •>lt iiilM 

ut least one s>iod 
>\v of tilt- ojdiiioii 



Ullil- 

3 he 

oden 

ihflf 



t* U 1 . i ...» '' ■ 

MLs.-* F" 



■ tii- 

' in 

( 

; ►-a 
; to 

IS an 

t,. 1.V 



MAfJARA FALLS, FKOZKN, 
SLOWLY VIEL1>S: DYNAMITE 
Tl RNS K'E INTO KIVEllS 



1.) 



.tnk. 



HIDES ON COWCATCHER 



1 ) 



fell' 

pi. 



Hi.' 



th 



li;* 



the ex- 
.irmy 
d his 

until 

the 

Furl 't- 

.•■ntlnp ' :i- 

U-ickie uUo a lari;".' -m f/.uii. 

. ■ • • - . frnnu-nt aid to 
lower Niagara, 

.•e the :^ 

v.. '\ 



• a 

, :p 

wi' ii.ivc at 

! fee live. The 

ben eat li the 

oark with a 

^ f >--".>r 



nUt'iMi 

ortiiall 



'■ pri.»let..' 



F! 



RE\0LrTION DAIOHTEHS 

ELECT MRS. M. T. S( OTT 





.1 walk' 

:'l. If 


I s 




Itial liie 


Walt-r 


. it 


would 


boil up 


.>ii an 


i swanip 


the Ut- 


(i !-ii->.'. 


M-.r." tl 


an this 


■.I ' s u 


■»■•!;'. lb:- 


in this 

• ■■■ .11- 

'' the 


i .. 




, iJol, 


>rt on 




Willi 


in :-i s 




steps 
ut to 
s re- 
late- 



oT ;i;i !.;•■■- 1 > 



\ ork 



nr, 



t>reMt Uauerr .\«'nr l.c\il.iti»o. 



The «r«:'at«si itanptM- ii 



Si ■ 
b' 



•!■ — also 



EX-SENATOR STEWART OF 

NEVADA IS NO MORE 



• ■\ 111: 

lOOf Mt 



. ri. 



a IS tr.iin 

' ■ the 

ii the 

The 

river. 

;,,■ ;'.»p of 

■ irlng of the 

\ r!-- ..f 



I 

ijave 

■id to 

.it 

.-1 

■ the 

.1! of 



;t st.viy feet 

I.!.., K- of Ire 

ra-HJi 

v'.irk- 

.! . ........1 it 



(r''>nf iriiT--*! fi-om it;te:»> 1 "» 






TO OPPOSE LA FOLLEHE. 



Walter Ali*xaiider of Waiisau Is 
Bring (iroonu'd fur Senate. 



- in the primary for ti. 



April ■:.,..— Current 

;-, [>> tlie etlt'ct tliat 

:' \\ aii.-;.ia will op- 

l Al. i.>i l-''<lletle in 

. ri;.'.-.| >t.H.-S Nt-n- 

UH uixi tail. The 

ined but tlie report 

talked of around 



Itniinnice < miiil 1 ii<««»e<-li'«l. 

J. . .\; ;■ ■iity-ftv€* 

I ■ mi; 111 ; M ■■■■■■ ■ '•■ 

;on. of .: 

I..- "■ ' 

Ins' 

*1i-... , V. . ' - 

:ink In tlie all-u .ute 

, I. The trip aloiiK anal 

will l»f made in automobileiS and 

l»iuiH.:'lie9. 



I: 





VOLLAND 



that lieu Ilat. 

1 r..n;iired. 



Hats rl.v. 

Hats ■■ . 

All the latest blocks and flan^ea 



MAtiES. . . .'. 



C. VOLLAND. 

<.ii». «.. Mo«»si»riii:i::fr. Siicfesfior. 

21 Firist Ave Ivasl. 
Both 'PtianM. 



. L L- [lie anti-La FoUette 
f. been casting about for 

s. -.) find a suitable man to 

'•n aii'l tlie elec- 
ii i.s sai.l. would 
i wiio are aversi- to .•^•-•.■iii^ La 
leturn to th» s«Miate. 
It !>■ underst" t Mr. Alexander 

will have the i , oi tho«e nu-m- 

bt-rs Ml tiie legii-iaiLUi.' who have i>p- 
pn>. I tl ■ invesli«alion of the recent 
senatorial primary, and frlendis of Sen- 
ator La FoUette atatc ti>-ely that tlie 
Wausau man will be pu.shed b> the old 
line statv^arls. 



DILITH ( ONCERN WILL 

BlILD TWO ELEVATORS. 



Bordulae. N. !'., April 23.— Foster 
county is to have at lea.st tw< new 
Kraln elevators before the l!">a crop 
in read\ for tiie market, one to be 
built at the spur, four miles east and 
the other at the spur four mile.s we.st. 
of fb>niut.Tr. Tli-y will be of Sy.Oim 
b and will be 

I. • iraln company 

of uuiulli. W urK on tin- t-iist house 
was commenced uii Monday. 

Muih '' ' been done. The 

ground : idition, altliouBli 

the cold ii!j,iii.> i.i-vtui rapid progress 
tenia; made. 



Boy KIllM IliM PInymatr. 

^V-^.. April 2;{. — riayfully 
■d rille al Kddie Keller, 
the 10-year-old son of 
in at Browntown re- 
tioot you." The bullet 
in tiie Keller boy'a abdo- 
ritle wa.s a X2-'10 and con- 
tained -sixteen cartridges. The boys 
bowels were pierced iu uine plucea. 



S.10 

asr 
1 ■ 


Monro, 
tnt ing 

o,1 7 


I!, 

touli 

ni>^ii. 


Tl 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: FRIDAY, APRIL 23. 1909. 



r 



..IB 



Women's $2 Hand Bags 5}. 48 



Women's new style Princess and Carrlaj 
fiiio seal grain Morocco leather, single 
.strai* handle. Moire or leather lined, wli 
purse to match. In black, brown, blue, green 

.\ very siietMal value at .$2,00; as an extra 

eliokv 1 



Bags of 

double 

in.slde 

nd- Utn. 






Women^s 35c 



Embrold* 
ered 



Hose 25c 



Silk Headquarters Head of Lakes. 
Lak« Arenue. Mlctkl«aa and Snperlw Streets. Doloth. Minn. 



The celebrated Esco brand, made of fine selected 
cotton, full fashioned, hand silk embroidered In pret- 
ty designs, also polka dot eftects, in black, tan and 
navy. 

Fifty dozen so on sale tomorrow inornlns: at 2.")C 
pair, instead of 3.>c. Be early to get first elioice. 



Beautiful Practical Suits : ^ At Small Cost 

Many special little lots have been coming in, special values we couldn't have induced the manufacturers to part 
with at tiie prices before Easter, so if for one reason or another you've delayed buying, take it as a real congratulation. 
Tomorrow choosers mav share these: 



Mannish Tailored Suits 



Regular Price $25.00— 
Special Tomorrow at- . 



$ 1 6.95 



Stylish Tailored Suits 

$25.00 



Regular Price $35.00 to 
$37.50— Special at 



Made of plain and fancy niaterial.s in a variety '■ 
of new .si>rin;r colors; plain tailored, stylish half- i 
fitted 1 -w g .red skirt.s, some button 

trimmed, othi rs with touches of color to set off ' 
collar and cuffs; excellent values at $25.00 — [ 
Ki)'-c'ial at Sltt.»5. | 



.•^uits of fine serge, satin cloths, and fancy weaves, 
in all the new spring colors; beautiful high-class 
materials, every one that stamp a suit at once 
with good style, mostly plain tailored coat styles, 
Xow hii)les.s effects so becoming to almost any 
figure. Large variety to select from. 



Tailored and Dressy Suits 

Regular Prices Up to C '3 ZT A A 
$45,00— Special at --. - ^>03*UU 

This collection comprises tailored and dressy 
models that take their style from high-class im- 
ported models. Women in quest of garment.s of 
Individual style character will do well to come 
and see the large variety of styles to choose from. 
Made of high-class materials, in a wonderfully 
attractive color range. 




Splendid Values in Girls' Coats | Women^S Stylish CoatS at $7*50 

tVhether ifs be a light coat for "Dre-'^s-up- or a ^^, ,^ „...,.„». or. j.,„v, r«.,»*„ r.f fa»,^x' tnvi<=ibif. strined materials i 



Whether ifs be a 
'aunch blue or red 



coat for "Dre.'is-up" or a 
or a tan covert, or fancy 



serge 
annlsh materials for hard service, it is here, along 
vvith a gre;xt variety of other interesting styles — at 
our i nil-resting prices. 

Children's $3.00 Coats at $1.98 

Sev't^l distinct pretty styles to choose from. Made 
lip 'it pretty striped and checked materiahs; neatly 
trimmed; ages 2 to ti year*. Regular $:L00 values — 
bpociai at $1.08. 

Girls' $5.00 Coats for $3.50 

Handsome P«>ngee coats, broadcloth, fancy weaves, and 
novelty mixtures; pretty girlish styles; ages 2 to 6 
yo.irs. Reduced from I5.U0 to $a.50. 

Girls' Stylish Coats at $5.00 

Peautiful Coverts, shadow striped mixtures in gray, tan, 
^oi't blue and reds; all lined. Pretty boxy .-styles; ages 
C to It) j'-ar sizes. Special at $5.00. 



Smart Coats at $7.50 



new ma- 
Regular 



Smart, boxj' mannish styl^ln a variety of 
terlais; swagger effects; ages 6 to 16 years, 
price 110.00. reduced to $J.50. 

Stylish Girls' Coats at $9.95 

The fashionable serges, ctwerts, fancy stripes and checks 
— some strictly tailored, others neatly trimmed. Many 
Btvles to select from. ' Regular $12.50 value — spe- 
cial at $9.93. 



Women's stylish 36-inch Coats of fancy Invisible striped materials in 
tan and gray, smart half fitted models, button trimmed; a very stylish and 
serviceable garment. A very special value at $7.50. 



Women's Silk Raincoats at $ 1 5.00 

The woman without a Rain Coat is jeopardizing the glories of her ward- 
robe these April days. These shower-proof Satin and Moire Coat.s arc ideal 
for uncertain weather. 

Two particularly Rood values In Sa_Un and^Ioire. |«M>>^e or close fit- 
tiiig models — whicluner you » ud more beconiiiig; $22.50 vatue. $15. 



Early Showing of 



New Tailored Wash Suits 

Ready with the newest conception in tailored wash suits, and 
what pretty, practical garments they are. Practical tailored 
styles of fine Piques, Repp, heavy Linen Cra.shes, Fine Linens In 
white and all the fashionable colors, gray, mustard, Du Bonnets, 
violet, tan, natural linen color, green, light blue and torquise. 



Clioose from many clever styles at $1 2.50 to $20.00. 





Sale of 500 Men s Fancy Vests 

Maker's Sample Line and Surplus Stock at Less Than Maker's Cost 

A well-known maker, and one whose name stands for the highest class of workmanship and style, sought 
a quick outlet for his entire sam[>le^fcec and surplus stock of fancy vests through the medium of a price that 
rei»rcsenK(l \nn a small portion of the original cost. 

The materials are mercerized fabrics, flannels and silk mixtures, made up in the season's 
newest styles. The entire purchase divided into two big lots $1.39 and $3.39 

Fancy Vests 

PHces"*^ $3*50 to $5 

Special for Tomorrow at 



Excellent Trunks 

$7.98 



Specially 
Low Priced 





$2.39 

The materials are fine imported 
?.I icerized fabrics, flannels and silk 
niixtur. s. perfect fitting vests. Three, 
four an«i five-button — plain welt 
pockets, and also fhip pockets; light 
and dark shades, light ground with 
tigiires, l.tns, browns and grays, plain, 
figures, ;.iii'->' striii.'S. chocks ami 
plaids. 

The seas(»ii'-i neivest styles; resf- 
iilar $0.50 to !$•'> \uiue.>. ut $2.;(9. 



Hundreds of Stunning New Hats 

At $5, $7.50, $ JO and $15 

The wonderful before Raster selling almost cleared 
away our great stock of $5.00 to $15 Trimmed Hats 
But our unrivaled workroom organization lias not only 
met the demands, but has iuindrcds of spic and span 
new hats ready for tomorrow. Really a better selection 
than ever. 

Hats to meet the requirements of every in- 
dividual taste — large, medium and small 
hats, flower trimmed, feather trimmed and 
fruit trimmed, hats that are becoming, hats 
to match any costume. The variety is 
wonderful. Choose from a variety to- 
morrow at, each $5.00, $7.50, $10 and $15. 

Charming Hats for Young Girls 

There is a distinctive superiority in style and quality in our hats for young girls. Many 
new one-, will be shuwn for the first time tomorrow. Our Dress Hats for girls are the cre- 
ations <jf our specialist and every hat has individuality seldom noted elsewhere. 

New Silver Purses 50c 

The latest styles of Metal Purses, plated in 
silver, gold or gun metal. Copy of the Mesh 
Bags, beautiful purse at $1, special price 50c. 

Children's Lawn Handker- 
chiefs 2 for 25c 

Children's fine lawn hemstitched Handker- 
chiefs; regular value 5c, special for tomorrow, 2 
for 5c. 

Pure Hair Net Covered Hair 
Rolls 25c 

The pure human Hair Rolls, fully 24 niches 
long, in all colors, covered with invisible net; 
regularly 35c, at only 25c. 



Fancy Vests 

^Zt" $2.50 to $3 

Special Tomorrow, Each, at 

$1.39 

Made of fine Imported linen vt-.st- 
ings: white grounds with neat small 
figures, also colored grounds in pret- 
ty tans and grays, small figure effects, 
check and plaids, four and five-but- 
ton style, plain welt and flap pockets. 

The si'a-son's newest styles: worth 
regularly $2.50 and $3.00: (*hoose 
tomorrow from a lar^e variety 
at the low price of. «'a«'h, $1.39. 



It's a common habit when peo- 
ple are getting ready to go away 
to spend so much money in prep- 
aration that the brunt of the econ- 
omy has to fall on the trunk — and 
many a poor trunk is bought in 
consequence, that will hardly hold 
together for a single trip. 

The trunk we feature here is 
strongly and substantially 
built and conveniently ar- 
ranged at a particularly low 
price. Our regular $10.50 
leader is specially priced 
for Saturday at. each $7.98. 

$6.5o Suit Cases $4.98 

High grade Suit Ca->e, made of 
best quality cowhide leather, 22, 
24 and 26-inch size; worth up to 
$6.50, special at $4.98. 

$2.75 Leather Bags $1.95 

Grain leather Bags. lO-inch -i/c. 
Regular $2 75 value, special $1 '»5. 




300 Pairs Women's Oxfords and Pumps 



Newest Spring Styles — Regular Price (T ^ 
$4.00 -Sale Price, Pair q/Z 

The sale is based on the suri)lus stock of a well 
know-n maker, secured by us at a price concession so 
favorable that we are able to offer these high grade 
oxfords and pumps at $2.85 a pair, instead of $4.00. 

They come in patent colt and gun metal and 
the new shades of tans. The pumps have 
pretty little buckles of pearl or gilt, some 
tiny leather bows. Every pair new, up-to- 
date. Worth $4.00, special, per pair $2.85. 

Men's Shoes and Oxfoxds 




Regular Prices $3.50 and $4.00 
Special for Saturday at 



$2.95 




Both high and low shoes in this collection, some par- 
ticularly attractive models for young men. The new 
tan, Russia calf, also gun metal and patent colt, in the 
newest and smartest styles of the season. 

Regular $3.50 and $4.00 values; 
special Saturday, per pair $2.95. 



Boys' $1.75 Shoes $K39 

The knid that will stand 
the outdoi^r knockabout, m)1i<1 
throughout with heavy oak 
soles, calfskin uppers; special, 
per pair $1.39. 

Misses' $2 Shoes at $1.39 

In tan and black vici kid 
leather, lace or button style, 
very dressy and durable for 
dress or school wear; special at 
$1 39 a pair. 



I 



Pretty Gloves 

To Go With the New 
Gowns 

No matter what your glove needs might be, 
you will find here just what you want, the 
kind that will give the best of service. 

Our New Mannish Gloves for street and 
dress wear have no equal for style and qual- 
ity, in black and all the new colors — $1.00, 
91.25 and $1.50. 

The New Chamois Gloves are quite the 
thing for dress and street wear, pretty man 
nish effects— $1.00 and $1.25. 




Prettiest Neckwear Town 

People tell us we've beaten everything in 
Duluth in Neckwear. For we've scores ot 
quaint conceits in French and American 
Collars, Jabots and Tops, that we've not 
been able to find with all our sharp re- 
searching in any other store. Tlieac spe- 
cials for tomorrow: 



DUTCH COL- 
LARS— Lace and 
embroidery trim- 
med, special 



J 7c 



DAINTY JA- 
BOTS— Of ^heer 
materials, finish- 
ed with dainty 
lace; regular 25c 



values, 
special . . . 

NEW PETER PAN COLLARS— In all white and 
embroidered dots and embroidered scalloped edge.. 
Beautiful variety of pretty Stocks, lace and cmbr<iidercd 
fects, many pretty conceptions in real Irish lace, 
priced from 25f to 



1 9c 
J 9c 



■f- 



$3.00 









» =■•*' ■ ' 1 




T« 



;- 



■VMBB-WM* 



I > 
1 

I 



mmM 















* 


















. 



















T 



■•M 



Mm i m -m... 



■ Mil In 






■ p ■ I ■ ■ ■ ■ .. ■ 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: FRIDAY, APRIL 23. 1909. 



\ 



NEW WEAPON 
IS FAVORED 

By Military Experts and 
Rearmament of Eu- 
rope Is Nearer. 

An Automatic Rifle That 

Would Be Formidable 

as Aeroplane. 



April : 




rr... ■■'■■^- '■ 


... ;.,... I 


111 ' 


all llu' 




etl that 


I . . , - 


■ R- Witll 


k I" Hie ei): 




!. Tllf* !1.'\'. 


- J, .s t »' n 1 , ;i iW ki t - 


:..-!! i.f 


Ijiven at lieii- 


ffW tla>s ■■■■ 


'tters b 


\.. i.i.i^t'B Dwr 


-iinary ^ ■ .•.■■■" 


tiMt lis CUlti; 


ioption wuiihl 


:■■■■■■■ ' •' be onl J' .L 


'' liiiio. The 


'.Tr merit 


.. ren systfiti 




ii>lfd, alter 


ii ■ , ii t 11 .-'.i>' t , I ' ' <v . 


. , - rifle at the 


eaiiM* lf\"«?l and i<> <■ 


.irrecl his aim im- 




- ■ a w a y f rurvi 




■iiiTiK- Such 




■ lb oi iiuMrii tie- 




11 would enable so 




- -id !'n an iit- 




• 111 advance 




at H. 




I <H) s ; ' r 






,1 i:^ aj.; 
if l»r«l»li l•^•■■ 



rfKari-i 
TrirrPf 





n oi' 11 general ttitlli > 
• 11(1 I lie niivf •way, i. . -i^ 

•■lid,:; i'.'S to 
will l-e tlie 


: f 


'II of 

,. , u ,, ..,,.. i . ..; .n all 
Of ,,tilT tt-fuhle. The 
t'.. • I--I' a tariff Is like 

It "iifv-r i-^. 


""We'ln uniry ;irr<>titert 
with a c 11 hie -V '""1__ 'l»^ 


1; 'i"hi'|-r VVL'Uia Lie U' i ' i > • " '" | 

are told, if only \v« luv: ifl"- 1'"* i 

what -:■■ • ■■ ■' '-' ^ ■-■-Ties . 

Tiie *1'"' 
r- — , ,, ■ ,: /.^u the 

Tlie real 

Tit Tafl In 

1,1. .-.^f?. In 
«i; - ;ki- ti»e 



ii:r-i.; .M„i)uu is hflirg: 

1» It ii faiiurrn f 

I«« n tfinff a r'«"fi*"t'a ir^-m '• -t 

Tritted 

, ,! fi-i.-c- 

r> " ■ ■ 

', u I • • n i I ■ 



tl)«> p: 



■<i ,■ .11 



(, t ^i I i i ' 

.'■■rclal ■\'' 



>pe. 

1 n ♦ i 



:.tl 



-I a sii.'ii.ii 



n';tyt ;t, art- \-t-:-v 



■. Uiokii;'ti 
not* that 



lit T: 



unt'ertaii 

(J lice an 
tert/^.t'M,l 
WOI id. 



all u nee I I i» 1 ri 1 y. 

(1 tlie same, but 

', intf uncertainty 

I riff. Tariffs do 

! 1 world from 

. is to Intro- 

'.t of self-in- 

iuio the political 



■Fur fc:«»t," III" Toplf. 

Tn r,"n-r\-!n2- <>vit Uo-ir lio.wpiiable prar- 

• . •;■. - i.v ^ .:'-'. i1 per- 

• r had 

,,i;..i. Miifi f>ui.*i; man 

H:irt, who a few nlRlits 

' f>f honor at a 

iiehall court. 
'■ fhi'.s.- fimc- 



11 

Si ' 

di 

V 

i. 
le- 

b*'ai niK 
111," "f S 

ih 

pi 



tl,e i-'ar Kasl aH tlie tuple 

■liinp'''" 'h** opf«>:Mu!iity of 

from the 

loiiK of- 

'Aun vvii u 1 !i«- I 'iiinese em- 

him tti speak with grtater 

' any other KriKllslimiui. 

d In part: "The Chinese 

..i,.i.il wav. a homoKeiieon.s 

of ci,Mir>«-. spr^fqd iiv.-r 



divided 

w filch 



111 11 "s "of tlie 

Mitii some two 

ju*- < ach larKH 

■dves, the 

of «.flO».- 

ufi'st of 60.- 

;11*> thtre is 

are Intlniie 



ait- ,1 M t< •-• i 
t>e(iiile, but. 

J,,.,.,;,. ' rii'Hi on<"i 

e. 
d- 

€) 

BJ). •'■- 

(H)(> or 7, 
OOO.tHlO . 

Eieiicral Himimuue, in.».: cii. ..- 
ifferenceB. the outcome of climate 
t • ment, occupation, etc. The 
:v of today may be considered 
I,. iM^duct of heredity, education and 
custom. AHk liim why he doe.s so and 
go he replies, "Berry old cii.stnm. and 
that old custom lias comedown through 
Dcrhaps a hundr< •! <>i- m<>r.- >i.n. rations, 
iLnd iK now h part of his nature 
m actiulr..l ould possibly be.' 

BROTHER SHOOTS 
TO AID SISTER 

Her Fiance Grabbed an 

Ax on Eve of 

Wedding. 

Platlshurf?, X v.. April 23.— Benny 
Newman, an ISl-jear-ohl boy, shot and 
prohahly fatally w-imded Bi-n Dud^li, 

Ills 



»tt V il : .-, 

tnjuri.' <>v i,h at :i. 
iHi'h-n air'l I"' 
liave h"<-ii in.' t 



qii'ar 
Tl 

bfo! 



Xewmnn were in 

• but Itie:, 

: an ax. 

; I li< Ip, and her 

: <-.■ times. Heshie 

l la llio shoulder by a stray 

Nfewmau was aire Bled. 




Silk Waist Patterns. 

Nolhiiii; M> stylish as a pretty silk waist to 
wear with odd skirts. We shall put on sale 
Saturday another assortment, including 
black, white, plain c(»lors and fancy styles. 
The pattern-, complete— commencing at 
$1.98 per jiattern. 




GLASS 5L0CK 





>VHERE\ 

QUALITY l&v 

PARAMOUNT 



Skirt Pattern Lengths. 

If you are looking for a wool skirt in black, 
cream, plain colors, or mixtures, in any 
len.cjths from 31/2 to 5 yards — at a money- 
saving price — we have a counter full in the 
Dress Goods Department priced for quick 
selling — commencing at $2.00 per pattern. 




Men's 



niiihings! 



LADIES' TAILORED SUITS, ETC. 



$1.50 

\rhi->i\ c 

50c 



We're on record ;is 'icIIltn el K'w.ii drc-s 
accessories I'or tucii, .nid we sIi.hI! live up to 
our reputation. W c would like tlic o]ipor- 
Uiiiitv of dcinoiistratiiiK to \ on that \vc of 
fer i'mr f-ade only "good things," and that 
oiir prices arc RIGHT! 

NEW SPRING SHIRTS— -MI the new- 
shades decnu'd correct lor .Sprmj^ and Suin- 
nier are here — pleated or plain h.isom, cutis 
attached or dctaciicd. fo..' ..r ..loscd >lylc>. 
iu fine rercalcs and M.idi.-.. 

each 

NEW SPRING NECKWEAR— Ixchi.ivc 
shades in i- • ■ '"t "-i'lv foin un- 
hand lic^. < 

h'jinr in-ll.iiids. I'.atwniK- -'H'ld Club Tic^. oi 
line silks, the swellcsi designs .sliouii in 
nultulr--.,a $2.00, $1.00 and OC-* 

down to Ai*JC 

CHAMOIS KID GLOVES— lli.y u . <h 
like clotli. correct in style, of d» I CA 
the l.-iin-'i- \'IKt^ make, pair . . 4^ 1 •*JV/ 
MEN'S SILK GLOVES— Mocha finish— 
carniot he detected from ^'ciuiinc Mociia — 
in -Ih.dci oi \xrAri and k'^iv — <frl 00 

SPRING WEIGHT UNION SUITS— 

Men's prime !•.-;> pti:i!i rnion Siiii-. spring 
weight, form futiug ginm-iu-. d» 1 C/\ 

with ela; tic sciins, eacl) «P * •*.FV/ 

NEW HOSIERY— Pure li-Ic thread and 
silk lisle Hose, medium and very light 
weights. See the new -fipcs in >ubdued 
shades of win n. tan and gray. rcKni- 

lar 50c yalues. . ;. Saturday 3 d^l f%i\ 

pairs for «P * •V/V 

PLAIN BLACK HOSE— In medium o' 
li^ht wtiKhts, the iiidesiruclihle OC-, 
iriiid at i-,T i>.iir 7a^. sot and £tiJ\^ 




Suits 



fudged bv anv 'standard, these Ladies' tailored suits which we have selected for Saturday's spc- 
ci'il ^eilino- are wf'.rth more— much more than the prices asked. Note the quality of the materials, 
the periec't wokmanship, try them on, and see the perfect fit. You'll lind iheni the greatest values 

O ^^ •' ' ^'1 '1^1 ^^■'^***^ Panamas, Serges, Worsteds, Prunellas, etc., in plain and fancy weaves, all 
W|«||-Q ^]i^. ,i^.^v shades. Coats are of the long, hipless variety, skirts «.f the new gored style. 
•JUl^^ There are plain tailored, and the more ornately trimmed styles in the lut— all specially 

priced at $29.50. , t- tx- . .1 1*1 c 

^ — - of Serges, Worsteds, Fancy \\ eaves, etc. — the approved styles of 

the season in all the wanted colorings — plain, two-toned and fan- 
cy. Long, hipless coats, silk lined, gored style skirts — plain 
tailored, and those trimmed with braids, buttons, tailored strappings, etc.— 
the best values shown in Duluth at their price — $25.00. 

^ • .So fine are the materials, so excellent the tailoring, so exactly 

^||||-Q correct the fit of these suits, that every woman who sees them 
^^^^^^ and learns their price, is astounded. Materials are Serges, 
Panamas and Fancv Suitings. New long style, coats silk or satin lined- 
gored model skirts— trimmed with Bengaline, fancy buttons, etc., m all _the 
colors of the season, suits, in a word, that would be excellent values at $25.00 
to $27.50. Our price on Saturday, $19.50. 

Garments that are made expressly for the 

young ]\Iiss, and that are made with the same 

care as the Senior Suits. They come in two 

and three-piece stvles, finely tailored, some having Bengaline collars and cuffs, 

or fancy button trimmings. '^Lade of fine Serges, Prunellas and Worsteds, in 

plain, two-toned and fancy colors— ranging from $15, $19.50, $25 and up. 

Ladies' and Misses' Covert and .Serge 

Coats, in the new hi])less models, 50 and 

52 inches long, i)lain tailored styles, with 

only button trimmings, perfectly fashioned and fine in fit. Specially priced 

for Saturday, $14.50. 



Boys* Better Clotj;)iing! 




Junior Suits 



Ladies' Coats 



Tailored and Lingerie Waists 

s'c new lot of Tailored and fancy Lingerie 
;s, iilain tailored styles with neatly 
J floats, laundered collars and cuffs, etc , 
s of all-oyer embroidery, and a number 



tyles with embroidery front> 

inserting-s and trimming? 

uJerful yalues at, each 



$1.25 



CHILDREN'S DRESSES. 

Dainty Tub Suits and Dresses for cycry occasion, 
embodying many new styles in Russian, sailor 
and pretty one-piece models. The plain tailored 
kind and imiiimerablc styles with pipings, btitions 
or lace and embroidery trimmed materials, in- 
cluding white lawns, dotted Swiss, fine .Anderson 
ginghams, repps, percales and chambravs — in 
jilain colors or dainty stripe 
checks and plaids, all sizes from 
4 to 14— from $7.50 down to. 



eiJ.iiii ui a \ . 1 II 

$L00 



Boys' Better Clothing — 

Rich novelties, neat fabrics, and tallorinfr 
better than any other maker's be.st are of- 
fered you in the suits tor boys we are now 
f-bowing. I'rices, as usual, at low wat<-r 
mark. 

Boys' Better Suits— $7.50 and $10 

Latent model Norfolk .style, in the new 
oliyea. fawns and grays. You would liave 
to be a ehjihing expert to tell these tr..m 
ihe ordinary $12. 00 to $15.00 suits. If you 
are one you will know they are "Xtragood." 

A Boy's Good Suit for $3.95. 

(Juud to look at and e-sjiecially K<)»jd for 
wear and tear. All new sprinj? styles and 
cclorinss. They pass easily for jr.. 00 in 
most stores. 

Boys' Blue Serge Suits, $4.50 to 
$11.C0. 

"Lest you forget," we tell you again that 
we are "strong" on navy blue all wool Ser»?e 
Suit.s, except in the matter of price, tliais 
Jure enough "low down." 

Boys' Spring Reefers, $3.75. 

Our stock is getting somewhat broken. 
Take your choice of a little lot of lii.OO to 
56.50 values Saturday at only $3.7.'>. aizes, 
2 1^ to 14 years. 

Seen the new Wash Suits yet? 

But beware! To see is to buy. Not ;. 
pingle customer has "passed them up" so far. 
Prices from $1.25. 

"Mother's Friend" Shirts and Blouses. 
The kind backed with a guarantee. $l.oo, 
"5c and 5(»(\ 






GLOVES FOR SPRING! 




Most important «'f .ill dic-- ar- 
ce-sorics arc the kIoxcs. Il.i\c > "ti 
got youi~: Ave you looking ioi 
a hai-d to find >h.iik? Then come 
here! 

Ladies* Chamois Gloves. 

Just ' d, a large shipment oi 

ladi< 1 Chamois Gloves, in 

natural color and white, one-clasp 
stvle with I'aris pointe stitching 
on hack and out scams, mannish 
effect, special for S.it- U^l 00 
urday only, per pair . . . V •*• "^^ 

New 'Debutante' Gloves. 

Two-clasp style in every imagin- 
ahlc sliade— navy, green, brown, 
lil.ick. white, pearl, champagne, etc. 
.'special for Saturday, 
per pair 



$1.00 



"Fowncs" Real Kid Gloves. 

Fownes* Street and Dress Gloves- in sliades of lavender, 
pmk, apricot, brown, black, etc , all fresh new d*1 CO 
stock, per pair *P 1 .iJV/ 



White Cape Gloves. 

Ladies' whitt i ..pr (llixcs. \;i\ ^utll and dressy, new 
mannish style, with one large pearl button, out 
seam, i'aris poinlc stitching on back, pair 

Children's Kid Gloves. 

Kid Gloves for children, a new stock just ar- tf^l (\(\ 
ri\cd. all sizes in tan and white, per pair «P 1 •V/vF 



$1.50 



White Waist and Dress Materials! 

A beautiful selection of White Goods worthy of this large store, in the three essentials 
that have always won your confidence — quality, design and price — from the lower 
grades to the higher grades of fine .St. Gall Swisses, you will find our stock complete, 
the best selling lines this season have been small and medium size checks, stripes, 
mid small dainty patterns; some of the materials are a trifle heavier than heretofore; 
all these are shown in a lar<?e variety of prices to meet every need— commencing at l2y2C, 
15c, 18c, 25c, 35c, 50c to $1.25. 

Special Saturday— 25c White Waistings 14V2c yd. 

I'or \\ liite Waists and Dresses, a fine sheer quality, splendid assortment to choose 
from in <lainty check and stripe. A fortunate purchase enables us to -fl y| l/g^ 

sell them at — yard XT' C 

WASH GOODS. 

GINGHAMS of all qualities have become a popular favorite, and thousands of 
yards are being sold for waists, dresses and children's wear. We anticipated^ the de- 
mand and have in stock now one of the finest assortments in the city—the Standard 
liraiid at 121/20, 15c, 18c, 25c, 35c and 50c, in every desirable color and style, including 
the new borders and stripes. 

Special for Saturday— 1262 yards lOc Fine 
Ginghams per yard 7V2c. 

Zef.hyr Ginghams (not short ends of seconds) but full pieces of all desirable styles 

dresses and children's wear. On 7V' 



Millinery Department! 








V / .-. • ^^ /'-v 



New millinery is con- ; 
stantlj^ arriving and be- 
ing added to our stock, 
and ill every shipment 
there arrives some new 
and novel styles, many 
of these are expensive, 
but our competent 
force of milliners and 
designers can make at 
very little expense du- 
plicate- of e\cn the 

most exciu-ive crea- 
tions. 

For tlio-e who pre- 
fer-to do their own de- 
signing and trimming, 
we invite inspection of 

our beautiful and extensive stock of milliiiery goods- 
trimmed shaj.ts, imported flowers and foliage, etc. 

SATURDAY SPECIALS! 

For Saturday's selling we have selected three tables of 

Street and Dress Hats, in all the correct cohjrs for this 

season, such as black, brown, navy, old ro.se, wistaria, 

etc.. every one an excepti<inal value 

at its own price— $10.00, $7.50 

and 

Girls' and Children's Caps. 

See rair magnificent new stock <jf Tams, Ping f^ g^ 
Pong and Buster Brown Caps, for girls and chil- i^vIC 
dren, in all colors, $1.50, 75< and ^^'K^'K^ 




-un- 



$5.00 



One Day More! 

Rose Bushes, Flowering 
Shrubs, Perennial Plants 

To close out the remainder of emr 
enoruioiis purchase of 12,0(K) plants, w f 
have to cut the price to 10 CENTS 
EACH. 

The plants are hardy field grown 
stock, acclimated to all kinds of weather, 
and are guaranteed t<' grow and bloom. 

They are ready to pl.tnt now — or can 
be kept indefinitely, as the roots are en- 
veloped in moist sphagnum moss and 
waxed paper. There are about 1,(KX) 
plants left, of the following varieties, 
and at the price we have put upon them, 
they will go c|uickly. So be on hand 
early! 

Rose Bushes 

Dorothy Perkins, Lady Cuay, F.m- 
press of China, Baltimore Belle, Heleiie, 
I'hiladelphia. 

Climbing Vines 

Clematis. Boston Ivy. Honeysuckle — 
usually soi<l for up to -SI — on Saturday 

lOc Each 



Bring Your Shoe Wants Here! 

Let us please your feet inside of a pair of our handsome shoes. They look well and feel comfort- 
able — and in shoes, comfort counts for much. 

Your feet onlv need one introduction to our kind of shoes in order to establish a lasting friend- 



ship. 

Ladies' Shoes and 
Oxfords 

The best of the 
^ . . o d one s — 
Wright Peters & Co.s Shoes in 
patent colt skin, gun metal, vici 
kid and tan Russia calf in Blucher 
and button styles with Cuban heels 
--Shoos, 0.\fords and Pumps. 



At $5.00 



$2 



Ctrt ^^'omen's patent 



At np£tm%J\J kid and vici kid 
Shoes and Oxfords, with Cuban 
or medium heels, correct in style 
and of fine quality. 

Shoes and Ox- 
fords, chocolate 
kid skins and vici kid, plain toe or 
with patent tip, light, medium or 
heavy soles, neat and durable. 



At $5.00 



At $2.00 



At $4.00 



Flowering Shrubs 



Spirca Buslies 
\\ islaria '' ' 



jsual price. ) S 
5c to $1.50 [ 
75c to $1.25 ) I 

Perennial Plants 



Saturday 
Price - 
Oc Each 



Tapanese Ins, HoUyliocks, Hardy 
Phlox, Fo\ Glove, Golden_ Glow 
usually sold at from 25c to 75c 
each. Our price, each 



10c 



The famous 
Krippendorf & 
Dittman Co. Shoes. Oxfords and 
Pump^, in all leathers; see the new 
stub shape, makes the foot look a 
full size smaller. 

J\X, tpO»OV/ suede top Shoes 
and Oxfords. Krippendorf & Ditt- 
man Co. stock; also black and tan 
leathers; sec the co-ed last, it's a 
dream. 

Glass Block 
Special Shoes — 
made to our own specifications, all 
leathers, new lasts, both Shoes and 
Oxfords, in all leathers. 



At $1.50 



At $3.00 



Shoes or Ox- 
fords of vici kid, 
with patent tip, light or heavy 
soles, exceptionally good value 
at $1.50. 

Men's Shoes and 
Oxfords 

At $6.00 

Shoes; they wear well, they fit, 
they are correct in style, without 
doubt the best men's shoe on the 
market — all leathers, black, tan, 
wine, etc., in Shoes, Oifords and 
Pumps. 



Shoes that else- 
where you'd pay 
more for, all the new styles and 
lasts of tins season, in all leathers. 
Shoes, Oxfords and Pumps. 

P. & W. Special 
Shoes and Ox- 



At $4.00 

fords, made to our order, guaran- 
teed to us and by us to you; all 
leathers, Shoes and Oxfords. 



At $3.00 

Black or tan Shoes 
and Oxfords, new 
lasts of this spring — 
Bole leather cour.ters 
and toe boxes; un- 
matehable at their 
price. 



Important! 

A Sale of Sheet Music 

All Popular Music, Operatic, etc., in- 
cluding the song hits of "A Prince of 
Tonight," -The Red Mill. " "A Stub- 
born Cinderella," and Al. Wilson's lat- 
est success, "When Old New York 
Was Dutch" — in fact, all Sheet Mus'c 
li.sted at 5()c, 60c and 75c, al one price 
on Saturday — per ^ C^-» 



• « • • • 



The Xettleton" 
G e n 1 1 e m e n's 



At $3.50 

Blucher and 

button styles — 

tan, Russia calf, 

waxed calf, gun 

metal, etc., long 

lived, shape retain 

— Shoes and Ox- 

fords, better 

value is not to be 
found. 

Only 
$3.50 



copy. . . 

Get all you need — this is only a one- 
day event! 




FISHERMEN 

How Is Your Tackle ? 

Needs some filling in, doesn't it? 
Come here and select what you need — 
only the best qualities, and those loo, at 
closely shaved prices ! 

SPECIAL FOR SATURDAY. 

Fine quality Steel Rods, in 6, 7, 8, 9 and 
10-foot lengths — cork grip, ea.sy run- 
ning guides, and the new right angle tip 
— elsewhere they'd cost you $1.50 or 
$1.75 ; our price on Satur- ^ ^ OC 
day, each ^ *• •^^ 





1 



1 



< 




T 



fdffS!W!f'?PW^^ 



W ^r'*" ""f'F«™»1irT'*"«lfP«"iP"!!! 



L.-m* '- u g- jM-L -y a ?as .a.j r 



T 



I 




•HE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: FRIDAY, APRIL 23. 1909. 




THOMASSON 

-tHE FURNIIURE MAll- 

«tD RLMW8 mux •CII.DIII^ 

uumm UMM AffiNut mni. 



THIS FINE 



mu, 

HTHOSC. 
t AKT. 
KX At Tl-\ 
1.1 Ki: 

«;i.T. 




ENTIRE LINE OF 

GO-CARTS 



T4» III-: 



CLOSED OUT 



A! 
ki. 



It.' 
Jl:. 

rp, 

F.. 

jli ^ 



•lt.7.% 

fto.o«» 
fUl.r.a 
•i7.»n 

•1».7.% 

•2 !..'><> 



• • :imi 

95c 



> t.tMl liil.i AH 1 



xi 



$1.95 



II 



i 111 ^!: I'llKKt: 



fiO-« \It I > 
«.n-< \t! I '■ 
«.)>.( %l( 1 - 

ti«»-l \Hf'. 

€io-r %n r> 
<;<i.r %K i> 

«.<»-« AKT"* 



#;!.7r. 

»«..'>«! 

yu.oo 
*•: ..M» 

*U».7."5 

)lt3.7>*i 
«14.75 



DESTROYER 
IS ATJVORK 

Historic Buildings In Paris 
Are Fast Being Dem- 
olished. 



««»»#»»««»«»«»»«||«||r»«««»«»»»« »»*#»*»*»»»»«»»»»«*#«»#»»«»##« »»»»#»«* 



Architecture of the Early 

Periods Is Rapidly 

Disappearing. 



Api I 
and 

.• I,, 



I'd r IS, 

f I'- 
ll! i: •; 
1 1 U ! M : t i i4 <■ - - 1 ; 
iill.T.- ■ 

> • r t i ; ■ 
■'!, 

n\ ' ■ 
m 
I" 
I" 

a ..- ■ 

M 

vn 
II 

tt 
d. 

t 



"n*> sees in tlie 
N^ tk newspapers 

ti;:.. i.r"t-'»^ts and com- 

'.:-..■ i^i"- ir.iiicf of ancient 

n. Ml liisturical 

i'-^i'i- 111.; <it-;struct!">n 

ifs al tlift hands of tiic 

'<( wliat 

■ liatid of 

still nior- busy 



■ )!" pro tf sit. Tu I lie 
man t'> wliom th*; 
t'vartls ni<-an fvcry- ' 
■ •n'th ••on.siil>MiUK. tlie.st- 
! t; ; 1) u I 1 1 > 1 1 1 < • 
! lit* .sliidciit Iht ^ 
1 an only be | 
iiarkable In- 

nnjiiunic'ut 

..IS riiy. 
itlnti tium On. { 

-i:;i: f.:.- {\<- d- i ■ ' ' -\. ! 



.1 

i; 



name fur 
v.). and t; 



ilif 

Hnt.'l 



tile 

lis 



III 



V:^t'*:3-)^-"' 



Some men like iinibrel- 
011 the wind 

.; -v. :i Sui>cri',>r 

Al! I >»iluth men need 
rainc 

Umbrellas arc good to 
lend or borrow , i)Ut a rain 
coal is vi -iir own and it's 
usfi'ul on a i-lriney -lax- as 
well a^ -Ml n rainy one — 
anyhow, during nine 
months of the year. 

$1S buy- a -' -od one at 
thi~« -litre. 

Raitiic of rain coat 
price.-. *1" to :l;:>5. 

Our bv-t .lie- are cra- 
venetted by Priestley of 
Lond '!i and tailored by 
St e J n i > 1 oc li of R och es t e r. 

The Columbia 



WtuVV. .1 it upon tli.S i>ifV«jt. -VUlM-lut. 

JtM (■'■:: 'itif III lurri't-; .Hid ojieti .siJiir- 
"iv I h'T \\"ith III'' (■ai:.atlJes and 

!'.■ ;.ii!..\\> i';ifiii« ilu- >.iurt. w*'r»» 

a ;i!:r I'-aturt- oi ttu* h";i-.'. <; ■ ..,, 

1» the T<iUi- de L>affoi>-" ■ ;i 
centurj- !■.■■'■■ 'n tht* K>>u »'\i: 
under tli' w of N'otre I>: 1 

vv.irknitti ,;, ,..is present mi>ii, ... ure 
l'U>> dfiiitilisjlilns- tlie old Hi.tel de Dievt 
and l! •■ l::ttM>-stini'- Am|,>;tliea ter de 
Meilio -hie arclK's a:u.i 

fiirioi' i near the .Sot - 

bonne. 
Iius>'ae£ub-rde b» t 

.' . THSTHT HT AR ARA T 

tli.- work of destruction 

in jiroclaiui- 

city is the 

t-M.-iiMiK buiidiijgs. 

a fine stone butld- 

— ,. .. ..■i.,.^j, ware- 

ch was 
, .... . ...vo it.s name 

lOp of .Seiiti, for whom 

A hundred and twen- 

was the home of 

l!l-fat.d wife of 

nth cen- 

aid from 

uio ilie night, 

famou.'i Lyons 

'' Iv'M an af- 

• V ; t. -iimI u 




• •I i><'i ; I'j ll.-. 
De»i»ntte^eli. 

is tilt; beaut if Ui 

!*• I'liildiLi; 

V of 

■iitlieTi 

n o w i t 

-. distiK- 

and advertise- 

r!ch with the 



» 
« 



* 
* 

» 
» 

* 
* 

* 
« 
« 

« 
« 
* 

« 

m 



HOSIERY 



HK'nmrB'M Hak^ — C}ood Quat 
try H'.ack Hose — 
.'-Jiiainrock brand 



Black Imported lAmir Panhloiird 

Iloae, usually retaile.l at 3Sc 
to 50c, Shamrock brand — 
per pair 

tMrr Bo«l Hone- 
In tdark — 
1'": 1' '•.'• 





CORr//fSTyiy££A5r^Sl/P£maffS7W££r 



HOSIERY 



< hildren'M Cotton Rlbl»e(l 

StoekluKM— in black — 

i)er pair 

C'hildren'n Browa Stoeklnea 

— "Iron-Clad" — very dur- 
able — per pair 



lOc 
15c 



i'bildren'it Fine Lliile 

S.jc value, specialized 

at only — per 

pair 



Stooklnf^fi'— 




Wlidt Win Women 
Wear This Summer? 



Panama and Lingerie Dresses are the fashion lead- 
ers. -\ specially designed Panama Princesse Dress, 
exactly like illustration, and several other styles in 
a splendid variety of colors and also black. These 
are to be found at this store exclusively ; something 
new and nmel that will lake the place of the ordin- 
ary suits during the summer weather; the cost is 
so strikingly low that we can hardly keep the sizes 
complete. You will want one of these if yo^ try 
one on ; do it tomorrow. 



Prii 



$ 1 2.50 



Lingrie Princesse Dresses are gaining in popu- 
larity. Ever since they were introduced last sum- 
mer these dresses have been in great demand. You 
ought to see the beautiful creations we are showing 
at $G.r)0 and $7.uO, and the chea]>er grades even down 
to .$4.50 are so exquisitely pretty — white, lavender, 
pink, sky blue and tan; plenty of lace insertions; 







■•'^; 



lonjr '"nircc'^ire" sleeves. Prices 



from $8.50 down to 

ABOUT 15 SUITS OF THE $9.85 KIND— Mo.stly navy blue; 
they're worili d- .uble ; they'll sell (juick ai 

Spring Jackets, mo-^tly 1)lack. an immense variety of Black and 

Jacket---, neatly tailored and well lined— 

for onlv ' 



Black Panama and Serge Jackets, nearly tlirce-quarter length, a 
siylisli coai for middle-aged and elderly women 

Black Panama Coats of splendid material- and workmanship, taffeta lined, three- 



$4.50 
$9.85 

Covert Cloth 

$5.00 
$5.00 




quarter 
lor onlv 



length, well fitting and neat appearing garments — 



$6.50 



Women's Black Summer 
medium heel — .specially 
priced, per pair 



Girls* Coats in Endless Assortment! 



I 



One. two and three-strap patent or 
calf pumps, medium and 
low heels, per pair 



A Complete 
Shoe Dept. 

You will ai)prcci- 
ate the distinct serv- 
ice rendered by this 
store in supplying 
your footwear at a 
substantial sav i n g . 
No question ever 
need arise here about 
quality ; we sell good 
\ Shoes only. 

Oxfords — vlci. ] 

$1.50 

t-nt or dull 

$1.48 




Gentlemen! 



We are building a permanent trade on the keystone of value; value is .some- 
thing you a]>preciate; worth of your money: satisfaction made certain. It brings 
lots V)f" trade here, and ought to get yours. 

Girls* Coats in sizes ^ to U. neatly striped patterns. ''\'alue 
received" if you get one of them 

Coats for Girls, ages 6 to 14, of fine wea\ e Broadcloth, in shades of red, navy and 

Cojjenhagen blue, lined; brass i>utton triimniugs sets them off 
in liandsome >tvle , 



$1.98 



$1.98 

-up Pump.s — 

$ 1 .98 



Appropriate Values in Girls' Coats, ages G to 14, at $2.98, $3.50, 
$3.98, $4.50. $5.00 and 



$2.48 
$5.50 



Wi 



Bll.iUI'^ 
TO 

f ) I ■ I I L' W 



at Third 
Avenue West 



the buildins: "t 

the two 



:ii.a.- ;.j-; been 
a ::i .■'. cii ad- 
paviU')n.s and 



th.-y 

king wa.s pr 
inquire as tu 
minister, wiien 
In the .same 
•Mavt-nne, oi 
ftir.Tj'jp !>!a,!- 
1,, 

n. ' 

fr^rU lif the 

fortunately 

i!l.: 

!■■ 

on I 
bet, : 
la- . 

d . ■ 
i.- 
1' 



IIANVN 1 


BIIOKS 


roR 


-ME.N 


SWt 


WO.MEN'. 



Woman 



a 

Ui 



li. 



lion of shops beneath, 
ly and inner court re- 
were in tlie liaya of 
-• house tliai tlo- 
in hla coiicli. to 
"i of his g:reat 
jsinated. 
d the Hotei 
!■ ■ ''. tlie 

\ . •■' ■ \ the 
<icei and 
■ n of tlie 
huicl witJi tlicir -shops. t)ul 
the inner court and build- 
I 1 for boys. 

! utiful liouse 
Hotel Fieu- 
■ d to a .sinii- 

.- a saved from 

1 I'ieultet, the min- 
-. :., of Austria, ni 1*J71. 
;►• front "f wiiirh iiresent.s 
riiK'U car\>-d .sluntnvofk, is 
Mil :■ i.f til'- arctutectur'' of 



Coats for Children, age> 2 to 6. navy, red and brown, braid 
trimmed ; gi >od c< >ats ai a small pr^ce 

^ Children's Coats, ages 2 to G. in finely woven soft .Serge, in pretty shades of red, 

H^ navy an<l brown: lined, satin covered buttons to match; pointed patch pockets, 

I artistically trinimed; very hand.some garments — €,0 ^rt 

T oidy ^A%^\3 

ilk If it's a Girls' Coat you want, you will find it here in almost any 

shade and cut. and the cost is reasonable; very, very reasonable. 



Wine, tan, Russia calf, brown vici, black 
vicl and patent colt oxfords. A complete 
assortment of sizes — 
per pair 

Tan and Patent Colt Ankle Strap Pump.s — 
leather bow, Cuban heels 
per pair 

"Kri.s & Pass Co.'.s Special" Oxfords for 
women — tan, Ilussia calf, brown kid, 
brown ooze top patent, patent colt, dull 
calf ajid many others, medium or high 
heels. Goodyear welts. Save $1.00 by 
buying these at, per 
pair 

Women's "Tenderfoot" Oxfords or Shoes- 
flexible sole — '"it bends 
with the foot" — $3.."»0 and 

les 



We have a few specially made shoes for 
you at $2.50. Made by the "Wauk-away" 
people, and also by John W. Ross of Lynn, 
Ma.ss. Six distinct styles — patent colt — 
blucher, McKay sewed — 
per pair 



Patent Colt blucher — Good- 
year welt, per pair 



$2.50 
$2.50 



$2.50 

or Shoes — 

$3.00 



$1 Q#% i Women's Shoe.s in a great variety of styl 
1 • ^\3 \ Specially priced at $3.50 ^1 Cj 

, , f J I down to ^P • •^ 



50 



desirable 



Women's Rubber Heel, turn sole Juliets — 
leather all the way through. We say they 
are worth $2.00. and you can take our word 
for It. They're a strayed shipment that 
were sold to us by the railroad company — 
There are only about 25 pairs QJl|^ 



left. 



Have them at 



Velour calf blui h.r 

McKay sewed — 

per pair 

Velour calf blucher — 
plain tip — per pair 

Vlci kid blucher, Goodyear 

welt, per pair 

Box calf blucher, Goodyear 

welt, per pair 

Girls' Shf)es, box calf, 9 to 13 — 

per pair 

Girls' Black and tan Oxfords — 

all sizes, per pair 

Boys' Box Calf School Shoes 

— a to 13 — per pair 

Boys' Box Calf School 
Shoes — 13 Vi to 2, per pair. 



peiforated tii> — 



$2.50 
$2.50 






train that makes the round trip in a 
■ lay, that two train.-ii will replace it. 
thus Kivln^ fa.ster and better service 
lo the tra^elinff pibllc. 



Tlie Hotel Reautais, in the Kue Fran- 
cois Mlron. i» now uR*'d for the ignoble 
p': ~ : J ' ft was 

fi Mnal Ma- 

zaini u.ifii'-o - ■•ii.^' of King 

Louis XIV int" ih his bride. 

The gates and ........in remain ex- 
actly as they were, but they have 
fallen into squalor. 



FRKE i()\( EFiT. 

Ppftgram for V\ eekly Eiitertaimiieiit 
at the Masonic Temple. 



■^^ 



l«lntereat«d aul should know 

*lK)iit t-he wonderfal 

MARVEL \ShJrliag Spray 

|Th« new V*cl«*< Sjfine.. injec- 
tion and .Suction, best— »a(. 
eat— M nit Convanleni 
IlClaamn luMatlj 



Jakytw dracgltt Cur It. 
If be cRnnot supply thm 
MARVRX, accept do 
otber. but ««nd ■(amp for 
til ii»t rated book— M«l»a. Tt(rlr(>t 
lull iMTtlcntlaiaatitl 4ir»i-tio:,ii tu- 
Taluabl* lo lartles. MARf'Ri. ro., 
«4 m. 984 WW,. HBW 1 CHH. 

For sail by Max Wlrth. Oruigltt 



$2 Ladles* Kid Gloves $1.39 

fl lies' Kid Gloves for 89c. and 
oui * immense stock proportion- 
ately reduced 
(1 u r i n PT o u r 
Grtat lu-moval 
Sal" ^-■•- ad,, 
pa^. 




Photographer 

M. Kkomsvnld Ijas opened a gallery 
at 3U» Sixth avenue east, corner of 
Fourtti .•street, and can do first- 
class work on portraits, postal 
cards and views at a reasonable 
price. 



I.oi>k a:" ir own interests and 

AvaH !i th> i who is constantly 

tiyinK ' .''U sometliing just a.s 

good a 1 tide you ask for. Never 

take a .:__-, niule. 



Thi.- 

m n .■■■ i « 

t ■ .' ' 
t i' 



Tlf i.ron'i-ain for int- twenty-fifth 
>t<( -^...lii- tr. >• •'■.;!.-.'i I . S'.inday, at ?.:'i^ 
p. to., vvii! Ill- as follow.s: 
Organ — 

a. f»verture — "Orph'-us". . "ifff^nbach 

b. Toreador.s' .«?ong— "( 'artnen" . . 

. Hizet 

Vocal soio — "Matii:. Tostt 

Leon > 
Organ — 

a. Selecfion.>< — "Oirofle-Glrofla". . . . 

l.e.'oq 

l>. l-'.uita.Hle I M-ama1ii|iie — "l-c ('id" 

. Massenet 

Vocal solo : i i; ses". . . . 

Hawley 

Leon Cooley. 

(,'>r !,•■;-< II 

ections — "Fiiusf Gounod 

• rture — "Mi^-. i ' Thomas 

|ii"Kiain, d- to sliow the 

of rnixltiii I. composers. 

^ the most celebrated composi- 
tlie several musicians selected 
for the orgon. 

Tlie features of this style of French 
music are its sprightliness and grace. 
It appeals to tlie ear and is restful be- 
cause easilj' understood; generally 
playful and humorous, it catches the 
fancy and pleases. 

OlTenbach is called the originator 
of opera bouffe. and his "Orpheus aux 
Enfer" was his first decided hit. In 
tills opera he gives full swing to his 
.sarcastic humor, stripping the Olym- 
j.iiin deities of their dignity and mak- 
ing them ridiculous. 

■'Carmen." Blzefs masterpiece, was 
the cause of his death through disap- 
pointment at Hie manner of its recep- 
tion. Its music is peculiarly Spanish, 
with an Oriental rhythm. The "Torea- 
dro's" .son;; is one of the cliaracteristic 
piece.'j of the op^ra. Lecoq responded 
to the popular desire for the light and 
.■sparkling in music, and "Glrone-Glrof- 
la ■ is one of his most cliacacteristlc 
compositions. In the "Cid," by Mas- 
senet. Is some peculiarly French 
music, while "Faust" and "Mignon" 
ri-present the compoBltions of Gounod 
and Thoma.". 



New \% arr«»ii<l Time Ckrdi*. 

Tiii«f River Falls. Minn., April 2,1 — 
(Special to The Herald. j — A new time 
<ard will go into effect next Monday 
on the Great Northern railway running 
from this city to Warroad. It Is likely 
that In place of the one passenger 



SYNDICATE BUYS 
DULUTH ACREAGE 

—^—^1 III — im 

Zenith City Men Obtain 

Sixty- Six- Acre Tract on 

Tischcr's CreeK. 

Tlie largest real estate deal of the 
ye.ir was closed yesterday, when a syn- 
dicate of local men composed of Alex 
W Hartman, A. M. Marshall. F. A. 
I'atilck and C E. Van Bergen acquired 
an unplatted 66-acre tract lying on 
both .sides of Tischer's creek. It ex- 
tends from Superior street to J. C. 
Hunter's residence at . oodland. 

The purchasers secured the land for 
$6t>,')00. or 11,000 an acre. For many 
years this property has been held by 
the estate of a Baltimore man. and the 
deal was made through the oflfices of 
F.. P. Alexander and H P- Dowse, Mr. 
Alexander representing the seller and 
Mr. Dowse the purchasers. 

The property touches Superior 
street, but has little frontage there. It 
touches the street at Thirty-first ave- 
nue east. The eastern boundary fol- 
lows the -section line north for about 
half a mile to a point that would be 
St. Marie street, were It extended. The 
west boundary Is Princeton street. 
The property is now held under the 
name of the Hartman Building com- 
pany. 

The corapanv plans on platting the 
ground and putting it on the market. 
There is a constant demand. It Is said, 
for larger tracts of land for the finer 
residences being built In the East 
and. It is the purpose of the company 
to supply this demand. E. P. Alexan- 
der has already reserved an acre for 
himself, where he Intends to erect for 
himself a fine residence. 



r 



Right Food 

Is a ttrooK factor of 

SUCCESS— 

GrapeNuts 



\ 



Vi 



Kelps one to Win ! 

'There's a Reason 



BOX CARS BROKEN INTO. 



Bi-ook.ston Suspects Said to Have 
Stolen Some Liquor. 

Brookston, Minn.. April 23. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — Boxcar robberies are 
becoming quite numerous here latel.v. 
Tuesday night the seals on two mer- 
chandise cars were broken while tlie 
ti'ain was standing In the local yard, 
and severnl small boxes of goods were 
stolen. Harry McArdle and William 
iius.sell were airesteil as suspects, and 
after a hearing before Justice Garland, 
were bound over to the district court, 
A quantity of liquor, whlcli was stolen 
from one of the cars, was found upon 
them, and other evidence produced to 
show that lliey were ti»e guilty par- 
ties. 



( RVPTK SIGN. 



On the f lorsed Saloon D««or Says "to 
the Ra^ Weeds." 

SlielbyAlUe. Ii.d., April 23.— A cryptic 
sign graces the front door of the saloon 
vacated by James Smith. April IS. 
Smitli being one of the first to feel the 
sting of county local option victory. 
Th»» sign, which none has decipliered, 
reads: 

"Closed by the D. M. T. P. C. & 

H. C Ba« k to the Rag 

Weeds for Me." 

At the bottom of the card Is the car- 
toon of a innlc shorn of Ills tail. 



RKD LAKES STILL 

( OVERED BV RE. 



Thief River Fall.s, Minn., April 23.— 

(Special to Tlie Herald.) — CapL Peter 

Eberhardt returned from Red Lakes, 

where he has been superintending the 
repairs on his towing boats. He re- 
ports that the ice on the lakes is still 
solid, and that the settlers continue to 
haul logs and hay across the lake. The 
prospects are that the lakes will not 
open up for three weeks yet, and the 
water is so low that it may take even 
longer. 

DEMORALIZATION IN 

(iRAIN PITS CONTINUE. 



Chicago, April 23.. — Demoralizati<tn 
was general today In the grain pit, the 
heavy liquidation which caused the 
.sensational slimip in wheat prices yes- 
terday hiring extended to coarse 
grain. During the first few minutes of 
trading .July wheat sold off to $1.09%, 
which was'^'ie below the low point of 
the preceding session. Corn for May 
delivery l|TOke more than four cents 
from the blest mark of the previous day. 
declining early in the day to 67Sc per 
bushel. 



EDITORS AND PI BLISHERS 
DINE LN WALDORF ASTORIA 

New York. April 23. — Editors and 
publljshers of this country to the num- 
b»'r of 600 aU^Bded the joint banquet 
of th« AssociaCed Vrfmn and the Amer- 



ican Newspapers Publishers' associa- 
tion in the Waldorf-Astoria. 

Count Johann Heinrich Von Bern- 
.•storff. German ambassador, and Joseph 
H. Choate, ex-ambassador of the Unit- 
ed States to Great Britain, delivered 
.speeches. Other speakers were Ma.i. 
John C. Hemphill of the Charleston 
News and Courier. Rev. Robert E. Bur- 
dette of Los Angeles and ex-Senator 
T. M. Patterson of Colorado. 



ORDER FOR HEARl.VG ON PETITION 

FOR ADMINISTRATION.— 
State of Minnesota, County of St. 

Louis. — ss. 

In Probate Court. 
In the matter of the estate of Mar- 
garet Griffin, Decedent. 

THE PETITION OF William Griffin, 
having been filed in this Court, repre- 
senting, among other things, that Mar- 
garet Griffin, then being a resident 
of the County of St. Louis, State of 
Minnesota. died intestate, in the 
County of St. Louis. State of Minne- 
sota, on the 8th day of February. 1908; 
leaving estate in the County of St. 
Louis, State of Minnesota, and that 
said petitioner is the surviving spouse 
of said decedent, and praying that Let- 
ters of Administration of the estate 
of said decedent be granted to him. 

IT IS ORDERED, Tliat said petition 
be heard before this Court, at the 
Probate Court Rooms in the Court 
House In Duluth. in said County, on 
Monday, the 17th day of May. 1909 at 
ten o'clock. A. M., and all persons in- 
terested in said hearing and in said 
matter are hereby cited and required 
at said time and place to show cause. 
If any there be. why said petition 
sh'Jid not be granted. 

ORDERED FURTHKR. That this Ord- 
er be served by publication In The Du- 
luth Evening Herald, according to law, 
and that a copy of this Order be served 
on the County Treasurer of St. Louis 
County not less than ten days prior 
to said day of hearing. 

Dated at Duluth, Minn., April 21st, 
1909. 

Bv the Court. 

J. B. MIDDLECOFF, 
Judge of Probate. 
(Seal, Probate Court, St. Louis County, 

Minn.j 
O. H. SIMONDS, 
Duluth Evening Herald, April 23, 30, 

May 7, 1909. 

ORDER FOR HEARING ON CLAIM.S.— 
State of Minnesota. County of St. Louis. 

In Probate Court. 
In the matter of the estate of Caro- 
line Peterson Decedent. 
LETTERS of admlnlstratloon with 
the will annexed this day having been 
granted to O. H. Simonus. 

IT IS ORDEItED. That the time 
within which all creditors of the above 
named decedent may present claims 
against her estate in this Court, be, 
and the same hereby is, limited to 
three months from and after the date 
hereof; and that Monday, the 19th day 
of July, 1909, at ten o'clock A. M.. in 
the Probate Court Rooms, at the Court 
House at Duluth In said County, be and 
the same hereby is, fixed and appointed 

$1.50 Ladies* Kid Gloves 89c 

Also our entire line of Ladies* and 

Men's kid and fabric gloves, at greatly 

reduced prices. ^^^ 

See ad page — ^^T • ..^ _* 

See ad., page 

19. 



as the time and place for hearing upon 
the examination, adjustment and al- 
lowance of such claims as shall be 
presented within tlie time afore.said. 

Let notice hereof be given by the 
publication of this order in The Duluth 
Evening" Herald, as provided by law. 

Dated at Duluth. Minn.. April loth, 
1909. 

J. B. MIDDLECOFF, 
Judge of Probate. 
(Seal, Probate Court, St. Louis County, 

Minn. J 
BALDWIN, BALDWIN & DANCER, 

Attorneys. 
Duluth Evening Herald, April 16, 23, 

30. 1909. 




ARTICLES OF IXIORFORATION 

— OF— 

CONSERVATIVE REALTY COM- 

PAXY . 

We, the undersigned, do hereby as- 
sociate ourselves together and adopt 
the following articles for the purpose 
of forming a corporation under and 
pursuant to tlie laws of the State of 
Minnesota. 

FIRST. 

The name of tliis corporation shall 
be -CONSERVATIVE REALTY COM- 
P-INY." 

SPiCOND, 

The general nature of the business 
to be carried on by tliis corporation 
shall be the buying, selling, owning, 
leasing, holding, handling, mortgaging 
and otherwise dealing in lands, tene- 
ments, hereditaments, bonds, notes, 
mortgages and other real and personal 
property, and Uie building, handling, 
selling, owning, and otherwise dealing 
in buildings, houses and other struc- 
tures. 

THIRD. 

The principal place of transacting 
the business of said corporation shall 
be the City of Duluth in the County 
of St. Louis and State of Minnesota. 
FOUItTH. 

The names and places of residence 
of the persons so associating to form 
said corporation are as follows, to- 
wit: 

Whitney Wall, Duluth. Minnesota. 

H. H. Phelps. Duluth, Minnesota. 

Louis Ramstad, Duluth, Minnesota. 

Colin Thomson, Duluth, Minnesota. 

H. J. Mullin, Duluth, Minnesota. 
FIFTH. 

The management of the affairs of 
this corporation shall be vested in a 
board of directors of five persons, who 
shall be stockliolders In the corpora- 
tion, any three of whom shall consti- 
tute a quorum to do business. Until 
the first annual election the following 
persons shall compose the board of 
directors, to-wlt: 

Whitney Wall. Duluth, Minnesota. 

H. H. Phelps. Dulutli, Minnesota. 

Ivouis Ramstad, Duluth, Minnesota. 

Colin Thomson. Duluth. Minnesota. 

H. J. Mullin. Duluth. Minnesota. 

The annual meetings for the election 
of directors of said corporation shall 
be held on the first Tuesday in Janu- 
ary of each year at the office of the 
corporation in Duluth. Minnesota, at 
such hour of the day as shall be fixed 
by the by-laws or by the order of the 
board of directors. 

SIXTH. 

The officers of this corporation shall 
be a president, vice president, secretary 



and trea.surer, and the following per- 
sons .shall constitute the first officers 
of the corporation and shall hold ofllce 



and 
and 



duplicate 
lath day 



(.Seal.) 
(Seal.) 
(Seal.) 
(Seal.) 
(Seal.) 



Trimmed Hats j 

for Discriminat- « 

ing Women! | 

The beauty and quality can be.st be ap- # 
predated when you see them, and you ^ 
should see them now. We've an excep- ilk 
tional collection ready, fresh, new models, £ 
admirably ai)propriate for dress or street 2 
wear. ^lany are tastefully trimmed with J* 
fruits, foliage — the popular 1909 style. Rib- W 
bons and velvets are much in evidence also. ^ 
but the worth-while feature is that these ^ 
same creations would be priced $3.00 to Jlk 
$r).00 more at exclusive shoi)s. \\'e make ^ 
a special feature of ready- ^ ^ ^\^\ ^ 
trimmed Ilats at from $10 to A ^sV/v * 
^^ 

» 

m 
m 
* 
m 

* 
« 
« 
« 

* 

* 
* 

$2.50 * 

$2.50 S 

: 98c t 

98c 2 

98c J 

$1.25 ; 



until the first annual election 
until their successors are elected 
<iualified. viz: 

Whitnev Wall. President. 
H. H. I'helps. Vice President. 
Louis Ramstad. Secretary. 
Colin Tliomson, Treasurt.r. 

SEVENTH. 
The amount of the capital stock of 
this corporation shall be Fifty Thou- 
sand Dollars ,$:.u.0O0) divided into 
Five Thousand (o.oOOi shares of Ten 
Dollars ($10) each. The capital stock 
shall be paid either in cash or prop- 
erty acceptable to the board of direct- 
ors and in such amounts and at such 
times ES the board of directors shall 
determine and designate. 
EIGHTH. 
The highest amount of indebtednesn 
or liability to whicli this corporation 
shall at anv time be subjected shall bo 
Two Thousand l>ollars ($2,O0D>. 
NINTH. 
In case of the death, resignation or 
disqualification to serve of any officer 
or director of this corporation the 
vacancy so caused may be tilled by the 
remaining members of the board of 

directors. . 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF. We have 

hereunto set our hands and seals in 

at Duluth. Minnesota, thia 

of April. A. D. 1909. 

WHITNEY WALL, 

H. H. PHELP.S, 

H. J. MULLLN. 

LOI'lS RAMSTAD. 

COLIN THOMSON. 

Signed, Sealed and Delivered 

In Prt-'sence of 

E. L. PALMER, 

J. D. MAHONEY. 



State of Minnesota, County of St. Louis. 

— ss. 

On this 17th day of April. A. D. 1909. 
at Duluth, In .St. Louis County, In the 
State of Minnesota, before me. a notary 
public, in and for said county and 
state, personally came Whitney Wall, 
H. H. Phelps, Louis Ramstad. Colin 
Thomson and H. J. Mullin. to me well 
known to be the same persons named 
in and who executed the foregoing 
articles of incorporation and they sev- 
erally acknowledged that they executed 
the same as their free act and deed. 
J. I>. MAHfJNEY, 
Notary Public. St. Louis County. Minn. 
My Commission expires .luly 21. 1913. 
(Notarial Seal, St. Louis County, Minn.) 

OFFICE OF RF:GISTER of DEEDS. 
State of Minnesota, County of St. Loul«. 
— ss. 

I hereby certify that the within In- 
strument was filed in this office for 
record April 21, 1909. at 9 A. M., and 
was duly recorded in Book 9 of Misc. 
page 490. ^ ^ PALMER. 

Register of Deedji. 
By THOS. CLARK, 

Deputy. 



State of Minnesota, Department of 

State. 

I hereby certify that the within In- 
strument was filed for record in this 
office on the 20lh day of April. A. D. 
1»09. at 9 o'clock A. M.. and was duly 
recorded In Book R-3 of Incorporations 
on page 'iZH. 

JULIUS A. S<^HMAHL. 

Secretary of State. 




■— T 



1 






j 


™ ■ 


. 






■ipiii 



imH a„— JK,.! 



I 



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•'■If"' 



\ 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: FRIDAY, APRIL 23. 1909 



IHMM 



!IAKn>«0 , 



<^y»A>^mP<^^ 



CHtCAOO 



Pure in 
the can- 
Pure in the 
baking. 
Never 
Fails. 
Try it 



Mfi's Best $2 Gloves lor $1.25 

At th.'' ■- ■ 



and browns 

HiH- ad., itag-'^ 



^^KBBQBSSI^^ 



BROKERAGE 
SKULEAR 

Curb Traders Quit BicKcr- 

ings and Get Back 

to Business. 

War Between Different 

Shops to Cease for 

Present Anyway. 









'■■■- 


1.1 .- 
t'l'l'iit-r 


fliK k <, ur 


t.. 




•lay wa.*= 


mark*.l f'V a Uv ^ •■' 


C «. ' : 


*• en tJtt? part -■( it.. I'ul- 


iili c. 


' < 


tnd furthfr by ku< !i '* 


lai'k i . 


V ■«.' • . . »V» v. * • •■ 


t in t:ii h itllit-r ain<»ng 


I lit- bro 


kerti tliat 


ai ..-iiNi "!.•■ Ji^tiv '-11- 


Fred 


Ji. Men 


.' broker whose 


fa ill! r 


' -■- ■•:-' ■ 


. VI,. h . iiaou in 


I V, »' . ■ 




! ■. U t t ♦.' - 


n 

1 „ 

(1. 




- Mill «■., i .1 tin; 
^'m^>tove^ <..;ii iiii^-' 
1 , ...: , . . 1 ...1 ,,, ■ 1 ...-n 



Women's $ 1 . 1 9 and $ 1 .25 Fancy 
Hose, Special at 69c Pair 



AlT«nya Sertd Vour Mail Ordera to 



li 



„_iiif<t when the approach of spring niakc^':j 
you think of <1ainty low shoep, we offn-r 
a special in faHtlnatlni? Black Hosiery, 
embroidered with black or with cliarni- 
mg coloring^, in exquisite designs — ape^ 
cia) ;U HJ»f pnlr. 



89c 




117-119 \Vf«t Superior Street, Dalath, Minn. 
FOR QtICK, SATlSF.\CTORV SERVICE. 



The New Embroidered-Cuff Silk 
Gloves Are Here at $1 .25 



Here they are— the latest New York craze 
Short Silk Glove.-? with embroidered 
euffs — the famotis Kayser make m 
all the new shades of green, wis- 
taria and old rose— all size.s— pet a 
pr. to match the new co.«tume, »1— 5 



-Women's 




$1.25 



Silk Sale Ends at 10 p. m. Tomorrow 

By That Time We Shall Have Sold Out About All the SUks Offered t 



LOT 1 




39c 




I'or SMk^ that sold 


) f J-' - 


ularly at f>"< , r.'j^ 


and 


cr.c the yard. 





LOT 2 



49c 



F< r Silks that Bold reg- 
ularly at 75c and 85c 
yard. 




LOT 3 

69c 

For Silks that sold 
regularly at $1 and 
$1.25 yard. 



LOT 4 



89c 



For SilkH that sold reg- 
ularly at 11.25 and |l.60 
\ ard. 



This is by far the best lot of silks ever offered at such reductions by this store 
or any other store in this region— don* t miss it if you have silks to buy! 



lnk<::- I,.! v.- >\liil 

,-■,.: t ;t. ^ : :"■ '1)1 I )'•• 

tliated 

i aiMl 

env-rgif^ 

-: back I" 

« uri) 

lit In 



Every yard cf it i'- dt'-i' ■''^' and worth every penny of its regular 
iruH If aiu < 1 it)(.!^( "■'■'■< .•m unsold at closing time tomorrow 

ni^lit. tVity Will go back m ttcck at regular prices! Buy luniurrow 
ami 'i.wf! 



Brides and Graduates 

Will be especially interested 
in this sale. 



\o wonder people jumped at the chance to buy such m ks at the 
.ale prices! No wonder we sold so many .ilks dc.pite wind and went ur. 
Come .-.nd look them over-get bargains m *:lks you II be proud to 
wear! 



I f yoii a ; 
waisted man, yun il ai>i>rc- 
ciate the libt-ral plan on 
which our new Si»riiig 
Shiri> arc ccMisinicled. 

Here arc alst- i-il; "l^- 
portnnities tor small nun. 

The Colombia $1 Shirt 
is worth fifty ceiit'^ jiictit', 
accord 111^' to the wax m 
v\ hich all other dca' ; 

Su})erior 'itrcet price 

\tiolhcr b:g ship nun; 
Manhattan Shirts wa= vn- 
l-do, .1 ■ ■■■■'■ 

— yuu bti '. •T.i.''*' :<-' T'-' •'". 

The Columbia 



.1 - 1 

1-. I \n 
iliey will 

with the 

r Alex 

in ore 

I nd 

V - 



ilaJj]'.-!' 
exi'lain 

u ■ 

I- - 



Lydia 1 



Wr \IAKI' 



MiiiL.t; 



at Third 

Avenue West 



BOYS MIST 
BE KEPT OUT 



Your Collar 
Button 




:: I Mayor Says New Saloon 
Ordinance Will Be 
Strictly Enforced. 

Minors Found Loitering 

in Saloons Liable 

to Arrest 



'I ■ 




sn ;• 




mil- 


!•! f. I tKt Ml 


loot 


- ' ■■ 


eiri! 




M;i\ > t i 


i. a. 




..r:i iv* 




I his or- 



. i w . . ; 



ma . 




DON'T MISS THIS SALE OF 

MAKER^S SAMPLES )^^^:. COATS ^ SUITS 

Bought and Sold at One-Third Off 

Ye.^tcrdav was a big clay for us ! Today is another ! Tomorrow will be greater 
vet— tor when the news gets tlioroiighly noised around of just how great the bar- 
gains are no intending suit buver will think of buying before they have seen what 
great savings this sale offers them! It's a big purchase of samples from ^-ew 
York's foreinost maker of women's and misses' wearables! ^ ou have heard ot the* 
makers— their name is on every price tag. We bought them at a third ott the 
■maker's prices. 

And We Sell Them to You at a Third Under What Our Regular Prices Would Be ! 



Xe Sample Suits 

You know what samples are — 
the very best %vorknian8hlp the 
maker can put Into them — 

Regular Prices-- -$18.50 to $37.50 

Sale Prices $12.50 to $25 

Now don't delay: Promptnes.'^ 
pays! You'll save a third here 

DOW. 



There are little wom- 
en's sizes in suits and 
coats, in 32, 34 and 36 
— there are misses' sizes 
for young women of 14, 
16 and 18, «" great 
quantity. 

Bring in the Girls 
Tomorrow A. M. 

It will be a fine time 
to make worth while 
savings ou smart new- 
styles in classy gar- 
ments. 

WIi\ APPROVALS. 

ni 1 1 EXCHAKGES. 

* ' ^^ REIUNDS. 



TTe Sample Coats 

All the very newest — the very 

latest styles in misses' and little 

women's coats — only a few of a 
kind — 

Reflular^Prjces- $10.50 to $25.00 

Sale Prices $7.00 to $16.65 



You save a 
worth while! 



third — and 
Be early. 



thal'.s 



There Are Also Many Attractive Offerings in Women's Suits ! 

\VOMi:X-.S COATS— WO-MIINS SKIRTS— WOMEXS WAISTS. 



We have In stock — odd size coats, 
regular sizes 36. 38, 40, 42 and 44. 

NEW COATS AT 
$10.00 

Tan striped covert, half silk lined^ 
36 inch length— trimmed with self 

strappings and horn rimmed covert 
buttons! Just In — bought under 
value — special at $10.00. 



in sizes 37, 39, 41 and 43, for women who can not be lUtr,] in the 



Dresses and Costumes of 

SUk or Wool 

Lovable little garments 
with all the latest style 
touches. They look like 
Paris-made models, costing 
many times as much. Prices 
range from $12.50 to $65. 



GRAY COVERT 
COATS $18.50 

stunning gray striped coverts — 
made up in smart 36-inch coats — 
all silk lined — trimmed back and 
front with graduated sjzes of Jet 
buttons — special at $18.50. 




"Bon Ton" Week Ends Tomorrow 

Be Sure and Come Tomorrow 



J|^^^|e^ 



I'Vin- 



WORKMAN HURT; 
WANTS DAMAGES 

Laborer Asks $1,995 From 
the Sykes Steel Roof- 
ing Company. 



ijUiOoan. 

II!) vt T y K ! i^ '.' 



< 

1...-, „,.,.,,...., 

* 
w 

Itee <i ■ '■O'lirt. 



I I J M I i I i i ■ ■ I ' I . I. . ■ 

worl^ing at i 
1 



a.ni-<l wiiilf ■v\'<'ik)rig 
ourtliuuse 
-k) wants 
I : CtiofitiK 
.1. the action 
1 the tierk of 



,,'•'. ■ T • ■ 


t-. to i: 




1 ' . 1 1 • . -i 


- •>>atlv u 




ii, U V ir:j;' 


^1 


:^«l - 


UMlflf V'. 




. iri- 


ilio i- .1 • • 1 .... ■ 




Mr.il 


Wits hard to 


as <-0!. 


j.j1h.\k ;i !Mt it 


know 


11 u - 


mi M'latiori- 


. 


,iv i(;> tin- 


at(< "f t^<^ 

1 pat I olituiii were 


mill a I'. : 


l->'t-n if a 
thai 


( a m Irs or spen in 


H «a!. 


■ here 


1 1 ( , r t ' . 


'" " :.■ 


! 1 r 1 o U 1 d 


i a 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 


> 


lie cauglit 


the v<.Mj 1 11 in. \ u<> J 


N ... I l.» ..V 


t of drink- 


!ng. 






i -■.■..,-,. 1 ; t i ,. rj «j ,'4 ». . 


. y.,.\\' < 1,; 


!.'« d. anii 

keep 

• ■getlier. 


No lenn-i.i \ \'. 


- lioWll .1! 


\iiiie. As 


i»oori a'' ■:'■' ■■ 


iF m;i<le 


both the 


man ' >^*^ '-' 


J the .«alO' 


m and the 


bov 1^ " 't 


will ht 


taken into 


court, auti u charges loilf-- 


. ■ : -_-• •■■.t 


tliem are fouml 


to be tru. 




\>iil met*' out fucli purusii 




i.iovhlt-d (.y the 


ordinary e. 






The proper C'or.set will mould your figure 
Just as the sculptor does liis clay — liie 
<lue.stion Is, of course — to 
teleot the jproper Corewt! 

Tbin «eek|, rw^ have 
v«ith UN, MIhm .>Ic. 
Duwell of Xew York — 
the formct expert wUo«e 
kuovvlrttKe of the art 
of cornel Idb l« *•«* *^' 
Miilt of lonK experience 
flltioK for the flneMt 
trade In -New York city! 

We invite you to meet 
iier tomorrow — she will 
gladiv aid you In the selec- 
tion of the proper corset. 
There Is no charge for fit- 
ting — and you will not be 
urged to buy I 

She pnrlloularly reooininenil* Bon 
Ton fon»et«. »vhlch are for women 
who want the beitt and are >vlil- 
InK lo pay for ivhat they Kot. 
I-rtoe* ranse »3.0« to f I2.0O 

She Is bv no means prejudiced — and if 
another make is beet adapted to your 
needs, will tell you so! Don't miss this 
opportunity — see her tomorrow! 



35,. BAURKTTKS 25c. 

Fancv carved Barrett<s — two 
3f>c styles : special at 25e, toinor- 
roM". 

Other new ntyleM. 

10 to 50 cent*. 



25c 



50c 



For S.^c Jabots 
and Dutch Col- 
lars. 



P'or 65c Belt 
Pins and Buck- 
les. 



RIBBON REMNANTS! 

A .'•ale of ItUjbon Itenmants tliat 
thrifty mothers will not want to 
miss! 

THESE TWO LOTS — 



Hats With Individuality^ 



3c 



I5c 



Yard for Rem. 
nnn(j>i of 5e to 
20c lllbbonn. 



Yard for Ileni- 
nnntM of 2,'»<> to 
75c Klbbonn. 



35c and 39c Ribbons 29c 

stiff Silk Taffeta Ribbons — 4 to 5 
Indies wide — fancy checks and plaids 
in all the new colors — regular 35c 
and 39t. grades, at 20c yard. 

NEW AROIVALS — HERB ONLY! 

Rat Tail Braid. Crochet Orna- 
ments. tJold Tassels. Silk Tassels. 
Sash Fringes. Paris Veilings, new- 
Beltings, Pig Tail Braid. Gold 
Cloths and Nets. .Silver (^lotlis and 
Nets, Novelty Ruchings, Tourist 
Ruchings. 



!«OT COM.-MOJN "FAtTORY" HATS. 

Our Millinery business is enjoying splen- 
did patronage! Our Millinery department 
is owned and operated by Gray-Tallant 
Company— as are all our otlier depart- 
ments! We mention this because of the 
number of millinery departments in other 
stores operated in this city by outside p 
ties, who make a specialty of factory- 
made hats! 

We upeclalliKe on lints created 
fOiT the Individual! There'** noth- 
luK c«tniinon about our llHti«! 

Tomorrow Spedals at 

$8.00 to $ 1 2.00 

A remarkable showing of liigli -class 
Hats — refined styles — uncommon ideas of 
charming good taste — Hats from our own 
workroom— fashioned by our clever mil- 
liners for various types of face and figure 
— and for various occasions and for all oc- 
casions! The showing is made up of Hats 
easily recognized as ten to fifteen values — 
we've marked them to sell at »S.O0 to $12.00 




I DALY S (OMKMFORARV 

I PASSES AWAY i\ BITTK. 



miur- 

and ! Br.tt. 



M..nt 



Af.nl 



Wash Goods Remnants 

'/3 to V2 

Under Price 



.)lHig!l. 



i > . i » J 



I 

hi . o U i d t; I .^' . 



KEW IL^! wmXS 



( OMMITs SIH II>E 



t-rai moiur.s 
- . ■■■]:■ .ia\ - 

, i W \V I 

,,- .,..'. I !,t .;. 

rilpi'! itlit-oUti Wl\'.i .l;i'- 

'■'.■ A. *■; ;irk fihii >!. 

I I, If.- V\-. . . \\"lt ill' 

, l\ViS('(»Nsi\ LEMSLATIRE 




The great Wash Goods 
business we are doing 
makefe hundreds of rem- 
nants every week. We 
have a great accumulation 
of rt-mnants suitable for 
Children's Dresses, La- 



dits" Waists — M» n's and Boys* Shirts 
— U'ell put them on sale tomorrow 
at 1-3 to 't less than regular price! 



•Mur- 



MAY AIUOIKN JINE 1. 



M .nil. .\ I ■ '. — Miss , 

, ' „, 1 MadH..n. Wis,, Aont -. 

■•■■■'1 ■♦- ■'■■•-■ <.t.*fn- , _ , ;.n-f-d i- 

sdav by J"(joot;ii^ .- that i' 

r:- ltd ij 

de- 



-Thf senate 



Ti 

;,, .lit- illM.at .'i;!' 



1 



no i»rei 

diuntr, 

«eai'«,-i» ol, tlit* J.I 

lifelej'H liody In a 

P'ri).*** he tl<**»'>ed uii 

sary. 



i:,'i-it: 



lit', rif:. >■»- 



ic; 



will "Move to Clnelanatl. 

.,.ii'<., T-'f'. Il AT>ril i'S. — The 

Xational ilaid- 

a.«.so<lation will 

II. -Hi N..Miville to Cincl.i- 

il..^ r\e> utive committee 

,iK the Ohio illy the most 

: oint. 




39c Novelty Suitings 28c 

.\,.v. liy ^'uiting.s — 48 inches wide with stripe or 

graduated dot borders — 

light and dark grounds — 
it launders perfectly, wears 
like linen, but doesn't 
muos easily — st Uing at 39c 
regul a r 1 y — Tomorrow's 
special 



We Are Selling 500 Hemstitched All | Women's Fine Oxfords 



20c 

for ch<)l<t' one lot 
.".he \Va>>l» (i<KMl»i. 

I'ekm Striped Suit- 
ings—imported voilo^ 
and Imported ging- 
I ' a ms — not many, so 
I.. . arlyl 



28c Yd. 



Linen Table Cloths at $1.38 (8^ $1.59 ea. 

Wholesale houses have never bought them cheaper than we offer them 
to you this week! We bought half a thousand from a maker who wanted 
cash so badly that he sacrificed the lot. We got them at a price so low 
that we can sell them to you for less than we ever paid for such goods! Why, 
you can afford to buy them for the summer cottage. 

Kcnu-mbor these are all licm- 
stitclied all around — are in many 
pretty designs with bonier all 
around. Vsc litem as breakfast 
ekitlis to save your more cosily 
linens — In fact, they launder with 
sneh a natural luster as to be quite 
good enongh for lunch and dinner 
cluihs. 





for 8-4 all Linen 
Satin Dania.sk Table 
cloths. 



(for nil li 
Satin D 
Table Cl> 



lien 8.Y10 
a ni a s k 
Cloths. 



Three Big Lot s of White Goods Are On Sale This 
Week Qt Very Special Prices 12 V2C, 15c and 19c Yd. 



All 50c and 59c Wash Goods in 
SUk Mixtures at 39c Yard | 

Ver- special for tomorrow — rough silk weave i 
viiks— Banzai Silks and Kckko Silks — all our 50c , 
and oSc Silk Mixtures, »yecial at 89c yardl i 



$2.00 BED 
SPREADS 

$1.50 

'Extra size Bed- 
9 pr e a d s, either 

fringed o r plain 
hemmed, beautiful 
Marseilles designs; 
$2.00 values, $1.50. 



Many Specials 
This Week 

On Pillows, Table Pads, 

Mattress Protectors, 
Sheets, Pillow Cases, Etc. 



45c WHITE 
GOODS 

35c 

Newest White Waist- 
Ing and Dress Ma- 
terials, including 45c 
Poplins, Madras, Jac- 
quards, Swias and 
other novelties, spe- 
cial, S5c. 



$2.00 to 
$4.00 pr 

Be fitted to a pair of 
our fine Oxfords to- 
morrow — don't you re- 
member how hard it 
was to find the new 
things last spring after 
the season really 
opened! Don't get 
caught this year— ^buy 
yours before the rush — 
We've got the right things now 
are uncertain as to shipment! 




-and reorders 



A big as.sortment of new styles — tans, 
chocolates and blacks — patent leaithcr or 
fine kid — ribbon lies — ankle straps or 
buttons — prlj'os, $2.t»0 to *-I.OU tl»e pair. 



Misses* and 
Children's Low 
Shoes $1.25 to 

$2.50 a pair 

Tan or black low shoes 
for young folks — heavy 
or light soles — low- 
heels — button or Gibson 
ties — at $1.25 to $2.50 
the pair. 



Boys' 
Shoes 

Extra gocd wear- 
ers — 

$1.50"$3 

the pair. 



/ 




Tr 

!! 


^ •wr~-' 


r- 

i 
1 










/ 






Harry Mitchell's Editorial 



III 



NO FRILLS! 

Why should a man wear store clothes 
anyhow, when he can have his clothes 
made to measure, and as reasonable as 
he can today ? I can't see why he per- 
sists in going around with clothes on his 
back that he knows and everyone else 
knows were not made for anyone in 
particular. 

I make gooddothes for thousands of 
men in the big cities of Minneapolis, St. 
Paul and Duluth. 1 know that I can 
please you, and for $ i 5, $20 or $25 Fll 
inake you as nice a suit as you want to 
wear and guarantee }'ou to equal any 
other tailors $30, S40 or $50 kind. 

If you want to buy a suit of clothes 
for spring, go all over town and look, 
but wait till you come to my store at 1 8 
r^ast Superior street, and look at my 
goods. I can save you a ten spot and 
please you better than anyone else in 
town. I am hooked up for it. 

Yours truly, 

HARRY MITCHELL, 

18 East Superior Street. 



I 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD; FRmAY, APRIL 23. 1909. 



Asaiiist Ruling Forbidding Opera 
ti.ms W ithoiit Patients* Consent. 






\ pril 



A yi'l^a;' t.t dollv- 

courl >>i thf t»ia- 

• >n perfoi riit-d on a 

i!, !:is cotl-iiMIt nr wllllOUt 

iilH legal Kuaidians con- 

inlnal offense, has given 

rise to HidiKnant protests anioni? the 

■: -r-,-ni mc'Ifeal i'»rofession. 

(.i-irH-ipa! oi: the H-i-lii. iiniverH- 
rv. ,!mli«;iai < 'otinriior I>r. Khal. de- 



rlares that an opfTatiuti ought not to 
l.f pt-rfornifii against the wili iil' an 
adult patient who is In full i>ossession 
uf his mental fa'ulties. but that in a 
lai'K** mmih>T <>' it is aljsnlutely 

irniinssjliU- [i> -il is euusfiil wliile 

pressing ■' ; .-vi-. i>. 

r>r. Kt ares tliat an .^iirgeon 

Willi hesiti • - to opiTutf ill cases 
wliicli deniatul immediate operation 
u-ouid be Ruilty of a grave moral ot- 
fense if he allowed hlminelf to be in- 
Hueneed hv tlie fear that he might sub- 
sequ.'ntlv be punislied for inflictlnK 
malarious bodily injury on a sick per- 
son. Manv otl»er strong eriticismsi on 
the ver-liri pronounced by the supreme 
eourt have l»een iiuhlished hy oiIkt 
eminent members of the medical pro- 
fession. 



S.S.S 



DRIVES OUT 
lUIEUMAnSM 



Rheumatism is due to an excess of uric acid, an irritating, inflammatory 
accumulation, whicii gets into the circulation because of weak kidneys, 
constipation, indigestion, and other physical irregularities which are u:,uaUy 
consitiered of no importance. Nothing applied externally can ever reacH 
the seat of this trouble; the most such treatment can do is soothe the pama 
temporarily: while potash and other mineral medicines really add to the 
acidity of the blood, and this fluid therefore continually grows more acnd 
and vitiated. Then instead of nourishing the diHerent muscles and joints, 
keepine them in a normally supple and elastic condition, it gradually hardens 
and stiffens them by drying up the natural oUs and fluids. Rheumatism can 
never be cured until the blood is purified. 8. S. S. thoroughly cleanses and 
renovates the circulation by neutraUzing the acids and driving the causa 
from the system. It strengthens and invigorates the blood so that instead 
of a sour, weak stream, depositing acrid and painful corrosive matter in 
the muscles, joints and bones, it nourishes the entire body with pure, rich 
blood and permanently cures Rheumatism. S.S.S. contams no potash, 
alkali or other harmful mineral, but is made entirely of roots, herbs and 
barks of great purifying and tonic properties. Book on Rheumatism and 
any medicul advice free to all who write. 



THE SWIFT SPECIFIC CO., ATLAHTA, GA. 



WARSHIPS 
IN THE AIR 

Germany to Have Twenty- 
Four Mammoth Zeppe- 
lins By 1912. 

Her Other Military Dir- 
igibles Will Number 
Fully a Dozen. 



Berlin, April :'3.— In 1912 Germany 
will have at least twenty -four mam- 
moth Zeppelin ships, each capable of 
oversea excursions. and probably 
speedier than anv naval vessel. In the 
pres.'tit >' will liave luur Zeppe- 

lin.>f, and m.- iii.iKiiirte.'nt factory at 
Frledrichshafen, .•ii<l>j\v.d with over 
>1. 500, 000 ly ih'- "ierman nation, will 
he ablf i'< I HI, ijui at least eight ves- 
s.i.s ,1 irur I his autumn. Thus 

by im. i.ii!!uin> can have twenty-four 
Zeppelins, and her other uiiliiary 
dirlKlMeK will number at least a dozt-n. 
IwiKiandsj rate ot jtroduotion is one 
vessel per annum, and by 1^12 she may 
have- Ht most some live small -sized, 
slow, nori-iiKid airships, which, as com- 
pared with the Zeppelin.s. will be anli- 
■ luaied crulKers to dreadnouKhts. 

l-InKland ha» had no up-to-iiale fa- 
liliti.s for buUdins large dirigibles 
even of the non-rigid type, and as tor 
the faster craft of the Zeppelin type, 
she iia.s absolutely no experience or re- 
sources, either of the government or 
private, whlcli would enable her to lay 
ilowti such ships suecfS>«f ully. British 
experts have sneered at the Zeppelin, 
and they have never built a ship ot this 
kind, thiiugh it is now estimated to 
be the faslesl and the mu.«it powerful, 
and the only craft which can attempt 
low over^•ea voyage.>*. The British 
Meet of five ships In 1912. if built ac- 
conilnjj m llu' present estimates, will 
l>e tUi'il nnlv f'T overland work, and 
will l»c i|iiite unablf to lOpe with the 
larger iin.l swtff^r Ciman vessels, 
wiiich can nujuiil bcU-s iiuus and carry 
more explosives. 

%^ imt ■ HorHl F.nect. 
A Zepi»elin of the present day type 
c«)Ukl reach Hnglun.l in ten li.iur.-? and 
do enormous damag.' in a brief space 
of tune. British experts have no ade- 
quate Idea of thf improvements which 
call be effected In the Zeiip,lin in the 
next v.;tr Mf twii. Twenty-four great 
vcHstls ul a vastU improved type might 
in I'.tl:; put ten or more of Kngland s 
dreadnuughts out of action, and dam- 
age her naval basen seriously; while 
Germany would still have a well-tried 
sectmd aerial fleet of twelve dirigibles 
to carry «»ut further operations. It Is 
not necessary to say anything of the 
moral effect of this sudden aerial at- 
tack, or of tlie panic which would bo 
created bv a single German ship mak- 
ing a demunsirallon over London. 

The majority of peoph- in England 
laugh at the whole idea, and even 
aeronautical writers pooh-pooh the pos- 
sibility of attack by dirigibles, and yet 
the records made by the Zeppelin in 
llt'ts show tliat a ship of this type has 
tiaveled over 300 miles, and later rec- 
ords show Its speed to be up to thirty- 
five miles n hour, with power to as- 
i end to an altitude of over a mile. It 
lan carry at least a ton of explosives 
and sufficient supplies for a run of over 
HOO miles. Tlie bee-line distance be- 
tween the most contiguous parts of 
(lermany and England Is under 2oO 
mil'-:. Vft tlie whole noth>n of aerial 
attack bv vessels of the Zeppelin type 
is ridiculed In England. At least three 
highly eqiiipi>ed factories in tiernmny 
are now making dirigibles, and Count 
Zeppelin alone has $1,500,000 for the 
work. 

Xtin* U'hb Suocemiful. 
England luis not yet buUt a .success- 
ful dirigible— her two attempts were 
failures too slow, too small in carry- 
ing capacity, too limited In range of 
action ami allogt-ther un.suitable for 
oversea work. At present she has an- 
other ves-sel on the stocks, at Farn- 
borough, where she cannot lay down 
a really modern ship. This vessel will 
be her product for 1909. and the ad- 
miralty inav add another experimental 
dirigible, as promised. There Is no 
private factory In the British Isles 
wnicn has ever produced a really suc- 
cessful dirigible. Thus, by 1910 Eng- 
land m.iy have at most two non-rigid 
dirigibles of more or less experimental 
types and probably too small for prac- 
tical work. In 1911 she may be no bet- 
ter off and may be content to produce 
two more ships, also more or less ex- 

perlit '' and hv the critical period 

^,f I can add only one more. 

r ...jst extraordinary activity i.** 

evinced at once in making prepara- 
tl.ins. Kng'and will be utterly unable 
to produce by 1912 a fleet of ships 
capable of giving her any degree of se- 
curity ag.iinst the attack ot vessels 
like lilt ci.riiuui aerial tleet. It has 
cost «iermanv veara of well organized 
preparation, and the expenditure of 
over $2.50't.ottO to accomplish this. Ihe 
German people, of their own free will. 
gave Count Zeppelin |1. 375,000 to carry 
on bis work, and by 1912 most of that 
,„oi ■; have been transferred into 

a «■ and well tried aerial fleet. 

llet*.i>- ii*"» France, it is computed, 
sptnt over fTSO.oOO on experimental 
\%ork .vlilch resulted In the establlsh- 
menl'of hei aerial lleet. 

When the history of Germany s 
miglity iiBval developments comes to 
be vvritlen, ...ne name will stand out in 
bold. St relief — Admital Alfivd von 
Tirpitz. secretary of stale for the im- 
perial navy. To this giant, fork- 
bearded aallor-statesman. a magnificent 
specimen of Teuton physique of the 
old school, must fall the lion's shnre of 
credit foi the persistent aggressive- 
ness with which the I'atherland has 
rushed to the front rank as a sea 
power. He Is the real creator of the 
German Heel. 

REFORMATORY 
NEEDS REFORM 

Conditions in Ohio In- 
dustrial Home Appeal 
to Governor's Wife. 

CoUimlnis. Ohio. April 23.— Mrs. Jud- 
son Harmon, wife of Governor Harmon. 
has appealed to the women of the state 
to irit-i.st themselves In the formula- 
tion ..t .^ome practicable plan by wlii'l} 
the dfplorable condition at the Girls 
Industrial home, near Delaware, may 
be r.'medled. After visiting 'e insti- 
tution In company with the j,'overnor 
-ind becoming cognizant ol the unfortu- 
nate situatl.m there, and the need tor 
action for the betterment of the wel- 
fare of the Inmates, she concluded to 
«end out a mt-ssage to the women of 
the state, asking them to co-operate 
with h>»r in doing s<Miiethlng that would 
bring about an improvement of condi- 
tions in the institution. . „,. 

The sight of between 600 and 700 
girls huddU'd together in cramped 
<iuarlers. and that of gins of 6 or . 
years associating with those much 
older, and many of whom, she feared, 
were none too good, aroused her pity. 
She found that the library In the home 
was very small, and that there was 
little reading material for the girls, 
and that, as a result, they would have 
much time on their hands. Mrs. Har- 
mon thinks that it would be wise If 



You Can't Better 
I the Breed b> Polishing 
the Brass on the Harness— 



Jl^^JM^Mt^ 



the women of the state, among other 
things, would see to it that these girls 
are furnished with plenty of whole- 
.some reading matter, ami she suggest- 
ed that they should smd the right kind 
of books aiid magazines. 

She saw but a single Bible in the 
whole institution, and that was in the 
hospital. The girls are in need of 
more spiritual an<l moral training. She 
also noted the crying need for more 
room. Two girls occupy single beds 
In rooms so small that there Is hardly 
room enough to turn around. In addi- 
tion to the bed there is a small wash- 
stand in the room, and the walls are 
without decorations <if any kind. The 
surroundings are such that there Is 
little to develop the best qualities that 
may lie latent In the girls. Mrs. Har- 
mon suggests tlt^t the rooms be made 
more attrat Uve.- .'^he also noted the 
lack of iiroper sanitary arrangements. 
The girls as a whole looked as clean 
and fitly as could be expected under 
the circumstances. 

Mrs. Harmon »avs that there is great 
need for such action as will give the 
fullest encourag-ement to the girls to 
reform, and also to give them such In- 
dustrial trainhiK thai when they go 
out Into thftworkl they will be able to 
earn an lione.^l living. The building 
in which thej^Awo girls who were 
brought to Colum'biis for medical treat- 
ment were located Is some distance 
awav from the main building, and It 
was' found In a badly crowded state. 
There were eignty-flve girls in it, and 
there is but one matron to keep tlu-m 
under sur\etllnnce. More matrons 
should be provided, as the present 
number Is entirely too small to watch 
those entrusted to their care. 

PRIN( KSS VVOILD DANCE. 

Novel Performance Whicli \> as for 
the Nobility Only. 

Rome. April L'.".. — There was a gor- 
geous display of dresses and Jewels 
recently at the Theater Qulrlno. where 
the elite of society gathered at the In- 
vitation of I'rlnce Ahamrrlek Lazareff, 
to witness the graceful dancing of his 
wife. 

The young Russian princess possess- 
es beauty aa well as real talent, and 
although fcer birth jMid social position 
would preclude her from ever taking 
up dancing as a profession, her hus- 
band frequently deplored the fact that 
she could nevof be known to fame. 
Some time ag'o the idea occurred to 
him of hiring a theater to which their 
friends could be invited to witness 
her perfainiance. 

The performance was a great suc- 
cess. The house, which was beautiful- 
ly decorated with tlowers. was packed 
to overflowing, and after a scene from 
"Cavalerrla Rusticana," sung by Bar- 
oness Korf and Princess TrubrtsKoy. 
and conducted by the composer him- 
self, the "star" appeared on the scene, 
clad In an "early Empire" gown of 
shimmering gold. 

The young princes.«i was rather ner- 
vous, but after treading tiie first few 
measures of the classical Italian "nas 
de deux" In comuany with her dancing 
master, she seemed to forget her au- 
dience, and gave herself up completely 
to her art. She was greeted with a 
thunder of applause and repeated en- 
cores. 



CONQUEST 
OF THE AIR 

Adds Zest to Literary 

Composition in Ttiese 

Days. 

Every Corner of tlie 

Eartli is Now Being 

Exploited. 



London. April 23.— Airship^ as aids 
to literary adventure are heralded by 
several English critics as saving the 
public taste from becoming jaded. Al- 
ready books have begun to appear in 
which tlie aeroplane is assuming an Im- 
portant position. The writing up of 
the earth has been going on so system 
aiically that practically every portion 
of its surface has been covered by cei 
tain authors who have, as it were, dui 
ing the last quarter of a century, 
divided the globe into spheres of inllu 
ence. Thus, Stanley Weyman has taken 
France; Seton Merrlman, Russia, 
Marion Crawford, Italy; J. M. Barrie 
Scotland; Robert Hichens, Sicily and 
the Sahara; Robert Louis Stevenson 
the Pacific Islands; Nansen, the North 
Role; Dr. Cook and others, the South 
Vntarciic. and so on. Even in such a 
small place as England, minute divi- 
sion of the country has taken place 
among authors, Thomas llordy taking 
Dorset. Eden Rhillpotls Devon. Hilaire 
Belloc Sussex, and W. W. .lacobs the 
cast coast. It is the .same with 
America, various writers exploiting 
the Southern states, others the North 
ern. Western and other sections of the 
country. 

Even the air, however, lias been 
more or less pre-empted by H. G 
Wells, and the literary Alexander, look- 
ing for new worlds to conquer, will 
have to get off the earth, betaking him 
self, say, to the unlimited space beyond 
Mar.?. 

"The reason aeroplanes and other 
new ideas are making their way Into 
modern fiction.' said a well-known 
writer In discussing this and kindred 
subjects recently, "Is because this age 
demands noveltv and sensation before 
anvthing else. The true delineation ot 
character may be done away with if a 
writer undertakes to provide a suffi- 
cient number of thrills and shocks, and 
keep things moving. Character delinea- 
tion is becoming decidedly old fash- 
ioned. It is for this reason that jou 
lind manv modern novels dealing with 
mysticism and similar topics. The for- 
mula for writing has changed. It is 
not necessary to hold the mirror up to 
best books are often 
while mediocre produc- 
endless sensations, sue- 




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quality. The right suits for those who 
know value. The unsettled business con- 
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tions on our high grade suits for a few 
days only. 

10.00 Suits for $ 7.98 

$12.00 vSuils for $ 9.98 

$l.->.tK) .Suits for $11.98 

$18.00 Suits for S13.98 

$20.t»0 Suits for $16.98 

$2.'>.U0 Suits lor Sl»»8 

StyHsh Hats 

$l..->0 Hats for SI. 00 

$2.00 Huts for $1.50 

$3.00 Hats for $2.00 




mir 



i 



-4«B 



m jmmm 



Men's High Grade 
Packard Shoes 

$3.50, $4.00, $5.U0 



Complete showing of Children's Cloth- 
ing and Shoes at a positive saving. We 
share our profits with you by our profit- 
sharing refund plan. 

B*~A.ik for catalogue. 




-I ■ 



■mHJlJiy l>V'-«<>iwii«iii«MpMIBi«| 



nature. The 
passed over, 
lions, giving 
ceed." 



Mrs. 

ire of 



for nearly fifty years, and on the death 
of the author, his son continued it. 
Whether the $365,000 left by the latter 
came from profits on the work or not 
is unknown. The book is sill copy- 
right, however, and doubtless brings in 
a steady revenue. 



r 



It Is an old story 
now that nervous 
people tell of how 
the blood became 
thin and poor and 
then the nervous 
symptoms follow- 
ed. 

How many cor- 
rectly fi^ess that 
the thin blood was 
responsible for 
the nervous dis- 
order? 

The nerves get 
all their nourish- 
ment through the 
blood and as thin 
blood is deficient 
in nerve-building 
material^ the 
nerves become 
starved. Pain and 
nervous break- 
down result. 

Dr. Williams' 
Pink Pills 

are a tonic for the 
blood that supply 
it with the neces- 
sary elements to 
nourish and tone 
up the nerves and, 
the cause being 
removed, nature 
does the rest and 
. healtti is restored. 

At all drugKiit«, or direct from 



I 



I 



Dr. WiKianiTlileUicine t ompany, 
J> -Sklioietiady, N. Y. 

SO cents i>cr box; iix boxes forfa.SA. 



•«•< 



9 

I 

»4 



• * • 
Humphry Ward has aroused the 
manv authors recently by re- 
marking: "I'eople who read only nov- 
els never properlv appreciate what they 
are. They are the jam of literature, 
and all properly conducted persons 
should begin their usual meal with 
bread and butter." 

Most novelists are asking if Mrs. 
Ward looks on her own works In this 
light; and quite an amusing contro- 
> ersv has arisen over the question of 
novels as foodstuffs. If Mrs. Ward's 
novels are to be regarded as jam, one 
critic points out that J. M. Uarrle 
.should be looked upon as the Scotch 
hr(.th of tlie literary symposium, while 
Marie Corelll Is recommended to young 
women as a cure for headache. This 
idea and the remark attributed to Mrs. 
Humphry Ward emphasize the fact 
that people of these days read novels 
only for amusement; which fact is 
further driven home by the failure of 
most novels which attempt to do any- 
thing else than entertain. There are 
few authors who can afford to Instruct 
their audiences and amuse them at the 
same time. . 

* • • 

Sir Ernest Clarke, who owes his title 
to literature through his connection 
with the curious publication known as 
the "Sette of Old Volumes," has been 
giving his views recently on the sub- 
ject of plagiarism among authors, and 
also up(m the benefits of prison life 
upon composition. Plagiarism is .so 
commonplace in these days, says Sir 
Ernest, that it Is unnoticed. Only oc- 
casionallv, when an action for Infringe- 
ment of" copyright calls attention to 
the subject, do cases of actual theft 
eome before the public. He excuses it, 
however, on the ground that every 
writer, not even excepting Homer, has 
dealt rather freely with the subject 
matter provided by his literary con- 
temporaries; and particularly of those 
who have lived before his time. In a 
discussion on tlibs topic which arose in 
a lit'^rarv circle in London recently, one 
of the disputants maintained tliat the 
plagiarism committed by most authors 
was of an unconscious kind, and was 
due as largely to mental telepathy as 
to deliberate fraud. This may be true, 
but there Is no gainsaying the fact that 
there are lots of literary kleptomaniacs 
roaming around, and the excuse of 
telepathy should not be accepted with- 
out due caution. 

Sir Ernest Clarke has great admira- 
tion for literature produced In pri.son, 
and cites the Instances of Leigh Hunt 
in Marshalsea; Walter Ralelgn in the 
Tower and others. After speaking for 
some time on tliis subject at a recent 
meeting at the author's club, lie con- 
cluded his remarks by .saying: 

"Rut as one reads today some of the 
effusions poured forth on a confiding 
public, one cannot help thinking that if 
l)rison in the past produced such splen- 
did results, would not something similar 
be highly beneficial at the present day? 
Only two or three years of kindly in- 
carceration, only two or three years of 
firm restriction from pen. Ink and 
paper, onlv a judicious discipline in 
svntax ami analysis and. perhaps, we 
should see bands of men and women 
di.«charged from their temporary homes 
at the end of their term with at least a 
real moral consciousness of the dlffer- 
tnce between adverbs and adjectives, 
and a nobler, higher sense of duty to 
tli^ relative pronoun and its antecedent, 
and more thought for the little verb 
which now occasionally trips along, 
alas. In the wrong furrow." 

• • • 

As to the influence of prison 
authorship, it depends largely 
nature of the offense for which 
thor mav happen to be committed to 
iall W " T. Stead, editor of the Review 
of Reviews, told the writer recently 
that In his opinfon, an author is not 
seasoned until he has been m jail. 
.■<tead It will be remembered, suffered 
incarceration In Holloway prison for 
some time as the result of his ".Nlaiden 
Tribute to Modern Babylon. ' He had 
a nicely furnished room, practically 
nothing to do; and managed to run his 
magazine until he came out. He was 
imprisoned as a first-class misdemean- 
ant which makes all the difference in 
the" world as to whether prison life be 
good for a man or not. Poor Oscar 
Wilde was not benefited by his term of 
liard labor, and neither was Arthur 
Lvnch, though the latter has made con- 
siderable copy from his prison exper- 
ien'^es Lvnch. while undergoing the 
deatli penalty, wrote some very good 
blank verse, which he has since pub- 
lished. ^ 

• • • 

John Lewis Roget. son of the author 
of the famous work, "Rogefs Thesaurus 
of English Words. " recently died leav- 
ing an estate worth $3*iG,000. It Is cur- 
rlous how this wonderful book eame 
into existence. It seems that old Peter 
Mark Roget. the author, was a French- 
man who had great difficulty in mas- 
tering the English language, and to aid 
himself in this task began preparing 
'lis Thesaurus of words which ultimate- 
Iv developed into the work which has 
been •'o valuable to so many literary 
,men The work was under preparation 



HONOR PRINCE OF MONACO. 

Mayor of Monte Carlo Eloeted to 
Academy of Sciences. 

Paris, April 23. The Academy of 

Sciences has elected the prince of Mo- 
naco to be a member of that Illus- 
trious body, to fill the chair rendered 
vacant by the death of Lord Kelvin. 
Tliere was practically no contest, al- 
though three votes were given for 
Lord Raylclgh. It was not unfitting 
that the prince of Monaco should he 
chosen to succeed Lord Kelvin. The 



great English physicist scored some of 
his greatest triumphs in connection 
with the ocean. The prince of Monaco 
has also rendered great service to 
science In ci>iu.i' lion with oceano- 
graphy. 

While Lord Kelvin devoted himself 
to the physical side of this branch of 
science, the prince has carried on a 
most brilliant work of research and 
discovery In the domain of the na- 
tural history of the ocean. He has 
applied his life and his fortune to 
prosecuting inquiries Into the Hora and 
launa of the profound depths of thw 
sea and has endured great fatigue an»1 
made long voyages In the course of 

this work. 

• 

"Suffered dav an<l night the torment 
of Itching piles. Nothing help-d me 
until I used Doan's Ointment. It 

cured me pe«manently," — Hon. John K. 
(Jarrett, Mayor, «lrard. Ala. 



-«- 




LAST CHANCE 

TO SEOHH^IE TftHE €ELEiMTEi 

W L 

DOUiGLAS 



iilllH 



STAMPED 



life on 
on the 
an au- 



$3 



50 

and 



$4 



Shoes and Oxfords 

$ i .98 



LOT 1— Any Tan Shoe 
or Oxford in the house 
— your choice 



while they 
•ast 



LOT 2— We have 
placed on tables for 

Saturday about 300 pair of Men's 
Slioes and Oxfords, all styles, broken 




LOT 3— The balance 

of our regular linos of shoes 
and Oxfords marked for Saturday 



$2 



MEN'S RUBBERS AT LESS THAN COST 

DOUGUS SHOE STORE, 

316 West Superior Street, Torrey Building 

Store Open Until 1 1 P. M. Saturday. 





•^ 




■ ' ' ' 



xhe: urairrH: EVEmsxi uesalu:.. Friday, april 23. i909> 



\ 
















f" 



UNION GETS 
A SETBACK 

Many Projected Church 
Mergers Halted By Ten- 
nessee Decision. 

Property Awarded to the 
Anti-Union Faction in 
Cumberland Church. 



Philadelphia. April 23. — A set- 


back 


«rlv«>n to till* man 


rent 


.. ,.t,„rch union in 


t'. 


;siun of thr "Vvn- 


r ' 


iit. awiudiiig til*' 


f 


lontr^'d to the Cinn- 


t 


Tl),, 


U.:.-- . 


.. ........ _■. 1,111 


b<;4y 


to the a; n faction in tlu- 


■C 'i 


- •..ll-K'H. '■ ' ■ ■ f'l«^ 


\ 


ihfin '"- 


V 


' , ■ i . ■ i t . (.■ 11 




■ •■arinK r>t 


, .,,..; tsJ to iinitf 


li 






1 .r ;.i. n t i - nil ion 


11, 


lad 


t ■ 


I'Ul 


▼. 




t 




R 


.. .1 


J 

I 


to the 


il 


.,.' .supreme 


Cwurt*. 




PliiiiH Tlint Mnv Itv Ilnll«"«i. 


1 

rlii:. 


! ; 


CTX'1* 




11 ■ 




t 





1 ; 



thtlr t.i:. 



ar; ■ 



>■ " , 





:itionalts<ts, 




■ - 1 


rrotf.st- 

ion for 






! aii'l 


1 1 c h u r 




BOl 


::AV\ne: 




' 'lins 




ilSt 


.Bpi.s co- 




1 -«i 


at thP 

■ ' '.lily 

tllC 


.1 •!(...; .\ 




..ip- 


Ban'i^' 




— 1 
,vur 


1.1. .ti .1'. ' 11. * 


.lit-* ^. 


. 1 ..;. ated 


ntH among 


the 


men ot 


I".. !>f..|'>t.. 






s bomheh 


f>n. The 


.1 ..n 


the 


verv 'lay 



ul 



iT.,ji.-.'.u..iru- 



•eel cm 
their '■ 
court.", 
form ' 

the rlfc.--'.- 
tlcins. 

The rnltri! 



dli. 



undoij t.il tide of sen- 

of closer relationship 

;rious denominations 

. The law of at least 

ipetl In to declare that 

..,. .«,,.;# finally have 

i y the clvU 

iar, In the 

interests, has 

i.iiitual convlc- 

■»Mne court had 

• n V9 Jones, 

. . cleslasticnl 

-MAtent 

t inal 

■ ,,_ .., vallv 



Tl'iree ■ 
Cum ''•■•f' i-i 
Wf. 
tol. 


tills* unKu 
■-bvtevian 
suininn 
two y. 


The tlrbate • 
had raged > 

the a I 
Ian I 





> ' .! ;i 1 1 u 
("Utnbf-: 

tt-nt .^"- 
t(.< Ite 
■■■id .L :. 

tlit-l 1 V 

tlie 



'a 

id 

n, 

,. ii-r- 

ulent 

.1 the I 
■ ..f I 

and tlic 

rumher- 

! : t : < ■ a 1 1 li 

•nomlna- 



Itl 

fart 



the 
that 



m 
I i 



U 

m 
tl. 

t" 

o. 

r» 
til 
auantsl uiiiui'i. 

Tiio million 

Tlv 

berli. . 

In Tcl.i.i. t .-M '■■. "'In 

Imporiain'f i" t; 
p t .. . . . I . 



10 "^be r«-'Vind In the Noith- 

d to be very 
i formldaldc 

- ine of Us 
ilf of the 
1 Uxiid nuini'crshlp; tlie 
united church say tliat 
■;(> per <-cnt, or, by a 
• t-, ;■;"- per cent. Be 
statu u£ Tenn^-;«>c 
nomentous ca- 
,f stronghold > ; > 
and ol the anli- 
R eel -Foot I..ake 
■ tt four-fifths 
stood out 



'1' ■ I m-i i.v. 

j: i.S€' at 

iCllOt'll If^" 

Frest>yt*-M.i : 



IlitllnrM liivoUetl. 

pr<'i>erty of the t'lini- 

ttrmtj denomlnatioti if 

• ' -'ive.s more 

1 of the 

ini .i.ciuy other 

ding the union. 



a i. 



Nash\ iltc, 



, 1 1 



.Bfli 

\>. 

<■ 

I'l 
<J- 

wa»- 

ettc^ 

being 

wlien. 

i- 

t. 

r <:.'«■*< 1. 

Ings 

J......: 

and 

pt..; 



The 



inii\'«T.>iiy 

■if I.fd>;i. n"fi 



, i.v t*' I '=•"-. Piiblifh- 
slnce 
Sunday 
whole 
• $::'">.- 

u:.d Uieological 
ai>- .^ald to he 

$.;i0.o«o. 

'Uffholll tllr 

I ih li.atjo.- 
remc court 

■ 1' ■ 




WATCHING THE GAME 



VOU have your favorites, of course; you may have it all figured out just who s going to win, and why, and how y«" "^^y ^^ 
Y posted on "form" and have the averages and percentages down fine; or you may not eare much about , , °; ^e anywhere 
between these extremes. Men are like that about clothes as well as baseball some are over-cntical some are careless but he great 
big majority of us want good clothes; and want to be sure of getting them. We've got the right things for all of these men. the 
critical, the indifferent, the sensible. They're 

Hart Schaffner & Marx Clothes 

and they meet every requirement that ean be fairly m.ide of elothes. They're stylish; theyre made of the best of all-wool fabnes; 
they're Llorcd in Se most perfect manner known to the craft; they're right; and we know ,t. We sell them because they ,e nght, 

for you and lor ns. Sujtg attd Ovcrcoats $15.00 to $35.00 

This store is the home of Hart Schaffner <Sc Marx clothes. 



The Style Store tor 1909 



KENNEY Wl an 




The Style Store lor 1909 



no 
purt 



I in 

jRSlltUI 

three v. 
board ' 
Buch ' 



,{,_• qu.'.'^tiMii.-; are 
K' upon all the 
:i Tennessee. Al- 
.1 nil...... --i ilie cliurch build- 
have lieen vacated by the union - 

..r ihf Northern church 

the publishing house 

V and seminary < 

outside of the S( 

.;. The former ha.s al- 

t i.\ a board of trustees 

il .states; tlil-H makes 

m an appeal to the 

rnt,! ctiurt. Idke- 

tt the educatk>nal 

" 'rs. becau.*<e, 

union, the 

..Mv.Mcing some 

lis as have arisen. 

;. .ul Into the Novtliem 



the hardships entaihd ,M...n '"'1'^!;'^;'^ 
.■ongrcgations and -• );' '* 

t',- . Tly declBlon.s 1. . uie against 

aiists they liave lo«t the house.s 
, . ..ship which bad become endearetl 
to them through years of wor.sh p. 
N'ow the unionises must expcn.m c the 
same suffering. ' v,i theie is a 

single anti-unh.n ' i" a c.mgre- 

gatUm. he or n t laim the prop- 

erty for the . '•"^•» '-;VTndbuUl 

Presbyterians inu-st move out and tjuuu. 
What all tills means in neighboring 

tarlan iirtivlty. may readily be ImaK- 
Ined. 

Vn*tnm Pay Heavily. 

The na f the churches that 

fa vorcd* I. . < ve nearl y all pa^d h 

l,.;.vv prit. fur i! ' Hon. Tlu y 

,,.v>.- io.i more or '\\[?V/Jt 

inemhersh p. and. conscqut iitl>, in sai 
arv In many cases, this has been true 
of the loyalists, also. Both have shown 
a brave willingness to suffer for cun- 
sclence s sake. 

Interested churchmen are asking, is 
this .ri..ther Wee Free decision?" His- 
toric in the annals of moden.<^iristen- 
dom la the case of the "'«'' ";"'VV,^„ 
s..„tevs from th- ".'>'"" *'^,,*'''^,.,fir,1 
f Scotland and the i;" J"'} 
; ,n church Into the I iilt'-d 

Fi>-e church. This ''""^l^"' , J'^. J^;:;- 
Free« as thev aie commonly called, 
'd to be still the Free church, 
natter finally reached the house 
.„ i.,,dH. which handed over to them 
all tlie Immensely valuable properties 
of the big and wealthy Free church 
denomination. 

Th>r<', It Is to be hoped, the analogy 
t.nd-« f-.r the Wee Frees have .shown 
„., ■ . manage their suddenly 

a. iltli; and have grown nar- 

. ^v,, .sectariaTi and more blgot- 

1 with each paasinK yen At present. 
;.,,dr €our.<ie is alniMst a scandal In 
Britlsli religious eircU-s. The opinion 
that the Cumberland Presbyterian loy- 
iisis will follow their ■ •« is 

probably born of the pa. p f 

the losing ••side in this case. w....ii will 
be 1 st'.rlc; If for nothing else than 
that it has probably set back the cause 
of church union a decade. 



WOULD JOIN 
IMMORTALS 

Paris Restaurant Keeper 

Aspires to the French 

Academy. 

Has Written Poetry, His- 
tory and Even a 
Tragic Drama. 



. 1 y. 
'.i ..r..>c bigger fcclesiaslical and prop- 
erty iiuestions. wldch tin 
pre'ss will thrc.'^li «'int U'v 
come, are of less human int- 



■i>-.st lluin 



Vandalism. 



Vashing Windows. 

Before windows are washed, remove 
the dmt both outside and in with a dry 
soft cloth, clean the corners and grooves 
with a skewer, covered with a cloth. 
Have ready a pail of warm suds made by 
dissolving a tablespoonful of Gold Dust 
washing powder in warm water. Dip a 
■oft cloth in the water, squeeze almost 
dry and wipe the glass off. Polish with 
chamois as it leaves no lint and does the 
work with more ease. Do not wash 
windows when the sun is shining on 
them. Wash mirrors iu the same way as 
windows. Then polish with a soft cloth 
;harged with powdered whiting. Finish 
irith an old silk handkerchief. 



To the Kditor of The Herald: 

1 was stirred to righteous Indlgna- 
ti,.n t.v seeing that some vandal ha« 
niVieii and disfiguied our new and 
beiuUful Y. M C. A. building by 
s.Mat<'hlng with some sliarp ln.strument 
the U-iter^ ■ W. L." on one of tlie base- 
ment stones near the Third avenue en- 
trance How could a person be so 
low an.l contemptible to perpetrate 
such a thing? 1 thought that the 
^ urce of it vva« our besetting sin of 
i , , h.e. and I was reminded of a 

... iiat 1 once heard on the sub- 

k. t u. .everenee. In which the preach- 
er said that he had heard the story 
that once, as the chief Justice of the 
I'nited States was passing Into the 
lobby of a large hotel. « >o""F f"**" 
with a hat on his head and a cfgai In 
his mouth, without removing either 
saluted the judge with a He lo 
iudee'" The preacher added that if the 
'voung man had stood with Moses when 
he beheld the burning brush he would 
nut have thought to remove h s shoes 
unless It was too warm for his feet 
on the heavenly Are. May we be de- 
livered from the sin of Irreverence. 

Duluth. April 23. 



Paris, April 23. — Michel Pons, poet, 
trag. tiiiin. .uitliur and restaurant keep- 
er of Paris, is greatly disappointed 
that lie has not been selected at the 
iciciit .Icciiim i.f tilt French academy 
to till I he place among the Immortals 
made vacant by tin- death of Francol.>, 
Ooppee. There are hosts of other dis- 
appointed would-be Immortals in 
France, hut none, perhap.s. whose grief 
Is so poignant, and vvIh. feels so deep- 
ly the slight which his country has 

^^Tlds^'Ts.'^'^rhaps. the first time on 
record that an out-and-out woiking- 
man has made a bold bid .for offlcia 
recognition among me >"tellectuai 
giants of his country. His title to the 
honor is not. at least in Michel Pons 
judgment, an empty one. iii the nrsi 
place, though pursuing the life of an 
humble restaurateur in the Rue Ues 
Moulins, he has not permitted the niere 
waiting upon customers to Interfere 
with his literary production. His first 
volume was a small pamphlet of poems 
entitled •'Early Dreams', which shows 
that the poet was a believer in the 
brotherhood of man, and in all the 
fraternal amenities that go along with 
that aspiration. Of course, liberty and 
eiiuallly figured largely In his "Karly 
Dreams." which, incidentally, met with 
considerable success. The fact that 
they were produced oy a genuine 
worklngman. unskilled in poetry, helped 
their success so much that the author 
was encouraged to continue his out- 
pourings. His first atteinpt was fol- 
lowed by a volume entitled Soul 
Hlossoms," which displayed to an ad- 
nilring world, the Introspective genius 
of »the resaturant keeper, and demon- 
strated the fact that restaurateurs 
have souls, and also that they can 
blossom, on occasion. 

Went Into HI««or>'. ^ 
E.xhausting his poetic vein, for the 
time being— or. rather permitting it to 
remain temporarily- unworked— Michel 
next turned his attention to prose and 
turned out a vulum© ot "Impression* 



of Italv." This work was reviewed 
with some favor by the press and M. 
Pons then lapsed into history, tailing 
a flyer on some "Xtdts on the Muil. 
Little Is heard of Jliis effort, but he 
next broke Into tfJlgic drama, pro- 
ducing a play called "Slaves." 

With all thest- displays of genius he 
tliought himself entitled to come for- 
ward and claim a place among the im- 
mortals. In his address demanding 
latlifr than asking for this exalted 
position, he describes himself ae: 

•'A son of the gmerous trench na- 
tion from whose boSom democracy 
n.ade its first attempt to soar. I nave 
the honor and the cotirage, humble and 
lowlv writer as I am. to offer myself 
as the candidate of the workers. 

"And what man Is tht re on the face 
of the earth." he continues, "or even 
the god of literature and of art — who 
would have the iiseuranee to tell man- 
kind at large that my doing so Is an 
act of follv, that my dream is a night- 
mare, when one sees denutles. sensi- 
tors and even ministers in the world 
of politics who have sprung from the 
ranks of the workers? 

"Has not the worker a will, an Intel- 
ligence and a heart like other men? 
Was nature, when she gave him birth, 
a hondmother? I 'id she not endow him 
with the gifts she gave to others, he 

asks. . . ,. . 

Th'? i;%'orkmau*ii Value. 

"The masterpiece of tlie architect 
would not live without the workman 
who translated the idea Into stone. 



Napcdeon would not have conquered 
the world without the workman who 
won his liattles. .... 

"I offer myself with confidence in the 
hope that all of you. poets, historians, 
orators, statesmen and men of science, 
who, as it were, are the supreme quint- 
essence of literature, of science and of 
art. vou who sym.bolize the crown of 
literary glorv which our great country 
wears — in the hope, I say. that your 
lofty souls will put aside petty con- 
siderations and antiquated prejudices, 
and that you will welcome heartily 
the man of the people who comes to 
vou full of courage, but void of pride. 
" After this Impassioned peroration, 
the French seeker after Immortality 
deserves at least to receive, at the 
liands of his country, a consolation 
prize to encourage him to produce still 
inore poetry, history, prose and tragedy 
which may. in time, entitle him to 
the place he has strenuously sought. 

•■ 

rp Hefore The Bnr. 

N H Brown, an attorney of Pitts- 
field. Vt., writes: "We have used Dr. 
Kings New Life Pills for years and 
find them such a good family medicdne 
we wouldn't he without them.' For 
Chills Constipation. Biliousness or 
Sick Headache they work wonders, 25c 
at all dru ggists. 

CONVERT OF 

REVIVALIST 



$100. Can you get some one lo go on 

his bond'/' . , .,. X u 

Chief Inspector Mayer said that ne 
would go on his bond for the limit. 

In 1878. after being graduated from 
the University of Alabama, Hev. Mr. 
Brlggs was sent to a small church in 
Galveston, Tex. Later he conducted re- 
vival services all through the South 
and became pastor of a large cliurch in 
New Orleans. In 1885 he was made 
editor of tlie Christian Advocate of 
Nashville, Tenn. 

SCHOONERS BE.4T KATY." 
"How Frij^co Road Bested Its Rival in 



tepj 
and 






Oklalioina FiKht. 



^RTERS 

■■iTTLB 

[TlVER 



Genuine Must Bear 
Fac-Simiie Signaturt 




REFUSE SUiSTiTUTEt. 



SIGK HEADACHE 



Positively cared hy 
these Little PUls. 

They also reUers Dl» 
tress from DyBpepsla. Ilk 
dlgesaoa and Too Hearty 
Eatuif .. A perfect reiD> 
edy for Dlrrtnat. Nausea 
DrowsloesBi Bad TuM 
la the Moat^ Coated 
tVmgue, Pain In Xhb Bidak 
'.K)RPID UVJOL, Hmv 
fcfolate tbe Bowels. Purely Vegretabla. 

SMAUPILL SMALL DOSL SMALL FRICL 



CARTER'S 

ITTLE 

m 



r 



CARTEL 

YlVER 

■ pJLi.& 



Mmw Must Bear 
Fac-Simile Signatur* 




REFUSE SUBSTITUTES. 



Becomes Bondsman for 

His Old Pastor and 

Friend. 

New York, April 23.— Chief Postofflce 
Inspector Walter S. Mayer, who years 
ago was converted through tlie minis- 
try of Rev. George Waverly Briggs, 
former pastor in the M. E. church south, 
appeared as bondsman for that clergy- 
man when he was arraigned in Jeffer- 
son Market court on a charge of petty 
larceny. 

"He is an old boyhood friend, " said 
the postofflce inspector, after he had 
told Magistrate House that he would 
furnish ball In any required amount. 

Then the inspector told between sohs 
how he had been converted many years 
ago In Galveston. Tex., during a re- 
vival conducted by the prisoner, then 
known as the "Revivalist of the South. 
As the story was told the old preacher 
also broke down and wtpt. 

The preacher had been arraigned In 
the court charged with the larceny of 
three atomizers from Henry Bohmfalk, 
a druggist, at 660 Third avenue. 

"Where is the complainant? asked 

"He is "not here. I don't think that 
he will prosecute,' said Detective 
c* 1 V' n n 

"Well get him here." said the court. 
"This is a sad case, and well have 
him come and clear the prisoner s nanae. 
I'll make the bail the lowest possible— 



Vinita, kla.. April 23.— The story of 
how the Frisco railroad finally secured 
a crossing over the "Katy" at Vinita. 
following a prolonged watchfulness on 
the part of the latter to prevent such 
a crossing being made, is t<dd by John 
Swain, one of the old-timers in Indian 
territory, and who helped survey the 
boundary line between Texas and the 
Indian territory before the war; crossed 
the great plains twice; was stationed 
in Arizona as a soldier in the united 
States army during the war; dug for 
gold in California, and who has. for 
the past thirty-six years, lived In 
Vinita. where he has sold goods and 
groceries to travelers and traded with 
the Indians. One of the most amusing 
stories of frontier life Is how the 
Frisco railway crossed the Missouri. 
Kansas & Texas line when the former 
road came into Vinita. ^ ^ ^ , 

The "Katy" was about the first road 
through the territory. Vinita was then 
a kind of gateway for wagon trains to 
the Southwest, and was called Down- 
ingvllle. When tlie "Katy"" learned of 
the Frisco's coming It became jealous 
and attempted to change the town site 
by going further south two miles. But 
tlie majority of the people of Downlng- 
ville did not take kindly to the project, 
and Downingville stayed where it was. 



Tlie Frisco came on into town an^ 
built up to the "Katy"' track. TheO 
they stopped because the "Katy"' k 
trains of cars slowly moving up a 
down the line. This lasted for two 
days and the people became interested. 

One morning the Frisco force was in 
readiness to do quick work. The 
'"Katy" train moved up slowly ana 
passed to where it usually stopped. 
Between that place and an intersec* 
tion was a wagon crossing, and a 
long train of "prairie schooners" heldl 
the "Katy" engineer. The driverf 
were very leisurely about it, crossin 
the track and occasionally one woul 
get stuck. The engineer whistled an^ 
blew off steam and tried to scare thcmi 
without success. He was afraid tO 
run into a w.agon and knock It off, aa 
the men with the wagon train carried 
Winchesters. 

When the last wagon passed the en« 
gineer tore down the track to se^ 
what had happened. But. ahis. he was 
too late. The Frisco had crossed th« 
"Katy." 

• 

WordM To F^rceise The Soul. 

"Your son has Consumption. His 
case is hopeless."' These appalUn* 
words were spoken to George lij. 
Blevens. a leading merchant of Spring-* 
field N C. l)y two expert doctors — onaf 
a lung specialist. Then was showii' 
the wonderful power of Dr. King's New; 
Discovery. "After three weeks use," 
writes M"r. Blevens. "he was as well a* 
ever. 1 would not take all the money 
in the world for what it did for my; 
boy."" Infallible for Coughs and Colds, 
Its the safest, surest cure of desperate 
Lung diseases on earth. 60c and |1, 
Guarantee satisfaction. Trial butlltt 
free. All druggists. 

Recent experiments made by balloon^ 
Ists show that the upper air is not fred 
from germs, as has long been sup-* 
posed. Gelatin plates exposed threflj 
miles above the earth have caugh^ 
many germs, mostly pigmented. th«| 
pigment probably formli.g protection 
against ultra-violet rays and cold. 




I 



I 



The best food for growing children is 

SHREDDED 
WHEAT 

Contains all the material needed for 
building muscle, bone and brain — a food 
to study on, to play on, to grow on. 





H il|llllll » | p 



■ 

II 



T 



i^B 





r 

1 
I 





THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: FRIDAY, APRIL 23. 1909. 



i mm 




D 



MANY ARE 
ATMEETS 

Farmers' Discussions Tliis 
Week in Si Louis 
County a Success. 

A.B.nostetterandOtl)ers 

Give Men of Soil 

Pointers. 



(ifli? !!H»rvt<'«» 



ivtr-mie. The i<i.H» w is .suiull. 



MAPLE SYRUP IN 
A HOLLOW LOG 

Novel Device to Send 

Sweet Substance to 

Roosevelt Family. 



t 

t 

t 
t 
I 

!• 
L 



f 






ill he 



STEEL CO. NOW 
SHIPPING ORE 

Began Loading Cars 

Thursday at Eveleth 

and Ely Mines. 



L£l<:&i ill"ij»ii 



1^ 



EAT WHAT 
YOU 



LIKE 



If Your Digestion Is Oood You'll 

Enjoy It. If You Don't Enjoy 

It, Take a Little Kodol. It 

Digests AH Food You Eat. 



— 1 1 ,, 

y.iur 

lIHl... 



nuitlff h«nv .iitticult or 

foot! t ■- {•'>■ tliv >; 



.if K.. 

• i i will 



It 



.1 It 

MV .■;it 

> ! 1 ; ; I ■ ■ ; 1 „ .1 
A ! a i » i ■ ■ - 



Ivxii'il !s «•> 8ur** • 
II, !;■! th.' many oti 
— lilt iff 



- '4 pounds of 

urally. just as a 
Thit Is why 



m umlig'-attxi food re- 

:._' i!i ih^- ■■it..m.i.-h IiuliiTt\Stlon 

'1\ .^-.s •-.luse-i by 

.,^. .-titiK. in your 

v>ur st.>niach can- 

^l food, of itself, it 

stance — and this as- 

;.iied by Kodol. 

h. by tempor- 

ii ti; i in the 

■ h-- st"i' .:iy r«'st 

• 1 ..s really a 

.11 for any Jl- 

• lisordtr <Jur Kuaranlee — 

L.Ilar buttle of Kodol. If you 

l)'-neflted — the druKJfi.-'t will at 

turn your money. Don't hesi- 

:iiiy druggist will .sell you Kodol 

' ' '•- The dollar bottle 

, as much sis the f>Oc 
I !.s prepart'd In the 
i f K. C. De Witt & Co.. 

Ctiicauo. 



t . . . i . 
and 

I' — 

! 
I 

t 
h 



\ 

K 

i 

ti 
u. . 

tut" 
on 
con I 



& Iron RjMitre r:*i!rr.Md offirla!.'* wert- 
in town \Ve(lnej»day lookinK after tlie 
ore shipplnn. It i.s staled unofficially 
tdat thf Miller may begin shipping 
nv\t wf<-k 

tiuin. A. Hi.Uer of the Spring mino 
wiiN in town W.-dntsday. The ^JprinK 
ha.-* not opened Vft. hut Mr. Holtor i.s 
1(11 Ite iheerful at the prospeets for this 
.•sunini<'r 




- . ■^,.■■.■1:1: 

till' in:iii 

n: i)ii;tUh 

It Trout 

, , -.i!< and 

A , ' '"f 

:; st'llt 

1 ojose- 

T 1 , i -; 



' on 

:it - 



',1 . ; i 1 1 ' i\ i a 
.vitli a I'lcture 

the 

^.■nc'e 
. ■ ,1 iiif ■■n- 

prl- 

• i. is 

■ :s siii'.iWtut- 

'■ •■ :! r-tJi on 

■i.-I|.>Ol 

■ . ■ ,,i : t ' 



: the M.'lli- 
t an fiit'-r- 
t ii'litorium, 

.•«• i- 
tho 
• if'i re- 
ly t)een 

t!.v. t, I. -in 'I' "f 
• as iiffu ill Itu.s 

Vf-i'l.'.> at- 

liere 



iti me 



II i i! «T!l ().,Ll"t 

the 
I»ti- 



itii nji- 

i; iiiaile. 

the 

.-.iist 



■'iiltje 
, ■ ■• I . 
ruunint^ 



ELY COUNCIL HAS 
FIXED SALARIES 

City Attorney Done Away 

With— Scavenger Bids 

Rejected. 

Ely. Minn.. April i.i. — tSpecial to The 
Herald.) — Tlie salaries of the variou.s 
i.ity oflfit'iaLs aniJ employes were fixed 
at an ailjourne'l m>-»'tin^ of the city 
council, a.>< follow- ''i'.v « l«-iii. L. W. 
\Vhit.-_ IT.'i per niontJi; .superintendent 
• if the light and water plant. T. \V. 
Toal. t}2:> t..r nieonth, wltlr rent, light 
and wultT. .■•ig;ineer.s at light and water 
plani, fSK. firemen ai the light and 
MMttr i>lant. f"'); chief of police Joliii 
l.aiiuifi. |*i(J per niontli: police officers 
J. .S. I •:' -f and U.scar Kauppi. each 
|T'>; .- '>nimls:<iunt.r, V\ illlant Pliil- 

U'>s t, :, jiinitor at city hall, (.'. 
• tiz. $<iO, chairman of the board of 
L.ih. I>r. O. W, Parker. $15'J per 
year, menibersi of the board of licalih, 
|5'J per year; atroft labor. |2 per da.\ . 
team.s, |5 ptt il i 

A pttition w ■ i\.'d from the 

fir«' •iijinrttnent a-sklug for .m nn-rease 
In ilif salaries of firmnen. ami for the 
1 Inn,-; "i 1 team for the use of tlie tin* 
depai iiii. ri! for the ensuing year. It 
wa.s relerreij lo tin- linance committf*' 
for a report at the ne.\t regular meet- 
ing- 

The petition .f .lohn riuth f'»r a sa- 
loon license w ;i;« refused on the Kroiimis 
that the city could not legally grant 
HUch license a.s the recent law specify- 
ing the number of saloons to certain 
ptipulations would not permit of the 
lIcensH being i-t-sued. 

Municipal Judge Thoni.is .Jury .sent In 
:i\inunUation to the effect that he 
ippolnied 1.. J. White as clerk of 
lunlcipal court and asking tlie city 
It to fix liks .salary. The council 
nxe'l the clerk's salary at STjO per 
month, after confirming the Judge's ap- 
pointment. 

I{ld.< for the scavenger work opened 
a» follow.s; Anton Kotchevar. |T;< per 
montli; Martin l"etek. $si), John Skaniz. 
%Hi: John P>edford. $U». 

All hill- V. . ' ■• I ejected, the council 
fixing the iniM;iii lo be paid the .scaveti- 
ger for the eiusulng year at $!tO per 
month, antt calling for applicatlon.s lo 
be considered at the next meeting. 

The report ot the superintendent of 
the light and walur plant sliowid that 
there were earniniis for the month 
atnountintr t > J;.',02I.«<*, au'l .1 charge 
again.si i:.i-. .it" tl.;»n,:: I'or expense 
mill deprrv-i.ii .III of the plant. 

e council letused l..) cotiunue the 
- -.f •>" ■ ■ ' I "■•\ fur the com- 



T 



tne 



t lUV 

had been 
council t 

ac'Mf! '■ 
f'i 



:. at any tin 
well voted, 
.service.s i)l' tin.' 



Mil pi 



•d ij> 



■■I employ an 

.It ; ii. ■iicie.s of 

•<iuire 

, lo re- 

aiioiueys that 

the prevlou.s 



>li»ye 

:iu the city again.st lite 
by Hernum Kandelin. 
1 by falling through 
!: last winter. 



FOKTV HOI IIS' i»KVOTIO\. 



1 ■ J, I. ' 

■ [iri'iiuo 



It 
111, 



tiolli 



d..n- 
eni- 

- .a 1 1 1 > • 

ictieally 

juivtor 

' ^ Shell 

■ rder 



OPEN PIT MINES 
ARE STARTING UP 

The Hull. Morris and 

Burt at Hibbing Are 

Busy Places. 

H.S'.iTc .Minn., April :i. — t special to 

The iltTiilti.i— Tlo- Hull. Morris and 
Burt, three of I. -, '(pen-pit mines 

: alton. are busy 

.*i1 in condition 

s and steam 

:auled and 

' >r the 

.; un- 

t iti the 

a. Sev- 

-; in the 

■ of tlie 

I, be- 
.... ...it in- 

CUen. t.'hia- 
Thi.s atart.i 

fi-oiii thus di.s- 
eek.» aliead of 



Sci'Aitt'N at Two Haibors Hwly <ihost 
( hiirfh Next V\ i'ek. 

■'"-, ■ IT 1! ;..■!-. .Minn., .\pril 'J.',.- — <' Spe- 

-.1 l;.-\. Futlier 1>. 

lu I. ... ll<>i> (JuLi.sl chui'ch 

s III.- ! illowim? program of 

I; . <is h Hi. Ill, commencing 

fi.-\l. J;iv. .lo.seph Wurm will 

liciv . ot the service, a.sshsted by 

ev. i i Jtev". J. Lemire of Duluth; 

T 9 a. m., solemn high 

i.<n; T:i!0 p. ni., sermon 

>.t(ir-.ii. ...11; Wednesday. S a. m., 

nia-srt and sermon; 7::{0 p. m.. ser- 

and benediction, Thursday, i* a. iru 

high muss and sermon and 



.*! . lliU^ I ' Ml! 1' 

!i of the Monro 



it I 
I \-. 
.rk, 
: retl 



ir.'., . 
la.1t 



J' ear. 



Ti' 

1... 

ol" 

t 



Kveiifth Sbliipinic BeicinN. 

Keeletli, Minn.. .-Vpri! i''4,—i .<[..■ i.i 1 



til 



• .il at 

. the 

till.* No. >i ahaft 

I the Nos. 1 and 

:" 1 rs will be 

shipping 

• i:i I . '■ .-^'lafts. as 

))..' taken car« of 



1: 

au.l 

high 

mon 

solemn 

closing exercises of the devotion, t^on 

fessions will be heard each afternoon 

from 3 to ♦» o'clock, and each evening 

from the close ol the sermon until all 

are heard. 

t)n Wednesday afternoon and even- 
ing there will be a French priest for 
the Frencli people, and he will hear 
confes.sioiKs al the hours mentioned. 



TWO H.UIBOIIS (JRADl.iTKS. 

Hlajh School Coinmeiieement >\ ill Be 
Held on June 4. 

Tw..i llai liLos Miiin., Afii. .;. -(.spe- 
cial to The- Herald. »— The higli school 
commencement exercises will be held 
Friday evening. June 4, at the Metro- 
politan opera liouse. lie v. J. W. Powell 
of tlie Endion M. K. church, Duluth. 
will be the .speaker. 

The Baccalaureate sermon will b** 
,1. 1 by i:ev. .). F. McLeod at the 

i rian chuiih .Sunday evening. 

May ■\". The class day exercises w*ill 
he held at the high school assembly 
hall Tliur.sdav evening. June i. 

The following wiil graduate: Bessie 
Weatherbv. P^mllv Kernan. Ftuth Wood- 
ward, .Matilda Uunswold. Hilda Peter- 
son. Madeline James. Maybel Owens, 
Kdna Bonham, Mabelle Stevens. James 
Kernan. FIrnest Gyldenskog and Will- 
iam Marker 



CHISHOLM MAY HAVK 

A MISSABE STATION. 



riiisholm. Minn., .\pril 23. — (Special 
to The Herald. I — It Is reported the 
Missabe road will build a station here 



'V\' I I I I 'II 1 .^ ' '*■ ' 1 t O:-- i 

the -stock piles wil 

later. 

'it;.- Ir.Mi IliiiL;- i-.i.i.l i, building 

til !:- !• .1. -ir West Adama yard 

tl ins open pit. .Shipping 

lu 1 will not be started 



for sivrii.- 
isleii.i I !>• :i: 
present seasijii -, ■ 
one. Much noils 
th- uM N\ 
V-e-ll .'lit .1' 



ipplng is going on 

pit mines, and tlie 

s to b. 1 

ng doll. .1 

-tl. il:at has 

some time. 



IMSHIMiWOKKON 

XKW HIRIil\<J S( HOOL. 



1 

T 

IJ a 
for 



tr.i 
;i .1 
< I \ f 

of 



liiMi.. .\pnl 'S.'>. — 1. Special to 
-Work on the new Cen- 
i..,,,,g rapidly pushed 
war«l act".. to tlu- contract. 

i«>w.s ,,.: , 'titractors. Bailey & 
'. for everv day in wiiich they 
ad of the specified time for 
u of tlie building. The con- 
■n return, are to forfeit |2.'i 
•t\' i!a\- ii: whlcli they work 
i,- nine s.'t !.>r the turning over 
building t<> the vIMii^e. 



,1 V I 

. tl 

the 



o- 



FOUMKR Dl LITHIAN IS 

DEAD AT BESSEMER, MICH. 



Eveleth. Minn. A[)ril J ; ..Special to 
The Herald.* — W. J. Dav.y and Alfred 
I>a\e\ if the Adams Spruce offices. 
w.i',' t.> HeHsemer. Mich., yesterday to 
ait ■!. I tl" funeral of their brother, 
(b 1 ue l>a\<-y, who died Wedofsday at 
tliat city. The leceased worked some 
year.s ago in Duluth, but then went to 
ijlobe. Ariz., for his health, bs he had 
b«*en .suffering with consumption, the 
caiine y>t his deatti 



Miller .«iuoii tu Ship. 

Aiii.o I Minn. .\pri! '.'S. — ^(Speclal to 
The Herald.^ — A party of the DulutU 



ORRINE 

CURES LIOUOR HABIT 



t I UK EKKKt TKII or MOXKV 
HKFl >iDED. 

Tliere !.<» no such thing as drink- 
ing In •moderation" and "with judg- 
ment." .No man with judgment ever 
drinks at all. Drink will not drown 
vour Conscience or your memory, but 
it win add to vour woes with each 
3U< cesslve delmuch. tJet cured at 
,„;Pe — commence taking ORRINE to- 
day It Is a simple remedy — a home 
treatment. No one need know you're 
taking It. No sanitarium expense — 
..nly the medicine to pay for. 

Read what th* Hannar DrtiK Co., 
the leuillng ilruuKlm* of Nt. Taul, 
Minn., »vho havr been HellluK <»K- 
KIXK over three yt-arn, have lo aay 
about it: 

"From our eKperlenoe la arll- 
Ing OKHIXK, we believe It the 
moMt meritoriouM treatment for 
the Liquor Habit on the mar- 
ket, lly following the inntruc- 
tlonn we poMltively believe the 
ilenired result* will be obtained. 
The buyer ban every protection 
by the gumrmuif*" 
OUKINK li p^ollar■-^l in twn f.irnw. No. 1. a 
iHiwdtr, fii5tel»-s» !ir«t oolirlesa. ea« be given 
teeretly lii foo-l "r arti>k. ORRINK No J. in pill 
fiirm. li ft>r lli.>»e wh" wt"h t.> "Jm thenwebes 

ORKIKB COSTS 0\l.\ »1 A KOX. 
The Ciiiarantee U In Kaoh Boi. 

Writfl fur Kree UUUINK Booklet (m«Ued In 

olalu »e«le«l in.elotN-i to OKHINK CO.. OUUINK 

B.ai.'.ln« W.*hli.«ton V C. OUIUNE soW by 

leading clruggUt.^ fvcrywhere. 

^^._^ Special .4 gents I 

W. A. .\BBETT, 



201 Went Superior Street, «.12 Raat 

Second Street, and 101 V\ eat 

Fuurtb Street. 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 



liISi 



T|^ $3.00 
Blake feat for 

98c 



EXCUSE US! 



When you see the Chi- 
cago Aucticn A. Com- 
mission Co.'s name it 
means $1.00 worth of 
merchandise for 



33c 



Our doors had to be locked about every 10 or 15 minutes in order to wait upon the crowds we had in 
our full packed store in order to buy themselves rich. 

This is certainly a genuine sale. If you don't know anything about this sale — WAKE UP. Goodby 
Golden Rule — no more Blake & W'aite hat house. Merchandise is going at 33 cents on the dollar — man- 
ufacturers* prices. The prices we quote below for you are not limited. For goodness' sake, take them all. 



25c POTATO MASHERS— Chicago 
.Auction & Commi-ssion Com- On 

pany's price WW 

25c MINCE KNIVES— Chicago Auc- 
tion & Commission Company's Q|i 
price Vlf 

50c MEAT SAWS— Chicago Aucti.di 
& Commi.s.sion Company's Ca 

price wV 



52-INCH SICfLl AN— Worth $1.00 per 
yard ; Chicago Auction & ^Q A 
Commission Company's price, •■ttllf 



10c LAMP BURNERS— Chicago Auc- 
tion & Commission Company's i^ 
price 11^ 

MEN'S $10.00 SUITS— Chicago Auc- 
tion & Commission Com- ^^ OO 
})any's price O^i %#0 

25c PADLOCKS— With two keys- 
Chicago .Auction & Commis- 0#i 
sion Company's price wU 



BOYS' FINE QUALITY SHIRTS— 
Worth oOc — Chicago .Auction & Of|^ 
Commission Company's price. ... ^^|J 

MEN'S 25c CELLULOID COLLARS— 

Chicago .Auction & Commission 
Company's price 



Ic 



MEN'S $3.00 BLAKE and WAITE 
HATS — Chicago .Auction & Com- QQi^ 
mission Company's price OOC 



MEN'S 50c FINE QUALITY BAL- 
BRIGGAN UNDERWEAR — Chicago 
Auction & Commission Ccjin- IQa 

pany's price IwU 



YOUR OPPORTUNITY GREATER 
THAN EVER— 10c COTTON BAT- 
TING — Chicago Auction & Com- 
mission Co.'s price, per roll 



2c 



FINE QUALITY SUSPENDERS— Chi- 
cago Auction & Commission 7a 
Company's j)rice I If 



10c SCRUBBING BRUSHES— Chicago 
Auction & Commission Com- 9i^ 

pany's price ft V 



MEN'S $3.00 SHOES— Chica'go Auction 
& Commission Company's ^A MQ 
price OlilO 

MEN'S $2.00 PANTS— Chicago Auction 
& Commis,•^ion C<»nipan)''s QOa 

price UOC 

MEN'S 5c and 10c HANDKERCHIEFS 

— Chicago Auction & Commission I -^ 
Company's price ||| 

MEN'S 15c BLACK SOX— Chicago Auc- 
tion &: Commission Company's Cj» 
price O V 



OUR STOCK OF BOYS' SUITS must 
1)0 .-^old out. as we <jnl} lia\o a limited 
time to stay in the store. 



LADIES' WRAPPERS— Chicago Auc 
tion & Commission Company's 
price 



49c 



$4.00 RUBBER BOOTS— Chicago .\ no- 
tion & Commission Com- ^i AQ 
pany's price ^Ii wO 



This sale is going on at Xn. 19 East Superior street, where the Golden Rule used to be. Tliirty-threc. 
cents will btiy one dollar's worth of merchandise of us. 

CHICAGO AUCTION AND 
COMMISSION CO. 

19 East Superior Street. 



;-*■••*- r ..>■; 



^•*:;>:^^ 



near the Great Northern track.s and 
not far trora the Pierce stockpile. 

R. Ueek.« of Kusli City, Minn., is the 
new Great Northern station agent here, 
succeefling C. B. Faus, who has Rone 
to the state of WanhinKton. A. G. Jor- 
dan, oa.sistant agent and cashier for 
the past tlve year.s, resigned yesterday 
and will be succeeded by P. Judy of 
Indianapoll.s. 

ARREST FOLLOWS 
THEATER FIGHT 

Owner of Virginia Or- 

pheum Alleged to Have 

Assaulted Performer. 

Virginia. Minn.. April 23. — (Special 
to The Herald. I— F. C. Whiting, owner 
of the OrpheuiTi theater bulMing, wa.s 
arrested Wednesday on a charge of 
assault on James O'Nell. a performer 
at the theater.. The matter grew out 
i)f a row between Whiting and Smith 
& Dees, lessees of the building. 

The written lease of Smith & r>ee.«! 
expired last Friday. Whiting leased 
the building to another firm. Smith 
& Dees claimed a verbal extension for 
six months, which Whiting denied. 
They held poss^«sio-n of the place, 
sleeping In the*, theater nights and 
guarding It by days. 

Yesterday Whiting gained possession 
and It is claimed tliat when Dees and 
O'Neil attempted to enter he repelled 
them with a chair. O'Neil claims to 
have been hit on the head. Whiting 
was arrested and Smith & Dees hold 
the fort. Ouster proceedings are pend. 
ing. 

LAR(JER HHJH S( HOOL. 



those present and it will be the policy 
of the clul> to provide entertainment 
of this kind every few weeks for its 
members . 



•Arthur Thurner and Frank John- 
son are In town for a few days d,iy«. 
looking up a business location. 

Robert Geiselnian spent yesterday 
in Chisholm on business. 

Miss Ida Franks of Lake Linden, 
Mich.. Is visiting her cousin here, Mrs. 
11. L. (ieiselman. 

The students of the high school are 
making elaborate preparations for the 
annual junior-senior hop, to be given 
Mav 7 In Close's hall. La Hrosse's 
orchestra of Duluth will furnish the 
music. ^ 

RANGE ATTRACTIONS. 



Lyceum Bureau to Inelude Princi- 
pal Tonus is Oi'gauized. 

Virginia. Minn.. April 2.3. — (Special 
to The Herald. I — A lyceum bureau cir- 
cuit comprising Virginia. Eveleth, Bi- 
wabik and Coleraine has been organ- 
ized on the range. Hibbing and Kly 
will very llkelv be added to the cir- 
cuit, with Aurora and Buhl as possi- 
bilities. 

.attractions from a lyceum bureau 
will come to the range next season, 
appearing on successive nights In dif- 
ferent towns. The arrangement gives 
better attractions at a leasonable out- 
lay of m oney. 

FIRST BASEBALL IN 

VIRGINIA SATIRDAY. 



Important .Matter to be Discussed in 
Vir/^inia Saturday Night. 

Virginia, Minn., April 23. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The question of enlarg- 
ing the school accommodations of Vir- 
ginia will come up at a mass meeting 
to be held In the Roosevelt school to- 
morrow night. The decision of the 
scho«)l l>oard, made some time ago, to 
build a new $125,000 high school has 
not met with the approval of a great 
many citizens and the mass meeting 
was called to allow an expression of 
public opinion for the benefit of the 
meml)ers of the board. 

The high school _l« badly crowded in 
the Roosevelt school and the grades 
are congested. Some favor tlie erection 
of one or two new grade schools, while 
Supt. Bliss and some members of the 
board want a new high school, leaving 
the present high sdiool rooms for the 
accommodation of the grades. They 
say better domestic science and man- 
ual training departments are needed, 
as well as more laboratory room. 

The site of the proposed new high 
school Is Roosevelt park, the only ath- 
letic field in \trgin1a. There is much 
opposition to the destruction of the 
park and many of the protests against 
the proposed new high school are based 
on that consideration. 

OLIVER CLUB ENTERTAINS. 



will be held Saturday afternoon. April 
24. At this meeting the question ol 
purchasing d.vnamite in large quan- 
tities will be discussed and decided 
upon. There will also be important 
discussion In connection with dairy 
cows. 

• 

<illher( Mine l.uaUiiiK- 
Two Harbors. Minn., April 23. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald. >— The Gilbert mine 
at Pettlt commenced loading ore into 
cars Thursday, and will load about 
fifteen carloads per day for the pres- 
ent. The ore will be held at the mine 
until boats are started to handle It 
from the ore docks. 



I-:vele(b MUltia UrIII. 

Eveleth, Minn., .^pril 2:!. — ( Special to 
The Herald.) — At last nights drill of 
Company F several new maneuvers 
were shown bv the company. The 
dilll was well attended, as the mem- 
bers are out to make a good showing 
at the Slimmer camp this year at Lak« 
Cily, which commences June 14. 

• 

MmnU Kveleth Fire. 

Eveleth, Minn., .\pril 2.'^ — (Special to 
The Herald.) — .-V small chimney tire on 
Pierce street was the means of arous- 
ing most of the town about nine o'clock 
last evening, but very little damage 
was done. The fire department. Just a 
few doors from the scene of the fire, 
was called out and quickly (extin- 
guished the flames. 

• 

To ViMit lu HibbloK- 

Laurium, Mich., April 23. — (Special 
to The Herald.)— Miss Inga I'eterson of 
Laurtum has left for Hibbing. Minn., 
where she will visit for .some time. 



pied l>y the Queen City Fruit company. 
BJoin & (,*ar!son will erect a modern 
garage. 40 l)y 70 feet, one of the finest 
in the Northwest. Fontain & .VngHn 
will ere*'t a store building on Main 
street, adjoining the C. O. D. Clothing 
house, and will erect a three-.story 
hotel on .Second street, adjoining tha 
Great Northern depot. Excavating for 
the foundation of the new J'.nt.ooo fed- 
eral building has started alrendy. and 
many other buildings are talked of. In 
addition to scores of residences. Tho 
season will be a very active one in tha 
building line. 

ATHLETIC PROGRAM 

BY BRAINERIi V. M. C. A. 



Virginia. Minn., April 23.— (Special 
to The Herald.) — The first baseball 
game of the season will be played in 
Virginia tomorrow, the Elks, a juvenile 
team, meeting the Mountain Iron team 
at Roosevelt park. 

FARMERS ORGANIZE. 



Two Harbors. Minn., .\pril 23. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — The Lake County 
Farmers' club perfected an organiza- 
tion and elected the following oflficers: 
I'resident. J. Turnquist; vice president. 
William Pepperling; secretary, Charles 
Rosen; treasurer, Chris Carlson: board 
of trustees, two years. John Boyer and 
Robert Jolinson; one year. Charles 
Turnqulst, L. W. .\nderson and Cliarles 
Larson. The next meeting of the dub 



La Hue Pitman Hurt. 

Nashwauk. Minn., .\prll 23. — (Special 
to The Herald. )— Frank Peterlln. pit- 
man at the La Rue mine, had both legs 
badly mangled under a mass of falling 
earth, and he may lose both limbs. 

MUCH CROOKSTON BUILDING. 

Coming Summer Will Witness Large 
Amount of Work in That Line. 

Crookston. Minn.. April 23. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — There promises to be 
a great deal of activity In building in 
the business section of Crookston the 
coming summer. 

John Buhn has had plans completed 
for a brick and stone structure on 
South Main street, which will be occu- 



Brainerd, Minn.. April :;":. — (Special 
to The Herald.)— The Y. M. C. A. will 
give its second annual athletic exhllil- 
tion this evening. A progrun has been 
prepared and the association will real- 
ize a good sum to add more equipment. 
The athletics have been under tha 
management of J. C. Manville. gener- 
al secretary, who goes to Two Harbors. 
Mav 1. to take the i)osition of pliysi- 
caT director and boys' secretary in tha 
association there, 

• 

Would L:Htiil»ll.<«li Alilti. 

Fargo, N. D., April 23. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Claiming that he was in 
Fargo Dec. 27, wlien the postoffice at 
Strathcona, Minn., was robbed, Andrew 
Hendel is endeavoring to prove an 
allhi. His wife and other witnesses 
swear to his i)resence in this city at 
that time. Hendel was once a witness 
in the postoffice case and Is charged 
with "peaching" on some pals. 

♦ 

MinneapoilN S«i»viiiillt» Start. 

Minneapolis. Minn., .Vpril 23. — Tha 
big C. A. Smith sawmill began sawing 
lumber yesterday. For the present a 
day crew onlv will be employed, but 
beginning Monday a night crew is to 
be added, and the mill will then run 
steadily until the log supply is ex- 
hausted. The Carpenter-Lamb Lumber 
companv has opened up with a day and 
night crew, and the Bovey De Lalttra 
company is operating with a day crew. 

• 

Ilede l.ectiirfu lu Minneapolis. 

Minneapolis, Minn.. April 23. — Con- 
gressman J. -Vdam Rede of Pine City 
will lecture tomoriow evening at the 
First Congregational church on ;;t>ur 
Nation; Its Prol)lems and Progress. Ha 
will be introduced by President Cyrus 
Northrop of the University of Minne- 
sota. 



This Machine is Absolutoly Safe and Accepted by All Leading Insurance Companies 
Cannot be EJtploded. Without Any Additional Charge. 



*W^Maid 






VO'OJ 



Several .\tliletic Stunts Oelight Pa- 
trons of Hibbing Club. 

Hibbing, Minn.. April 23. — (Special to 
The Herald.)— The jOllver club enter- 
tained Its members and a few friends 
last night with an athletic entertain- 
ment. Some very good boxing and 
other stunts were puUed off. The club 
has some excellent talent that with 
more experience will make most any 
of the professionals hustle. The 
athletic exhibitions greatly pleased 





THE EXCLUSIVE. Y Distributer OF 



MANuf AClTuR to BY 



.C^^' 



,^4,3 ■♦iS^iO •♦Za-A* ■♦Jfc EPtARLST^ C 



CINCINNLATI.OHIO 





-tSCENUlGHr^ ^ 



HRE PROOF 



Headtguarters at Duluth, MInnm ^ 



FOOL PROOF 

Machines Cleaned and 

Repaired Promptly m 

A Satisfactory Light at Smali Expense 

Y^'^'^ r.Ji WVhaJi a generator that makes the gas all at one place and dl.stributes through gas pipes to 
he Ugh s- A gL sto^e cf n be ised in connection. Call at our office and see demonstration of lights and 
stoves Let us give you figures on lighting your building. 

F. P. GAS LIGHT MACHINECO.'"'"iJSfrSrWllS,r'"* 



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THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: FRIDAY, APRIL 23. 1909. 



U 




Can be found at Bayhas In a great variety of styles, and at prices that are guaranteed to be the lowest in the dty^ £tvy^uld^ttave'^;d^tTI^ 
to us The aualitv of our goods has been the foundation upon which we have built up a great business. Without quality it would not ^ave stooa inc 
W make it our aun o buv^he most reliable goods and the best values the market affords. Our many years of experience m this -- ^-^«f f^'"-^ ^_ 
tcctsvou against inferior goods and exorbitant prices. We stand back of and guarantee every article sold in our store. We will not, "^n^- mgly. buy anj 
Jhmg'we cfnnot guarantef. and we will not under any consideration sell anything we do not guarantee. Our positive and personal guarantee inakes Bayha 
"The Safest Place to Trade." 




Extension Tables 

Wr want to call vour attention to th* best line of tribU-; '<ii 
the market— the HASTINGS line We teaturc this table be- 
cause we KNOW It to be the BEST VALUE the ttKirkt-t af- 
fordH The ONLY table fitted with a TYDEN LOCK, the 
ONLY PERFECT TABLE LOCK. Tlicse t:.bles are built of 
.'elected genuine quarter sawed oak and are heautilnlly fmislu*.!. 
The vanetv of de--igiis will suit all tastes and prices are lower 
than are quoted on tables of inferior quality. 

\Vc arc exclusive agents for this popular line of tables, and 
we invite your inspecti^u .>f the LINE OF QUALITY. 



Visit Our Rug Department 

Tlic time fnr rcncwinj^ some of the passe things in the home has come 
ar..uii.l a.uaiti. It may be a new rnj^. curtains, something in the yard goods line, 
such a- Madras f(»r side drapes, nets for (.d.l size witulovvs, new shades, bed- 
dinj^. liiudoum. portieres, or some ether <.f the varions articles fonnd in our Rug 
deparlmeiit. that go to make up the h..nie and add to its comfort and homelike- 
ne^-^. V«'u'll find all these thing> of the right quality, and rightly priced at this 
store. 

We have ^omc especially interesting bargains to offer 
for Saturdav'v -elling in our Rug department, and consid- 
ering the season of the year, vvc feel confident that every 
housewife in the city will api>reciatc these values and visit 
our .store Saturday. 




Ideal 

Cabinet 

Gas Range 



The housewife's deliKht. 
Nothing in the line of t.;a9 
ranges can equal tlii"» 
"best of all'" ranges — eco- 
nomical in the use of fuel, 
so convenient to work 
with Hi it the old time 
drudi- n.iw a pleas- 

ure. I'l'lCV ^ ^ 

only 



$50.50 





library 
Tables 




Mahogany the ehoicp of all woods for the making jf hlgh- 
Prade. anistYe- fu/niture. i.s Kr.atly in f viderfre in our a-ssortment 
of IJl.rarv Tables. This assortment sliows »''«" i^V „^f,?i fin.Mh 
llieir stvle. whUe tlieir siil-slanllal appearance «"V-'*'"vv ,V„t to % 
H.ow clearly the hand of the skilled workman ^^^^^^^ Offering in 
your attention to three exceptional values we are olTering in 
Malioganv Library Tables. - . , , 

One neatly designed and heautifully finished 
table, worth $30.00— t=peeial 

A good sized Table." with ' large' drawer; French 'f S«;^i;'* ^°^^ 
Bhelf This table is a beauty in design and finish, tf TC C/1 
a ml the wood i.s of select mahogany— worth $4S..>0— ^JJ,^^ 

(lur special price ' '.1' ".',' ' ^ . ^^ mt ^% 

Thi« i« one of those massive Colonial d^s'f"^*! tables. O'h^ C/1 
imilt of "ejected stock and beautifully finished, must 3*t^,JV 
be 4en tube appreelaled, worth 155.00; our special...'*' 



$21.50 



$i9.85 



An opportunitv is offered you to buy a high-grade \>lvet Rug, 0x12 size, 
in a variety of the'ne\ve^t '-pring patterns and coloring-. These Rugs ^re well 
worth if'iiO.OO. Quantity buying enaldes us to put ther;i «.n " 

sale at the very low price of 

In addition \u ihe al.vr tx cei lional value, we c ffer the following 
money-savers : 

STAIR CARPET— Good quality carr-et. three patterns to select from, 
goods 22\i. inches wide, worth nearly dC'\dk— Saturday's 00 />C 

Sjiecial price of, ]ier yard fcfc/-^\. 

LACE CURTAINS— White Chuiy Curtains. 2\i> yards long and full 
width, have neat lace edge and insertion : they are dainty and serv- tf ^ TT 
ieeaMe; worth .$4.00 per pair— Saturday's special, per pair 4/^««/i 



^' 






Book Casses 

A massive Bookcase of that 
cvcr-plcasing Colonial design — 
built of selected genuine ma- 
hogany stock. This is a piece 
of furniture that would be a 
pleasure to y<>u for a lifetime ; 
worth $45.00 ; our price only , 

$37.50 




Kitchen Cabinets $10.50 

A Kitchen Cabiiut will actually pay l..r it-clf in a 
few months' time, by doing away with the waste that 
naturally comes from not having ihr ]>r(>i)er place to 
keep them in. WASTE of money and WASTE of 
time and energy is done away with l)y ha\ ing one of 
tlie^e Kitchen Cabinets in your home. 

We are offering an excej.tional bargain in Kit- 
rluii Cabinets this week; a value-giving you can't af- 
ford to overlook. One of our special bargains is a most 
c(vnveniently arranged cabinet, built of hardwood 
and nicely finished ; i.lenty of drawer room, large 
flour bin. work b«.ard and various compartments 
for the thouNanil and one tilings that should be 
kept handy in the kitchen. This cabinet is easily 
worth $16.50; our si)ecial 
price only 



Credit! 



We offer the most libei-al terms of 
credit of any firm in the city: no em- 
barrassinc: conditions attached and 



No Interest Cliarged 




-^ 



$i0,50 



We are the Exclusive Agents for the celebrated 
HOOSIER Kitchen labinet. the best built and 
most conveniently arranged cabinet on tlie mar- 
ket. Come in and see them. 






^^ 



Extra Special! 

Plate Racli 59c 

FOR SATURDAY ONLY, we offer 
these neat little solid oak plate XQ^ 
racks at this low price, only ♦/•C 



Phonographs, Rec- 
ords and Cabinets 

We do not ask you to take cur word 
for the statement that we carry the largest 
stock of Victor and Edison machines and 
Records in the city. We do not make 
any claims that we can not verify. We 
merely ask vc'U to investigate and make 
comparisc ns' and KNOW FOR YOUR- 
SELF. 

Victor Outiit $33.75 

Including Horn and Ten Records. 

Tliis eaitfit consists of the popular No. 2 
A'ictor, brass horn with 11%-inch bell 
and five of the new. large double-faced 
records; thus giving you tc^n records of 
vour C'vvn selecticm, all 
for 

TERMS: $5.00 down and $1.00 per 
week. The newest "hits" in Songs and 
Music are found here FIRST. 









c^ 



$33.75 







Arts and Crafts Furniture 

Tins i)leasing style of Furniture is found here 
in a greater variety than in any other store in the 
city. 



We are associated with L. & J. G. Stickley, 
originators of HANDCRAFT Furniture ; they are 
acknowledged the leaders in turning out 
the truest conceptions of this popular style. 

To get Arts & Crafts Furntiure that is RIGHT 
in design, finish and construction, you must come 
here. We are offering .some exceptional values 
this week in Rockers and Chairs, C ^ A[ T C ! 
worth $19.50; special at JJlT.I ^ V^^ 



^ 






-v?" 



Careful Attention to Mail 

Orders 

Mail orders sent to us will be given most careful 
and prompt attention. All goods sold are exactly | 
as represented. i 



A Good Sewing Machine 
for $12.50 



A full sized serviceable machine. Its mechanism i3 
simple and reliable, easy to run and causing no trou- 
ble to the user. It is of the drophead style, with 
solid oak case, beautifully finished in goMen^has 
five drawers and full set of^foot 
attachments, easily worth double; 
our price, only 



I in giMueii, iids 

$12,50 

The Startdard Machine 

The STANDARD ROTARY is positively the best 
machine made, because it is the only successful ro- 
tary made and the only machine that will make per- 
fectly both the lock and the chain stitch. It runs 
easier, sews faster and causes less trouble than 
other machines. If you will call we will be pleased 
to show you this machine and prove to you that it 
has no equal. The cost is less than other machines. 



I 



Specials in House Furnishings 

Heavy Galvanized Pt,-el Wash Tul.s, with drop l.andlf-s, No. 2 size: regular CQ^ 

(Htc tiil'-s. for only 

I llil,:i.' (jlHSK Wash Boards— regular BOc kind, only 

IliKh-folding Clothes Bars, strictly all hardwood; reRular 11.25 kind; special at 
,. r p.,..ni Sheve Board, the l-e-Ht of Its kind on the market, sella regularly 

, in I, only. . - - 

b.^t i-i'- '-■•' Irons-, three In a set, complete with cover and suii.d; 

the regular %\.So kind, for 




. . . 70« 

33c 
79c 



coMPLm mnsERiiwisiiBis 



SiC0iidAra.W.iBdFirtl4l 



Office Furniture 



ROLL TOP DESKS— All sizes, plain oak, quartered oak 
and jrenuine mahogany. Flat Top Desks, Typewriter Desks 
and Bookkeepers' Desks, all will be sold at a discount of 25 per 
cent off the regular price. 

Some fine office chairs included m this sale. 




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THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD; FRIDAY. APRIL 23. 1909. 



HERALD 



AN IM1t:i'KM'V'> T ^K\\ xl* %I*I^"K. 



I .1 at Hpiai.J Bi.lK- F'lst St. Opposue P. « >. riquare. 

T'^" TTERALD COMPANY. 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. 

I ullf.l *itji«.i niMl ( nnail*. Pif^lnite l*rep«l«l. 

fIt.OO 



> u I u t h Fob t o f flee a.-* s » 



DULUTH WEEKLY HERALD 

r , III aiJv'a "<"•■> . 



1; has eiitfaKc.l by the ycir an able agricultural expert, 
\v!io Iia-- !ul(l mcotiiigs in all parts of the cmnity and 
has ^.tjrrt-d agricultural .sentiment to a remarkable de- 
gree, it has provided during the past winter for a note- 
worth) OMiir^r ',i lectures ..u agriculture, gardening, 
dairying, etc.. and the final lecture of this course will 
be given at the lecture riom of the V. M. C A. this 
ev.-ninu: It h^-, distributed bulletins, held meetings and 
!!' thr r way- Ntinuilatcd inti-r -t in farming and dairy- 
ing in St I-.tui.-. v.Mitity until \w begin to realize that the 
i.tMi >j;reit'-t niimra] r.iunty in the state has also agricul- 
•**""''' tural i> i--it)ilitic-^ <>i' the largest. 

Xatmally the \v..r!d looks upon St. Louis county 

simply as an iron-pr -diuing region. Once w c have 

g, ^ I estalili-lK'd a tlourisliing agricultural school, however. 

.so We slial! have a powerful agent for the mending of thi- 

j unfortunate misconception. The primary purpo.sc of an 

,! ;it I agricultural scli<«o! is to te.ich the l>'.->t .md most scien 



I. 'It ;irt.->r tl-. 



,■,■ lll.'llt lis 

t h'- pap'T I 



ti!M methods of farming, and in this respect the St. 

Louis county agricultural school will be enormously 

j)rotitabK- to the jteople of the county. When all our 

BY CARRIER. Ill THE QTY, TEN CENTS A WEEKJ*"""'^-'- -'^ »"^'^v. comparatu-dy. as they a,-,-, are apply- 

kvVtkv |.;%KM!>i«;--i>Ki.ivi:Kl<:D. I ing the best mcthi'ds m their tarmmg. agriculture will 

- • -"^ rapidly grow in importance in this country and new 

ijio --ettlcrs will come in with ever increasing rapidity so 
2.«o(that St L,ouis county may supply the ever increasing de- 
mands of us market. Industrial and commercial de- 
velopment must surely come on apace at the Head of 
the Lake;,, and the rich lands of St. Louis county must 
be made to yield the products that this increa-sing pros- 
perity demands. 

The way for the immediate establishment of a county 
agricultural school in St Louis c<ntnty is now ojien and 
the county urgently need.s tiie school. 



TO SUBSCRIBERS: 



!• is imporii 



iriK tilt" «i'! 



yur paper 



A LESSON FOR THE PLAIN MAN. 

he liiglily commended 

•c. but those «»f us 

• had better save 

-lature is n*>t 

' I ,.ir' : totk body, 



. iiutng the past 
rtam, and chaotic 



in their thinkun; upon put)!ic 'i 



on O'i the 



ii. 



.1 !..•;,! „•. 



Ill 



iUCS- 

.Miune- 



Tlic 

1, tiijii 



JUSTICE ALIVE AND JUSTICE DEAD. 

Justice d>.ne by the cold letter of the law is a sort 

and with few real|">f dead juatice. and it sometimes works in the end the 

ature of those most terrible injustice; justice that take-, c o^ni/ance of 

the ethical principles invohed and thai i^ ba-ed on a 

broad understanding of liuman nature :m<\ a deep iym- 

ul the legisla- P«'fliy i'^'' humanity, is living justice, justice that inevit- 

: • , condition. I ably make, f ,r right. 

c which gavel Out oi deal justice grew the felhnv servant doctrine, 

imary election j n"^'' repudiated in s.. many jurisdictions and not long 

>t -state drainage, to live m Minnes-jta. "It arose." says the I'hilailelphia 

Tliat session Press, "from a judicial blunder m considering the prob- 

finite think- lt>" '■' '^-^ narrow jutlicial aspects without regard t<.» the 

>f the economic "r ethical princii)les involvcl." The doctrine 

of the fellow -servant rule was !i[>t laid down in I'.ng- 

land in 1837. Its .•ip[>Iicaiioii in thi^ country w:i- due 

■ ' Mtion of the reasoning by Chief Justice Shaw 

..V ..... .s.icluisetts supreme court, who with Lord 

vlunger of l-.ngl.ind, its author, e\i»onnded the doctrine 

with great force and leariiitiK. and ett •ctn.illy I'.isteiied it 

upon !)o:li . >vmtries. I'.oth men were exceedingly 

• " ' led HI the law. and were jurists of the highest re- 

, ;:.. but they lacked that sympathy with humanity 

t which Theodore k'i-\o!l s. strikingly illustrated in 

!•> rcce;it editorial in the Outlook on "-\ Jutlicial h;xpc- 

:re lep- I rteiiL-e," iSecaiise ' '*'s doctrine, falsely arrived at. 

iiurc through •' ' -i.I . ^...iitngs of the technical law, in- 

1 justice ' t nod upon laboring men tor many 3'ears, 

^e and ; nty years in this country the doctrine has 

1; they ' brought terrible li irdships and sulferin.ki> to families 

w. Re 

•t tin 

I but The d.'ctrine u i in I'.ngland some years 

a., \ t!ie sMt'-'s of the .Ameiiian L'nion ha\-e been 

aally wipniR it trum the law books, .\mong those 
. ,iaies whicli have rei)udiated tlie rloctrine .are Massa- 
■'chusett.s. New Jersey, Xew York, Delau ir<-, IViiiisyl- 
ania, Georgia, Mont id<». Kentucky and Con- 

■•i. uMprejii- ' necticut. (i^iNcrnor Johnson vigor. .u-ly urged the re- 
in tl: ■ .11 of the d'»ctrine by -statute in Minnesota in his 
,, ,, iir.nu. ... -, to the legisl.iture thi. year, aufl the commission 

us valuable Uutlv.n:'od by the !e:;i>lature to im .-sturMte the eniploy- 

the needs of th 'ility law and to draft a new measure will un- 

hicli , a..ulned!y incorporate in such a U.vv a provision defi 



i-, cut otY and to wh.>ni the law has 

.:.rii-.' whatever. 



a few cxceptioas. 

i! wav, V 



...f t: 



.[ in mu-iiigent 

-sion 
been its agricultural 



instruct; 



nitcly doing away with the doctrine of fellow-servant 
liability in Minnesota. 

Lvcry court .n^.:llt t.> be a curt of law and a court 
of equity; t>.> often, our courts have been courts of 
■ iw alone. A curt of law. unintluenced by the humani- 

Mrian and .-tl.i, il a^i>ects .if tiie case may declare the 

next letter of ti. t)ut it is most liable to do injustice so 

.r agricultiird great that it can be --et riuht only after Img suffering 

;il experiment; ' through ma:iy ye;irs. in such a way. and by such means. 

"• Mr. , was the d>jctrine of tlie fellow-servant created and fast- 

:r,T)-' 'ened upon two great Anglo-Saxon peoples to their 



tar 



ful loss. 



eventually 



be 



,■ ; ..uil 
the most 



The cooler is tlie proper place for a scorcher. 

Turkey's bloodless revolution shows red about the 

eyes. 



ike tin- lessr»n 

; > t 1... ,. ,..,■.. ! 



Everything in the line of invitations comes President 

Tail's way 



tlieir 
better 



tllatl li 



;n ..'-'i',„'. 



()■ dution. l;o\\ many massacres are committed 

and uncer- in tii) naine in Turkey! 

li'i^iNlation * 1 — 

It's a good l>et that the government will not stop 
Then .II wheat gambling right away. 

-■.(sla- 

If Jim Patten is a philanthmiiist. as some declare, 
John D. is due to be canonized. 



ST. LOT"*? COUNTY'S URGENT NEED. 



T'l,,!. .-I'-.c'i 



the 1'. 

.. H. ' 



till' net 



.<L;['-icultur;V 
with 111 



be pr 



,->i. 



^ 



t..v 



■ .;; of 1909 

■ hi!! rippro- 

f the 

I'h:. law is 

in- m. at" and better agri- 

• "■. '•• r'.ns that in time 

I in every con- 

! lition to the state 

y Park in connection 

what is practi 

■ 'd a sh< ""t di!>- I 

The n 

■,h school-, 

i be 1 >cate<l in St. Louis 

.:-»unty has alrea 1 ■ -^'ed 

■■.inty agricultural ol, 

:> I ■■ ;:, -M:.>n ap- 

» . locate the school and for 

* > establish it, 

_oujs I. -.,..■.»;, »»... .'v. Hiie entitled to 

id provi 1.- 1 for this purpose, and what 

ultural school for the eighth 

t will be established. 

. urgent need of this schc»oL No 

■I- ' 1 itids lie out of doors any- 

y. To apprise 

. (unty of tins fact, and to induce set- 

■ rth tin- luickest and the 

. t:Mke tlicsf .<i...i^ i.. >..iably productive 

nth Commercial club has gone to large expenses. 



L'.^-cl are the joymakers, said Oliver Wendell 
Holmes. He was not alluding to the joy ridci;?, how- 
ever. 



With the beam not yet out of its own eye, San Fran- 
cisc.i is talking about "the revealed shame of Los An- 
gelea. 



J. J. Hill called on the President the other day. The 
other 79,999,999 of us have to call on Hill if we want to 
see him. 



of 

tliey will lo«e 

difference in the 

Soiitliern dealers 

witti the 

nectl^n of llie coun- 



Xhe 

lo 0impete 



Prof. Pickering, who wants $10.00().0(X) with which to 
signal to Mara, ought to pick out bomeb.Hly bcsi.les mil- 
lioanaires for easy marks. 



cird of I. 



Mary Garden s.iy, that .American men haven't got 
"the lingerie of life," whereby she means its small 
graces. What's the need when we've got Mary? 



HQTEfc: GOSSIP. 

\V. .1. Parks, a lumlierman from Shell 
l4ike, stated at the s\. l.ouia yesterday 
tliQt tlie competition of Southern pine 
would result in makitigr inroads in the 
lumber business of the North. 

Mr. Parks stated that the Southern 
pine i.s sold tox IS a thousand for 
.siiimpage, whilft". th*'"^Norlliern dealers 
will lose money «ut that price. Unless 
they receive lu the neigh horhood 
$7 or $8 for stuwpage, 
money. Under fhe 
.scale of prices 
are heglnninK 
dealers in this 
t rv. 

The reason why the Southern dealers 
ean sell the Southern' pine for a lower 
priee Is that in many instances the 
tiraher was secured by them at a very 
low liKurt'. In many in.stanees the 
dealers have needed ready eash. This 
has resulted in the sale of lumher at 
a very low figure, and has also resulted 
In the Southern deaUM-s being able to 
ship luml^er lo the Northern markets 
and undersell their Northern competi- 
tors. 

Mr. Parks says tJiere is a ready mar- 
ket for all the white pine in this coun- 
try. He says there is not such a 
strong demand for Norway pine. He 
also says that a i?reat deal of white 
pine is Ijeing lield in this section of 
the country for future prices. The 
priee at the pi<esent' time is not what 
many of the larger dealers believe it 
ought to be, according to Mr. Parks, 
and much of this lumber will be held 
until the time when the lumber dealers 
think the price meets the value of the 
lumlxT. 

It is the same In the lumber districts 
of the South. Here. Mr. Parks says,. 
Weverhaeuser and the Kdward Hines 
I,utfiber company have vast holdings of 
.Southern pine that they will not sell 
at the present low rtgure that is 
being oblalneil in the Nortliern market.^ 
for Southern pine. These men believe 
that the market valup of lumber will 
advance, antl they are holding their 
lumber until that time. 

• • • 

Said a gentleman from Bemidji. at 
the Lenox hotel last night: "A man in 
the present legislature, from the city 
of Bcmidji, did not make a great hit 
with his fellow townsmen by voting 
for the ISjorge tonnage tax bill. This 
bill, in the event of its becoming a 
law, would have Injui^ed the interests 
of the entire northeastern part of this 
slate. Bemidji wouid have been in- 
cluded in the section of the state that 
would have felt the ill-effects of the 
bill. Therefore the fact that a man 
from Bemidji votetl for the bill, hasnt 
exaetlv pleased his constituents. If the 
governor hadnt vetoed the bill, the po- 
sition ol this man would have been 
lather embarrassing. Kven as it is, 
he has made no hit with the people 
who sent him lo the legislature by 
thus voting for a measure that would 
have resulted in Injury to the section 
of the slate that lie represents." 

• • • 

Judge Thomas Brady of Hlbbing. 
who was at the St. l-ouis and who is 
nianagtr of the Hibbtng baseball team, 
stated I lull Hlbbing will be represented 
upon the diamond by the fastest ag- 
g-regalion in the norihern part of the 
state, and that the team that Hibbing 
will place ill the tield this year will be 
llie best team that It has ever had. 

.ludg'.^ liradv expressed the hope that 
\'irginla wouid finally see some possi- 
ble chance of phievng a team in tlie 
field, as without the aid of \ Irginia 
in sustaining interest in the sport. 
iKiseball would noi liave the standing 
that it would with the great rivalry 
between the iwu t4)wns. And. then, 
too. the judge admitted th.il the peo- 
ple of Hlbbing were Just naturally 
longing for the .>pp<>rtunit y of getting 
back at the Virginia people for the 
rude wav thev treated the Hlbbing 
fans last vear. The baseball fans upon 
the range have a long memory, and 
the Incident of the lifting of ih.-Healey 
cup will not be forgotten by the Hlb- 
bing fans for some time. 
• • • 

the I.enox: H. W. ^.strickler, St. 
1). Hudler Ohicaaro; H. H. War- 
.Minneapolis; J. W. Foster. Iron 
Mountain; Fritz Petersen, Siambaugli; 
ICinil Johnson. Siaiiil>augli: l.udvig .Mor- 
linson, Stambaugii; M. Stein. Milwau- 
kee W. M. Siiiith, riiicago; \V. <". Hoff- 
man, St. F'aiil; M. l>. Kelly, St. Paul; 
t- .Seelig Milwaukee; J. K. Pennis and 
wife. Taeonlte; John Norton, Taconite; 
William Dawe, .Milwaukee; A. J. Nor- 
ton. Minneapolis; C li. Adams. St. 
Paul; Charles Jenz. .Minneapolis; John 
Larson, Minneapolis; ('. A. Dunham, 
Chicago; T. <j. Frickson, Chicago; 
Joseph La Beau. Red Cliff: J. T. Bar- 
rett. Chicago; A. A. VVahlstrom, Roch- 
ester; H. W. Byrne. Bessemer; A. M. 
Thompson, St. Paul; A. Siewright. 
P.hinelander; W. A. Meyers. Milwaukee; 
L. Seelig. New York: ilichard Miltez, 
New York; G. C. Hoeppner Kau Claire; 
l> P. Thomas, St. Paul; T. M. Watson, 
Minneapolis; C. It. C.illette. Milwaukee. 

• « • 

At the Spalding: Murray M. Marks, 
New York; Maud l-I. iMurphy, Flan- 
dreau, S. I).: W. I>e Wolf .Chicago; II. 
B. Bliss. St. Paul: H. S. Clarke, New 
York: K. H. Houghton. Winnipeg; H. 
J Morg'an, i:hleago; W. W. Keteham, 
Chicago; H. B. Hersey, Chicago; A. S. 
Putman. Chicago: Harry Lesch. Chi- 
cago: G. J. Cook, Chicago: G. R. Dane. 
St. Paul: F. A. Nolan. St. Paul; C. 
Jones, New York: J. J Cizek, Lynhursi, 
N Y. : S. A. Robinson, New. York; S. De 
Mers. St. Paul; A. M. Howe. Minne- 
apolis; William A. Morrison, Chicago: 
A. Cahn. New York; Martin Taylor, 
New York; G. W. Charles, Minneapolis; 
Fred Ambur. Chicago: P. Colson. Chi- 
cago; D. H. Kvans. Minneapolis; H. O. 
Joiinson. Virginia: William Cohen, Mll- 
W4iukee; Al H. Wilson. New York: Sid- 
ney R. Ellis. New York: C. H. Patten, 
i'a'lalena. 111.; Robert L. Bowen. Min- 
neapolis; Julia Batchelor. New York; 
William Smith. Kansas City; P. J. 
Kruse. Chicago; C. E. Frailey, Minne- 
apolis. 

• • * 

At the St. Louis: .\. S. Burham. 
M|jni«*apolis: P. K. Vail. Virginia; Miss 
I.imare Vail. Virginia; T. V. Clark. 
Chicago; E. M. Meek. Chicago; J. W. 
De Haven. Minneai)olis; B. C. Munson. 
Minneapolis; Henry Logan, Grand 
Forks; A. B. Clark. Grand Itapids; T. 
1'. Keena, Ashland; James W. Sargent. 
Minneapolis; H. Carroll. Scanlon; T. J 
Casey. St. Paul; J. H. Dallon. St. Paul; 
C H Miller. Cleveland; L. W. HotTman. 
Green Bay: K. S. FInh. St. Paul: WiU- 
lab Crane. Minneapolis; J. H. Jeffrey. 
Tower; John Ferguson and wife. Moun- 
tain Iron; Miss Clara Ferguson. Moun- 
tain Iron: Miss E. Wright. Minneapolis; 
William Koepi>el. Milwaukee. 

• • • 

At the McKay: H. P. Hanson, Cam- 
bridge; A. T. Craig. Spokane; VS. W. 
Smith. St. Paul: C. J. Vaughin, Mln- 
neapollB: G. A. Jorgenson, Spokane; E. 
L Raab and wife. Sparta; J. Hogan, 
Kerrlck; G. Degner, St. Paul; F. A. 
Watklns, Carlton; R. U Brown and 
wife, Stevenson; O. S. McVey, Phila- 
delphia: C. H. Siebert, Buffalo; A. C. 
Seott. Hoi yoke; H. H. Luehrs. Chicago; 
l». M. Cole. St. Louis; W. J. Gibbons. St. 
Paul; J. W. Furber and wife. Minne- 
apolis: R. B. Howell, Minneapolis; Mrs. 
F. S. Dane, Blwablk. S. Grimm, Hatton, 
S. D. 



THE WEATHER 




Last night was 
cold — very cold for 
this season of the 
year, and Duluth 
people shivered In 
spite of the clear, 
dry air. Today it 
is a little warmer, 
and still fair and 
bright. although 
the weather man 
looks for cloudy 
weather. 

A year ago to- 
duv there was a northeaster blowing. _ 
The sun rose this morning at 5:0^ 
o'clock and will set this afternoon al 
7:07, making fourteen liours and two 
minutes of sunlight. 

Mr. Richardson makes the following 
ci-mnicnt on weather conditions: 

"Somewhat colder weather attends a 
rise in pressure over the Upper Missis- 
sippi valley and western lake region. 
Freezing temperatures prevail through- 
out the Northwest and southward to 
and including Nevada, Utah, New Mex- 
ico Kansa.s and Oklahoma. During the 
past twenty-four hours snow or rain 
fell ove>- the upper lake region. Ohio 
and Lower Mississippi valleys. Middle 
Atlantic sitates. Colorado. New Mexico 
and Alberta, due to barometric depres- 
sion.s central over North Carolina and 
the extreme Nortliwest. Warmer 

weather prevails in the Dakotas. Sas- 
katchewan and the plateau region, at- 
tending a tall in barometric pressure. 
This rise In temperature should reach 
the Head of the Lakes tonight." 

Following were last night's lowest 
temperatures: 

.\l)lleiie 3* M<?<Uoine 



HAt 



ind to '^ 
■ire way 



A candle, nine feet high, and constructed to burn for 
five years, has been built and will burn to the memory 
of Joe Petrosino, the detective assassinated at Palermo. 
Some men are said to burn longer than that. _ 



The genuine popularity of Roosevelt is proven in 
the fact that it .survived his failure to attend a single 
ball game in Wa.shington during the seven years of his 
administration. Or maybe his failing to get out and 
root for the home team was what made hiin so dis- 
liked in Washington? ^ . 



At 
Paul; 
ner. 



.\»)ievllle 

.VUaiiU 

natUcfDr.l . . . 

Itl.wian-k 

Hosl.in 

liiiff&lo 

Clin 

Caleary 

Chnrleston ... 

rhU-ac.> 

ClMclntiAU . . . 
ri>ii<sir.ll« . . . 
l»K»enl)ort 

iMiver 

I »el roll 

l)u<IU Lake .. 

IMd«e 

l>uluU\ 

K.lMI.)llti)II .... 

Kl l*»40 

(l-'catiuha .... 
Oatreatuii ... 
liranil llaTeii 
Ort-pii Bay .. 

Ha ire 

Helena 

Houglilon 

Hurmi 

Jilckiuiivllla . 
I\amli><>p< ... 
Kamas Cltjr . 
IviKixvUIe ... 
l.a I'r'iaae ... 

LtiKior 

Little JUpIi . 
I.ii'i .Xiigelea . 
.Vl.irguetle . . . 



. .5ii MenipliU 

..Go Mites riiy 

. .14 MllwauK(»« 

...24 Mlnrnxifna 

. .5.) il.iileiia 

, . .3ti .MoiitBomrry .... 

, . .42 M.>.>riii-aii 

..18 New Orl?Bna .... 

, ..7i) -New York 

..31 Nnrfiilk 

...11 NorthflfM 

. ..38 Noitli PIaU« . . . 

. . .30 Dklalioma 

, ..?,.! Dmalia 

. ..;12 Plioi'ulK 

. . .14 Pierre 

...28 PUOlMirg 

. ..12 l*"rt Arthur . . . . 

. . . IiJ Porttalul. Or .. , 

. . .44 Prince .VHn'rl . 

. . .24 tju'.\pi)ell.« 

. ..6t. Itapia City 

...34 .*!t. LiiuU 

. ..at; St. Paul 

. . .24 San .Vntmilo . .. . 
, . .32 San Friini-U.-o . . 

. . .22 S;Miltt t'e 

. ..2C iSault .Ste. Marie 

. . .70 IShrevepon 

. . .46 j.SiMikane 

. . .40 .Swift I'lirneiil . . 

. . .S'l ' WasliliigtKii 

. ..2« Wichita 

...24 Willlstiiii 

. . . 4< Wliiiionuiva . . . 

. . .if WiuiilpeK 

. . .2"! Yellowstone . . . - 



.20 
.18 

.ar. 

.30 

. 8 
It) 

. .fiti 

.52 

'5 J 

31 

. :!0 

..34 

.:>« 

. ."I'i 

.2i> 

.42 

.12 

.41 

. . (i 

. 8 

.32 

. .411 

. . 22 

■.0 

. 46 

.32 

. .24 

.54 

. .3.S 

.10 

. . Si) 

. . :i'i 

.24 
. . 30 
.. S 
.28 



Department of Agriculture. Weather 
Bureau I>ululh, April i:3. — Forecast for 
twentv-four hours emling al 7 p. m.. 
.Saturdav: Duluth. Superior and vicin- 
Itv including the Mesaba and Vermilion 
iron ranges; Partly cloudy weather 
tonight and .Saturday; warmer tonight; 
moderate winds, .shifting to easterly. 
H. W. RP'HARDSt'jN, 
Local Forecaster 




^Baking 
Powder 

Absolutely Pare 



The only bzdcing powder 
made from Royal Grape Cream of Tartar 




TWENTY YEARS AGO 

Taken From the Columns of The Herald of This Date. 1889. 



•♦•The Marine bank. which will 
open its doors on April 10, filed articles 
of Incorporation yesterday. The cap- 
iialiration is JIOO.OOO, which the in- 
corporators state will in a few months 
he increastd to $*.Jf.i),000. at least. 
Stockholders are Frank Osborne, H. D. 
Sizer, S. H. Kobbins, Edwin Saeger. 
all of Cleveland; O. K. Shannon, James 
fiiilings, Wilmot Saeger, George A. 
Klder, I. H. Bradford, H. A. Wing, S. F. 
U'hlte, all of Duluth. The officers will 
be: Jf.mes Billings, president; Wilmot 
Saeger. cashier. 



•••The injuries sustained by W. E. 
Richardson yesterday were much worse 
than was supposed at first. Both arms 
were broken at the elbow joint. Every 
day for a month he will have his arms 
unbound and reset at different angles, 
a most painfdl process, and it will 
probably be several months before he 
will be out again. 

•••Prof. A. H. Wigdahl. who has 
been very ill for some time, is very 
low and may not live more than a 
few days. 



Chicago. April 23. — Forecast for 
twenty-four hours ending at 7 p. m., 
.Saturday: 

I'pper Michigan — Partly cloudy to- 
night and Saturday: wanner in west 
|)ortion. 

Wisconsin — Fair and warmer tonight ; 
t^aturday probably fair. 

Minnesota and North Dakota — Partly 
cloudy tonight and Saturday; warmer 
tonight. 

MEANT TO BE Fl NXV. 



New York Press: 
see a man. my love." 
••.Scotch or Irish, Jim, 



I'm just going to 
dear?" 



Philadelphia Reeord: 
comes Borleigh. Do you 
speak to? 

Joax — Not if I see him 



Boston Transcript: 
motl»er Is worried half 
her affairs. 

Hub — Just like her. 
ilolng things by halves. 



Hoax — \\<irfi 
know him to 

first. 

Wife— John, 
to death over 

She's always 



•••Both houses of the Minnesota 
legislature atljourned sine die at noon 
today. The Keyes bill, applying the 
Australian system of elections to all 
cities of 10.000 or more inhabitants, 
was passed and signed by Oovernor 
Merriam. Tlie Duluth & Winnipeg 
land grant forfeiture bill was in- 
definitely postponed by the house. 

•**The Bai)tlst reunion at the First 
H.'iptlst church last evening was large- 
!■, uUiii.led. Z. D. Scott read the early 



history of the church from the records. 
.\. R. McDonald resuonded to the toast, 
•Our Brothers-in-law." Prof. Itudolptt 
gave a recitation. W. B. Patton mad» 
an address on "'Our Outlook." Mtislo 
was furnished by the choir of the 
First church, consisting of Messrs. 
McEaehran and W. P. Hurlhut, Mrs. 
Dr. Bowman and Mrs. E. Mcllroy. Ttev. 
G. H. McClelland. pa.=itor of the First 
church, presided over the gathering. 

••'At the city council meeting last 
night, W. B Goff presented an appli- 
cation for the position of city engineer. 

•••William Porter of Porter Bro..* & 
Co., of Duluth. leaves for California 
today for a month's visit. 



•••The plan for the Sixth avenua 
bridge In connection with the unioa 
depot were received by City Engineer 
Fuller today. The bridge is of Iron, 
with a roadway of plank and cedar 
blocks. The roadway Is to be thirty feet 
wide and the sidewalks about six feet 
wide. The expense to the city would 
be |15,.3t52 foi- the bridge work alone, 
while the cost to the company would 
be $;l.fi96. The plans will not be ac- 
cepted by the cit\. 

•••Ericks.in & Olson have liought a 
lot in Fifth division, West Duluth. 
and will erect a store and dwelllniy. 
Np to noon ttday there were forty- 
two stores of ail sort.^ In West Duluth. 



•••Another mass of pure copper, 
wieghing about five pounds, waa 
thrown out of solhl trap r'lck by a 
blast yesterday In tiie Masonic temple 
excavation. 



THE TONNAGE TAX VETO 



London Opinion: .She — I consider I 
am responsible for your business suc- 
cess. 

He — Well, you certainly did make It 
necessary for me to earn more money. 



Chicago Record-Herald: "Oh. George, 
I dropped a brass- headed taek on our 
new Persian rug this afternoon an.l 
I've hunted for 11. but I can't find it. ' 

"Wait till bedtime. I'll take a walk 
around in my socks." 



Cleveland Leader: "'Is your husband 
all you thought he was?" 

"Just about. But he doesn't eome 
close to being all he thought he was." 



Houston Post: 
mv hand, George?" 

•'No; he gave me 
eye:*' 



•Did papa give you 
his! Look at 



my 



Philadelphia Record: Blobbs — Why 
do you liken Harduppe to the busy 
bee? He's not particularly Industrious, 
is he? 

Slob'os — Oh. no. It Isn't that, but 
nearly everyone he touches gets stung. 

New York ,Siin: Kicker — Do you 

think a shelf three feet long could hold 
a liberal education? 

Bocker — Yes. If used as a shingle. 



Tbe 'I'nir of a Tub. 

(Not bv Dean Sv.ift.) 

Faith, Molly O'Neal, 

Why siiould you conceal 
A face that no artist could fiatter? 

There's no hint of yotir nose — 

Your chin's all that shows 
Sii)ce my colleen's become a tub-hatter 

No longer your eyes 
Seem to mirror the skies 

When those hearl-killin' glances you 
scatter; 

'Tls a cave that's come down 
To the neck of your gown — 

Why should Molly become a tub-hatter? 

Tf your face were not fair 

Sure nobody would care. 
As to church of a Sunday you patter. 

But for you to be hid 

III a laundry-Biyle lid 
Is sheer cruelty, eharining tub-hatter. 

So. Moliy O'Neal. 
Give your lad a square deal — 
Don't stamp, and declare 'tis no mat- 
ter — 

Or perhaps, jealous miss, 
He'll be stealing a kiss 
From a girl who is not a tub -hatter. 
— Denver Republican. 



An Kxpoandrr. 

Milwaukee Sentinel: John L. Sulli- 
van says he mav become a preacher. 
He certainly Is a fine old ex-pounder. 



Cleveland Leader: "Jim's in love. 
Isn't he'?" 

"He must be. He accepted an Invita- 
tion to a bridge party where they don't 
play for stakes.' 

Pointed Paragrapha. 

Chicago N:'ws: When Father Time 
hangs up his scythe hell be no mower. 

Those who dwell in other peoples 
memories ought to live cheaply. 

A mob always thinks with its sym- 
pathy, never with Its reason 

When a man gels lonesome he begins 
lo reallzt' wliat poor company he is. 

Ever notice that most of the things 
you are prepared for neglect to hap- 
i-t n ? 

If you would find out what the wild 
waves are saving you should go to sea. 

It's surprising how many otherwise 
men believe in signs and 



Crooksion Times: There can be no 
Muestion but that Governor Johnson 
has materially ineieased in the e.sli- 
malion of every citizen who for«et.s 
politics and regards a public official 
as an individual with a mind and a 
judgment of his own. Tlie governor 
was eonfronled with a situation that 
required the use of considerable back- 
bone and nerve, and he has acquit teil 
liim.seir with great credit. He Ijeheved 
•hat the tonnage tax measure, whicli 
was sent up lo him for his endoise- 
ment. was unjust, and a statute which 
was not required and would serve no 
good purpose: that it was aimed 
against the best interests of the slate 
an<l would materially hamper the bet- 
ter development of a section ot tlie 
state which al the present lime should 
be given consideration. 

On the other hand, there was no 
.lue.^ilon but that from the political 
viewpoint the tonnage tax \vas popu- 
lar. It had a hold upon the people 
simplv because It was seemingly aimed 
against a corpi-ration. and had been 
used by politicians and demagogues 
to arou.se public opinion. They save 
no consideration to tlie merits of the 
hill no thought as to Its Justice or the 
effect it would have on the future of 
Northern Minnesota. Many sa-id the 
Kovernor would not have the nerve to 
Teturn the bill lo the state legislature 
with his veto. Irrespective ol party 
and irrespective of our opinion as t«> 
the merits of the measure, we should 
lake some pride in a state executive 
who i." not afraid to stale his position, 
notwithstanding to many it may ap- 
pear in the light of a political blunder. 
The governor did right in vetoing the 
bill when he could not give his personal 
endorsement to It. and the people ot 
the stale should give him credit lor hi.^ 
independence. ., ,. ^i * 

We are of the opinion that the ton- 
nage tax bill was intimately connected 
and associated with the development 
of the entire northern section ot the 
state, and had it become a law it would 
have been a factor in interfering with 
the plans already made for the estab- 
lishment of an industry which will 
have a direct bearing upon the future 
growth and development of Northern 
Minnesota from the Red River of the 
North to Lake Superior. There can 
be no doubt but that It would have 
material I V affected Northeastern Min- 
nesota, and we are of those who be- 
lieve tliat what affects a part affects 
the whole. With greater development 
in Duluth and the range country, we 
believe that the Red River valley and 
Polk countv will be benefited, and eon- 
.sequeiitlv the governor. In coming to 
the aid of Duiutli and tlie surrounding 
territory, has also given something to 
this section of the state which will re- 
sult to Its benefit. 



delegation in his candleacy for presi- 
dent. And if he should be the Demo- 
. ratic nominee, the Republicans will 
liave to keep awake to prevent his ap- 
propriating the electoral vote. 



Hlbbing Tribune: John A. John- 
son in the United States .senate would 
look good to u.-!. 



Dl LITH .\ND THE HERALD. 



St. Pet->r FrC'i Press: One of our 
best exchanges is The Duluth Herald. 
Of course it is a little daffy on mat- 
ters pertaining lo the steel trust, es- 
pecially on the tdxation of iron ore, 
liut In m'jst other respects It presents 
and di.seu.ssc.s questions of ih*' day with 
an independencj .rarely met in a Dem- 
ocratic party j)aper. B>-sid.-s it is 
newsy and metropolitan througliout. 
Tile Herald would be u credit to any 
large city. 



Mankato Free Press: The Herald 
says; These are genuine spring days 
In Duluth." We woul.l like to take your 
world for it. but you'll have to show us 
first. 

Stillwater Gazette: The Duluth 
Herald evidently i.s not much al.irmed 
at the ordinary wolf as it is at what 
that paper terms the ' gray-wolT' that 
is not satis-^ied with howling, but in- 
sists upon coming right in and sitting 
al the council V»oard. 



of courtesy should be 
upon the bread of inde- 

5ht to his 
remains a 



sensible 
omens. 

The butter 
thickly spread 
pendenee. 

And every man has a rJ 
own opinion — as long as he 
bachelor. , , ,, 

Riches never roost upon the shoulder 
of a mar who is engaged in playing a 
slTt machine. . ,,,^1,1 

You should practice self-denial b> 
denving yourself the pleasure of say- 
ing unkind things of others. 

And now a scientist says that tears 
will kill disease germs--and every 
woman knows they will destroy a 
irake-up. , , 

Even a married man can always 
manage lo have the last word— if he Is 
willing to make it his name at the 
bottom of a eheek. 



■ Bachelor. 

People are natur- 



RFfleotloDN of 

New York Press: 
ally so honest that they seldom think 
they have to live up to it. 

Spring poetry is as green as new 
vegetables, but isn't worth money the 
way they are. ^ ^ , x 

A woman can be a great deal hap- 
pier not knowing things than a man 
can thinking he does. • ., , 

Most of a mans troubles in this 
world comes from his trying to make 
It for other people. 

A girl has such an imagination she 
can think she Is In love with a man 
when what It is is that she isn't In 
love with somebody else. 

Every time a man gets elected may- 
of a village he thinks he's In line 



or 



residence in the 



for a four years 
White House. . • , . 

The German "Herr Is an equivalent 
for the American 'Mr. " But the Amerl- 
"her" Is more than an equivalent 
any "Mr." on earth. 



■or 
ean 
for 



A SucoeMBful .\Krloultiirl«t. 

Chicago Tribune: Farmer Patten Is 
one of the few eminent agriculturists 
who can harvest a crop of $1.26^ 
wheat at this seasoo of the year. 



Cambridge Independent Press: The 
hosiilitv displayed bv the people of .st. 
Louis county to the Bjorge tonnage 
tax bin was the outcome of either a 
wonderful unanimity of conviction or 
oKse extravagant testimony to the skill 
and Ingenuity of Interested parties in 
manufacturing and fostering false pub- 
lic sentiment. We prefer to accept the 
former and to think that the people of 
Nortlieastern Minnesota really believed 
that the Bjorge bill, if made into law, 
would spell ruin to that section of the 
state The bill passed the senate Fri- 
day night and the governor held it 
until Tuesday before returning it to 
the legislature without his approval. 
The veto message does Mr. Johnson 
crcilit He gives liis reasons for not 
signing the bill, and to those who were 
opposed to the change in the system 
for taxing the ore of the state they 
win seem good and sufficient. The 
supporters of the measure will soon, 
if they do not already, realize that 
no harm will be done by Its failure to 
become law at this time, and when the 
question again come.t up— If it ever 
,}oes— the people of the state will be 
far better qualified than they are at 
present to answer It Intelligently and 
satisfactorily. 

Vlrcinla Virginian: By his action 
Governor Johnson has risen to the 
height of a statesman. A man who 
will use the veto power in such a 
situation to save one section of his 
state from being plundered by the 
whole state through an unjust taxa- 
tion measure Is big enough to be presi- 
dent. 

Eveleth News: When the reliable 
news did arrive yesterday noon, the 
happiest men were those who had sup- 
ported Governor Johnson /or three 
campaigns, because they had faith In 
his honestv and confidence In his Judg- 
ment Thev had cause to be consider- 
ing the fight that was waged on the 
governor, when It was crammed down 
the necks of everybody that a vote for 
him meant a vote for the tonnage tax. 
Fven his words defining his position 
were and have since been, misquoted 
.^nd garbled by feeble intellects, 

St Cloud Journal -Press: Governor 
Johtison can have the St. Louis county 



Roseau Times: If there was any 
legislation the present legislature un- 
derstood it was the •'tonnage tax on 
ore." So great was the knowledge of 
the prairie member or\. thi.s matter, that 
all the arguments of the representa- 
tives of the iron ore industry fell like 
cotton flakes on the hirsute and un- 
einhelllshed heads of these duvotod 
statesmen. Alas. Duluthl Woe, Iron 
range: 



Itasca News: April 17th brings not 
the first rain sliower, still Duluth will 
claim swarms ot canaries — feeding on 
snow flees. 



EiW Miner: And now comes Rabbi 
Lefk'oviiz of Duluth and says ilie J.^wa 
did not crucify Christ, and that the 
teachings of the Sunday st:hools and 
churches are not Chn.-tian in this re- 
spect a.s creating a liaie for the Jew- 
ish race 



Two Harbors Iron News: Duluth has 
passed an ordinance that hits the ri^ht 
spot. This makes it n mi.sdemeanor 
punishable by a fine . or Imprisonment 
for a boy between the ages of IS and 
21 .vears to go into a saloon and mis- 
represent his age in order to obtain 
a drink of liquor. Thi.s places the re- 
si)onslbility where it properly belongs. 
If it is wrong for a boy to drink in 
saloons, and It undoubtedly Is. then 
the boy is at least equally guilty with 
the man who sells It. This will also 
do away with the sending of boys to 
saloons by so-called detectives to buy 
liquor In order to trap the saloon- 
keeper. 

Le Sueur Sentinel: The Duluth Even- 
ing Herald gives the following stagtes 
of intoxication: gelling "an edge." "a 
gentle slant," "keyed up" "piekb-d, 
wiiicli is when his ton^rue gets tangled 
and he sees more than he ought to; and 
after that comes the last three stages, 
wliii^li get worse by rapid degrees: 
•loaded." "sou.sed" and 'paralyzed.' 
These seven stages are said to include 
about all the symptoms an ordinary 
case will develop, and have been classi- 
fied by some wise man of the Zenith 
City. 



Ad .\|>ril .Note. 

April is ever pleast^il and cross 
A madcap In Time's race; 

He stole the winas of March to toss 
His curls about iiis face! 

— Atlanta Constitution. 



AMUSEMENTS. 



FIK«»T TIMK 
T<>.M<>H'r. 



LYCEUW I 

TOMORROW AND SATLRDAY. 

Matinee Saturday. 

AL H. WILSON 

TUe Golden Voiced .Singer In Hln 
«lonK Bederked Play. "WHK.N OLU 
KKU VOKK WA.S ULTt H." 



Next Week — Monday, Tueaday, 

Wednenday. Matinee Weduewday, 
WALKKR \VHiri:sll>E l> "THK 
MKLTINCi POT." Friday and Satur- 
day, FLOREXIJE ROBERT.S. 
















1 


1 


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1 














1 








IJ 


' ■- 




! 


^ 






t 




I 




1 • 


\ 


J, 


■ 


- j^ 


1, 








I 

i 
"I 



ilaii 



rjiiMiiiin 









1 










•• 





/ 



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— ' 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD FRIDAY, APRIL 23. 1909. 



\ 




HERE MR. CLOTHES BUYER ! 



When you buy clothing you only see the outside of a garment, but when 

we select clothing we see both inside and outside. We see to it that the riglit 
stitches are put in tlie rij4lil place and that the lining and every hidden part that 
goe> t(. make up a well made Suit or Overcoat is correct. 

In Thfs Splendid Stock of 

The Big Duluth Quality Qothes for Men 

^'ou can certainly suit your indiyidual tastes as to outside appearance. 
Tweniy seven year, of honest clothes selling guarantees the rest And we 
are sure, from our knowledge of the clotliing situati.^n that you will get a 
better value here titan an) where else. 

Spring Suits Spring Topcoats and Cravenettes 

$J0 to $35 $10 to $30 

ImmciiM- allowing of inatclilos values at $!•'., $I« and $20 Saturday. 



little 



— - f « , For ilrfVH.H, striM't and -lUtinK wear — - 

Mens Opnng spritig's corrtM-t styles, rust >m-tiiil- 

<ir."l I'rxiii tht» liiiest n»attMials — 

$:2.U0 to $M.OU. 



Trousers 



A ^ . . # Duluth'H most complete ahowing o« 
AutOlStS aut.. loats. dusters, cap-i. gauntlets. 

,-tr The very best makes at^th* 

l.)w>'.st i>r)ce.-J- 



Apparel 





riHr i— M* 



An eleiiant showing of New \\'aslial)le Fancy \'ests— $1.00 to $5. 



GUESTS DO 
NOTHURRY 

Medley at Harcourt Re- 
ception "Stick" to 
Dinner Hour. 

Alfred Vanderbilt Pre- 
paring to Create Quite 
a Splurge. 



"BEAUTIFUL FACE AND 

NO WORE W RINKLES 

FREE BEAUTY COUPON 

FOR HERALD READERS. 



»» 



New Novelties in 

Spring 
Furnishings 

SJilltTS— with collars t.. match, in n.-vv 

stripes and tigur<'s — $1 jO. 

■COLLAItH- <\ piiu-d clfio Truly 

Ihf iie.v.v,t. ihinK thi.<> season. All 
tl t.it;,. at the poiuilar watering 

: ..[ th." cast — ir.r. 2 for 25c. 

HOSIEIt\- - With nr<-kties to matcli, very 

pretly c'l.jiiufc;- >■■■■ i'^"- i- '' -*^'t 
1 1 *') *) 



initial — very rn'W, in 
".v ilh Kill iniliiil — .'.Oc. 



blai'iv 1 

XKl-RTIES Four-in.-ha,n , itli hat- 

baiida to ttuit-'li lu all the pupular 
col'irtng:-, P'T ■■"■t. — $l.tJO. 




Mothers— 



Do your 
C'LOTHK.S • 



i.oys wear the HRST 
If not, th^^y should. 



Tlieres no reason why they 
shouldn't w.-ar the best clothes in 
th»' world— The Big Duluth Clothes 
— ft>r thpy cost no more here than 
the oliu-r kinds elsewhere 

Smart Spring Suits 

$2.45 to $15 

Nobby Spring Overcoats 

$2.45 to $18 



Your New 
Hat, Sir, 



here 



Como in any 



Is 

lit you c'orrectly In a nobby 

hal that will become you. 



day and let us 
new spring 



H.',<,l-v. 



Footwear, 



Furnlsliini?M. 



Stetson's Hats 

$3.50 to $5.00 

Guyer Hats 

$3.50 and $4.00 

Mallory's (Cravenetted) 

$3.00 and $3.50 



VuiiiiK Men hv tlie -scor.- are 
funlin« the ••snap"' and quality 
they want in our L-System Colh-ge 
Clothes— $i:. to $3:.. 
Olh.r L!.st Makes — 14.93 to $1 -•.'<'). 



Gordon Hats 

$3.00 



Waite's Hats 

$3.00 



( In soft and J^tiff.j 
.Spring Capa — 50c tu $2.00. 




BOSTOMAX 

sii(>i:s. 

$:t..->0 and V4.U0 



Slor* •ptfi Saturday 
night till 10 id. 




^iimm 



wii.i.iA.MsoN & .mi:m>i:xiiaij.. 



ATTORNEYS WILL NOT HAVE TO 
TELL WITNESS TO "SPEAK UP" 



iiiu tlw ,U-i.u.'- tliat separates him 
troui ihe judKc. naiuraliy npeaka loud- 
ly, so tliat his honor may luar, and It 
tlie jiidK*> hears, tlie attorney.^ and 
»tetioKra|>her mufd also hear, for ihey 
are as near the witness as the judge. 



-A. ' ' 

> .uihlitiK. ill 

J, • . - •-:-■■ 

V 

i : 



.1 in pn-pai - 

i!)>or of til.- 
Mi' tl»o 

;),rc liifl'tT- 



tlH» fat-t C.iit 



In t 

I r 1 1 ' 1 1 t 



i4 U il t i' 

1' rii. 



■pi,. 



•r\' 
II.' 



1 



Call Koy's Auto 

K.ist Ml' liitfan street. 



New 



til. 



tl >. . . 1 J . --> . 
J) it's a '" 
Tlie iw., 
•part. 

The purpose of 
make wlliu-.^ses >i 
It; at not ""iv t!: 
torneya ar 
can hear •■ 
sv3t»--m al~ 
enough a v. 
larty fli " 
case in 
Ing from . 
wafted out 



lir is p 

■ ■ the ; 



th*^ tl*"*"* 1»1«»' 



he judges il'air, and forc- 
^- Ills niiioJ li-^ni the trial 
■ re hitn, 

<ourlroom» in tl 
city luiU conditio, 

l(oth rooms tlo' vvi!ii«-.s.> 
placed flosf Ix-.si.le ihe j 
Tlif pri-soner and the man 
ui.-r he was guilty or not 
w*Tc siuiggled up side liv !<iiU~. | 
witness i)arely u lilsp.rtil tlie 
r..iiM iir>ier.sland what lie was j 
bit tlie att(one>.s and other In- | 
■d persons w-r.- (1<t-'-n--" •• up i 
t it if the man •>! u n the ' 

did not speak ui a <,., .i. l.jhc of 



to 



: n t* VI ' ' <« ' 

-, if he icu- 

, =.,»,.... , , . ,!,f, 

!i aris- 

, '.. ..; Kenlly 

vc. without tariy- 



KuowinK t 
pally direct* 



IliK «)n. 

it w : I 
I I ; e \\ 
In the 



marks were princl- 

!,e judge, the wit- 

; I :ii)i.. ,11 to forget all about 

( the attorneys were also 

I what was going on, and 

their voices so low that 

,. ,.r could hear what was go- 

riHve arter lime, during tlie 

.t , verv trial of ativ length, 

, s,n \ to cull 'i: ;iie of 

-! lo :speak lo.' 

lo'w rooms (he vviir -■■e- 






THE ROYAL YENDES 

ARTILLERY RE6IMENT 

BAND of Sweden 

LYCEUM THEATER 

Matinee and INight. 2:?0 and 8:15 p. m. 

SUNDAY, APRIL 25. 

TICKET SALE BEGINS FRIDAY. 



and colonial cities. A di.splay of pic- 
tures which told the truth ahout condi- 
tions abroad would do much to coun- 
teract the display of fine clothes and 
jewels and the lyinR letters boasting of 
nonexistent wealth. 



TOO MICH WINE IN ITALY. 



■arik 



/ 



:.;:V.\v.' 



If you wekr Ric^ .30llil*^^/^s'Shoes 



both comlort and jstyle ar^Vyofirsat 

sinaH cxpciTStJ: — r n ;\7"" 

We operate sipven large factd?]ics prodiicing 
many brands^ and--st>|es-JDl m^n's, wompft's 
and childreti's^shoes. For nea# 50 ye^fs we 
haye (ievoted ^ur energies tq brodu^jng the . 
i^est slipes possible fojr the [)fie.Xt)iir vairK 
o^ advertised s^ioes are branQ^ ori the s^e 
uarantee df gopdn96s and as a yrK)si' 



as 



tive means 6i^idci1|rFitalt 



/ 



ybvLrWpff dealer. 



Rice 

Men's All America 

Patent Colt Blucher 
With special fancy mat 
calf insertion in upper. 

Price $4.00 per pair 



moes 



riiiiiiiii/' 



iMiiiiiMiiiii 



RICE A HUTCHINS. Hon»« Offk*. Bmton. Mom. 



IRISH EXODUS 
SHOWS DECLINE 

Emigration of 1908 Is 

Smaller Than for 

Seventy Years. 

Dublin. April liS— La.it year deserves 
to he marked as a re.l letter year in the 
Iri-'ih .Mlendar. for n .' -^iii.-e the sta- 
tistics of liKsh eiiii^r.iuou iiave been 
kept has the numt>er ')t emigrants been 
ao low as in 1908. It is probable, in- 
deed, that the fiRuics are the lowest for 
seventy years, for. accordiuB to UCon- 
nell. the population of Irelaiui was 
falling rapidly before 1S41. 

The previous low-water mark.s smce 
1S41 were in 1876 and 1898. but there 
were i>.»)Oi» fewer emigrants In 1908 
than in IH'JS. and the emigration rate 
la^t year was only b.'i per 1,000. com- 
pared with T.l In the previous low- 
tide years The decade of which 1908 
was the closing year was also the low- 
eat on record, thus proving beyond a 
doubi that the tlow of population froiri 
Ireland has been permanently checked. 

A remarkable feature of the emigra- 
ti.>n IB that Ulster, which has always 
boasted of Its prosperity, is now fur- 
nishing the greatest number of emi- 
grants. Antrim. Including Belfa.^t, last 
vear lost 3.265 of its inhabitants or 
about as many as all Leinster. includ- 
ing Dublin, and half as 'many as all 
Muusler with two and a half times the 
[Mipulation. 

It is significant, too. that the ma- 
jority of the emigrants were not skilled 
workmen from Belfast, driven away by 
the depression in the shipbuilding and 
weaving trades. They were chletly 
farmers and farm laborers, and it must 
be remembered that the northeast cor- 
ner of Ulster is the one part of Ire- 
land that has not been seriously af- 
fected by the recent land legislation, 
landlordism still nourishes in Ulster 
and the people are fleeing from it. 

Of course the chief cause of the de- 
cline In emigration Is the growing 
prosperity of Ireland, but In addition 
to this there Is the growing realiza- 
tion that all is not so bright in the 
n«*w countries as the people have been 
led to imagine. A striking lecture on 
the subject wa.H delivered at Cork a 
few davs ago by Uev. M. Phelan. wh.) 
declared that the display of wealth 
made bv the one returned exile was 
often accountable for a great deal of 
ihe unrest among our people. They 
never heard. however, said Father 
Phelan. of the submerged ninety-nine 
-vho are dving In poverty and squalor 
in tlio sliiiufl at tUa great American 



Farmers riffed to Make Conifields 
of Their Viueyaid.s. 

Rome, April -J?.. — Discussion in the 
• haniber of deputies on the reduction 
or abolition of the duty on corn has 
aroused a considerable amount of In- 
terest, but. as was expected, the gov- 
ernment has refused to sanction either 
proposal. 

The question, like most economic 
problems in laly. Is complicated by the 
dilferetice l)etween ilie North and the 
.South. The North wants the duty re- 
moved, the South desires it to be main- 
tained, while the Ministerialists em- 
phasize the difficulty of meeting the 
large expenditure on the public service 
without It. Their remedy Is that Italy 
whhh now produces more wine than 
she can sell and less corn that suffices 
for her wants, should diminish her 
wine-growing area and increase her 
cornfields, but in order to Induce the 
farmer to do this he must be protected 
against the foreigner. 

It is pointed out by the Protectionist 
party that when in 1898, under the In- 
fluence of the labor riots of thai year, 
the nudlnl cabinet reduced the duty on 
corn, the reduction In price to the con- 
sumer was small; the middleman prof- 
ited, the state lost, and the people re- 
mained much In the same position as 
before. The bread question Is further 
aiferted by the recent law prohibiting 
baking at night, with the result that 
for his breakfast the consumer has to 
eat bread that is not only dear but 
also stale. 



GOVERN M FAT BL.\MKI) FOR 
B.\D NAVAL CONDITIONS. 



Paris, April 23. — Much has been s.ild 
of late, publicly and otherwise, of the 
weakness of the government of France, 
the rotten condition of the navy, arma. 
ments, etc. Doubtless many factors 
have contributed to bring about these 
conditions, but an eminent Frenchman, 
in talking over the matter this week, 
remarked that the French government 
was much more occupied in keeping 
power than in maintaining the 
strength of the army and navy. 

The council of ministers, he said, 
meets nearly every week at Mme. 
Sorel's of the Comedle Francaise. Mine. 
.Sorel. It appears, was a bonne amle of 
President Felix Faure, and Felix Faure 
got her Into the Comedle Francaise. At 
first she could not act at all: but she 
is a woman of great personality, and 
soon she began to show a real apti- 
tude for certain roles. She is now per- 
haps the best exponent of the coquette 
on the French stage. Not only does 
more than one minister consult her, 
but it is a fact that the council of 
ministers meets very frequently at her 
house. Mme. Sorel Is a sort of fetnlnlne 
nrlme minister and she undoubtedly 
has a good ileal to do with the gov- 
ernment of the country. 



London. April 23, — Mrs. Lulu Har 
court lias resumed her weekly recep- 
tions, which were interrupted on one 
or two occasions because she con- 
tracted influenza. These are parties of 
a semlpoiitical order and very catholic 
to which all and sundry may come. 
They are made up of ministers and 
their womenkind; labor members and 
their better halves, and very often the 
friends of the latter, altogether a fas- 
cinating and interesting medley where 
no one is dull. Mrs. Harcourt is one 
of those hospitable liostesses who do 
not put an hour of departure on their 
cards. The result is some people do 
not know when to go. At least the 
other afternoon there were some who 
apparently understood the Invitation 
lo mean a night's stay. They got fixed, 
some wit afterwards said, "near a glue 

The Harcourts were giving a dinner 
party that evening and a royal princess 
was to be among the guests. Mrs. Har- 
courfis frame ot mind can be realized 
when at 7:30 some of these awful peo- 
ple were still sitting in her drawing 
room. Like the typical husband. 
Lula" dues not always show up at his 
wife's afternoon parties. As a matter 
of fact, he iiad spent the greater part 
of the time In the square playing with 
his two little girls, seeing the guests 
come and go. He went in when he 
thought they had all cleared, only to 
hear the voices of tiie freezers-on 
talking animatedly. Feeling it his 
<iuty to help Mrs. Harcourt out of the 
.lifticultv he went to the drawing room 
and was button-holed. They wanted to 
know all about the naval vote of cen- 
sure on the government. 

The poor hostess wandered about the 
room frantic, kept looking at her 
watch, and still they would not go. 
At last an idea struck the butler. He 
thought that if he sounded the gong 
they would think It was the announce- 
ment of dinner and leave. Not they. 
They still stuik. .Seeing this the re- 
sourceful servant entered and said lo 
his master, "If you please, sir. a firi. 
has broken out upstairs and we have 
telephoned for an engine." Still loth 
to depart, the undesirables suggested 
that they would go upstairs and see 
what could be done. At this juncture 
a junior .servant appeared and ex- 
plained lliat the fire liad been put out. 
but that Mrs. Harcourt had fainted, 
overcome by the iriglit and that she 
wanted her husband. Then and then 
only the guests ileparted. 

Leader uf HritiMh Snelet}. 
Lady Ll!<ler-Kaye has been always 
si.iinewhat overshadowed by Consuelo, 
duchess of Manchester, her more beau- 
tiful and more witty elder sister, who, 
in spite of all newcomers, remains par 
exeellenee the hostess of kings, tlie 
tirst favorite of society; practically the 
leader of British society. Neverthe- 1 
less. Lady Lister-Kaye is having lier 
innings just now and has been doing a 
great deal of entertaining. Her din- 
ner for the prince and princess of 
Wales tl* other night was the biggest 
thing she has done yet. Those who 
understand the inner workings of so- 
ciety and the idiosyncra.«les thereof 
consider that it is In many ways a 
greater privilege to entertain the prin- 
cess of Wales than the king or queen. 
The prineess. of course, knows all the 
-Vmerican best set in the ordinary way. 
but on her private visiting list there 
are not halt a dozen names of Ameri- 
can.s. Among this privileged half 
dozen is the evergreen Consuelo. 
duchess of Manchester. Lady Lister- 
Kaye and Lady (Arthur) Paget. .Slie 
has a special regard for the last two. 
Lady Lister-Kaye was the only Amer- 
ican who was asked to Marlborough 
house to the exclusive dinner party 
given by their royal highnesses tliis 
week. 

Vanderbilt Coach Still PoiMiIar. 
Alfred X'andeibilt has taken a house 
up the river near Henley — a beautiful 
place, owned by Lord Kgmont — where 
he will entertain wlien the time comes. 
It la being decorated regardless of ex- 
pense. Tlie houseboat he intends to 
have alloat will be a thine- of beauty 
and joy for the season. He liopes 
through it to revive the lost Interest 
in houseboats. A special band has 
been engaged for him to entertain his 
guests both in Piccadilly, where his 
flat is situated, and on the Thames. 
He has the same suite of rooms at the 
Metropole. Brighton, which he occupied 
last season. Owing to the visits of 
King Kdward to Brighton, the place Is 
more popular than ever, and the Influx 
of visitors for the coaching time will 
be. judging by the booking, phenomen- 
al. Alreadv people are clamoring for 
tickets for the coach. Some of the 
philanthropic societies have suggested 
to the millionaire that he should ac- 
cept the "fancy" prices which he 
might have without the slightest 
trouble for the drives, and to hand 
over the same to them, but it appears 
that Alfred says that would not be 
"cricket" and has declined the hint, 
remarking that he would far prefer to 
give a check of his own than defraud 
the public 

Xo lntere.<«t In Motor Carw, 
A London motor firm has r^-ceived in- 
structions to send down to the place at 
Henley half a dozen of their beat cars, 
and a garage is being built in the 

According to his friends, this multi- 
millionaire gets tired of everything ex- 
cent iiorses. Motoring has practically 
no Interest for him. and the cars he 
has ordered are for the accommoda- 
tion of his guests. He is a host en 
prince, nothing being good «"0"^'' 
f.ir his euests. Numbers of the 
"sponger-border got hold of ^m last 
vear and had the time of their lives 
The stock that Is in the background 
awaiting his arrival just "o^ /'^f '"- 
created considerably, and it is sal.l to 
include a good portion of the tnore 
dangerous order of the "shark" vanely^ 
Where money Is concerned he has his 
Jlad Ic^ewe'/on fairly level and loses 
little to sharpers, so he may »^» 



Arrangements have been made with 
Harriet Meta, World's Famous Beauty 
Specialist, of Paris, London and Syra- 
cuse, N. Y., to furnish free particu- ; 
lars to all readers of The Duluth Her- 
ald in regard to what is believed to 
be the most remarkable method of 
removing wrinkles which has ever 
been discovered. 

Mile. Meta has been awarded nine 
Gold Medals by Paris. London. Brus- 
sels. Rome, and other International 
Expositions on her great Beauty dis- 
coveries. The French government 
has honored her with a Patent on her 
wonderful new proces.s for removing 
wrinkles, and patents are also now 
pending before the United States 
government at Washington. 

Mile. Meta is. herself, a living ex- 
ample of the great power of her re- 
markable beauty-making discoveries. 
By many she is considered the most 
beautiful woman in all Pari.s. 

She took her own wrinkles out in 
three nights by her new dl.scovery over 
three years ago, after face massage, 
inasks. straps and steaming pots had 
all failed to remove them, and her 
skin today is still soft and smooth; 
her face beautiful, and she has no 
more wrinkles. But be.st of all, her 
discover'' not only succeeded in her 
own case, but it seems to have wouked 
even more astonishing results In the 
cases of others. 

Mrs. Mary J. Davis of East St. Louis, 
111., says: "My wrinkles were verj' 



deep and of long standing, so yoti can 
imagine my surprise when, after only 
two applications, the^- entirely disap- 
peared." Mrs. L. E. Haskell of 2.^02 
Clay street. San Francisco, Cal.. 
writes: "I am r)0 years old. conse- 
quently my wrinkles were of long 
standing, and I had not thought it 
po.ssible to erase them, but now. when 
I view my changed reflection In the 
mirror, I can scarcely realize the 
transformation that has been 
wrought. ■• 

Mrs. M. A. Edwards of Raleigh. N. C. 
says: "I look younger tiian 1 did 2.5 
vears ago.'* Mrs. Nellie \V. Hoyt of 
Brooklyn. X. Y . writes: "Your treat- 
ment has removed every mark and 
blemish from my face, and niled out 
the hollow places, giving it a most nat- 
ural tone." 

No other Beauty Specialist, living or 
dead, has ever been honored by gold 
medals from International Expo'iitons. 
! and patronized hy Countesses and 
ladles of high title and rank to the 
same extent that Harlett Meta ha.>i 
been. 

You will never again have the op- 
portunity of consulting a Beauty Spe- 
<-ialist of such world-wide reputation 
as Hariett Meta Therefore, be sure 
to cut out and use the below Free 
Coupon today You need send no 

money, not even a postage stamp, but 
merely enclose the following coupon 
I in a letter addressed to Hariett Meta. 
Syracuse. N. Y., and you will receive 
; an answer in a plain .sealed envelope. 



FOR REMOVING WRINKLES 

Cut out thb* coupon today, and send it to the World Famous Beauty 
Specialist, Hariett Meta. of Paris. London and Syracuse ( N Y.), for 
I'reo information in regard to removing wrinkles by a marvelous new 
proce.ss that often makes ordinary wrinkles disappear in one night. 

Many ladies say it has made th.Mn look from ten to twenty years 
younger. No face massage, masks, straps or steaming pots, nothing 
to inject In or under the skin, but a wonderful new process that any 
lady can use in the privacy of her own home. Be sure to read the 
above article and write today. Address Hairiett Meta. Suite t>l.lH, 
Syracuse, N. Y. 

Duluth Herald Free Coupon 

Do not fail to ( ul out this coupon and cn«los«' it wltli your letter. 



DO NOT 



NEGLECT TO READ 
W. L DOUOUS 

SHOE AD ON PAQE 
8. LAST CHANCE. 



ENGLAND IN 
BLIJE^FUNK 

German Scare Has Even 

Made Impression on 

Smart Society. 

First-Aid Tea Parties 

Are Fad of the 

Moment 



London. April 23.— First-aid tea par- 
ties are t!ie fad of the moment in high 
society. Mrs. Lulu Harcourt. niece of 
J. Pierpont Morgan and the wife of oTie 
of the leading men of affairs in Eng- 
land, and Mrs. George West, one time 
Lady Randolph Churchill, also an 
American, are responsible for the latest 
vogue. At the present moment it Is con- 
sidered imperative by every society 
woman that she know how to manipu- 
late bandages, treat wounds and behave 
generally toward the Injured pending 

the arrival of the doctor. , . , . , 
The reason for all this is to be found 
in the ceaseless talk a»J'>Vt the coming 
German invasion <^f . ^"f and. The 
whole country, including the staidest 
members of the house of commons and 
the house of lords, are in a blue funk 
Diat is laughable because there is a re- 
mote possibility that some three years 
hence the kaiser's fleet of Dreadnoughts 
might approach in number that of J«>''" 
Bull It used to be openly boasted 
that' an Englishman was worth ever 
so many men of any other nationalilj. 
hut all that is changed now. and t 
appears to be the general fear that If 
put to the test, it will take a couple of 



Britishers properly to handle a single 
foreigner. 

Flmt-Ald l.emmonu. 

Lady Esher, wife of one of the king's 
chief advisers, has puldlcly announced 
a series of first-aid k-ssons, and hei- ex- 
ample is being followed by ihe upiier 
ten. Famous medical men from Harley 
street and Cavendish square are Invited 
to attend and give demonstrations to 
the would-be nursew. 

A well-known English peeress, who 
has the fuver bad, told me the other 
(lay that it was easy to get the big 
doctors to attend the classics, but the 
difficulty was in finding a volunteer 
subject for the demonstration. This Is 
because there are no men in the world 
so afraid of ridicule as Englishmen 
and they think that their apitearance In 
bandages and splints for imaginary 
wounds is likely to produce amuse- 
ment. Occasionally, some sidf-sacriflc- 
Ing woman lumps up and offers herself 
as a subject, but not often. Even the 
domestics have resented bitterly being 
called upon, as they express It, to play 
the fool for a crowd of aristocratic on- 
lookers. It is now the custom for boat- 
esses to engage a district messenger to 
perform the patriotic part of being 
wounded for his country at half a 
crown an hour. 

Fetohias UuiformM. 
At one aristocratic house, where the 
hostess and her audience take them- 
selves seriouslv. they wear the most 
fetching uniforms. The gowns are of 
ricli deep i>urple cashmere, the aprons 
exquisite things of lace and tucks, and 
cobwebby arrangements of the same 
rest on their perfectly colffe hair. Lit- 
tle jabots of real lace and cults to 
match are added. The final touch is 
given in the chatelaine, which Is some- 
times of filigree silver and enaiuel. 
Tills contains a number of small in- 
struments, including scissors, penknife, 
tape box etc. These chatelains are 
now among the very smartest things 
which may be given as presents. 

At the conclusion of the flrst-ald 
lectures, elaborate teas are served, and 
the guests are all expected to be able 
to discourse lluently on the characteris- 
tics of the respective navy and army 
of Germany and England. Everyone 
studies carefully the special articles 
appearing in her pet morning IJapen 
and everything else she can get hold 
of on these subjects so as to express 
ideas and to lmi)art information as It 
is her duty to do. 

• 

Harsh physics react, weaken the 
bowels. cause chronic cons IpaHon. 
Doan's Regulets operate ea.sily, 
the stomaeti, cure constipation. 
Ask your druggist for them. 



tone 
25c. 



SOUR STOMACH 

"I used Cascarets and fe«l like a new 
man. I have been a atiflerer from dys- 
pepsia and sour stomach for the last two 
jears. I have been taking medicine and 
other drugs, but could find no relief only 
for a short time, i will recommend 
Cascarets to my friends as the only thing 
for indigestion and sonr stomach and to 
keep the bowels in good condition. 
They are very nice to eat." 

Harry Stuckley, Mauch Chunk, Pa. 

Pleasant. Paiatftble. Potcnf . Taste Good. 
Do Good. Nev«r Slcktu Weaken or Gripe. 
10c. ZSc. Wc Never »o;d !a hulk. The gen- 
aloe tablet stamped C r.' C, GaaraBtee4 to 
•urs o( you amain back. 



Success 

Awaits 

You 



very 



trusted to take care of hims elf. 

DOG SMOTIIERED A B.\BY. 

Left to Protect Child. It Caused Its 
Death. 

Paris. April 23.— The danger of leav- 
alone In their cradles In 



Ing Infants 

with dogs or cats has been 
more in the case of 



a room 

exemplified once 

a poor family of charcoal burners near 

Coulommlers. 

After their mid-day meal the par- 
ents went Into the forest to resume 
the?r work leaving their little daugh- 
ter S«rzanna. aged* 3 months «leeP*ng 
In her cradle, under the protection of 
two dogs. No sooner had the parent.s 
eone than one of the dogs leaped nto 
fhe cradle and curled itsielf up to sleep 
oti the top of the infant. When the 
father and mother returned some 
hours later they saw the dog Juirip 
from the cradle and run out of the 
door The motlier hurried to her In- 
fant, only to discover, to her horror, 
that the poor little one was dead, suf- 
focated by the weight ot the dog lying 
upon her for some hours. 

Secure Your Tickets 



For Vendes band. They are 
Uraud. Lyceum next Sunday. 



simply 



Rock 
Island 



In the Great 
Southwest 

The Southwest is growing rapidly. 
Thousands have taken advantage of the 
low fares in effect on "Homeseekcrs' 
Dates" and made a trip of investiga- 
tion to the Great Southwest. 

They were amazed at the evidences 
of prosperity which abound on every 
hand. They saw for themselves the 
great promise the future held in store, 
and they decided then and there to 
stay. Today many of them are inde- 
pendent and men of influence in their 
respective communities; others are on 
the road to prosperity and independ- 
ence. 

Next Homeseekers' Excursion 

DATE. MAY 4th. 
Take .-idvantage of the low fares in effect 
on this date, make a trip of investigation 
and be convinced. 

Literature, descriptive of the section 
which interest you most, on request 
W. L. H.\THA\V.\Y. DiHt. PasH. Agent. 
Rock Island I.inett. 
400 Nieollet Avenue, Minneapolis. Minn. 





V 



^ j^ «■ —^'vjma _"i-'y 



I 



$.^tinMammmw m -3 > i ' 





»I |W H 1 Mk 



\ 



r 



14 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: FRIDAY, APRIL 23. 1903. 



WeSdlto 
Mothers Who Know 

■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■> MMlHHBBi^^aBi ■■■■i^Hi^B^aiBiB 

We would sell all the boys' clothes in town if all 
mothers knew the truth. 

For we control the X3MS22D line — the Eder- 
heimer-Stein suits for boys. No other boys' clothes 
give so much for the money. 

The makers of YTRAGOon specialize in clothes for 
young folks — they are tailors to young men and boys. 

They have built up a business of 500,000 suits per 
year by excelling on these lines alone. 

The trousers are lined in every 
YTRAGOo n suit for boys. That 
more than doubles the lif eof them. 

One-third more cloth is used in 
YTRAGOo n suits than the common. 
That's so the boy won't outgrow 
them. 

No suits pay the maker or 
dealer less <>rofit. But you get 
twice as much for your money. 

And the styles are distinctive. 
Pick out any specially well-dressed 
boy and you'll find he wears an 
YTRAGOon label. 

You are wronging yourself and 
the boy when you get an inferior 
suit. Come and see the X3M222D. 
We've a wealth of styles and sizes. 




7aiiloti« 




THE BEAUTY 






B UU.\ 11 11A\- 

I'ir basse men I. 

s^fjiiart (leal. 



TRUNKS— BAGS— CASES 

NORTHERN TRUNK CO. 

2:iH \vi;:sT fiiisT stiikkt. 

tippdwife \%ol%lit BuihiiiiK. 




Ih 
III 



p kii.- 

p:tr'l . 

"X. 



ilijtit, and says 

lU luiin has done si. 'iiuoli for the 
•1 and .sut-oially foi- u.s \\ im live In 
iirn IlemlMplure, as Clirlsto- 
j iiniibu.x. and no man in history 

lias received so littl« credit for the 
work he has accomplished. He was un- 
intentionally robbed of the distinction 
of having- one of the largest continents 
of t!i>- New World named after him. 
■•v.,t t-\fu an Island, be it ever so 
111 I lie oceans and seas svir- 
liriK North ar.d .South America. 

■vnu» of Columbus. Thert> 

■ s in Nortli America that 

Mori of bearlnB his 

irg-os-t, riche.st and 

t he city In which we 

ty a rare diwilnction for 

, to have .said of It that 

>.st prominent 



■Not 
s 1 1 1 : 1 11, 



1.1 



A MONUMENT 
FOR COLUMBUS 

Feature of First Cen- 
tennial of Knights 
of Columbus. 



I live, il I- 
t 'olunil)ti^. 

it is ttit 

I [-i.U'f 111 • 

Worbi tlial i..cai-.s Uo- 
discoverer. 

" \ nd yet. admit t 
eveii a plain 
n lhi» city 



New or Old 

u.i.jii' of the great 



t!if II, 



iff d 



I ' 

Mu: 

ai' 

V* 



•1 Ivll 

K 



;;,t o: * . 
I'l-; tii;"in ! 



the 



: and 

v:m b< 



. M .1 t 

.state 
<5uch 

Ohio 

f t!ir 



.Mr. < 



■ Iressed a 



d 

L I O- J.l > t 

rmal ac- 
<n taken. 

Ifttei- to 



Cut Glass Sale! 



•^ 



tar. 



;r.(l a Jobber who was very anxious to close 

( ut glasf--. By taking the entire 
price which eimldes u-^ to offer yu 

• lejird of in thi.s <-itv The stock is 

y[<H k, i.^i we 
pinale tiifse prices. 




Every Piece Fi ne Cut Glass! 

It* ms. Note the big saving: 
10 .: ■■ ,1 designs Bon Bons — regular price ^4 f^£k 
* -This sale %^±m9U 

i -inch h' Bowls — regular price f 8 00 tfff 1*^ 
rhia sal- , ^9»M.9M 

C 1 ! ■ -V De^^igri Wat.r Bottles — regular price ^Q M^ 
i -Thi-s sale ^OmTiO 

8 d«*..-.t 11 Fide Tiiiiihlers — regulai' j.r'j- t-.v run frvva $1.15 ^ Rg% 
to T .ich — This sale from $1.15 tu ■ tf V 

' ' M lied and Plain Nappies. Pin Tray-^, 
Ho: .o. . .:. 1. ■ -■ and Sherbets. 

logins at 10 o'clock Saturday morning. 
tito iheni in our big window now. 



<& o o D s — »» pt I c e 3 n I o H T 



YHARD 



YOU R 



BACK I r NO 



I I ( H ■ I i 

••Tlo 1 
S. 



; tliia. there Is 
of granite or 

... .. iOMit'iiioi-aiing the 

iient.s of Columbus. Why is it 

iuKs man in so little honored, not 

'- this city, but throughout the 

■'t large? There can be but 

to the fiuestion an<l It Is 

ji«_ ople are not public-spirited 

to advocate and insist upon 

>rs to which hi.s memory is en- 



!n 



It 



>r 



i.s no ni.Tri' appropi-iate city 
■ .'State, lu fact, in Anierlca. North 
iitb. to trttt a njonument to the 
Mils coiintr\ than in the 
i!ic world u hicli bears 



.MetnbtTS 
bu-s rf-Hidtng 



f the Knights oi" Colum- 
in Oliio will eioteavor to 
.secure an api>ropriation from the tlie 
state legi.'slature for the purpo.se of 
erecting tlie proi)Osed mor.ument. 

PRINCK TO TF{AVEHSE 

(M)N(J(I FORKST AFOOT. 

I',: .\pril 1:3. — Prince Albert of 

H.l^.ium I. AS titarted on the trip he Is 
to ijiak.- ill the Congo. The prince In- 
tci.ilM to A i.sit Khodesla. then he will 
walk over l.'.OO mlle.^ through the 
Congo forest to the source of the Congo 
river, wliich he will follow to Boma, 
where he Is to arrive in Augu.«t. 

King Leopold at ftr.st refused to t\llow 
Prince All)ert to go to the Congo, but 
the prince was Inclined to disobey. The 
king then traced a program for the 
tiip which would be comfortable and 
Mil<«'rficial. but Prince Albert wrote to 
his uik1«': "I owe my people an ex- 
aniplf. If 1 do not go through the 
dangerous zone it is no use going at 
all. 1 want to see everything." 

.\fter that the relations between 
ut\i le and nephew were somewhat 
strained The prince did not go to the 
F^lvlera to say good-by to King Leopold. 
The prince is accompanied only liy two 
officers and a valet. At liroken Hill an 
escort of :',Oft men will await and escort 
him through the C<mgo forest. 



MEMNCilTIS IN PARIS. 



N'iiiety-T«o Cases of the Dread 
Spine Disease. 

laris. April 23. — It is officially stated 
that tliere are at present ninety-two 
ca.^es of cerebro-spinal meningitis in 
Paris and the suburbs, and that for the 
moment, the epidemic is slightly on the 
Increase. Tlie patients are being 
treated with serum discovered a few 
year.s ago by Dr. Wasserman of the 
kocli institute In Berlin. This remedy 
has tor some time been successfully 
u.vid in the French military hospitals 
and good results are expected from it 
upon the present occasion. 

A Catliolic missionary father who 
had contracted sleeping sickness dur- 
ing tlie course of his labors in Central 
Africa, was seized with a fresh attack 
in the Luxembourg gardens a few days 
ago and lias succumbed to tlie disease 
at Pasteur Institute. Tiiere are now 
fourteen patients in various stages of 
the sleeping sickness undergoing treat- 
nuiit at the institute. 



REMOVAL OF 
SILKPLANT 

From France to America 

Is Due to Protective 

Tariff. 



United States the Best 

Market for Its Own 

Goods. 



-^-^fc^-i 



i_J-EOCE\s^ 






LEnCER^ 



1\;-. .•-"— • •■ . 



ll»A»liK.%»- 



-'■^'X^ii:>- 



interested in 
these manu- 
country said, 



A healthy man is a king in his own 
right, an unhealthy man is an un- 
liat>pv slave. Burdock Blootl Bitters 
builds up jBuuaU health — keeps you 
wtll. 



New York, April- 23. — Some weeks 
a^o I referred tp the removal of a 
very extensive lace manufacturing 
plant from France to this country, and 
now it is announced that a large silk 
manufacturing plant from the same 
country is about to move to the United 
States. 

It is said the owners control a capi- 
tal of about 110,000,000. and that the 
combination Includes dyeing, weav-. 
mg and finishing establishments of a 

high standard of workmanship. 

It is thought that most of the work- 
ing persons can be found in this coun- 
try, but workmen will liave to be 
brought to the United States in order 
to teach our silk workers some of the 
latest methods of foreign manufactur- 
ing of the silks. 

One of tlie gentlemen 
the project of bringing 
facturlng plants to this 
relative to the subject: 

'The United States has been the 
greatest silk buying country In the 
world for many years, and it has been 
here that the French manufacturer.s 
have hatl the greatest market for 
ihelr goods. 

"They have had to face the tariff, 
however, and that means a tremenilous 
lessening of their protits. 

"That has been the principal reason 
fur the decision to transfer tlieir 
works here." 

Tlie gentleman evidently meant to 
e\i>res8 the Idea that if the goods are 
nu de here their profits will be greater, 
o\v:ng to the protection offered by the 
tariff. 

Tlie removal of these works to the 
United States will give employment to 
several lliousands of employes, even if 
it does not give silks at lower prices 
to the people of the »-«>untry. 

It means more work for our own 
people and will save for the home mar- 
ket several millions of dollars that 
our people annually send to France for 
these same silks that it Is proposed 
now to manufacture here. 

Kee«I For IniportM. 
Our progress in manufacturing is so 
advan«'ed In many articles that it Is 
not necessary to import them now, 
where years ago they made large con- 
tributions In duties to the United 
Sates treasury. It would seem fr»>m 
our extension In the line of manufac- 
ttires and developments in our new 
possessions of tropical productions, 
that our home supplies will shut out 
importations to a greater extent every 
year and that finally the custom 
duties will dwindle so that internal 
laxaticn will have to be laid upon the 
people with a heavy hand. 

We have so many things to protect 
and so few things to come In that we 
do not jiroduce that when importations 
cease by reason of our own production 
of i>rot'ected articles our customs 
duties will all be derlvetl I rom articles 
we need and which protection will not 
give to u.«. 

Then we will have a tariff for 
revenue only, for It will be levied on 
articles we cannot produce, and there- 
fore cannot protect. 

It will not l>e many years from now 
until other largo manufacturers, like 
Carnegie and Scliwab are doing at 
present, having made their millions 
and controlling natural supplies, 
profitable patents and Immense capital 
themselves, will feel able to face for- 
eign competition without protection, 
and If protection be cut down or taken 
completely off they would soon be rid 
of anntjying competition in the United 
States anil h.ive to themselves the en- 
tire home market. 

The French manufacturers of silks 
and lace.-i are coming here to enjoy the 
larger profits accorded to them by our 
tariff. 

Tliey will give our people work. 
They will bring with them that 
whicii Carnegie had to first borrow, 
capital. 

They will give our people good 
silks and laces produced In this coun- 
try, and thus save our people's cash for 
home uses. 

Will .4ld Our induntrlen. 
These are all excellent things for tlie 
United States under present conditions 
of the lace and silk industries in the 
United States. 

But If these same lace and silk man- 
ufacturers grow wealthy through the 
great profits afforded by the tariff and 
obtain contiol of the natural supplies 
of silk and of profitable patents cover- 
ing its manufacture, and we are at 
last able through their combination to 
face foreign competition and make 
profits without a taritT protection, 
wouUl they be justified In demanding 
the repeal of the duties so they could 
absolutely destroy competition in the 
United .States and have our home mar- 
ket at their mercy? 

The tariff is a complex subject. Man 
is mightily sway;ed in opinion by Ills 
poverty, his wealth, liis position or his 
power. 

Humble petitioners for protection of 
one era may become industrial tyrants 
in a succeeding one. 

Pleaders for the home market at one 
stage of commercialism may become 
Its plunderers at another. 

Hunger may be appeased, but avarice 
is never satisfied. 

The Long Lsland Railway company 
reports that during 1908, along its 
lines, outside of Brooklyn and Long 
Island City, there were 4,785 dwelling 
houses and more than 300 store build- 
ings erected. 

This will give the public some idea 
of the transformation that Is taking 
place in the suburbs of Greater New 
York. 

The sales of acreage to be subdivided 
and of subdivisions recently cut from 
acreage have been this week of great 
extent and Immense value in the ag- 
gregate. 

On Long Island alone they have run 
far higher than the million-dollar 
mark, and deals are now under nego- 
tiations there that will run above 
$5,000,000 In consideration. 

In the Bronx on Thursday of this 
present week unimproved realty to 
the amount of $1,750,000 changed own- 
ers through one single transaction. 
Ileal estate in New Y'ork city suffered 
nothing during the panic through re- 
duction of values. For several months 
It was dull, but very strong. Now 
It is becoming very active and values 
are climbing In every portion of the 
city itself, while Westchester, L. I., 
beyond the city limits, and New Jersey 
for miles away from the Hudson are 
each receiving hundreds of new set- 
tlers every day. 

'•Grenteat" New York. 

Connecticut. New Jersey and all 
Southeastern New Y'ork state are really 
becoming New York city. 

Tfiey may hold their state and county 
lines, but they are New York city today 
In thought, sentiment, work and policy 
as much as Brooklyn, Harlem or 
Staten Island. The steam lines, the 
bridges, the tunnels, the trolleys, bind 
tliem securely to tJiis metropolis, and 
every month they are more closely 
tied. 

Their realty Is feeling the effects 
of the spreading out of the ever-in- 
creasing population, dependent upon 
the city and Its business Interests. 

In every city and town of Connecti- 
cut and New Jersey can be found for- 
mer residents of tlie greater city, and 
in their present locations, fixed in busi- 
ness locally, they still call themselves 
and believe themselves New Yorkers. 

And why not? Trenton, Hartford and 
Kew Uaven are within an hour's rlda 



^, 






'^:^:v^'^ 



•• World's Greatest Credit aothiera. " 



We Have the Styles You Want 



The time to buy new clothing is when you need it! 
Let the paying part take care of itself! We offer you 
strictly high grade ready-to-wear garments at cash store 
prices ; and the credit plan is arranged to suit your con- 
venience. 

Remember : We guarantee every garment. If it is not satisfactory, 
bring it back and we will make it right. 

Entirely Separate Departments for Men 's and Women 's Carmenta 

LOW, PLAIN PRICES 



-^•Si! 



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MEN'S SUITS 

Every new weave 
and shade, and some 
nobby little style 
features. 

$10 to $30 



WOMEN'S SUITS 

Correct in style — the 
very latest in every 
way. Large assort- 
ments. 

$12 to $30 






Trimmed Millinery — some of the daintiest 
creations you'll see this season $3 up 

Tailored and Lingerie Waists, Just received $1.50 up 

Men*s HatSa soft and stiff styles, all the new shapes $1.50 up 



MKIN 1 MARINBO^ 



28-30 E. Superior Street 



2Dd Floor, over 
Public Market 



Store open Monday and Satur* 
day Evenings till 10 o'clock 



of city hall and Tammany's wigwam. 

The New York inornlng dailies are at 
their breakfast tables and tlie numer- 
ous editions of the evening papers are 
delivered to them damp from the pres- 
ses In New York city. 

The New York theaters and opera 
liousea are their places of amusement. 
The New York liotels are their gatlier- 
Ing places for luncheons, dinners and 
ban«iucts. 

Tlie metropolis is once more getting 
ready for a great, big business boom. 

INFORMS ON CONSPIRATORS. 



Tutor Saves Son of Ameer of 
Afgliaiiistan From Deatli. 

Allahabad, April 23. — Further de- 
tails have reached here concerning the 
conspiracy against the arneer of Af- 
ghanistan. It appears that when his 
majesty was about to leave Kabul for 
Jellalabad in January he directed tliat 
Sardar Umar .Ian should accompany 
him. But the youth excused himself 
on the plea of illness, and remained at 
the capital with his mother, the Bibl 
Halima. who proceedtd to work out a 
plot that had been arranged some time 



before. .'She had won over a number 
of ex-refugees belonging to the old 
Shere Ali faction, who had reti;rned 
to Afghanistan a few years ago on the 
invitation ol the ameer. Tiie conspira- 
tors took an oath on ilie Korai. binding 
them to secrecy. 

The original idea was to poi.^fn the 
ameer, the heir apparent. Inayat I'llah 
Khan, and Sardar Nasrullali Khan, 
brother of the ameer. This pian fell 
through, however, and it was then ar- 
ranged to take action on Marcii IS and 
to murder also ilie sipah saiar. er com- 
mander-in-chief, who is grandfather 
of Inayat Ullah on the motliers side. 
There was to be an outbreak simul- 
taneously at Kabul and Jellalal ad. 

Unfortunately for the conspirators, 
one of tiieir ntimber. a mullali named 
Siraj-ud-Din. Informed Injiyat of the 
plot. Siraj-ud-Din liad been tv.tor to 
the young prince and could not bring 
himself to share in the murder. He 
furnished a list of those who had com- 
mitted themselves to the conspiracy, 
and this was sent at once to tlie ameer 
at Jelabad. There w'cre in the camp at 
the place about twelve men. including 
some young sardars. who.se names 
figure on the list. Tliese were imme- 
diately arrested. 

Meanwhile at Kabul Inayat rr.ah 
had seized the local ringleaders. Two 



of thtse. the nazir safaS and the nail. 
kotwal of the city, were blown Irom 
guns on March 11. Thtse measures, 
coupled with some executii'us at Jtl- 
lalabad, seem to liave been effective, 
for the plot faJed i <>n"i)'!etely. 



HOW ROYALISTS GOT EVEN. 



i.'.tj- Aprt] 2S.— By v.;. -' l.^•.r,|L'C 
fi r the trial and sentti.'t- ni ii.tu com- 
rades recently, some young Kcyalj.''t» 
who have been conspicuov.s In Faris 
lately, have treated M. Mamelln. tho 
police magistrate, to a piactical joke 
on a very large stale. 

Throughf lit the whole moining there 
was a ctasele.'-s jjrccession ol trades- 
men and carts along the street in whicIi 
had been ordered in his name. Among 
the goods- that were cfdlecled at lK!^ 
door were six pianos, i;i'0 bottlefc of cod 
liver oil, half a hundred weight of cab- 
bage, and fourteen silk liats, and tl;ere 
were al^^o a cornc.itter, and undertaker 
and an tmbalm'-r. 

The pul.dic quickly gathered that the 
whole affair was the result of a pranic 
and collected in large numt<eis round 
the iKinse. A force of police was called 
to keep order and tell the tradesmen 
that the goods had Ti^t b-^er. o;.bred by 
the magistrate. 



Weak Over-worked Women 

Who are broken down and made invalids by the drudgery of never ending household cares 
and duties, or by over-frequent bearing and nursing of childern, and many other cares, 
burdens and strains which the weaker sex have to bear, are deserving of profound sym- 
pathy. But while sympathy is commendable what these unfortunate women moit need is a 
good, honest, square-deal Restorative Tonic and Strength-giving Nervine and Regulator 
—one compounded and carefully adapted to act in harmony with woman's peculiar, deli- 
cate, ever sensitive organization. 

Who so well fitted to select, carefully proportion the ingredients and compound a 
remedy for the cure of these distressing and often pain-wracking weaknesses and derange- 
ments, as the carefully and thoroughly educated and regularly graduated physician who 
has had a long and successful experience in treating just this class of cases. 

Dr. Pierce's Favorite Prescription 

THfiS li^EIDICIlSrE IS 

THE ONE REMEDY Now, and for over 40 years, sold by druggists for Woman's 
Peculiar Weaknesses, and Distressing Ailments, gotten up by one having all of 
the above qualifications. 

THE ONE REMEDY which absolutely contains neither alcohol {which to most 
Women Is rank poison) nor Injurious or habit-forming drugs, 

THE ONE REMEDY which is so perfect in its composition and so good in its 
curative effects as to warrant its makers in printing its every ingredient, as 
they do, on its outside wrapper, verifying the same under solemn oath. 

In all the above most important particulars, the "Favorite Prescription" stands absolutely 
alone — in a class all by itself — as woman's most reliable and trust-worthy remedy in time of 
sickness and distress. It is a pure glyceric extract made from American curative roots, 
found by long time experience most valuable in curing woman's weaknesses and derange- 
ments. The leaders in all schools of medical practice have endorsed each of its ingredi- 
ents as of the best known remedies for the complicated affections for which it is recom- 
mended. These professional endorsements should count for far more than any number of 
lay testimonials. A booklet full of them sent free on receipt of name and address. 
Wood's Dispensary Medical Association, R.V. Pierce, M. D., Pres., Buffalo. N. Y, 



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THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD* FRIDAY, APRIL 23. 1909. 



15 



Popular Priced Clothes 

-at- 

$1 a Week 



Ladies' Salts 

French and American 
Models 

$15 to $5S 



\ 



9ILiri!i 

T iV. ':>i Afrac'ive- 
neas 

$3 to $17.50 



Shoes 

Th*t Fil Your Foot 
and Appeal to 
Your Head p^ 

$2 to 94 




MUUnery 

At Prices That 
Please 

$3 to $20 



^ * i ir A ^ iJl ^ i< 



;-»»» »»**»»***«»********* 



»*»JaHMHMfr*** 



WELL KNOWN DULUTHIANS 
IN CARICATURE ^ 



Waists 

Most Anything 
Y.>u Want 



$1.50 to $17 



if 
g/ Petticoats 

Silk .md Heather- 
l bloom 

\ $2.50 to $10 




IT PAYS TO TRADE AT OUR STORE. 

Artistic and Stylish MUUnery 

at $5.00, $6.50, $7.50, $8.50, $10 and $12.50 

A trulv beautiful collection. We invite you to come and look them over. We 
also suggest that you compare our prices with any other Hats oftered elsewhere. 
Third floor — take elevator. 



T. J. McKEON. , 

One of the Well Known Members of Duluth s Bar. 



£)HNt *» »*** ****** **** * * ********* *** 





ZKT 



8 £. SUPERIOR ST. 
H. A. NELSON, Manager. 



PORK CHOP 
SHORTAGE 

Loins Have Been Steadily 

Going Up in 

Price. 

Higher Level Predicted 

By Packers— Produce 

Market Is Stronger. 



WOMEN'S f\PP/^REU 

In Women's Apparel we show the season's most favored models t 

IN UlLORED SUITS 

at $19.50, $21.50, $24.50, $32.50, $35.00 and $37.50, as well as many 
more elaborate models at from $45.00 to $75.00. 

IN STYLISH SILK DRESSES 

Of Messalines, Taffetas and Rajahs, priced from $19.50 to $^0.00. 

IN STUNNING SMART COATS 

For all occasions we have evervthing new, up-to-date and proper in long and .sliort 
lengths, black, white and colo'rs-serges, worsteds ,coverts aijd silks at trom ^1 oO 
to $25.00. For values represented these lines are unmatchable at the prices an>- 

wh e re . 

FASHIONABLE FABRICS AND DRESS ACCESSORIES. 



DO NOT 



NEGLECT TO READ 
W. L. DOUflUS 

SHOE AD ON PABE 
8. LASTGHANGE. 



frii'i-n a j»l'»i-i,ii; 



of p 



>rk 



V 




— t 



GETS AN ORDER 
FROMJUE COURT 

W. J. Strlcklcr Must Not 

Attempt to Take Son 

From Mother. 

rearlTiK a'- ■ ^>" ^^e {.art ..f h-r 

,. husbc -i. A-. J. Sirickler, U:> . 

>•. h.-;r T-v-'iir-'jW 8«->n. Mrs. W. -V. 

, . "" ■ ^ J. • '" "'. 

; an uidt»r trtua i 



Duluth 
Cliupa. 

Pork loinsi liuvf gjiit- up again, an J 
thf packing huuse representatives sur- 
,u\M- thai tl.e end of tl.e rUe iu tlu-m 
ul lieeli »e>Mi jet. 

would ii'>t li*' .•surpri.st'il if there 

llmeij between now and the luid- 

,f August wlien It will be iinp'>a 



a. barrel and $2 to |2.50 a box. accord 
lug to tlie aize ami quality. 

• • • 
Potatoes continue to be very atrong 

Old stocks are selling here for |1.2o 
ii bu.sliel and new potatoes from Hor- 
Ida. and the Bermudas, aro «iuoted at 

SS a barrel. 

• • • 

Prices for other sl^aples and green 
vegetables, remain unchanged from 
la.st week. Keceipts have been good 
and prices are considered reasonable 
for this season. 

• • • 

Radishes, onions. lettu«*e. and other 
Kreen stuff, are plentiful at last week'.s 
iiuotations. 

« * • 

Butter prices remain unchangod. 
Creamery print.'^ are "30 to 32 cents a 
pound, and tubs JS to 30 cents. The 
renovat»'d variety is 26 cent.s a pound, 
and packing stock is a little stronger, 
ut 17 to 18 cents. 

• • • 

(juutat i'ln s ..a poulLr.v and fish are 
iiiioh.uit;>--d. 

"I'd Kiither Die, Doctor, 

Than have my feet cut off." said M. U 
Bingham of Princeville, Hi. 'But 
y.iu'll die from gaugrent (which ha(l 
eaten awav eight toes) If you don t, 
•laid all di>ct(jrs. Instead he used 
Bueklen's Arnica Salve till wholly 
( iired. Its cures of Kc7*-tna. Fever 
Sores, BoiLs, Burns and IMles astound 
the world. 25c at all druggists. 



New Laces, 
Embroideries, 

Dress Nets 
and Veilings. 

Crisp, beautiful new 
goods, and marked 
to sell at priws 
lower tliaii you'd 
over expect to get 
them for 



New Silks & 
Dress Goods 



Special attention is called to 
the beautiful liu<s of Fou- 
lards, which we show in the 
choicest design.s (of^the spot 
proof quality*, at 73(', 85e 
and $1.00. also to the much- 
in all the newest shades, at 



wanted satins and me.-^salines. 

'^^" ^e .'!lfndid values we are selling in Wool Dress Goods 
aro adding to our reputation as popular priced leaders, i n e 
noveltv and plain serges, prunella cloths, taffetas and mo- 
hairs, which we show at 50c, 75c and $1.00. can't be equaled 
anywhere. Come and see if they can. 



New Wash 

Goods on Sale 

Tomorrow. 

Many new lines, both 
in white and colored 
— received today — 
will he on .sale to- 
morrow, specially 
priced for a quick 
selling. 



New Hosiery. 1 New ninves._^Ne w Jewelry. | New Neck Fixtures. 



Superior 




lias 1 
"I 

we If 
dl' 



ti^ *i^ u^ Of a< Or 
Jfl ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 

*■ 
Jtfe 

l>Ki:\V PKNSION .\S * 

SOl.DlFll EXPIRES. * 



% ONLY WOMAN WHO 

* 



. t,-!, 



, ho win 



'.->urf 



re- 

■<^ 

•n® 
nd 

•V. 



< ..f May and ,Iuly wheat, 
1 y quarters here. To 

, [.•similitude la added 

!»v III-' f;i> I that prkea liava tumbled 
,,,.-,- [t . .TUs in the last week, and that 
\ iseir ha.-^ sought re.-^t in 

1 , i.f a New Mexi'-o rfinrh. 

.Mil,'. 4 f.>iiurie ha.s been •'■■ ' ■>ut 
!,\ .;;.■ ,!■ .-ii!!.' this we.»k. my 

ii iiitn id a handsome pinu on 

r,ap»-: ! Ining on for more, now 

i. nfruim a lefkit. There are many 
such The wide publicity given the 
i(iirk-i hroiitilil into it many a man 
A) ordinarily walked in qiiietr 

1> J t ilS. 

iWIFE CHARGES 

INFIDELITY 

Mrs. Thiel Files Answer 
to Her Husband's 



up HIll'th'T 

a iiouuil. 111- 
Huhiiti to- 



Complaint. 



X ■ V 



:<?r »c»n'^ 



PATTEN IS OUT 
OF THE MARKET 

At Least. That Is the 

Story Believed in 

the Pit 



.urt.T charges agaln.^t her husband. 

Tluel. a Hibbing photographer. 

> made y*'st»'riiii \ l>\' Mr.s. Carl 

. . "-■..■ ' " -livorce pro- 

llK;,! llibljiiig man. 

She SAYS that lie f.Tt.U.d lier re- 
having iniprojif-r relations 
I : women, and ricite.s ii.ei- 

- ' -.vhere the alUwed mis- 
iit took place. 
.1,-, r uli.. i< (lest i t nte 



_;■>. April 



P 

n» ti 
the 



after 



— T:; it .lamos A. 
try 
■ >m 

.' af of his 



FAT m THrOIRECTOIRE. 

The coming season will be a hard or 



1 the costs and 
action. 
j: t Mr. Tliiel says that 

lii.<' ■• .. ■: l-.ltn liver a year ago. 

and Im.x suic.' that tim.' • ■ .,•'.... 

will' hint- Tliit-I is i'J • d 

Mr:- ' '"* ■•■'■ They w.-t.' iiuii-ii--d 

In ; 1 tlier.- ire twn children, one 

of w:u)iii is a minor. 

LAST LKCTl RK IN 

AORKl LTLRAL SERIKS. 



f >r fat 






I* 



T;,.. dlrectolre mode en- 

. • scornful eyebrows 

,4 bulgy hip.*!. Fat. 

! it may be de- 

^-.-,...it i-..:id»-!iina- 
,_ In I 'i.i a^- >e9e, 

...Any meHH»d.H 1. Ex- 

ring. 3- Worrying. 4. 

- Marmola. -VU these 

It not all should he 

,nce. ! and 2 are n-ii 

not hygienic. 

side and con- 

»*?" A harml".ss powder ob- 

, ,. , .1,., which. 

lid Kx- 

,,, , ^ ounces 

taken after 

will, without 

ancea or out- 

rtionat.ly and uniformly, 12 
„.„,_, J 3 a day. 



l", . ! , ii of tlie department of 
, ( 1 ..lit pathology at the 
agricultural school, 
the Y. M. C- A. audl- 
t..iu>,'Ul. His subject. "Farm 
I'l.l Plant Df.'*eases." Is one of 
^t at t' ' -^ iJion of the 
r-ture t will be the 

I i;ist of 11. r .-v. le.s. and Prof, 
will go Into his subject ex- 
An orchrtstra will play 
? and X. at which latter hour. 
. ...are will begin. 
Prof. Fr>>eman Is an authority In 
the field of botany, and plant path- 
ology H'" '<>-r\-t'<i for some time In the 
government d^ partment of agriculture. 
tie recently resigned from that post 
to become an Instructor in the state 
dtural <»chooI. 



!•■•■■ 
botany 
Mlnne- 
will I- 

toriutn 

Bof.ir. 



11 

h 
th 



.sihh- to se<ure anv p. .rk loins at nil In 
ihls market." said one wholesale meat 
dealer today. 

Quotations on potk hdns havo i,oue 
ur. a point in the local market this 
week. They are selling now at 13 to 
13% cent.-*, which Is considered a hi^jn 

*" Receipts of hogs at the killing cen- 
ters' have been very light. The price 
of feed has been so high that tlie prop- 
osition of raising hogs for the i"»«-«.*;' 
has not appealed to the agricultural 
mind as a protUable enough und..r- 
tak.ng. The farmers have devot-d their 
time to other things, letting the hog- 
raisln.;;- go. 

l.ard has also g"ii. 
notch. l.ard i» 1- < *iil.-> 
stead of 11 H cents in 

*^"i't' will Ho.n he . h.-ai..-r to eat ehi. ".vtii 
Ihun p>Tk thui.s. 

• • • 
Tho rest of the pro.luc market is on 

a 1 gher price level than last week. 
iie'Xts of various commodities hive 
been light, owing to unfavorable vea- 
Iher ami a stronger tone to the quota- 
tions 18 Ine vita hie. 

• • * 
I'resh eggs are up a cent, being 

,pm[ed at 21 cents a dozen, instead of 

^0 cunts. 

• • • 
The market for cheese Is stronger. 

Full "cream twins are 'i\^"l'f ^''J;^> f^ 
17 to IH cents, Instead of lu lo iti 
cenl^ and Wisconsin tlats have under- 
gone a similar rise. 

Toniafv^ ar.' n bit .■^irunger than 
uJ^w.n '--t«'.;ek. owing to a storm 

!.Snsl^e;:^:^eceip.s (-- beeti K;;od 

and prices are "», » J^^^ ^ t^aX/t 
are quoted at »--"» i*^* 
crates. » • • 

Pieplant i*. arriving .n large njianti- 
ri.., now from Wa^liington and I ij; 
noTs. ami i. selling wh.desale at $^.. 
for fifty-pound ^'.oxe.«*.^ 

;...,-,£. ,• d Mi-islssippi continue to 
''V^^^^ nice s awbJrVles an.l they 

are Ust«*J ^^ »-•'" "*''' ''''^^'' ^^^^^^^ 
four pints. , , , 

oranges are f'l','^";,;;;.^,[7;r' thorn 
'''' '7rVt,:r^'tir.ngc. n ota^ions today 
-,::/{frop0^erbU. Thefru.tls 
still of excelleia qimlit^v. 

froir N still plentiful in this 
Grape fruit is f^''' »'^ ,,a„;|„as are 
market. a.t »^ «V ' '^ ;!;,ft.H a pound, 
arriving freel\ .'i ^i <^ ni- '^ i 

selling m .Michigan street at f6 to *. 



t, lid ill 

any li» 



Telephone In .'inyluni. 

Newl>erry. Mich.. April 23.- f. Special 
to -fh^- Herald.)— The I'pper Peninsula 
Hospital for the Insane here has been 
provided with a private telephone ex- 
change conne.t.-d with both the^ local 
and long-distance lines of the Michi- 
gan .state company. There are forty- 
six ttl'phone.s on the system, which 
serves tvei\ d-i>artment of tlie big 
a.'»yUim and i.-^ proving a great con- 
venience .\ similar system is In oper- 
ation in the Marquette penitentiary. 



Always Ready 

To Serve 

Post 
Toasties 

"Crisp and Mavory." 

"THE T.ISTE LI!«CiEIlS.« 

Popular pkg. lOe: Large Kamliy 
Nlae lAe. 

Made by 

Postum Cereal Company, Ltd.. 

Battle Creek. Mich. 



Wa.shinffton. April 2X. — Mrs. * 
Ur Sarali K. Tlioinp.'^on, wLo i.s .said * 

* to luive lM*en the only woinun * 

* drawing a in^nslon «,s a s«>l<lier of * 
^ Uie l"i\ll war, has suc«niinhed to * 

* lnjuri<*s re«'«'ived wiieii .>»ho was ♦ 
^(f kmnkiHl senseli'ss in a strtH't car * 

* a<vi<leiit. .Slie waw a luitive of * 

* Teiines.s<H', and in tlie Civil war 
^ niarclied at the head of a tnnip * 
^ of <-avnlry and jllscovered tlie * 

* wlierealxiut.s of Cien. John T. * 
^ >lorgun, tlie Confederate raiiler, * 
^ For this service she wax liit?l><.> * 
^ eoniniemltHl l)y Cirant. For many ¥^ 
years she held u el«*rleal position * 

* in the iK»st«>lTiee tlepartinent. * 

* * 

MORE IRON ORE 
WILL BE MOVED 

Martin Pattison Says Last 

Year's figures Will 

Be Exceeded. 

Martin Pattison, who returned yes- 
terday from a Southern and Eastern 
trip, says that in a conversation in 
.New York with United Stales Steel cor- 
poration officials he was told that more 
ore would be shipped this year than 
last from the Minnesota ranges. Mr. 
Pattison savs the business situation In 
the Kast appears to be steadily, if 
somewhat slowly, improving. 

\t Washington the mining men had a 
talk with Senator l>a Follette, who ex- 
pressed hlmsell as being ot the opinion 
that it would be .June before the tarlrt 
matters are disposed of. Mr. Pattison. 
who on his trip ICast and South was ac- 
companied tjy his daugliters. Misses 
Mvra and Lois, is well pleased at the 
stand Governor Johnson took on the 
tonnage tax bill. , u a <.t 

The father and daughters visited at 
the home of Mr. and Mrs. Frazer at 
Ma'on. Ga. Mrs. Krazer Is a daughter 
of Mr and Mrs. Patthson. Mrs. Pat- 
tison who had been visiting her son at 
Bisbee. Ariz., joined the family at 
Macon. 

RK HARD CROKER IS 

BANUl KTTKD BY M.U'K. 

New York, April US.— Richard Croker 
was the guest of honor at a dinner 
given last night at the Hoffman .house 
by Norman F. Mack, chairman of the 
Democratic national committee. Croker 
voiced his grateful appreciation of the 
welcome everywhere accorded him dur- 
h.g his visit to the Cnlted States. H*> 
was pleased to reallr.e^ he said, that 
some of those who previously had most 
Mced him, -now showed 
hlin frien d in ess. ^_ 

VATICAN (;ALLERY OPENS. 

Seven Rooms Killed Wifh Works of 
Art— Addition Probable. 

Home. April 23.— The pew picture 
gallery of the Vatican has at last 
opened to the public. Both the gallery 
artd the arrangement of the pictures 
are In every way admirable, and Mgr. 
Misciatelll. who directed the work, may 
1..- warmly congratulated on the re- 

Tlie gallery is on the ground floor im- 



mediately below the Vatican library, 
between the Belvedere court and tlie 
outside road which leads to the en- 
trance of the sculpture gallery.. A 
handsome new doorway has been built 
in this road, so that the entrances to 
the sculpture and picture galleries are 
now but a stones throw from each 
other. The gallery, wlilch is desig- 
nated bv the Architect Commendatoi 
Constantino Sneider. consists of an en- 
trance hall, leading Into five rooms on 
the right and three on the left. Tlie 
rooms are all lighted on the east shle, 
looking into the Belvedere court, liieir 
large windows being furnished with an 
elaborate arrangement of small bllnd.s, 
which permits an exact moderation of 
light. They have also an excellent sys- 
tem of heating. The fioors are par- 
quet; the walls, whUh have a wains- 
coting of d.^rk walnut-wood uji to the 
height of three feet, are covered with 
olive-green moire silk, which makes 
an extremely good setting for the pic- 
tures. The vaulted ceilings are of 
vhite stucco, in the cinquemento style 
decorated with the amis of Plus X. 
whose bust, an admirable likeness by a 
German 8<ulptor, stands in the en- 
trance hall. Kach of the rooms is pro- 
vided with a certain number of .«eats. 
of a kind which Is in strict keeping 
with the rather severe and restrained 
character of the decorations. In the 
center of some of them have been 



placed handsome marbles from tiie Vat- 
ican. I 
The most important feature of the 
art gallery is, of course, the new ar- 
langement of the pictures, many of 
uhich, now brought together for the 
first time, have liiiherto been hidden in 
various apartments and closets of the 
Vatican. Tliis collection an.l arrange- 
n-'-nt is due to the late Prof. Seltz, for- 
m.rly director of the old gallery, and 
Prof. Pletro d'Achiardl. At present 
there are seven rooms, to which an- 
other may be a.M'^d later. 

♦ 

\> rite It Down in Your Hand. 

Vendes band. Lyceum next Sunday 
afternoon and evening 

♦ 



ORDINANCE TO 

FI.V BKE.AD WEIGHT. 



New York, April 23. — .Vn or- 
dinan<'e presiM'ihinp a standartl 
loaf of bread in lin-ater New 
York and fixing the weiglU at a 
full sixteen ounees will Im' intro- 
due«^l Hi the hoard of aldermen's 
meeting tonight. 



»»***»*» »^-»-: 



CHURCH MEMBERS 
FORM SOCIETY 

Unitarian Men's Club Or- 
ganized With Twenty- 
Four Members. 

The men of the First Unitarian 
church met last evening at the Com- 
mercial club and organl/.»-d a new 
social and fraternal society to M* 
known as the Unitarian Men's club. 
Twenty-four men present signed th« 
roll as charter memb.,r>^. Tl»«^ ">«n of 
the church feel that good lellow.->hlil 
is best advanced by .social inteicoursa. 
and in the future the club will meet 
monthly, a banquet being a teature of 

^"a 'r A^in was elected president 
and the pastor of the church, Kev. 
George H. Gebauer, was elected secre- 
tary. 




iperior 
Where Your Dollar Does its Duty 

The Only Store in Dnlnth Devoted Exclusively to Women^s Rcady-to-Wear Garments. 



WOlflEN'S SUITS, SKIRTS AND WAISTS 

SPECIALLY PRICED ! 

You win ask: -How Can We Do It?" when you se.> these bargains. 




The Suits are what they lo<»k to be— real $25.00 value-s. Th.-y tiot only 
look good, but they are good. 

Every suit an attractive new spring model of splendid and dependable 
fabrics. The lines In each garment are all you could expect. The coats 
are lined throughout with excellent quality .satin and come in lengths from 
34 to 38 inches. Some slashed in back and button trimmed, others sever- 
ly tailored. The skirts in the new flaring models trimmed to match. In 
black, blue, green, tan and gray serge; Panamas and shadow striped worst- 
eds. We say Ifs by far the greatest suit offer of the " 
season. $22.50 and $25.00 values. Specially priced 
jjt • 



idow siripea worsi- 

$16.45 



SPECIAL 

SKIRT 

OFFERING 

These new gored skirts 
are inade of fine wool 
Panamas. Serges and 
Fancy Worsteds, In 
black and colors. Some 
plain tailored, others 
trimmed with satin 
bands and buttons. $6 
and $7 values. Special- 
ly priced at 

$3.79 



SHIRTWAIST BARGAINS 

^ t 1 !,• ^^ t\^^ 



a ^«.^t WaHt Offer There are ten distinct styles for you to choose from; included are tailored w 
A Great Waist uirer. ^"^^^ "'J .„„y,^, „nd lace trimmed, with the new long sleeves— In fact, you 
waists, mull and lingerie .waists, tucked at^d ace tn ^^^^ ^^^^^^ ^ ^^^^.^^ ^^^ ^^^^ 







" 




alsts, tawn 



will find almost every style and trimming In the lot. 
Pick the one you ^%wnt at 



Ifs a waist sale that means a saving for you. QQf^ 



.illllll 





t 



y-WLU ii 



i i » ■ * ■ --> ■ -, I ' I 









I 



i 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: FRIDAY, APRIL 23. 1909. 



! 



l 



ARTICLES OF IJJCaRPORATIOX 

__0F— 

BENRKKSEN CONSTRl ITION 

COMPANY. 



K ' 


\ BV THESE PRES- 


EX'i'.- . 


f und'TsiKnfd whose 


names are i 


cd, do hereby 


M.soc).).te <i'u- 


i . . , . .. ^ :.er and adopt 


and vit'ii U.t 


sc aillcleb for the purpoee 


of form:' 


rat! 'n in accordance 


with th- , 

t^ ■ • '■ Ii.fCl 


:,».• ff O.nr'tfT TiS of 


.Liiws of Ml. ■>. li".'^-. 


a nets 


i»mendator> ' ii'Kl 


BUpt>ll.-H.'. . • 


•' , -.. • 


Th- - 


..•^ijti'in «liall 


t>« 1 


:iy. 

-•f 


•f !■,.... 


t; 


■■ colli 1 . 


G 


-d to I". 




' ■ - : 111 


V 


,ind 
the 


I'- 

any 
■Isti 


nd 


rchaue. 


ltaf> 


Idirigs 


of it. 


., . . . .. ' . ^ lis. 


\\ 


s, units. fltoragre 


1 
K 


.irfTifr i>!nnt»_ of ;aH 


t 


sell ana vvu\'.-y 


li. . 


i or unimyrov.il 


re 11. 


"■'■""■* ■" ' ' 


and 




n' 




11 


:;ge 
at 



TENNIS TO 
BE POPULAR 

Game Is Expected to 

Boom This Year in 

DulutI). 



New Cement Courts Are 

Being Built at Boat 

Club. 



« 

to I 

I, 

1 ; ; 

r 

f 

I: 

br;- 

pof 
all 

ri 

1 



i...:i.- Tennis rromlses to be on© of the 

..,, 'TT,..<r Tii.ntilar of <iilt ■lii'ii- sjriiirts iti Du- 

■juinnie; ■'« at 

,■•' I ifiiHt uiur pliict's wiLcrtj it wiii be 
'of l>lay€-d in tlie city. 

' " Tt'ntils elub has been 

:•., ,,.^ ., „., ;,. t}..' «i .uMiiii fuid i] 

Will toe more ac. It i.-i 

' very p. ,'."",r ".■■■, - : .,".■.■■.. ii :■•< ■.■.ni'i ditt- 

r 1 iet tift\' nifinberM, 

Is planning lu put In 

Its rt-iihu'liig the old 

rather un- 



il'pUi'iitiori p!^ 



t 
fa 

ll.il 



t : 

in 

• Hi. 

1 . 



e a Vrry pi..ii"t ...i i spurt 

i.ch of the 
L* exffllent 

: Win I'f in ovi'ii bet- 
ytai' ihiiii lliey wt-re 



■ trii^'k (if 



-I, Is t) 
:,. wh''! '• 

The j- 
club nit 



Nr.fth- 

tcllli Is 

■ t a 

■- l:-S- 



-. Vkt . Ar^ *:. C«E 



Two 1-i 



11 

of . 
tlori 
r ; :"■ ' 

TI" •■ 
11. 
1 



...1 i-vUi i...«.' I'l"*- .- 
■., riTiCLF; V. 

iiiu.1 plnct'S? of 



Li.a 



und 

Minn «.' - 



year. 

.»f the 

.a: the fall mia<ii..s. wnen 

.1 was pulled off. and itn 

. aliould Increase this year, 

.e four sets of courts In oper- 

•;! .-ame should tlouriah tlila 

ye -i likely that some tourna- 

.... I f» arranged between the 

!he different cluba. 

1 club tournaments used 

ayers from all parts of 

St, and If a combination 

niianieitt wtre arranged by the tliree 

• hs hittrt "ted, It should be even 



zc 



r; 



: y and 
^.^• pel"- 




[^POI^TING 




iM 



all 



schedule that each team can meet 
of the others. 

Under the system first proposed, it 
was decided to .divide the league into 
two sections, grouping the teams in the 
north end of the county together, and 
doing likewise with the Portage Lake 
and South Range teams. At the end 
of the season, it was decided that a 
championsliip game be played between 
the winners of the north and south 
sections, respectively. This was feas- 
ible, but entirely against the wishes 
many of tlie teams. 



CAPT. LEOPOLD McLAGLEN. 



'ICtfS 



A p. I 



r. • 



(n> Hriiee.t 

If t\t.'r a nuniil were 
pointed lu tlie game of 
athletica, wc have that 
niuial In tlie ea^« of 
thf white life of old 
"Farmer" Burn*. tlie 
veteran Iowa wrestler. 
The preos dispatelHS 
yesterday morning tun- 
ned the news ' ' it Burn» 
is«n defeating Delivuk. 

■•-:■ -' ■. • '■. :■.•■! plOn, 

iiaa 

.....,.;..., -I yet 

w is ai-iu d In 

- and it : . "ies a 

at liie ungmal rubts of 

■r - 

viry 
. th«f 



V ■'>■■- 
the 

llHS 

new 

the 

•Tap. 

Hke 

...1- 



f'apt Leopold .Mi Laglen, an Irl.sh cap- 
tain in his majesty's imperial service, 
litaiiiig a niedal for royal st-rvice well 
It ml. red and wUh an English walking 
atick and an KngHuli accent that 
smacks of Phadllly, don't you know, 
old cliap, is with n> 

"The Irish Giant . nii.tain is 

known in many paii.-i <.i Uie vvorl<l, for 
he comes of Irlsii parentage, though 
educated in tlie sclionls of merrie Kns- 
laiid, 1.S an exponent of the Jiu Jitsu 
style of self-defense. Tlie captain ex- 
plains tliat tlie game is not wrestling, 
but the art of self -defense. 

Tilt- .)ai>aii<'.s.' have it. that it Is the 
u I i! k luutt L tiiiK themselves. Accord- 
ing to the gt-niai captain's explanation 
of tills game of leverages and knowl- 
edge of nerve centers, it ts not a game 
for u man wiio lias engagements for 
cotillions. A man is very liable to lose 
a litnh in this kind of a game. 

"Oh, yes. you are allowed to kick an 
opponent in the stomacli; surely, that l.s 
part of the game?" 

With that reniHik the 'jiptaln lets 
you in i»n st>me oi ttie Itttlt- plca.'^anii ies 
of thhs .Tiu Jitsu struggle. 

Jlu .litsu is a game tliat tui-s i ome 



' ' I- 



down 
attd 
that 
the 

tlie many 

of attack 

■ • .?aln 

•r a 



Ligh the <'enturlfs. It origin- 

1.. thf ("hri^tian era. It Is 

if defcn.se of 

inpllcatt-d are 

liuUls, so gruat Is the variety 

and counter delense, that 



says 
man 



it 
to 



ills of 
tlcient 



t 



illtic L'l-uuH. 



It 
one ' ; 
matt> I 

the f/Hiii'-. 
wrestler, o 



i.i 1.1 . ,1 k a inan'.s limb by 

ni.ttiy ticadly lioliis. As a 

f.u t a mail <an be killed in 

An expert .liu .Jitsu 

tighter, knows tlie locu- 



l.i nclU to the (igiit 



- -;1 

. an atii 
J wisest 

son lu lite athletic game, vet he 

learned one cardinal principle of 

and his ilfe should p 

to many of tlie you 

.K-ir oet !.•: ' '. •■ ;■■":''' ''" 



a 

a to 
lows 
lete. 
per- 
has 
the 
rove 
nger 



OF' 

Slit! 



( > 1.1- T ; 



fll 

H 



a. K 
t hf 



V. - -. 

page It 
Dill With 


X 
I 

E-. ■ SI 


■•raid— A:. 


.v; 


TR 
t 


, I'TJioLi...! 


,:nt. office 

,i. tjF Tiic crn- 





,ng u 
comi' 

liini 111 

; . Ills i I 



■<\ 111 

a w - 

Mson 

■f the 

iini>i>«Hll)le 

(iistlngiiish 

liion. 

. the 

tilt- town 

futility of 

in upon 

;ients In 

.illed off. 

ghiring 

.nit>- at- 

•j: liack- 

..)■ tl..- 

.Mirt unity 

rent. 



The retur. 



\\ 



U>..' 

Ex 
In I 

fit. 

aut: 

of 



cin. 



tin J. 



{ft :'< 

r«'i 
De 



th, In the 

.te of Min- 



tiitj r.'L.diiif.s.'s 01 



f Duluth,' 

Ciunty of 

Ota, is 

. uslness 

i^; i in Section 

. . yi-vly-nlne of 

.latfcs of tlie United 

American fix- 

.. 1 1 ..REOF witness 

; uf office tills Third 

"' "iiAWUKNV'E O. MURRAY. 
Comptroller of tJie Currency, 
of the Cttmptroller of the Cur- 
11 y. Currency Bureau. Treasury 

partment.) 



Tt 



p, 

tl • 



; ' > I" 

■s ;i 



'mny 
v\ ,i> " hron- 
t^raph news. 
...,i .......1 .or wounded 

fgion of supporters of 
:i There l.« only one 
., l.;t)l that rivals 
,>i; is- Lin- hitrrv 
r the little 
..t ease witli 
: lie mid «ta- 
•• of opinion 
agree that 
' playei-s the 
. .<-r produced. 
Viast hall lirains of 
It was Evers who 
for liie Cubs, by 
)f Merkle'.<i failing to 
I liase in tliat numorable 
I*oIo grounds last fall. 
is not mentioning the many 
iiiits that the little fellow has 
the Cubs V ' --; = tiy and time- 
He is th. ^ of the Chi- 
■ Id. not forK-; .i.^ the work of 
itance. and his return to the 
-"ifhtilv stienirthen tlie team. 
• * • 
:,nl:''.i th.- t'ruit,T(-ss of the 
rotiier? Henri St. Yves wins 
,thon d.rby It was a sad 
til.' IriKh, loo. >! ' " and 
But 



wiiivli Lai'ry pcrtor 
Hon. There is a d 



Thai 
o t li *■ r !- 

SM '^ ■ 
\\ 

Cfi 

F' 

Cu..- - 



lal. he has 

(I IlJlli t V. 

int 



TAKE CARE OF YOU 



ILst 'if regular monthly 
tak'- care of you right. 
h. and liave our 
■ r Sfc you. New 



I Call ' 

I Job pi 

Ideas-. 

MILLAR PR NTINa COMPANV. 
niiliilh 'I'hoBe HJ04. 



now • Re- 

; : .■ i_i,. ujs in his 
iner in the 
I ' .Ml I an of the Hos- 

{,', iitl<!n. There were 

^V ii..^.,. German, Fingllsli, 

G, ,1 Indian runner.s in the nut-, 

hui ..,c i:enaud boy carried the honor 
of La Belle F'ranco well to the fore. 
With I.arrv LaToic. St. Yves and a few 
,,. aking into the 

Irish- Americans 
t,, n...li to their laurels. 
* • « 

• w scientific minds are turn- 
;i, attention to tlie squared cir- 

cl. cientitic use of oxygen, Ught- 

f>i ,.iu beyond the limit of their 

iiat Hiii endurance. It is a grave ques- 
lion as to whether this tangled fad 



it NV..V \.^ 

trodiif.-.l (h 
into his e> 
contjueror of 



: -, I ■ .1 1.1 [ I \\ ho til' St in- 

..1" iiuiiiping oxygen 

.1 n<id\. W'lien the 

Terry .McGovern is wont 
to feel himself .sliding to the wobbly 
s' he stalls until the end of the 

: Then he has one of liis sec- 

uiius get l.iisj witli the elixir of lif« 
stuff. By this metliod t>f recuperating 
an exhausted ligiittr, he is enabled to 
ftnisii strong. 

• • • 

It is .1 (luestlon as to w hetlier tliis 
ilmsa t hurt a fighter in the end. It 
i.s ji more or less artificial .sliniulanl, 
ami any atlilete who carries ills wan- 
ing powers along beyond tlielr natural 
enduratu-j- by tlie use of artificial aid, 
i.s hound to suffer in the end. Mtither 
Nature wont j'tand a jilt. 

• • • 

Tlie other iiiKiit in the gay capital 
of I'aris, two big dinges fuugiit for 
the *i>atty du fole" ciiampionsiiip. The 
principals were Joe Jeannelie of New 
York, N. Y.. and Sam .McKey of tlie 
boulevard de Honore. late of the stock- 
yards, Cook county. 111. 

The light lasted most of the nigUt. 
fifty Ressior.s went tlie battle. Brother 
Joe saw many wold>ly visions along in 
the interim between tlip twentieth 
and fortieth r<»unds. Then they began 
to pump oxjgen into his dark frame, 
and tirother Joe came back and rudely 
Jolted brother Sam. Il was anotlier 
ease of the oxygen. If this thing con- 



tlon of the nerve centers. His aim Is 
to get to tliese nerve centers and dis- 
able ills opponent. The captain .says lio 
can render the limb of an opponent 
useless by the application of a little 
piessure upon the nerve. Likewise, 
he can put an opponent Into deep slum- 
ber by tlie pressing of other nerves 
that telegrapli slumber signals to the 
brain. 

Its a fine game for Sweeney. 

Capt. AIcLagen says that he could 
defeat Frank Gotch under llie free- 
and-easy rules of the Jiu Jitsu game. 
But Frank avoids the Jlu .litsu en- 
iHuglement, according to the captain, 
as a colored brother would avoid the 
haunted graveyard, and after some of 
the explanations of the captain of the 
deadly holds and a few practical dt-m- 
tinslrations, you will commend Gotch 
for having a cool and calculating 
noodle. 

The captain wants to wrestle any 
five men in Uuluth. He will guarantee 
to throw the quintet inside of half an 
hour. If the captain fails to throw the 
five men in the stlpuialod time, he 
stands ready to forfeit $500. He will 
deposit this money in the hands of tlie 
.^-porting editor of The Evening Her- 
ald, to be held as a forfeit for the five 
prospective opponents. 

A great struggle was pulled off in 
Minneapolis only recently between the 
eajitain, who claims the Jlu Jitsu 
» hampionslilp of the world, and a Jap. 

The contest attracted a great aud- 
ience. The captain will be here for 
some tiays, and would like to hear from 
live brawny mat aitist.s. His wife Is 
on the Bijou circuit, and will appear 
at the Duluth theater next week. Like 
her athletic husband, the captain's 
wife Is engaged in an exhibition of 
.strength. 



tinue.^ to develfip, it may inspire some 
of the ol(l ciiampion.'j to draw deeply 
of tile oxygen pump and hurl chal- 
lenges to the younger generation. 

FITWELLS CINCH 
THE PENNANT 



■A t 
Will 



A^et the other fel- 
low experiment. You 
buy the hat you 
KNOW is good. 

Cordon 
//at $3 

The Gordon De Luxe $4.00 



Take Three Straight 
Games From the Cen- 
tral Team. 

The Fit well bowlers last nigiit got 
a firm hold on tlie championship pen- 
nant for the season, by winning three 
straight games from the Centrals. Sam 
Olsen, for the Filwells, carried off the 
honors of the evening by rolling 229 
for high score, ■with an average of 211 
for the three games. 

Tlie Filwells won out by a comfort- 
able margin in each game. In the first 
ttielr total score was 932, and that of 
the Centrals was 861. In the second 
they rolled !>76 and the others 917, and 
in the third the score was 900 to 791. 
This gives the FItwells the ciiampion- 
siiip for two successive seasons. Fol- 
lowing are the scores for last nigiit in 
detail: 

C'puirnln. 

Mansolt (21) 

Heppe (25) 

Dummy 

Mitchidl (16) 

Fairhairn (7) 

Handicap 



Totals 

Berini 

G. Olsen 

Wegman (15) 

Schultz 

.'^. Olsen 

Handicap . . . . 



KHwellM. 



l.'.O 


179 


195 


166 


178 


116 


laO 


150 


150 


161 


158 


113 


165 


183 


154 


69 


69 


69 


861 


917 


791 


165 


202 


177 


203 


188 


170 


175 


150 


164 


165 


192 


178 


209 


229 


178 


15 


15 


15 



Totals 



932 



976 900 



CRICKKT LEACil E 

WILL HOLD MEKTLNG. 



with a single that scored two of the 
three runs In the eighth. Cobb made 
a great catch of Tannehill's long fly in 
the second. Score: ^ R. H. h,. 

Detroit 00000001 — 1 6 

Chicago 000 00 03X--3 7 2 

Batteries— Wllleti and Schmidt; 
Smith and Sullivan. Umpire— Perrine. 
■ 
Long Game at Cleveland. 

Cleveland, Ohio, April 23. — Cleve- 
land's postponed opening of the season 
was held yesterday, only a small crowd 
being present. St. Louis won in the 
fourteenth inning on two bases on 
balls, La Joie's error and Ferris' sac- 
rifice fly. Joss and Graham were 
knocked out of the box. Bimingham's 
fielding twice saved the game and 
Clark's battings was a feature. Score: 

H. H. E, 
Clevel'd .0 0004000 000 — 4 16 2 
St. Louis 00020200000 2—6 12 2 

Batteries — Hhoades. Joss and Clark; 

ieger. Umpires 



" uaiieries — imoauea. J> 

of Powel, Graham and Cri 

1 — O'Loughlin and Kerin. 



NATIONAL LEAGUE 



Standing of the Clubs. 

Won. Lost. Pet. 

Cincinnati 6 2 .750 

Boston 5 2 .714 

New York 3 2 .600 

Chicago 3 2 .60o 

Philadelphia 2 3 .400 

St. Louis S 6 .375 

Pitt.^hurg 2 4 .333 

Brooklyn 2 4 333 

REDS WINTlASH 
WITH PIRATES 



Pittsburg Loses Season's 

First Game on Its 

Home Grounds. 

Pittsburg, Pa., April 23. — The Na- 
tional league season was opened locally 
here yesterday witli an exciting game 
at Exposition park. Vlnclnnati defeat- 
ing Pittsburg by a score of 7 to 4, thus 
advancing into first place. A band 

concert was the only ceremony that 
marked tlie opening of tlie seasor... 
However, every one in attendance at 
the game was supplied wilii a wliistle, 
and tile many excitin,g features gave 
ample opportunity to start the season 
with plenty of noise. 

Pittsburg began the run getting in 
the Initial inning on a hit by Clark 
and Wagner's triple, hut the visitors 
forged iiliead in the lliird inning and 
kepi in tlie lead until the eighth, 
when an error by Mowu;y allowed Hie 
homo team two runs, placing them in 
the lead. 

The hopes of tlie local enthusiasts 
were dashed to the ground in the final 
rtund, liowever, when Cincinnati made 
four runs on the same number of 
hits coupled with three errors. Bran- 
den' was relieved in the sixth inning, 
.11 ttie heavy hitting of the opponenis 
could not be stopped. Paskert played 
a splendid game for the visitors, mak- 
li g several sensational catches atid 
liitting well. Score: R. H. p:. 

Pittsburg 100 00 1020—4 9 3 

Cincinnati 002100 4—7 16 1 

Batteries — Brandon, Leifleld and 
Gibson; Ewing and McLean, Umpires 
— Klem and Kane. 



Pbillien Vlctom at Boston. 

Boston, Mass.. April 2;;.— McConnell s 
error In the eighth inning, followed by 
a sacrifice and two timely hits, al- 
lowed Philadelphia to score the only 
run of a pitchers' battle between 
Coombs and Morgan yesterday. The 
former pitcher was wild, l>ut effective 
with men on bases. Wagner made a 
great stop In tlie eighth inning, that 
saved a run. Score: , H- H. E. 

Philadelphia 00 00 000 10 — 1 6 

Boston 00000000 0-0 1 4 

Batteries — Coombs and Thomas; 
Morgan and Carrigan. Umpires — Con- 
nolly and Kgan. 




CubM Wallop St. Louia. 

St. Louis, Mo.. April 23.— The Chicago 
team won the inaugural game of Hie 
season from the St. Louis team at the 
new league park 7 to 3. Mayor Kreis- 
mann pitched the first ball. More than 
15,000 enthusiasts braved the unseason- 
able weather. Chance's men pulled the 
game out of the fire in the eighth, scor- 
ing five runs. They hit Sallee freely 
and tlie locals hit at critical periods. 
Score: R- H. E. 

Chicago 0000 2 00 50—7 7 4 

.St. Louis 3 0—3 10 

Batteries — Sail«e and Bresnahan; 
Brown, Overall and Moran. Umpires — 
O'Uay and Emslle. 

Rack Bay Crowd Whltewawhed. 

Philadelpiiia. April 23. — The Boston 
team was defeated in tiifi opening game 
of the local National league seasim 
here vesterday, 4 to 0. before a large 
crowd". Covaleskl was a puzzle to 
Boston, and only one of the visitors 
got as far as third base. Ferguson 
was wild, and the home players took 
advantage of his passes by timely hits. 
In the seventli inning Philadelphia 
made two runs on a double by Dooin. 
Covaleskis single. Grant's sacrifice and 
Kimhe's double. The Philadelphia 
club yesterday announced the release 
of Third Baseman Hannifin and Catcher 
Clirlst to Detroit. Score: R. H. E. 

Philadelphia . . .0 1 2 1 x— 4 7 
Hoston 0-0 4 1 

Batteries — Covaleski and Dooln; Fer- 
guson and Smith. Umpires — Johnstone 
and Cusack. 

tilautft Win I'rom Brooklyn. 

Brooklyn, N. Y., April 23.— Twenty- 
five thousand spectators .saw the sea- 
son opened here yesterday, New York 
defeating Brooklyn, 8 to 5, in a game 
marked by hard hitting and plenty of 
errors. Ground rules, allowing two 
bases for a hit into right field, was 
enforced. The home team looked like 
sur>» winners until the seventh, when 
Alperman made two misplays which, 
Willi three hits and two passes, put Hie 
visitors in the lead. Murray's home 
run drive over the right field fence, in 
Hie eighth, clinched the victory. Ames 
was relieved in the sixth by Wiltze. 
Score: R- H. E. 

New York 01010141 0—8 11 3 

Brooklyn 02100200 0—5 8 5 

Batteries — Ames, Wiltze and Schlei; 
Wilhem and Bergen. Umpires — Rigler 
and Truby. 



Standing of the flubs. 

Won. Lost. Pet. 

Indianapolis 6 2 .750 

Louisville *■ 2 .750 

Minneapolis " - -714 

Milwaukee -i - .C*!' 

Toledo 4 4 .500 

St. Paul 2 5 .286 

Kansas City 2 •''■ .286 

Columbus 8 .000 

■ 
SalntM I.oMc to Millera. 

St. Paul. Minn.. April 23.— The Amer- 
ican ap.«oclation's season here was 
opened vesterday, Minneapolis defeat- 
ing St. 'Paul 1 to 0. Although the 
weather was cold, there was a large 
ci-owd, and both teams played fine 
ball. Hall and Oberliii botli pitched 
good ball. Two singles and a fielder s 
choice gave Minneapolis the only run 
of the game in the second inning. 
Score* R* 

.St Paul 0000000 — 4 

Minneapolis .... 1 0—1 5 2 

Batteries— Hall and Carl.sch; Oberlin 
and Block. Umpires — Hayes and Cona- 

han. 

■ 
fienatorM Lone In Thirteenth. 

Columbus. Ohio. April 23 —In a game 
of liigh quality, the Columbus club 
opened its home seaf^on this afternoon 
and sustained its eighth straight defeat 
by a .score of to 2. Both the Louis- 
ville runs, for wlilch Dunleavy made a 
start with a double, were scored in the 
HiirieenHi inning. Several times in the 
regular Inrilngs, a long fly would liave 
given eitlier side the lead. In the 
eleventh, Columbus had runners on 
third and second with none out 
Score: R.H, E. 

Columbus — 7 
L'ville OUOOOOOOOOOO 2—2 9 4 

Batteries — Goodwin and James; Hogg 
and Hughes. Umpire — King, 
■ 
Toledo GetM Ftrat Game. 

Toledo, Ohio. April 1:3. — By hard and 
timelv hitting. Toledo defeated In- 
dianapolis in the first game of the sea- 
son on the home grounds. The visitors 
put their third pitcher in t)ie box be- 
fore the end of the fourth inning. 
Score: R- HE. 

Toledo 04 10010 x— 6 13 3 

Indlanapoli.s 13 1—5 8 

Batteries — West and Abbott; Gra- 
ham, Cheney. Glaze and Howley. Um- 
pires — Eckman and Owen. 
■ 
Brewern Drop Game. 

Milwaukee, ^Vis., April 23. — .Milwau- 
kee lost to Hie visitors yesterda.v. 1 to 
4. ."^core: R- H. E. 

.Milwaukee 000 00 100 — 1 7 

Kansas City . . . .0 3 1 — 4 8 1 

Batteries' — Manske. McGlynn and 
Hosteller: Swann and Sullivan. Um- 
pire — Sullivan. 

SPORT OF KINGS 
AT LEXINGTON 



team will be chosen to take part in th^ 
Duluth tournament this year and 
challenge may be Issued to some 
the neighboring cities for team plaj 

The city baseball team will play It 
first game this season with a Dulutj 
team, the name of wliich has not y^t 
been given out. The prospects for ^ 
fast team are good. The players are all 
voung. but are experienced. 

The high school baseball prospects 
are the best they have ever been. All 
the old men, with two exceptions, will 
be in the game and the Incominfif 
freshmen of last fall brought some eX/ 
cellent material with them. Their 
schedule Includes games with the Su^ 
perlor high schools and some of th» 
range schools teams. 

WILL HAVE A 
SHORT MARATHON 

High School Boys to Run 

Six Miles Through 

City. 

A six-mile Marathon race will be 
run this afternoon by a number of th« 
high school boys who have been train- 
ing for the long-distance runs. 

They will start at the school, run up 
Lake avenue to Fourth street, along 

Eleventh 
oulcvarq. 



Fourth street to Eiglilh avenue -weBt, 
up to Fifth street, west to EU 
avenue and north to the bouU 
The re.«t of the run will be east alonfif 
the boulevard and baek to the schook 



will 



boulevard and oaeK to tne scnooK 
Coach 1>. W. Helsiand and a j>arty 
.VI. i follow the boys in an autonioldl^. 
He does not know just how many will 
run. Only those who are in shape wljj 
be allowed the privilege, and Ihoaft 
who show sipns of fatigue will bift 
picked up and not allowed to finish, 

Track work is goii.g along nicely 
at the f-chotd. and Hie coacli is as en~ 
ihusiaslic over prospsyits for a winning 
team as are the hoys themselves. 



YOUNG (ORBETT-KEYES. 

Unless There Is Court Interference, 
Fight W ill Come Off. 

New York, April 23. — Unless there IS 
court interference. Young Corbett an^ 
Bert Keyes will fight before the Fair- 
mount Athletic club tcniglit. Tiie bout 
is scheduled to go ten rounds. Cor- 
bett is a 5 to 4 favorite. 

The manager of tlie club announces 
that there will be no police interfer- 
ence, as the dull is protected by a 
permanent Injunction, and that Hie law^ 
governing membership will be strictly 
adhered to. 

This statement of confidence is made 
In spite of the action yesterday of 
.Magistrate Butte, who summoned tUa 
lioxers and club officers to cou.-t, un- 
der the authority granted bv the ponaj 
code, whicli authorizes a magistrato 
to issue a warrant wlien he believes 
a misdemeanor is about to be com- 
mitted. A decision by the magistrate 
is expected U'day. 

MAKES OFFER TO KET^HEL. 



MeCarey of California Would Match 
Him W ith Langford. 

Lcs Angeles, Cal., April 23. — Manager 
McCarey of the Pacific Athletic club, 
last nigiit wired Stanley Ketchel an 
offer of 110,000 to meet Sam Langford 
before his club in a ten-round contest. 
If the off< r is accepted by the fighters, 
il will take idace during tlie week of 
July 11, in connection with tht fes- 
tivities of Elks' week here. 

BROOKSTON >Vi'lL 

HAVE FAST TEAM. 




Standing of the Clubs. 



Clubs — Won. 


Lost. 


Pet. 


Detroit 5 


2 


.714 


New York 5 


2 


.714 


Boston 4 


3 


.571 


St. Louis 3 


3 


.500 


Cleveland 3 


4 


.429 


Philadelphia 3 


4 


.429 


Chlca.go 2 


. 4 


.333 


Washington 2 


5 


.286 



Calumet. Mhli., April 23. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The league officials of 
llie Copper Country Cricket league 
have notified the teams that a meeting 
will be held tomorrow evening in the 
Arlington hotel. Bed Jacket, for the 
purpose of reconsidering the division 
of the two sections of the league, 
known as the north and south. 

The calling of this meeting is the 
result of of the recent agitation start- 
ed by several of the teams, asking for 
a reconsideration, claiming that the 
decision made by the league would be 
to the disadvantage of all the teams. 

It is believed that the league offi- 
cials will reconsider the action of the yesterday by" beating Detroit 3 
previous meeting, and so arrange thej jj„,itli, who pitched well, won tlie 



HIGHLANDERS 
HOME. HAPPY 

New York Defeats Wash- 
ington in First Game 
at Gotham. 

New York, April 23. — The New York 
Americans, making their first home ap- 
pearance of the season yesterday, de- 
feated Washington, 8 to 1. The visitors 
were unable to bunch hits on (julnn. 
while the home players were able to 
make their safeties count. Smith was 
found for five hits in the third, which, 
with a pass, netted the locals five 
runs. Eflgle led in batting' with a 
single, a double and a home run, his 
home run being one of the longest 
drives ever made on the grounds. 
Score' R- "* ^' 

Washington ....000000010—1 7 
New York 0502001 x— 8 9 1 

Batteries — Smith and Street; Quinn 
and Kleinow. Umpires— Hurse and 
Evans. 



Ponies Are to Run on 

the Kentucky 

Track. 

Lexington. Ky., April 23. — Tomorrow 
the racing season in Kentucky and the 
South for 1909 will be inaugurated 
here, and one of the best meetings 
ever held at the running course is 
expected. 

More than 500 horses are stabled at 
the track and every stall lias been re- 
served by breeders from all parts of 
the counlrv. Horses were shipped from 
Los Angeles and Oakland last Satur- 
day so as to be here to run in the 
coming meeting, which will continue 
for seven days. Six races will be 
run daily, with a total of $10. 000 hung 
up in purses. 

Former famous stakes have been cut 
out. as betting at Lexington and Louis- 
ville is conducted by the Pari-Mutuel 
system. As the machines are being 
tiled for the second time, the meet- 
Ig Is something of an experiment 
financiallv. This meeting will be fol- 
lowed bv one of eighteen days at 
Cliurchili Downs. Louisville, after 
which the Latonia Jockey club will 
cut In for a month, according to pl.ms 
recentlv announced by the official'* o^ 
that organization. The fate of L.n- 
tonia, liowever, still hangs in the bal- 
ance, but the court of appeals clerk 
has fixed May 4 as the day on which 
arguments in the case of the Liilonla 
Association against the State Racing 
Commission would be heard at Frank- 

''Because of the unsettled condition 
of racing throughout the countiy. 
horsemen are hoping that the commis- 
sion will be sustained by the appellate 
court fearing that to inaugurate an all- 
summer meeting, as is said to be con- 
templated bv Latonia in the event it 
wins tlie fight against the commission, 
will result in a law being passed at 
the next session of the legislature in 
January prohibiting the sport alto- 
gether "in K entucky^ 

CLO0UETY.M.C.A. 
ATHLETES BUSY 

Baseball and Other Sports 
Will Be 



Brookston, Minn.. April 23.— (Special 
to The Herald.) — A meeting' of base- 
iiall enthusia.'^ts was held at the B. L. 
A. hall Monday evening, when plans 
for the coming season were outlined. 
Plans were thorougldy discu.= sed, and 
it was decided that Brookston should 
be represented en the diamond by a 
fairly fatt team. W. A. Epperson was 
ciio.'^en as manager of the club, H. M. 
Wilkinson was selected as captain, and 
J. F. Ryan as treasure!. There are In 
Hie neigliborhood of fifteen good ball 
plaver.s in and around the village, and 
theie !s no reason wliy a good team 
sliould not be selected. Tlie grounds 
will immediately be p;j< into first-class 
condition, and as toon as the weather 
permits the candidatf.s for the numer- 
ous positions will be put througii daily 
stunts under tiie walrtilui eye of Capt. 
Wilkiiif-on, wiio will endeavor to pick 
out only the strongest and best ma- 
terial. It is pl.-.nned to have the team 
plav everv Sunday throughout the sea- 
son', and about half of Hie games^ will 
be played on the home diamond provid- 
ed the necessary financial support is 
forthcoming. A eommiitee of three 
has been appointed to solicit funds and 
this committee will commence work at 
once. 



POH(E K.4II> (H'n. 



Kept 



Up. 



Twelve Arrests Made at Boxing 
Contest in Neu York. 

New York, April 23. — A tcore of men 
weer clubbed and twelve persons were 
arrested in a raid made early tod.'iy by 
the police on the Carlisle Athletic club 
in Brooklvn. The police have been 
active of late suppressing boxing in 
Hiese club.'-, which they assert aie not 
conducted in accordance with law. The 
managers of the club ye.«-terday 
obtained an injunction from Justice 
Carr restraining the police from raid- 
ing the club as long as the atliletic 
tontesls were held in accordance with 
law. 



Runners in Readiness. 

New York. April 2.'i. — Henri St. Yves, 
the Frenchman, and Alfred Shrubb. the 
Englisnman. have put on the last 
touches before tJieir 15-nille race will 
Le run under the glare of electric lights 
at Amerocan League park, tomorrow 
night. The race will be started at 9:15, 
and will be run over a grass course, 
six laps to the mile. Interest centers 
in the contest, as It is a departure from 
the manv recent full Marathon events, 
and because of the doubtful results. 
St. Yves demonstrated that he was a 
great runner by wirming the tlO,000 
Marathon, but .Shrubb lias always main- 
tained that he is the fastest IS-miJe 
man in llie world and that lie car. easily 
defeat the Frenchman at this dis- 
tance. 



White Sox IJovour Tlgera. 

Chicago. April 23.— Tlie Chicago 
Americans opened their local season 

e tfame 



Cloquet, Minn.. April 23.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — At a meeting of the 
athletic committee of the Y. M. C. A. 
the matter of summer outdoor sports 
was taken ilp. Dates were set for the 
spring track meet and plans made for 
the organizing of a baseball league the 
teams of which are to be made up o^ 
the members of the association. Four 
teams will be organized by a com- 
mittee from the names of the members 
handed In. In this way evenly balanced 
teams can be put in the field, and as 
there are a number of good players the 
success of the league is a foregone 
conclusion. 

A tennis club has also been organ- 
ized and work on the courts will begin 
at once. In all probability a tennis 



St. Paul Player Hurt. 

St. Paul. Minn, April ;;3— While 
turning second base during the last 
play of the game yesterday. Outfielder 
Jimmy Murray of Hie St. Paul team 
broke a small bone in his left ankle, 
and will be out of the game for sev- 
eral weeks. 

. • 

Baseball Scores. 

At Ithaca — Cornell 4; Franklin and 

Marshall. 0. ., , r, . . 

At LawrencevlUe, N. J.— Princeton, 
7: LawrencevlUe academy. 1. 

At New Haven— Yale. 6; Tufts, 1. 

At Peoria— Peoria. 3; Des Moines. 2. 
» ■ 

Accidents will hapi-en. hui the best- 
regulated families keep Dr. Thomas 
Eclectrlc Oil for sucli emergencies. If 
subdues the pain and heals the hurts. 



Temple Roller Rink 

Music every niKJu a nd Saturday ma« 
tinee, excepting Monday and Thur» 



day nights. 



i — fe 




■mr % 



^ 



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THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD FRID 



^iY. 



APRIL 23. 1909. 




Most Extraordinary Gl ove Announcement 

Our Great Removal Sale Starts Tomorrqw. 




flffer May 1st Our New 
Location Will Be 

26West Superior St. 




After May Ut Our New 
Location Will Be 

26 WestSuperiorSt 



(h, M."i r,l j„.i ,,, .hupxH.'.j ■l;,isj;,„n ,„.,. — ...■ m-^l .»■"•,• I,. „;r „..,r l...,l,„n „„.l II, 

I, f n .. / >.; • • "i'f-< /">' ^^'*' ''"' 



TO mum. 

THE BKSiN 

i'l 

Dredging Work >in the 
Harbor WHI Be Re- 
sumed Tuesday. 

No Opposition to Deepen- 
ing of the River 
Channel. 



Our Ladies' Fine " 
$1.50 Kid Oloves 

for 98c. 



■ !,,.!.■ 



Our Ladies' Best ^ '; ' ,' •'", 

$2.00 Kid Oloves , ,,,.;,, 

for $1.59 ' '/ '« 

■ ' ' ■ .'-vl'tsj' Jress 

,' ' ''. . 'i ■ .' 



98c 






$1.39 



Oloyes Worth up to 
$4.00 for $t. 55. 

Women 's 5Qr Pure Silk Gloves, AIJ- 

IFomerrj B<?.yf S1.25 Pure Silk Gloves^ 

89c 



If ''omen *s 

Best 35c 

Extra Fine 

Lisle Gloves 



Jyli^h' ''- 



$t-«5 



T\U' woik on tlio extension of tlie 

iHiliitli I. url)<>i ancliorage basin. wliUli 

was .susp^^nded last lall, will be re- 

- 1. . i lu'xt Tuostiay. One dredge will 

j, i .1 It i\vi,l and anolher put on the 

■,..;; The plans contemplate 

.He.ifc;i: aea of about eighty acre-s. 

ro.isiil. inoro than Half of which 

was douf last .summer. This work. 

wheii completed, will give anchorage 

iirra of practically Ji't acre.s of h gen- 

tral depth of about twenty-two tcel. 

It iH expected tliat the work will be 

tinlshed by the middle of the summer. 

Col. Fiieh. of the corps of englii- 

eera. Is receiving nunierou;* aiisw^^rs in 

j.'i.U to lii.s It-tters 5'*'nt out llie nrsi 

.■''■■. iii.oiilt. regarding tlie improve- 

Mi ,i- 111 ilie rivt-r channel, all tavor- 

■ 1,1.- I . the project. It IS proposed to 

,1, ,.i.,Mt ilie cliannel from .spirit lake 

to the stone quarries above bond .lu 

Lac. a dli-tance of approXlinHiely nine 

miles. In tlie replies r«c«lved by coi 



A CLOSE SHAVE 



.Many of TIhmii Happeiiins; i:Aer> Day 
But Soon Forgot tfii. 

f'losp shav.-s would be of nflnre fre- 
quent occurrence but for the tender 
fiice.s of nuinv men. which will not 
|. rmit of shaving often. Heretofore, 
nuthing has been said in these col- 
umns about po.siani. a new .skin dis- 
covery, in connection with its use after 
shaviner. It.s publicity and sales have 
been confined almo.st exclus^ively to its 
remarkable properties a.s an eczema 
cure: it stops the itching at once and 
cures the worst cases in a few days. 
While the application of poslam af- 
t'r shaving is one of its minor uses, 
such as for pimples, the complexirvn. 
ftc. shavers will find it a revelation, 
;is "it does for abrasions, roughness, 
tind severe scra]»itigs what it does for 
;ill manner of skin difficulties — heals 
and cur^.s in a few hours. It is the 
only article po.sse.ssing real antiseptic 
aiui curative value that has ever been 
exidoited for this purpose, and will 
voothe and tone up the skin as no 
toilet prepaiation could possibly do. 
Poslam can be had for fifty cents 
at any reliable druggist'.s, particularly 
the Lyceum Pharma. y and ^V. A. Ab- 
betfs in Duluth. and Holmberg's in 
Superior, who make a specialty of it. 
Or the F:m<rgencv Laboratories. No. 
3 J West -T'lh Street. Xew York City, 
will send a trial .supply free by ma»l 
to anv one who will write for it. 1 his 
is sulficient to show results m -4 
hours. 



tlie ful ill'-. 



(Is 1. 

Ilie 



111.' nci-i-s- 
iiarbor eii- 



liarbor. ami 
dock, there 



Women's Fine Chamois Fabric Gloves 



itth 



/'■'"■ 



/ p'lirl 

89c 




Men 's Best 

New $2.00 

English 

Walking 

Gloves 




$1 



S WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 




IflTT \Tt 



lUP., .i 




OlRECTiBY OF 
AHySEIiEiTS 




,." 1«^spribed on the pro- 

• of a Diil'h." anil 
t of a privileged 

• ^tuni-s ar" 

V, M 'n' r'-p>-.*ited 

•■•ii'.iiri i.'!.l nig'it. 



\VHKrvKHM;OTOM(iHT. 



■Th»" Mt'ltins l*ot. 



\\ 



]}\ ' \\'\:>'n 



Melting 

■ oni- 

Mou- 



IH.I» FitlK-NDS MKKT. 

Al. \V ihon uml Aiuliem*' H;jve J(»ll\ 
Tinh* al thf J^M'mjhi. 



\V.-..lti. 



er\'- 

I'oi - 
1 t I'i 



Fitch, the general opiiiton^is that the 
river cliannel slioubl be deepened to 
twenty feet i.s t;u- a- Sew Duluth. and 
to ten feet from th-i ■ to the auarries. 
The time for a i.reliHiinary exam- 
ination of that part •« Uife upper luir- 
lh>r. has not yet bcr. determint-d up- 
.1) but it will probauly be made early 
!i M ly. _ 

SOO BREAK-UP 
IS EXPECTED 

I — -^ 

Nineteen Boats Are Now 

Anchored Above the 

Locks. 

T,,e i.re.ik-up ;.i I, - ■-'•'• i-- .•M)ected 
within a few day.n. ac .o.linK lo tele- 
grams received this morning by the lo- 
cal transit companies from tlieir agents 
It that p..iht. The weather i-s reported 
as warmer with the wind shifting to 
the south. Tlie steamship Superior ar- 
rived at the Soo this morning and two 
more boats are expe.te.i there this 
afternoon, making a total of nineteen 
boats wliicli will be anchored above the 
locks thl.s evening. ,., ^„ 

Tugs at Round L«lan<l yesterda\ re- 
port downbound boats it^ r^tvh'/Jpfll'b 
ice about ten miles soutU of V\ huetWi 
Toint- 

FIRST STEAMER 
TO CROSS LAKE 



liiue in 
siiv for 
trances. 

A I the north end of the 
in front of the No. 4 ore 
^s shoal water eviendlng about 6o<i r<'f-t 
out from Ih'- harbor line, ami covering 
an area of about ten acres, with a 
depth of less than twenty feel, ami 
from that down to fifteen feel, as is 
seen on charts of the harbor. 

Til is shoal Avas not an obstruction 
to the smaller vessels of earlier y.-ars. 
but is an obstruction to the larger 
vessels of the present time, and it is 
believed that it should be removed, as 
it would add materially to the avail- 
able harbor room. 

No dredging has been done by the 
^'overnnu-nt In this harbor, and there is 
no mone\ nor authority for sucli work. 
Dredging therefore, cannot be done 
without provision for same by .nn- 
ijress. , 

Expressions of opinion are reiiuesie.i 
regarding thi.s matter also by Col. 
Fitch, with a view to determining 
wliether or not the removal of the 
shoal is a needed and worthy improve- 

Uient. , . 

Replies .should be sent to him not 
later than by May 15. 



HARBOR WAS 

FILLING IIP 

Government Must Do Lot 

of Dredging at 

Port Wing. 

Tlie government has cnleicd into a 
contract with the Northern Dre.ige & 
Hock company lor the dredging and 
deepening of Port Wing harbor on the 
south shore. The work, which will be 
commenced at once will cover a period 
of about two months. 

G A. Tavlor of the governnunl < ii- 
Rineer-s olTice and a party of assistants 
went to Port Wing Wednesday, making 
the trip ill the government boat V i- 
dette Thev made a complete survey 
of the harbor, and found the entrance 
ilogged with sand and a mean .lepth 
of but twelve feet of water inside. 

The depth at tli-e dose of navigation 
last fall was aoout sixteen feel. II 
Is tlie intention to dredge and deepen 
th.> imrbor so that the work will not 
have to be repeatetl another year. I he 
contract work will be done under iie 
supervision of Col. C U. Mtoh oi the 
"nuluth offipe. 



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1,11 — a i>. 



.:aiiag<ed, 

M\ where. 

White- 

''iiicago. 



I ; '. 1 s 

ered 

\-vl 



The Charles 0. Jenkins ^^^ f jj^g J[](J 

Reaches Ashland From 



•day. 





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miles south 
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•';,• -1 i). "Hatlle E. Top- 
: : > : i a little eastward 






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of (Jood Hope. It win 
inleiesling to know that 






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Mt^nt In a l»ottle <»f 




s* ■ 














'in>r. < Mder a case 




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ii-flf. Order of your 
tr be »ui»pli<'d by Du- 

M niieapolis Brewing coiii- 



The Columbia 



■An 



at Third 
Avenue West 



it \ N \^ 

.1.1'-., ill 




RroiiKht Ilodj- From .%l«"ls«. 

Wai.sau. Wis. April 2:t.-The r«- 

>f mains of Fred Miller, whose body wa.s 

II I r.-v'j.^ 1 n.i:i;!;ic tn a river at Katchikan. 

1 ^ 4.-nt to Ida home here, 

,f \v ' . 1 v.^aterday. Miller wa.*i 

1 -^tH-i; alive an hour heforo his Iwdy was 

t-;.,,nnd, and It Is supposed that he was 

a vlt-rlni of foul p'ay. 



i 



GITCHE GAMEE 

SHOES 



Are thf sole leather toe box, flexible oak insoles, fast 
color evelet.s, the all leather heel, chrome tanned ui-per 
lealher. extra ^ra.le outer soles, grain sole leather 
cotinters. ^^^^ /^^^ RECOMMENDED BY 



T 



H. \V. Hill, 
W. life I- •'••oe Co., 
J J. nor * SttB* C»., 
fViSjp < lolbing Co.. 
KiiMfrlner * IVewinaiti 

Hi.:. 1 Mi la HI. 



r K. IllodK^H & < "-. 
Wlelnnd ^li«>«' < "■• 
8. Vail Warner, 
Rutfkivell Shoe * ».t 
jMtrn Shoe l'«».« 
Alfr«;tl .lohMOB, 

i%iid be-t dealer" throunhout the Piorthwe-t. 

Northern Shoe Go. 

MANUFACTURERS 
DULUTH, MINNESOTA 





Fort Killiam. 

Aslilaiid, Wis.. April ::3.— (Special to 
Tl,,. H.-!.iM.i Navigation on the 
.^.,^l^ ke .Superior was 

Mpene.i lu.M . ■'. I..- arrival here of 
the Charle.^ « •. .1. nkin-s. The .Jenkins 
, l.-aied from Fort WUHam yestt-rday. 
iiti.t is tlie hrst vessel to cross Lake 
Superior this seas<in. rr, .... 

.Slic will load ore at .Vsliland. Tlieie 
is considerable ice her.- yet. 

IMPROVEMENTS 
AT MARQUETTE 

Col. Fitch Wants Opinions 

on Proposed Changes 

in Harbor. 

I.ieiit. <'ol Ciraham I). Fitch is 
anxious to secure opinions from those 
interested in the propo.««ed improvement 
of the liarbor at Mar.iuelte. Mich. 

The act nf congress approved March 
u, 1903, provided for making a pre- 
liminary examination of tlie harbor al 
Maro.uette. Midi. 

The dutv of making the above pre- 
iiminarv e.xamination has been as- 
signed to Mr. Fitch, and it is expected 
that his report on tlie subject shall 
stale whether or not any changes 
should be made In a certain idan which 
liad previously been recommended lor 
111 extension of the breakwater. 

I'lider an act of congress approved 
lune l:! liHij. plans fur the extension 
of the present breakwater for a dis- 
tance of 1,500 feet were prepared by 
fapt Poller in 190;?. the estimaied cost 
of wliich was laoa.ooo. These plans 
were dulv ajuiroved by the division 
engineer, "bv Hie board of engineers 
for rivers and harbors and by the chief 
ui engineers. No at)pi opriatlou has as 
vet l)een made by congress tor this 
work of extension, but it is understood 
that parties interested inten.l to urge 
the pas-<age of an item providing lor 
this work by tlie next .eongress, 

The oroposed extension ol l,.>oo U-el 
was in a direction due soutli from the 
"nd of the present breakwater, which 
would make it a continuation o! tlie 

'^'rVurther'^'Vud.v of tbe,sv.b.iect in this 
office since the preparatfoh. of the fore- 
^'oing report, a period- ot more than 
ft e vears. leads to th« .belief that a 
modification in the p.^sition of '''»' P';''" 
nosed extension would be ad\ant- 
ageous. namely, a deflection lakewaid 
of the extension, that s in a .southeas - 
e-lv direction from the end of the 
nre^enl breakwater (in.slead ot an ex- 
lensrofi in the present direction south- 
wTtd as this would fa,ciliiate the 
J.ntiance of vessels in he^vy weaUier, 
and lessen the danger ut their being 
thrown on the beach. 

The ne.-d of providing greater safet\ 
to vessels in enteiing harbors has been 
emphasized in recent years by the diffi- 
culties exiifexlenced by v,es.>»eds at i ei - 
tain harbors on the lakes where there 
was insufficient r..om. The increase in 
t!ie size of lake fieiiflit vti.ssels which 
have baen built, and ii^ liable to con- 



IS mm HERE 

The McGonagle All Ready 

to Clear for 

Duluth. 

The new fire tug McCJonagle. built at 
Lorain, Ohio, for use at the Mlssabc 
docks in this city, will leave her dock 
at the former <lty for Duluth tomor- 
row morning. The new boat is one ol 
the finest and most completely equipped 
fire tugs on the Great l^kes. and will 
aid materially in protecting water front 
uronerty from heavy losses by fire. W ith 
tlie coming of tlie Mctlonagle. the tug 
\merica. which is euuipped with fire 
tiehting apparatus, and has been in use 
for some time at the Missabe docks, 
will go Into service as a harbor tug. 

ON WAY TO Dill TH. 

Manv of the vessels of the Pittsburg 
Steamship company's Meet of ore car- 
riers have left their winter berths al 
various lake ports and are now on 
their way to Duluth. Ore shipping will 
begin as soon as the boats arrive. The 
comi.anv does not anticipate that the 
vessels ■ will be held up at the Soo 
more than a day or two. 

The .lohn W. (;ates is al preseiii un- 
loading coal al Detour. As soon as ihc 
.argo is discliarged she wnl procce<l 
lo Duluth. _ 

THRKE BO.\TS SEKN 

OFF FiUlT AUTHl R. 



Port Arthur. Ont.. April L'U.- -Thrco 
big steamers can be seen l'''lweer, 
Thunder Cape and Islr- Ro\ale, ap- 
parentlv in drifting ice. Isle Uoyale is 
foriv niiles from here, but is plainb 
visible todav. and tlie bt.ats. which aie 
unknown, must be at least thirty miles 
out. 

HANDLES FREKiHT 

FOR FOIR LINES. 

The C'itv Dock (imiiiany will handle 
freight for the .season of ltf09, for the 
following lines onl.N^ Mutual TransH 
company. Port Huron A: ni'l'Jt'i 
Steamship company, t lucago & Du- 
luth Transportation company and 
Anchor line. 

Marine Notes. 

Members of the Lake ^-^a^^f "■«.';">'';" 
are still voting at their offices in su- 
oeiior It is probable that the result 
of 1^1 e vote will not be known here 
until the returns have been sent to the 
head officials in Chicago. . 

Tlie contract for raising the fishing 
Ilie !•" » Hall, whlcli is under water 
at Isle Royale. has been let lo V\ hit- 
iiev Bros, of .Superior. , , j 

The fen V steamer Hattie Lloyd, 
which sank" in the Tower bay slip, has 
been raised and taken to dry dock for 
an overhauling. A large bo'^'r ''i^'' 

iV.und in her side, the result of ice 
lamming against her. 

The GeoTge W. Peavey Is loading 
wheat and barley at the Globe eleva- 

^''capt Helnrich. the local compass 
adjiis'er is aboard one of the Ice-bound 
vessels in Whilefisli bay. 



It 







■ .^ V»iV>tv''T*.-' 



^^Stylish New 
Clothes are a 
Necessity for all 



Every man and woman wanfs 
to dress well. That's natural. 
'/t is also wise. In a business 
way it is an asset; in a social 
way an obligation. 

It was never so easy to buy 

good clothes as this season. 

ft was never so easy to choose 
lust what you want either, 
we have the most season- 
able clothing for men, wo- 
men and children, and sell It on 

credit. 



as; 




». 







OPEN A CHARGE ACCOUNT 
AT ANY TIME YOU LIKE 



-^j-/?*" 



a week 



MH 



Come and See 
Our New Store 

M 122 East Superior 
Street. 

Mad to have « bigger and better 
place— and we've got It. 



h 



ROSEMB^'iCO. 

122 Easf Superior Street, 

Next to City Mall. 

Store Open Saturday and Monday Evenings 



Do Not 
Neglect 
to Read 




W.L. Douglas Shoe 

Ad on Page 8. 



LAST 
CHANCE. 



Telephone Your Wants 

If you want to sell anything— .Furniture, 
Rugs, Phonogfraph, Automobile. Horse. 
Buggy or anything that still has a value 

Telephone 324 




V2 Off Reduction Sale 

In order In rerluce our lare:e stock of books we are 
olferin£>- you all the latest publications for the 1)alance of 
ihi.s iiioiuh at 50 per cent reduction. Tluis: 

$1.50jook s 7 5c 

$lj 5 Books 65c 

SLOOB ooks 50c 

This sale includes set... nU > Liibles and Prayer 

ALBERTSON'S 

330 West Superior Street 




For Quick Results Use BeraW "Wants'^ 




.1 







1 








T 
























■ 












1 











■■» I .1 ' 1 



"T 




1 



THE DULUTH EVENING ^HERALD: FRIDAY. APRIL 23. 1909. 



I 
I 



^fs. 



POPULAR PRICED CLOTHES 



■AT- 



$1.00 A WEEK 



Men's Snits 



$10 to $35 



Cravfneltes 

For f., f 

$15 ami $18 



Hats 



English 



«., ■; 



$2 to $5 



Fancy Vests 

New Suit 

$1.50 to $7 




Top Coats 

■ner and Fall 

$10 to $20 



Odd Pants 

in Handy 

$1.50 to $6 




Slioes 

TLe Fan. JUS Endicott- 

Jt hiisuri Line 

$3, $4 and $5 



THIRD FAIR 
AmMIDJI 

Beltrami County Agri- 
cultural Association Pre- 
pares for Big Event. 

Fixes Dates Sept. 15. 16 

and 17 and Elects 

Its Officers. 



dll the low 
plared in • 
thfir ful' 
Tin {«• . 



land** in lliis territory 
lii.ie wliith wlil admit of 



Mliuu 


\- ■ :'■ : ■■• 






r 




(.•11 




Tliiii s.i. 




s. pt 


1 


17, t 


u:\ •■ !)•>- 




" 


til i. 


m'ini< 






ju»t lielti. 

Tilt- f.'li' 

1 ; > s 1 1 ii : ■ 


! It'll V ' 







Ml 
;. t 



A l^ew Addition 

Our i me Ntw i >.r- 
nisi.ing Depanthti.t 




• a*«t of tliip city have 
_ ul i>tMrliuse«l two imi>orte<l 
r'f7olieron ">tfifTions. These will he 
controlled by tlus= npsocirition. und it 
1« (xpf'cted that tl-ie brtt-ding- nf tlior- 
ijiiglilTfd lfcr>*8 will l<f a line of 
ffirniiiig 'vUlLlfc^.vvlll soon brinif m gcod 
rtturiis to M.f '.u\tr'^\<<\ investors. 

FIND FLOATER 
IN RED RIVER 

Taken From Stream at 

Crooksten and Hard 

to Identify. 

• Crookt^ioij. .Minn., Ai.r;) :3.— (.Sj-fCJal 
to Tl»e Herald.)— A sen-vation was 
oauMd l^iere last tveninjj by tJie dis- 
covtry of a mane body in tiie Fieri 
Lake river, l-y Ben Krue^fer, near 
Mose tiillerH wareliou.«e. eatt of the 
Norltiern. Pacific dtpol. 

Kriu-Rer went to the bend of the 
riv«.r after wood and w.is lion ified to 
see the lloater. t'art. Vonderbeck and 
Officer Godhuut were hinuuioned and 
h^iled tlie »■< dy out. It was in a lad 
•■^tato of dt toiiiposif.on. Coroner Sien- 
blioei took iliarge and after the cloth- 
ing l:ad Iteen searchtd, notliins could 
be found lo identify the Uead. 

The dead man's watcli had >-toi>ped at 

9:55. Hi."- piirKe contained two |'. blll^. 

showing that tlit man iiad not been the 

victim of foul play, with robbery as 

the motive. There was a time book 

Itiuiid. but Ihv** only contained certain 

davs-" work checked off. without the 

naine of the firm the m.m worked lor 

or hif own i>*ine. He. liad evidently 

! flronned some time last fall, as iie had 

tton undejwenr and overalls, only. 

i.odv io«>ked to be that of a man 

ytHirs old. and will be held 

.V davs. .n the hcpf of identiri- 

|,^.;. i. Thc'body n.ight have lloaied 

Itoni Ked l.akt Falls itr Thief 

Falls, and lio authorities tliere 

I»e€'n coiiiiiiumcii t» d With. 



fullv raised and at a profit. Mr. Roise 
hcs also been talking poultry and eggs, 
and will be here again in the fall to 
pay a koo<1 cash price for the farmer? 
potato.es, eggs, chickens, duiks and 
geese.' 



! LET US SHOW YOU 

The Snappiest line of Lively, Well-Buill, Genuine 

COLLEGE aOTHES 



} 






MINNESOTA BRIEFS 



,.nd- 

,,_.K of 
iildlng- 

..!•• fi-r 



'll' \vi, 

Hirer 
have 



. I w ui !ifi. *•::(.; i. 

I <'il.r l.llifnil I'retiiliiiim. 



(ilHL IS OKLAT SLKKI^ER. 

SiiifViln^' Frcui Nervous Exhaustion 
She MuDibeis Tuo Weeks. 

fJnen Isle. Minn.. April 23.— Sadie 

Corrigan. the 16-year-old daughter of 

' Mr.-^. Corrigan of this place. 

1 in a partial stupor for twu 

. .-eks. being aroused at intervals only 

I order tliat she could parlake of f<'od 

■ id drink. She is now convalescing: 

,e1anves and friends of the fiimily 

. regarded the case as a mysterious 

but the attending physician de- 

- tliere is iiotlung pr'i'i' "''*''^y ''^* 

.able about It. The patient, he 

ii. -.!(,, ring from iivrvous exhaus- 

- iifiw able «o sit up a lii- 

Mild yesterday dietnted re- 

i:' s id sevt ra 1 



8 E. SUPERIOR ST. 

H. A. KELSON. Manajrei 



n I n 



MKKTIMi AT HKAINKIUK 

; Session of Ci'on \\ i«^ County Edu- 
fi'.tinnal A^'^oeintlon Mn. 

iiti'iiiU. ! — ; 

K'Mh !Ub.<nal 




on 



LIVES ,EM»AN(.KKEl» 



BY FIRE AT IHKIM. 



I y 



bii'. k - 
by Viclor 



■ I ■ . • : I 



e groufiv,!. 



FINE FLORAL TRIBITE. 



KMiiHTS TEMPLAR INSTALL. 

MontioM' (oniniandepy of Calumet 
Ha"^ Impressive Exercises. 

*-;,,;i!,i«t Mil'!. .'\pi-II 1*". --(Special I" 

re held in 

lay ni^lit. 

>\ Kniglit.s 

1 new offuem. aa fol- 

.. , ,-.] p. =' r. I- (lord on 

• work 

grand 

t com- 

.,-.- .'"•■ w„' .. >-•■■• ra!ii«»!- 

CJ. Heckel, captain gen- 

; \t. I •;. 1 1 !iiii t,. \u.v ivar- 

'len, 

■ ,.;_.. ...i: .. s E. 

; A. I'jiynoweth. 

i i .r .\nderson, 

1 war- 

1 .lohn 

. ; .1 . ( ,1 . .- 1,,- Pax, 

t H I'll, « t( r. ru.-t 



CLOQUET MILLS 
ARE ALL BUSY 

Industries ef Slabtown 

Furnish Employment 

to Many Men. 



at leliiuc-n. 

.,., ...v. ., .-;..... i.i ... .lU address 
"ri.htagiotift Distases In the Public 
r.i.ls" bv Dr. J. A. Thabts. former 
111 officer of liie city. President 
annaii of the Duluih normal school 
will audress the S«^aturday afternoon 
.vtvvjon, and J. V. Smart, county audi- 
tor of «'row Wir.s couttty will si-t.'i 
on "The Kconomics of TaxeF."* 



Brainerd— Thomas Jackson, fonnerly 
matluiie foreman of the Northern Pa- 
cific sln'i'S here, but nov in charge 
of the shops at Livingston. Mont., and 
John J. Miller, formerly a iilacksmith 
:n the shops here and now a foreman 
of the blacksmith shop at Livingston, 
arrived Wednesday inorning and spent 
the dav looking over the shops. 

Beaver Bav — A sneak thief 

•togged" himself up in great shape 
last week at the expense of three men 
wi-rking at Laocours, by stealing a 
suit of clothes, under-dothes. and a 
pair of siioes. The constable was 
notified and was in hot pursuit, but tlu 
robber had too good a start, going .n 
the dlre<-iion <>f Knile Kiver. 

St. Cloud — Tile funeral of Henry 
Fietsome. who died at the home ol 
John Imhoitt. .\pri! 11'. in Clear lake, 
was lield from the ttonian Catholic 
cliurch Wednesday. The deceased was 
5«> vears of age. He is survived by n 
wife and three children, Mary of Itoy- 
alton, Henry of St. Augusta and Min- 
nie of Stattle. Wash. 

Little Falls— The ranning factory 
proposition is Vieing aired to quite an 
extent of late and n is possible that 
it will be taken up at the next meeting 
of the Commercial club and some ac- 
tion mav br- taken to secure such a fac- 
tory for this city. , , ,„ 
New Yoik Mills— Thomas Jatkola 
sold liis farm and all on it lo Andrew 
Tolvaniemi last week. The consider- 
ation was 10,000. The piaco is in 
Leer Cr?ek township, near the Leat 
River schoolh<-use. Mr. Jackola int"iHK 
to return to Calumet, Mich. 

Crookston — Section agents of ili^ 
Northern Pacific railroad have received 
circulars fiom the mam office al St. 
Piiul directing tliem t<- increase the 
number of men upon their respective 
s< ctions. Tins wiil mean the employ- 
ment of a iarge number of additional 
men uikui the sysU-m. Tills older 
means that general road repairing will 
bfgin in the near future. 

St. Cloud — Mrs. Ma.y E. 1<« :v lain. 
aged TTi. one of the pioneer residents 
of St. Cloud, died at the woman's build- 
ing at the Slate Soldiers' Home Tues- 
day evening al 9:^0 o'clock, following 
a i>rotracted illness, 

Stillwater — Kid ward C. Foster, city 
treasurer for the past ten years, and 
just commencing his sixth term, liand- 
ed his resignation in writing to liit 
citv council Tuesday night. 

Kocliester — Mrs. Emery Hunt of 
Creek, a village ten miles east of 
tin. attempted sui< i<le Monday by 
ing a large dose of carbolic acid, 
was in a half demented condition and 
her family had noticed her strange ac- 
tions for some d;vvs. Quick mcdKisl aid 
saved her life, and she will b. ;; • <l 
m Hie Koclicsitr state liospiial. 

Isanti — Tiie village scho.d bouru mot 
.Mondav evening to engage teachers for 
tiie next school year. Miss Iiaisy 
Ciiapman and Miss Jennie Scoiield. the 
present teachers, were among the ap- 
plicanis. and the board decided to re- 
engagi- them at tluir present sr .; t > s. 

§(■0 per month, for the princ;; ■ 

$:■•< ''ir the primary teaclier. 

.\ III Branch — Last Friday morMing 
the farm residence of Anton SUil.;. 
about f<'Ui miles from this village. 
was totally destroyed by fire. The !iie 
! burned with such rapidity. i.:aciiciill\ 
nothing was savtd. The hoisf- ";.'• a 
new one and was valued at >- 

neigliborhood of $1,000, whiK 
surance was only about $40". 
Anoka — Monday in Anoka 
home of Peter Linston. occurred i;.c 
deatJi of (Jilbert H. Leathers, one ot 
the i.ldest re:^idents of this county. -Mr. 
Leatlieis has been sick for some weeks 
and his death was noi unexp< n* o 
• iilbert H Leathers was born m .n >- 
tingli.ini. N. H, L'ec. 12, 1S'.4. 



^ 



:'■ 



You ever saw — there's nothing anywhere like 'em. 
Stop any nifty dressed young fellow on the street and 
ask him where he bought his clothes and he'll say: 



TJic Fitwcr 



WeVe nev^ shbx\ni so 
many swell colors and pat- 
terns — that helps in select- 
ing,' and the tailoring is of 
the highest character — that 
means satisfaction and they 
are only 



IvOS<- 

Ans- 

tak- 

She 




4 fmm^mm 



/ 



Jl 



T' 



. 




ITAS( A PARK R(IAI) 

TO BE ( ONSTRLCTED. 



al to 

.>per- 



1). K. 

.Kf'i'i'n'; 



Staples Railroad Men Send Beauti- 
ful Fmhlem to (Jilbert Funeral. 

:3.-.^ A(riI»ENTALLY KILLED 



t' 

e,l 

,jle 
ral of 

f t';t- 



<■;..<;.;• t. Minn.. April J3 
The Herahl ■ -- M' ""^ ■"!! 
atlng for ti 

J. I ; ■ ' ■ L 1 ■ , . 1 lia \ rr.' 1 111 ay .uai l ui - 
,,,.;. ^ . no ui !■■ about LOOu 

,yj,.„ A- .IS tiie Light crews are 

put on ', , ■iH.re nu n will be em- 

ploved. A strong wind yesterday car- 
ried rnosi .f the ice down the river 
and the spring drive will soon start. 

With the exception of the iMamouU 
Mairh companv. which has abandoned 
ti.ir plant heie, all the industries in 
tbe citv are in full swing and with 
go. d prospects ..f .-iri.dy employment 
fer all. Tliere is marked activity In 
all lines. 



Baglev. Minn.. April 23.— (Special to 
Tiie Herald, i—^"^"! Id has been received 
frf.ni St. Paul that the special road 
appupriatiC'ii of flo.oOO for the con- 
struction of a goi'il rnad frt>m rtairley 
tc I'ark Raj.ids. via Itasca Park, 
passed botii houses and haa been ap- 
pri'ved bv the governtr. 

The commer« lal clubs of Bagley and 
Paik Ra:iids are to have charge of the 
appointments of superintendents ti> 
look aftei the construction of the 
road. 

Charwater countv will add $1' oiui to 
this appropriation — througii road funds 
of the cominis»:ii>ner districts and towns 
afiected and through whi.h «he road 
will pass. ^^ 

CASS LAKE (OLNdL 

RE( ONSIRERS ACTION. 



GOPHER HINTING. 



M. 11 



I' 



.\}.! 



Alonzo 

• >•',■ a 



and 

: I • left 

wound. Medi- 

<~u!iunoiied, bui 

^■' ^Ti-Mt that 
(.. S\\\f ilu- 

... . lie ll\e'l 



GAINED NINETEEN POUNDS 
IN TEN WEEKS' TIME 

Rapid Development of Texas Boy Due to New 

Cooper Treatment. 



CLOQUET YOUTH 
HAS CLOSE CALL 

Drags Shotgun Through 

Fence After Him, the 

Weapon Going Olf. 



Cass Lake, Minn.. April 23.— iSepcial 
to The Herald. I — At a meeting <•! llic 
village council Wednesday evening, 
the elertion of Clia'ies Argall as vil- 
lage altornev wnn reconsideretl anil it. 
M Funck was elected. At a meeting a 
week ago Attomev Argall was <ieclare<l 
elected hut l« was afterwards noted 
th.-it the vote of the entire count 11 was 
not taken. A protest was piesenie.l. 
with the result that the former motion 
w:i« lost. The councllmen then ba- 
ll. led for an attorney, with the result 
received 3. Argall 



that Funck 
[ Smith 1. 
I'ollceman 
pointed f'O- 



I and 



Breweriette was 

another term. 



reap- 



UriNi Y MINER KILLED. 

( OMPANION I^ IN.U RED. 



WISCONSIN BRIEFS 



Ashland — By a decision of the state 
supremo court, handed down Tuesday. 
.Mrs. Anna Lind will get $4,000 from 
th<^ Uniform stave factory for the di-ath 
of her husband, who was killed l'>' 
falling into a vat of boiling water at 
the companv's plant here last summer. 
Madis<m — The senate committee on 
transportathm has favoraldy reported 
the Lofknev bill, requiring interurban 
cars to be heated to a lemperature ot 
not less than 6o degs. between Oct. 
15 and April 15. 

Manitowoc — Bonds furnished the city 
bv its treasurer must cover funds de- 
posited in banks and guarantee the 
citv from hss in event of failure of 
the banks. This decision was reached 
bv the council when it refused tlie bond 
of a bonding company wliich did not 
cover bank deposits. 

Eagle River--Eugene Hull. 2*. ■ < ars. 
aitemiited to commit suicide by stab- 
bing liimself over the heart. 

Milwaukee — Relatives of Mrs. Martin 
Rude who was buried March 30 from 
ber home, have asked to have the body 
exhumed and the district attorney has 
started to investigate the circumstan- 
ces incidental to the woman s death. 
The relatives fear that Mrs. Redes 
death was not entirely due to heart 
disease as indicated in the certificate. 
Fond du Lac — Fred Hunter, the ne- 
irro murderer who escaped from the 
Northern hospital at Oshkosh. was 
recaptured on the Wisc<.nsin « entral 
track in the town of Byron by ( on- 
staVde Charles I'eters and a section 
foreman named Andrew Collins Tues- 
day afternoon. 

Merrill— John 
awarded 56.200 
of an eye in his 
Stange company 
$5,000 was tiie 
jury. 



.'onsolidated mills, has tendered his 
resignation to become effective May i. 
Edward Koepel. for the last five yeart: 
assistant superintendent of the rn- 
nioui.iain mill at Bfacon Hili. has been 
appointed superintendent of the con- 
solidated mills. 



DAKOTA BRIEFS 



Nelson has been 

damages for t h^- !oss 

suit against the A. H. 

In a for til' I trial 

amount fixed l.y tlie 



Di<kii..-on, N. I '.—A ciiange in the 
stock holdings of the tiiadstone State 
bank has recently been made. Tlie in- 
terests of Mr. Ri.hards were purchased 
bv L A Kimpson. and he in turn dis- 
poned of the Rlchaids- stock to Senor 
Ferdinand Leutz of Hebron, henor 
Leutz will succeed .Mr. Richards as Mce 
president and director:. Tjie officers 
will remain the same, with Mr. Simpson 
av president and A. L. Ritt as cashier 

nrand Forks N. D.— It is P7'}';«J'l^ 
that Abner Brown, who was charged 
with a serious crime in which a num- 
ber of young girls were involved, in 
h s citv. may be deported to <'anada 
Brown s now in iail here, but wealthy 
sisters of his. who live m Canada, 
have appeared and are working in his 

^*^Far^f^o N D.— Bids for the sale of tlie 
f 100. 000 bond issue rcientiy autliorized 
bv the voters of the city of largo, or 
.'nv part thereof that i^^'f^'^ary to 
niHke the improvements planned by the 
nf? comic", will be rer;eived by the 
citv auditor up to May 3. , ,. „ „ 

Janiestown. N. D.— While stealing a 



ride on the westbound North r , ■ t 
Limited, Tiiesdav evening. Johr. 
Potarnick. a vouih of i9 who resides 
at Portland, dr., received Injurlts near 
Medina tliat resulted in the amputation 
of his right let: a few inches aboy« 
the knee, at ai .. : ' • ■'• '"■•- :i < • !r<. y 
morning. 

Fargo. N. r>. — Rev. J. .*-•. I't Lciig, 
pastor of the Broadway M. E. church. 
has resigned and in .rune will *>egin 
the pastorate ot the Albion Iowa. Meth- 
odist Episcopal churchy He will be 
succeeded by Rev. S. S. Wyand. the 
present pastor of the Albion. Iowa, 
cliurch. tiie two pastors sirnj.lv ex- 
changing pulp.'- '• • -*■ '» 

effective June 1 

Grand Foiks N. I.— Anl..n VJf.*'^r^ 
one of the former well known C.i.md 
Forks bu-iness men. is here i'^'"' *^'''e- 
gon He left Tuesday for Baudet e. 
Minn., where he has business inteievts. 
Mr. Ekern likes the country la ^ '♦-»<;:'"• 
hut still holds a warm siot under nis 
vest for the Red River vailey country, 
wliich he says is iiard to »•«•;•*• 

Minot. N. D.— In view ,.f th^ f-nti- 
cism of the street grading contracts 
Alderman Anderson, al the .rneeting_of 
the council Monday evening, urged 
that a committee be appointed to c*-^" « 
up the street grading cor,nact« <f the 
last rear, to see if the estimaf 
city engineer were fair. 

Grand Forks. N. D-— The </ 
the construction of tlie adciT 
V R. Jack auditorium wa- ■ 
day afternoon to <"onlia' i 
& "Pansgaard fci J- ^' 



■m 



f the 



•S\\: 



. lo 

il \ 



III., .Spril -■;'.. I >l 
,d .li.hli .N'ehlbc -•! t 

\ :i \ iUi of .1 f.,1 lu:i.iti- a. . .- 
i-torv of v\luch !ia> just been 
..v.ii.g lo the young man's 
about lelhafj; of the .-i fi'a i ;•. 
Saiurday lie rciurned 



■ici 1 ■■ 

br'^ugi-, 

I- 
i 



,'!< r>\v.. 



I 



th- 



iiait; 
: ' .r luei i\ 1 > . » V. •■ - - - ■' 
,t Hovi^toii. Ttxa^. but 



.itili ll\'«-'- oil 



i lu. 



". ..^l Ui, attai k 

!' tht st*'n'...!'h 



;. I 



reined,. 



. ri\' (li I ■ iL fail' d to 

l,( ■''-■. try Cooper's 

X, had been highly 

)■,,,,; Mil. .i.'i. ,; ..nsil,de pHrsoiiB. 

1 • , ,.-. ru. t \.i>-,-- ., \vl;en I say his 

(hanged for the belter the 

' Uiiy vv« gave him the ('ooper 

ai"m ■ -'. iii.i'i ' \ cnit lit 

■ .,,- .. .. ii^'ht t. 

v; . ! \\ <;ie thoroughly 

lite Increa-^ed, he 

,:... ^,,,i:.-.. ' '"'' """'I t.ega,n to 

plax anil ■ nd heaJth. 

Wo" Lav. ,,■■'■ t"' '-■ ■" •■:'>' about 

f<ii A'.ks. by whi- was en- 

, , ,.\-.-r( (1. ii> i~ now three 
I ;,i,n ",( iglis forty pounds. 
(Is he . nineteen 

^ iking ti , . r medi- 

cine, 

s.l (h . '■ r-.itcful for what 

N", u I : V has done for 

I (].! n>t bolleve 

th us now were 

.■1 iiu diciii' 
'.■erv is II'-' 
all drui .ere. It 

n t.i - • - '■: • i>.-re. A 

ipon reciuest 
:v, ,, ,,. .,.,..,. .-.^.,,^ .... 1 er Medicine 

but . corijpany, Lujlon, uiuo. 



( • i ( . . 1 1 1 ' 1 

T!.. II. r. 
was lb e 
dent tl" 

lent !l»''l. 
I ' lu * nc< 

Last 

loime with ills hand m a oandai . 
marking that he liad hurt il i.ia.Miig. 
His trjustrs were badly torn, an-l the 
mother \' . - lo.i ijuite satisfied with 
tlie stor\. Aft* I leferrmg to tlie suV>- 
HCt a number of limes, the boy finally 
owned up to liaving had an accident 
with Uis. shot gun. He had been mint- 
ing rows in a nearby field, and while 
endeavoring to crawl up on the birds. 
«,< a« to hide l.elilnd a stump his 
ich he was pulling after him. 
, ,1 tearing away part of his 

tiou^ers at ' ip and also takine 

his ihumb !f but Ijesides a few- 

scratches on :, s hainl. tlie shot did 
no further damage. , . , , 

Nehlhe vvlio is 1. year.s 'dd. declares 
that he will never drag another gun 
alon:? the ground after hiin. Had Hie 
«iirection of the gun been an inch 
eitlifr wa\, amputaiion of eitlur arm 
or leg \^. aid undoubtedly a-., fol- 
lowed. 



Cahimet. Mich.. April 23.— (Special to 
The Herald, t — Fall ing rock in No. *« 
shaft cd the Quincy mine instantly 
kilW-d .Nat Eystanen. aged IT. and serl- 
oiislv injured Jidin Var.ti. 



DILITHIAN L(M>KS 

ABOUT FOR POTATOES. 



Greenbush. Minn.. .April 23.— (Special 
to The Herald. I — Jfdin Roise ot iHiluth 
has been driving through the country 
the past week in search of potatoes. 
While not getting the <iuality of pota- 
toes desired, Mr. Rt>ise has used his 
lime profitable in talking the p«itato 
tiuesiion to the fartners and we hope 
thev will follow his advice and put 
in potatoes this season. There is no 
question but that they can be success- 



roR 





Ml( H DIT( HINO PLANNED. 

Towns Xortheast of Thief River 
FaHs to Drain I^and. 

Thi. f River Falls. Minn.. April 23, — 

,<,. : ,; to The Herald.)— Ditching 

are being planned by tlie 

,- 1,, the section of ciuintry n<>rih- 

! ct this fity, and as soon as the 

I'.ist leaves die groutid several large 

("ontracts will be let. A number of 

Ifrmers are also combining to buy 

smaller ditching machines that are 

'.rdlnarilv used by contractors, and 

Willi Uie'sse macluuea will soon have 



lead 

& Catarrh 




USE 



meea 



Oil 



Pour a teaspoonful of Omej^a Oil 
in a cup of boilirg water, hold the 
mouth and nose close to the cup, an(3 
inhale the arising steam. The steam 
carries the healing properties of the 
Oil into the tliroat and lungs, giving 
quick relief. AIpo rub the nose and 
iorfeheaU with th« OU, iOc. , 25c. 50c 



PENINSULA BRIEFS 



,Munisiiig-.-lmporiant alterations aie 
in progress at the big plant ot the 
Munising Leather company The 
manufa.lory is being converted into a 
drvliide sole leather tann»-ry. At tne 
same time tlie plant is being tn'^rged. 

Calumet— Isaac Bjorklund ot -'^l',<^'"«: 
was arresttd Wednesday on compla nt 
of a man name.l Kakela. .-harged wlln 
kteping barmaids m his place ol busi- 
nes..; contrary to the state law Jus- 
tice Tialhen. before whom the case 
was brought', on hearing the M^a of 
not guilty, ^et April 27 as the date lor 
the examination. • , , , 

rshpeming-Peter F tzpatrick o l.^h- 
peming, deputy state building and fac- 
torv inspector, will recommend to a 
nui^ber of the church societies ol the 
upper peninsula that complete changes 
be made in the main entrances to their 
houses of worsliip. 

Hougliton— L. A. Dravel. South SiTi.re 
ii< kei agent, left Wednesday tor a visit 
t his home at Tomi-h. Wis. From 
there he goes to Merrill. Wis. During 
Ml Dravers absence. C. H. Frear will 
look after the duti« s at the local sta- 

"*Hancock— All of the bids received for 
water pipe by ihe board of public 
works f.rr furni-^hing water pipe for 
the proposed extension ef the water 
'vstem In West Hancock, were thrown 
out bv the council Tuesday night and 
the bbard of public works authorized 
to advertise for new proposals. 

Laurium— Arrangements are being 
made bv the secretary of the Laurium 
firemen's committee, Harry Hermann, 
"engage Prof. Martin of the Martin 
Balloon company of Petoskey lor as- 
cersion here during the week ot the 
upper penincula firemen-.- tournament 
Cflluniet — Bernliardt Wikman died 
at ifi- home at 2322 County Road Tues- 
dav aged 24 vears. Tuberculosis was 
tlte" cause of death. The decedent has 
been h" a hospital at Buffalo fe-r some 
time. He was brought bacK lo Calu- 
met six weeks ago. , . ^ ^ „ ,„, 

Ho.ighton — F G. Coc"-!" "^or p 
ber of years head ol Ihe Copper Ran«« 



World's Most 
Beautiful Fair 

Thai's what they claim for the big fair at 

Seattle, and, best of all, it will be open on 

time. Make your plans now to spend your 

vacation seeing the Pacific Northwest and the 

Alaska-Yukon- 
Pacific Exposition 

June 1 to October 16 

It is a world's fair in e\'ery sense. Exhibits from 
all nations. To see it is a liberal education and a 
lasting delight. 

$50 Round Trip 

T>,ilmh to Senttle. Peruana, ana ail ^""'> >'»,r'?,^ S°'' 

rrrtkulars and les.rve accommodations from 

FRED A. HILLS, 

Northern Passenger Agent, 

432 West Superior St., Duluth. 



!i|_ 



National Irrigation Con- 
gress, Spokane, Wash. 
August 9th to i4th, 1909 



Kose Festival, Port- 
land, Oregon, June 7tb 
to 12th, 1909 



4 



flAll^^ 




I 



:■ 

' 
1 



■Ill 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: FRIDAY, APRIL 23. 1909. 



19 




■ .« |. I I H II Il Mfci". 

I 



•.•M> . 



FOR MEN'S 
FINE SUITS 

AniAL VAIXI- TWENTY 

DOLLARS. 

BEST IN AMERICA. 

THE GREATEST 
SUIT SPECIAL 





BOAT CLUB FOR 
VfEST ENDERS 

Much Talk of Such an 

Organization is Being 

Heard. 

(' .nshl.t.ilil.- la'k i.i KotnK on of the 

• .1-^ iiiizaiiMii Mf a Wi-st ' ' '■I"'' 

,111 .jU'-iiiiii was 
, but ilic iiialter 

I ur ..I.-., .i Lt..' k-e lius .ii.-ai.i»eari<l 
fruni tlie buy. ur:d many lauucli own- 
ers aiP BettUiK tlieir boats out. > es- 
UT.lav Joliii Aloir launtlu-d til.s oraft, 
iinil many utliers exiK-< t to do the- ?ame 
1i:m'h\ oi' t'liiiorrow. 

At' tht' front of tii. I. -athouse at 
Twentv-Iir.st avt-ntie w^sl a large <Je- 
(xslt of mini has aotumulated in front 
Mf tl.r d'H kJf, t-auaoi by shiftinK cur- 
i-.Mils in the bay. This will have to 

he diw< away bwfor.' ^^i .f llie hoal.-; 

» an be taken out. 



"lot! i:\tr lliui l»re>«MiltM! to You at This 
Time of the Year. 
GIIKAI IX VALIF AM* HHKAT I\ ASStUHMFNT. 
A CSREAT OPItJIlTlM-n »X>H FC ONOMIZlNt. 

Tnti are invlttHi to vte\%- the rlothts we [-r -s.-m as truly fash- 

■ r this spring and summer. 
V,, mk .luaUty " 'i. ffi.shlon, which staim.s ..ur i.rr).luct...ii> with 
,i,.j i.iHl.imy. Th made for us and thert- an- none betttr . 

We sell the best Suit for Boys in Duluth, at 
$1.50, $2.50 and $3.50^ 



Save half a di>llur i>n y-.ur h:it Buy^U heft 



rnion nun. u.- as 



atly f'T you. 



Coirie t'nii>ii.)\v 



THE MODEL 

CLOTHING STORE, 



•NO PL.\( K IJKK nrilTH.!' 
Fonnor \\ t'>t Eiider Sa>> Tlii^ City 



^ Only Ton II. 



illth 



17 \vi;.sr .stPiiiiioK stki.it. 




!i.) (ilari- on eartli lik-' l>ii- 
• ■ i;ii. i-i-i.ii .'f Tvv ''n- 
lic'th a\-:iu.- vvf.'il ami l-'ii-i stii'.-t. 
Hii has iii>t ffturned after i vai .s 
.-^lay ill \\ . sL. Ill Alheita. 

A'cur.liuK; tu Air. Krickson. ti"' i»'- 
|)orl.>< tiiai iiidur*' many tu «<> to Wesl- 
.•rn Canada are liigliiy colored, and tlit- 
i...s.-^jbililita of mu.sliroom wealth aio 
few. Mr. Ilrickson wa.s in tin- plum- 
l)ing bu.Hin. v< 'Ai.' II '-■ l«ft Pii'.iith for 
the West. , , 

H'j InleiuLs to build a liunn- Ihi>- ;ui'l 
rt-nialn in the WeMi »-nd. 



Fiinuer Ihiliitliian H«'re. 

II. Webb, r.-rmerly ul th.- West end. 
but M->w ol Glindon. Minn., is vi.-^iting 
hi.s iinele, GeorKe Jewell of llie L • 'S. 
l>htrk. Mr. Webl> >> «< 'ince a printer 
.ii>l u;i.s fui-rii.-i' loyed at Tiie 

lieiald. 11. '.^aw liiie <.f work. 

however, oi ■.nut ol Uis health. anU 

beeamt- inl«t. si.-d In I'arminK. He has 
a valuable pieee of land near Superior. 
l.a.Ht wf.k 1h> was in eon.-<ultation with 
:i land ,:ar<lener of Mlrineapoli.'*. 

j,s he i planting trees on his 

pn.pi-r! j . 



c 



cm BMEfB 



3 



Quick work by 



CoinpuMitlun. 

Thwins-ritt wart Co. 



t 



I ^' h f 



MliiUlll*" rnilv It'ill 

hy ttu- '/. 
'i '" " ■ ,11 >i,;i' 

r't. Tl 

1... .i-s.attt tiui- u... 
be 25 cents. 



Will 



|4> I irnt 



Mwv«M» 

N H. U'Ml 
a famUlHi ■ amon. 

«trei'-f nn,-i ■ , will ni-- 

\\ ■ "^ -.1 slr«:::.,-l Mav 1 



street. 



\)riri .1. r 



111 



M. J 



rior 

:t! to 



s of 

,hti:,-r. 

! X ti-t-nth 



avenue e,;. ■■' 
Ing. Til.- .,1. 
vt Mrs. W . 



ni- 
I • 

1 : 



1 1 -i u- i 1 : 



'1 - 

anKf- 
,\t Hi. 

.-. 1 1 ; bi 



M- 



It r 
Wt 



Uitlter Tiirle'i* »»Ii«I.t Oleit, 

I ' 11 !e..* I'etre l^ovelL 
U t.T Turie of Duluti 

■ Mier-iet. Kng.. -M'* 



18- 
It 



UMtiarri UhIIv}- 

Riehar.l Bailey, wh. 
thite wt-ek for appen-h 
hoijpital by Dr. W II 
to Improve an<l will 
hf about town 



Impro^'rM. 

was opera t«^d on 
•iris at .^t. Luke's 



M 






.1 tinues 
.ible to 



Tm LIT 

€»% Oat 
•Ldterti 



ill- ■ -•,,.:■ 

d 

vi\ .'.i '■ 

fuiieral 

.,)■ clock ;^.. 1 

Kin 111. "ih Ky 

Interment \\ 

tery. 



Mn*. MilpolM 
KvH Siipola. *: 



' '-re. 
••r 



yea I 
hom 

men. S' : - 

...^ ,, chihii ••■ ' 'le 

will be ii.i.i ai I 

afternoon l'r...ii the 

, ' l.uth-raii ■ •-"[-■■h. 

a Park liil! t'.,'int- 



Tll.T. 

of tht 
nn-nt 

n 1 ' I n t 



llillsiders \MU Meot. 

. will b.- a im-etliiK thi.s fvi-iiing 

W.yt Knd Hlll.si.ie Improve- 

club. and the matter of tlie Fied- 

avenu..- gradinyr will l)e takt-n up 



t.u con«lderalioii. A i.etilion a.sking 
that the gra<le on tliat avenue be cut 
<li,wn so as to permit the pa.ssage of 
<ire. t . ar.s a.n far a.s Tenth street, has 

I II Sim. 1 by a larg.- number. The 

;,i,,p...-<iti..n will probably come up be- 
h.rc thf next meellnK ot lli*' council. 



Hoist's (Jo to Canada. 

A liitw li umber of lioracs are being 
-!..hl in iho WVsl end and are being 
Hbippe.l to Canada, where they are 
bringing good jirices. A team from 
one of the ttre halls was tlie last paii 
to go being shipped ye-sterday. Many 
of tlie liorse.x tliat ar.* purchase<l for 
this purpose liave conn- in Irom the 
W(>'.'''= f''''»'ii t ly. 



IDFY 



Word Kmch Iiii»*rtl«»ii — X« 

Iseiurut l.eitu Tlimt 15 t'entw. 

^'^^■' "" " "^^ ~\s haIu 

Fourtli 



i:ts. 



The 
and Wl 
took pi 



111. 



«iunili>y-liuul. 

w-Hldfng of Mi..;H Maty .-iiindhy 
I' . Hunt, botli ot tlii.s city, 

i.-rdav afternoon at Hu- 
ait Is a well known local 
with his bride left I'or a 
Tl.fv will later rvturii 
wii.-'..- tiov will be at 
L-iUltnn wa,s a very nuiei 



:\i 



i 1 ■ 

a: .1 
! I- ! 1 •. 

■it •.' 
: ^ f w 



li l,>e«l. 
and r* 

;.,1 at "nue. 



"Thr <oiiiii' 

Hugo C, (tall- 
known >^ 

the ma I, ''T 

.a;.' !!;■ 



Ill 



McKay 

.11 m.ii-e 
(".lunt." 
of tlie M 

■- ' . Lo u 



Mbop. 

familiarly 

-sullied 

barber 

..-. -ta.p t" 



iii^ new i>..--iiion. 



Ill 



TH)-: H,i:.<T 



IN 



THK 

sli..p. 

Tta.if. 



Kionilnntioii i«« t" ••nnil.v. 



lent of 

: I < vis. 



all 
Fiat 



W Ay VIA 



li). 



*> 



si 



H 



vv i I i 1 



Hoit- 

dmi; 

: ■ H 1 1.- 

1 > U - 



ii.>u,scv. urk. llui* uomi< 



XHuriintH \rr.-,'««»-d 



W est End Slioitralls. 

liank Htnden ..f St.'v.'n.s I'oinl, Wis.. 
i^ thf Kill St of his brother, Joseph 
H.-mUn of IS'H Wfst First !«treet. 

.losi-ph Nacey left for Virginia la.«t 
( v.,uing on a short busine.s.s trip. 

The Uni.jue Social club gave a danc- 
ing partv last evening at (.'olumhia 
hall. Till' party was succcs.if ui. many 
atlendiiK 

K B. Warm r ol Hiainerd was a busi- 
ness visitor at I he West «-nti yesterday. 

Miss t'lara Marsh of -6J'J t'ourtlaud 
<ii..l ha.s rtturned from Baylicld. 
wlicre she has been visiting friends 
and relall\ts. 

Mrs. KkblH.1 of :i-0 West Second 
street has gone lo Scandia. Kan., when- 
she will visit her mother for a montii. 

Miss Angeline Fuerfey of Cleveland. 
Dhi'.. i" the guest of West end friends 
ari'' tvfH. 

1 .ng ladies of the First Swed- 

-;h i-.aiMist duirch will meet thl.s eveu- 
ins "I I he liome of Mrs. .John Nurd of 
■til;; West Tiitrd street. Arrangements 
mav be completed at this time for the 
coming May festival. 

Ed Nelifon came down from \ i^nia 
vesterday on a short visit. 

William McClure left yesterday for 

Barnum. wliere he will l)e employed 

during the next few months. ^ ,. . 

\ nuaitcrlv meeting of the Ladies 

the First Norwegian- 

I . Inirch was held last 

evening, at tlte churcli. The speaker of 



. A. 

K'l 



tlie evening 
who gave a 



work 

Were 

"Na 



in 111' 



was Kcv. 

short talk 
churt'li. 



W. Schvenius 
on the ladies' 
llefreshments 



I U.K. 

,-i,lri.i 



r 



ra.. 



Thir 



F' 



.M 



• i: 

exchai 
stand::! 
i , 1 1 i 1 1 .,■ ) , 



.SAM' 



TWO 



• ■ lor - 

i' ••a-jt, 
\\ 11, \T V 



M- 

-iii-:i> 

»t 1 -S I > 

.1. nr. 

. ter- 



ii..llUllK I"' 

ollce thouu 

liir-- tui I hem either • 
w.iik or g'l to jail. 
nuiUv in ittunlcipal coin i _ 
and wa.s ordered out of 



I line p.i 
was ab 



».. 



-!'"-•■' 



i of lai.- ! 



U ill >ot l*ln> ill lliiliilh. 



two. - 



.V hi. 



i: vi.r 



U.,.-:ald. 



t; 

.4htii 



I rorn 



Ma nailer t ". .\ 
book 



urn 

• h.. 



to 

biiiT 
I'll 



& 



New 

H..,i I 



Vork, 

ih- I 



.Ml- 



I..-, 
the 



ded 



^.•iil. 



.M.n- 
•The 
Er- 

thi!=t 

' "day 

' \"ed 

all- 

II a,r- 

larse 



^le 



the .su"j>-i 
red Sunday 
churcli by 
be 



h.is been 

I .o a leelure to 

at tlie St. Jean 

John H. Norton. 

given under tht 



.XT'Ss 



IHiLISH, 
Hill 1 i. 



Mil a 111 |. 

of flrs 



ALP 

icuring 

ajlr g' 



TREATMENT. 

- :?. stock 

ide to 



aT..|-s. 

IF 
>t .iml 

igan'-s. 



:atie.s. 



Moi 



Th 



Knterlniu J«« ( nrdt 

•••'I < .■ !.-nipl.'. .\'". ,.",'. 



i-taiii their members 
id^ in K. Ol l". hall 



•iiin« 



Tradrii 

! •■!.; II la! 



AMMriiility If ret Ing. 

hi- wet kl v ni.-.-i i 



of 



li 



lui 



■pliones. 12a 1st 



our 



furn- 

Avti W. 



.1." 

J a 



li 



MARRIAGE^ LIC^^NSES^ 

• \n niche r and Anna i idegaard. 
k Ilanka aii.i Anna ICnil t iiib.n. 



BIRTHS. 



liali. A number 



1 1' 



will come before th. 



.Ill maltei's 
'.atioii. 



for \ iile 



ha mile 
.spaiilii 



(;riidniite«. 

,- at the 
litig .111 

-■'.' ■■tu I , !;■ 



I lead 

g I >■ n 1 1? 
at 



of 

it 

tile 



Treamiirer fhoweii. 



ii'irn t 

■■ I, M !•: 



ami Mrs. 
aue east. 

I Mr. and 

ist Tentli 



Ihi.S I! 

Irea-siii' 

s»-frf'f ai \ ..i ' •<•' 

UK r The meinb 

, .i....\ . I,.. 1 1ll', 



11 V. I 



■ I 
i .-d 
:va. 



I-i 



a 1 1, t i M 

a%''*i!, lie 



>[ I. 

Ml 



lo Ml. 
; Ninth 



BUILDING PERMITS. 



,st 

Ht 



tlW ■ 



dwelling 



•■I.. 
,i,h 



ll.iHh) 



600 



3.500 



2,000 




i i,>pi>'l ni 
ipon th 



Oi^L 



D 



1 '-J. 1,) t 

The lecture will 

ispics of the French Naturalization 
.V iiui-ua! program will al-no be 

.; I > en. 

.V verv imiiortant in. •.•ting of the par- 
l.Hliion>-rs .>f the St. Luke's Kpisctjpal 
church will be held tliis evening at 8 
o'clock, at tlie church. Flans will he 
,. It line, I for tiie ensuing year. Every 
mtinber of the congregation Is urged to 
att.oid 

'I'iu- h.iys of tlie Ad, iiool are 

looking forward with much interest 
to tlie apprtiaching inler.'icholasttc fitd.l 
meet. Every evening a number of 
I hem get out for training. The meet 
will be held some time In May. 

The infant child of Mr. ami Mrs. 
fhail.v- Larson died tills morning at 
th. 1 iinilv residence. lHi;r. West Second 
sirt ft The funeral will take place 

tomorrow afternoon from F'orward's 
umlertaklng jiarlors and the Interment 
will he at I'ark Hill cemetery. 

Rev. Teter Beckstrom will occupy 
the pulpit Sundav morning and even- 
ing at tlie First Swedish M. E. church. 
Tliird street and Twentieth avenue 
nest- Sunday school will be at 10 
' 1 the mt)rnlng. 

Iberg. who has been engaged 

,..iu. time past In the house- 

, ,1 iiiig business in the West end. has 

..,v,,, .11. this line of work. Mr. Wel- 

1„ ^ built a large number ot 

h li the West end. 

The Central Butter & Egg company 
has moved from IK06 West Sup-MUir 
St net Into Its new warehouse and of- 
ft e building at Nineteenth avenue west 
and Miciiigan street. 

Arihur Johison and Albert Peterson 
have returned from a fishing trlii about 
nve miles up Miller's creek. Mr. Peter- 
son landed twenty-one speckled 
Ueaiisies ami seventeen were hauled in 
hy Mr. .lohnson, Fishing, they say, is 
n.ii v. 1 y good as yet. 

Th lore Uahljem, a West end baker 

is a ship at 2419 West Third 

s the report that he runs 

.-iiiip anil tdaims th.at his 

le union men. He furthermore 

, . . ,ioes not attribute the burning 

.1 hat. li of hanlfaek to the union- 

i . it was rumoretl. stuffed up 



Extraordinary Announcement! 

— A Message From Our Wholesale Department — 

$1,000 Worth ot Traveling Mcn*s Samples In Ladles' Tailored 



Suits, Skirts Ete., to be elosed out at wholesale prices and less 



O 




UR TRWEIING REPRESENTATIVES are thn^ugh for the Spring .^^eas-.n nml have just turned in 
their sampk^s. consisting .d" latest styles iti Ladies' Tailored Suits. Ladies' Tailored Voile and Panama 
Skirts. Ladies' fine Lingerie and Lawn Wash Dresses. Ladies' Lingerie Lawn and Net Waists. Misses 
KMI and Children's Spring Coats and Infants' White Cashmere and Pique Coats. »...:^t« 

Wese Inplef !nly o^e o^r two of a kind, are tn perfect condition (with the --^^^'^Z\"or^c^"\^t^ P-fe 
being slightly mu.ssed) a.id might have been put right into our retail stock and sold at full P""^' ""^^ ^^ l\'l^[ 
to give our patrons the benefit of this extraordinary opportunity to se.:ure a styh.h Sprmg garment right 
height of the season, at a price that will mean a saving of nearly halt. 

This Great Exposition ol Spring Fashions 

T.. which we invite you. will be one of the rare treats of the season— an .opportunity 
skirt, jumper suit'or shirt waist at prices representing a saving ot nearly halt. 






Uj secure a stylish suit. 



TAILORED SUITS 



Snappy up-to-date 

Panamas, Serge. 
^\'orsteds; sample 

price 

Worth to $20. 



style? 

fancy 

sale 



come in 



plain 



$12.50 



TAILORED SUITS 



In best of materials— Panamas. Serge and 
Xovelty Worsted, beautifully taU'^rcd^ntljit.^- 
fect in fit and finish from ^ ' '^ 

our best P'astern makers; 

sample sale price 

Value to $35 



tail.ircd and per- 

$18.50 



Sample Line ol Separate Skirts! 



There are ab..ut one hundred in the lot, consisim^^ of line imported Voiles. Chitlon P,^"^ "^^•.,^^;^'-^^.f,^ 
plain an.l fancy Worsted.s. .\11 made in the latest and most approved models. St.me '" P'^'" ^•l>l^;7*^^,^'Vi 
rdf trimming effects others with .satin folds and button trimmmgs-a most magniticent la ge ot Muart 
style^-mily^ of a kind. We shall arrange the lot into groups and each group will be a revela- 

tion in money saving possibilities. Group 3— Ladies' Tail- Group A — Ladies' fine 

Group 2-Ladies' Tailored 2''A.^^''''' ^'^^''^'^ «i'q*m ^^^'^' ix''si\ 
Skirts, worth fij CA ^^OA^ (Jt7 50 ^}^^' $10.50 



Group 1 — Ladies' Skirts; 
worth to $5, 1^9 QQ 
choice ^AmUO 



M $7.30. at 



$4.50 



choice 



, \V. >l III l«J 

$7.50 



i 


^ 







ch.M 



ICC 



A GREAT SHOE EVENT! A MIGHTY MONEY-SAVER! A Combination MANUFACTURER and 
JOBBERS' SAMPLE SHOE SALE and OPENING of our new and enlarged shoe department, now located 
in rear of our Men's and Boys' Furnishings Section. 

$1,000 Worth of Men's, Women's and Children's 
Shoes, in Every Style, at Wholesale Prices 




Sale Begins Satur- 
day at 9 o'clock — 
None Sold Before 
That Hour. 



I 



r 



The.e are the sample shoes that ^'^^ ]^'''-tl>'-''-" Shoe company s 
traveling men carried on their last trips, and are all 19<W styles. Ik 
sizes are mostly medium, and most fec-t can Ik> tiltctL riiere are clip- 
pers, Oxfords, Juliettes. House Shoes. Street Shoes. Dress Shoes, \\oik 
Shoes— in fact, every kind of shoe you would expect to see in large 
wholesale lines. Being the samples, these shoes are finer made than 
ordinary store stock. .\ few pairs may ''^-V^^'^^l^' '""^^^1:''^WF"^A^ 
but otiicrwisc every pair is in prime condition. HERE lb IHE WAY 

THEY GO 



J 



I 



Men's and 
Women's 



$4.00 Sample Shoes . . .$2.90 

$3.50 Sample Shoes . . • $2.40 

$3.00 Sample Shoes . . .$2.10 

$2.50 Sample Shoes . . .$1.75 

$2.00 Sample Shoes ...$1.40 



Boys' and 
Girls' 



The Blue Pencil 
Marks Indicate the 
Low Price During 
. the Sale. 

$2.00 Sample Shoes . . .$1.45 
$1.50 Sample Shoes . . .$1.15 

$1.25 Sample Shoes 95^ 

$1.00 Sample Shoes 70^ 

75c Sample Shoes 55^ 










Slippers lor Men. Women and Children 

$1.75 Samples for $1.25 

$1.50 Samples for $1.10 

$1.25 Samples for 95^ 



For Saturday and Monday Only! 

60c OFF every pair nien^s and 

women's fine shoes — $3.50, $4 
and $5.(XI kinds — regular stock. 



In addition to the samples there will be dozens ol 
extra special bargains trom our regular stock. 



^i>£^ 



PHILLIPS PRIDC. 



Jo/?n J.Moeic^nsCj^ The^ West En 

(fbrmeH^JohmonJiMoe) 



Bid DeR^mentSior^ 



^/if Ave ./^ d Superior St., Duluth^ 





t 



1- 



the 
at 



I for 



In 
tlui 

will 



N.ii'VVftAian iia.s putf"'.'.! 

manuiacturlio? < 
■ !•• trurik.s uf ur •-•i. 
the sap I' 
..f f.ircc . 

IS Clllt.llt*(l 



1 prt»Cf.sH 
wootts. 
ire ct»l- 
ijut by 
injected 
tlittt w.»t>d 
iiucli more durable and 



u'jI vSiAiy. 



.1' 



1 S ! ~ 



DILITH FIRMS 



Duluth liuslnes.s hou.ses .'ire receivini; 
ttie written ctmgratulations of Twin 
I'itv .ununt-rcial houses upon tlie df- 
I, ,. ,,1 the HJorpe tonnajfe tax hill. 
^ ,v ,.-\\<f of the leading commer- 

,1 ;.ses of St. Paul mailed letters 

of ctuiKratulatlon.s to a numher of Du- 
luth houses. The letter contained an 
appretiation of the stand taken by the 
Kovernor and - statement of the fact 
tliat any of the leading houses of the 



two cities were alive to the fact that 
the pa.ssape of the tunnag*" lax bill 
would greatly less.-n the bu.<»iness of 
Twin City houses' in this part or the 
*'late. 

DECISIONS ARE 
HANDED DOWN 

Judge Dibeil Refuses Four 

New Trials and Grants 

Two. 

Tour motions for new trials were ilc- 
nled and two Were granted this morn- 
ing by decisions handed down by Judge 
Dibeil of the di.strlct court. 

.lohn Uag^rart. wlio some tlni". ago 
entered a demurrer axking that he be 
left out of the case tif George Bjelos 
again.st the Cleveland-CliPf-s Mitiing 
(onipany and himself, was refuseti his 
reouest. Haggart was employed as 
.superintendent at the Crosby iniiio 
;il Nashwauk when HJelos was mj ired 
by the caving in of the walls of a 

'* Carlo Malnello, who some tin e ago 
seed l»r. Buwer.s for $1,00'J because 
Powers would not give him pfsst^ssim 
of a building he had rented from the 
doct'ir was awardeil |.'.=) by th.- lury 
in this case Dr. t^kuwers v.-aiitel a 
new trial, on the ground luat the 
tontract had been cancel icl. .'ut!ge 
Dil ell granteil hini a new trial. 

In tti«* cases heard during the last 
tern, of court. of the ln«l*"P<>"; f "J 
Ili-.wing company against C. B. t.uri 
fir monev. the compuny alleged it was 
unable to collect. iKfet the company 
wat awarded JSHtl and y,\-M) in two 
separate cases. One of the cases was 
over an account, the |yi.-r "ver a .wf. 
Judge Dibeil grant.iF% new trial in 

'"'llildiJiK'' Oradinf v ' o brought suit 
Hgainst Dr. J. H, .l.iu lor malpractice, 
and was given notl|ta by the jury, 
wax refuseti a new vtfha» 

Max Wetzler. wl*.-^d the jHy for 
11 ">-, l.ecaiise his b.iWt' backed into a 
uufl'v at Twelfth avenue west, and lost 
hi^ case was refuseti a new trial. 

C.eorge A Toor. v.lioaecured a ver 
■ lie of I1.4110 fronCkf«f^»t.v. for in 

t.ries sustained _bJl t'^"''"f . "" .o"" 
broken sidewalk, n«**)nsent to a re- 
duction of the verdict to $90U or stand 
a new trial. 

KKiHTEKN PKKSONS TAKE 
THK PASTlEliR TREATMENT. 

Bloomington, Ind.. April 2a. — On ex- 



amination of tlie brain of a dog that 
died In convulsions a few days ago, tlie 
medical department of Indiana uni- 
versity, announced today that the ani- 
mal had rabies and seventeen students 
ar.d Prof. Charles Hazeinan will at 
once take I'asteiir treatment. 

BOY TIRNS I P.'tELLS 

, TALE OF KIDNAPING. 



Cincinnati. Ohio. April 23. — Leo Mul- 
hern, a 12-year-old boy. who has been 
missing from his home In this city 
since VVednesdav. appeared In the home 
of his grandfather. I'oliceman Edward 
Uaffertv. in Ironton. Ohio, today. 

The bov told his grandfather he was 
stolen bv" two men and taken to some 



town in West Virginia. He said he 
escaped and came to Ironttjn on a 
Chesapeake & Ohio train. It Is be- 
lieved the boy ray away fr.>m home 
and that no one had a hand in hlb 
disappearance. , 

He disappeared following the receipt 
of two letters by his mother demanti- 
Ing that $30<i be deposited at a litth 
street nickelodeon. The threat was 
made that the boy would be kidnaped 
if the money was not ilep'si t'"!. 

SWEDISH BAND. 

Royal VendesOrpjanization of Stock- 
holm Coming to Duluth. 

The P.oyul Vendes .\rtlllery band 



and orchestra will appear at the Ly- 
ceum Sunday afternoon and evening. 
under the auspices .>! the Svea Glee 
club, and the visit of this fine organiza- 
tion promises to he one of especial in- 
terest among the Swedish people of the 
ilty. The American tour of the band 
has been a most su< cessful one. Miss 
Hilma Mattaon. soprano of the Koyal 
opera house of Stockholm. Is the aa- 
slstant soloist. The concerts by the 
organization have been everywhere re- 
ceived with en tluislaam. 

Your Only Chance to Attend. 

Vendes band next Sunday. Lyceum. 







THREE REASONS 



CORRECT STYLE 

FIT 

ECONOMY 



Tlial's what everyl)0<ly looks for when buy- 
ing .shoes. 

My Shtx's have not Saled and Saled the 
sea of the bargain counter, but every style a 

1;M)9 model 

I always sell Men's and Women s regular 
$:{.r>0 to .$.",.(«) values, for — 




$2.48 and $2 




i 



V 







r 





\ 



^f^immmi^ 



20 




PHE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: FRIDAY, APRIL 23. 1909. 



ihe latest in 
Ladies* Neck- 
wear, 3ic, 
SOc and 75c. 





;eOTT 



O WW o 
18 WEST SUPERIOR STREET 




New thing^A In 
Belt Pins, 
Brooches, 
Bags and Jew- 
elry Novelties 




I^HiiDllDiiiisinf 

M F©pyiar 
Piri©as 

Saturday we put tn ^;l]o 5ti -i'« - 
ci.iN HI Suit .111(1 ht;iutiiully Tail- 
urt(i Mats — I'vcry hat with a dis- 
tinct style, blacks, burnt straws 
and other o-lors $6.50, $7.50, 
$8.50 and $10. 

I'iftv of the most beautiful Dress 
llats-'-hats tliat will compare with 
those that you are asked $15 to 
$20 for. Saturday you can have 
V-nr ch..i.-,- at $10 aiu! 912.50. 

Waiiti m Sal@ M ©m FyirinilsllDDiiDg i©pi 

Ihirtv pure Imcii Tailored \\ai>l>. tucked - worth $3. >i)ecial $2.60. 

I-my TaiIo.!< 1 a:..c1;.^ Waists, 1(1 r.>\vs of tucks worth $2.00, Salurd.ij 
at f 1.50. • $1.25 an.l $1.75. 

Iiiini I landkerchu-f^ at -l** each. 



/rll l>tlM 




CONCERNING Furntturc 



AAT^. 



ADDITIONAL SPORTS 



LEAGUE HAS 
ELECTION 

Commercial Ball Players 

te Have Gala Opening 

of Season. 



Double-Header Will Be 

Played First Week 

in May. 



L. 
Of u 
a ri'i- 
I. - 
r 
t- 
y 
I 



I .Id 



Ut'f ■;'■■■■ 'ill tt'<i 11 



The huu.>*»*u ifi- was puzzled. 

Stioiilil .«he make a rhubarb pie or 
hIhjiiIiI sIk- have strawberry shorieake, 
01 \' • I't It all go and juei have 

any iiuie uiitiK tor dessert, and ins-tead 
leKin -MiirinB houseeleaning by calling 
i Hfthel to see If she eould gel 

a .,j dust I I"* rrisTM or .^Iliiuld J'llO 

du'tli. im-ntlhu va- u- i •■ done, 

Of would islie ttiush thai iittit bit of 
ironlngr tbat was left, or would sht 
rlraii III*' wlntlows, oi ?-h..>u!<l .^iie lay 
out tiat comforter thai liad to bo 
beirun right away, or should .slie let all 
ol thoKo thiuKs Ko and .start in on the 
.•-prinK •'ewinK- Dear knowj* there was 
enough of that to be done, or should — 

The M«res«ity for deei.«;ion was de- 
layed lor a moment, for tliere wa.s a 
knoek at the rear d(>%r. 

The hou.stwife answer, il it. 

"Good niornir .«1 the mwn who 

stood there. 

■'Good morning, .-aid the housewife 
tirietty. Its alwa.\s well, shf tlunk.s. 
ii. !•*■ very brief, especially when they 
1 < iiH- to the I'ack dooi\ 
I 1, ■ .said tl<e man, •am from the 
I Ipoard of healtli and we are trying to 
Kel l>uh)th cleaiKtl up spi> k <iim1 span 
tiefore tin- ^pi'ing is aii>' l;ollufi ad- 
\ a need." 

The houfewil'- MilfttH-d |.< r • ptit.ly. 

•'That's ali nj-'i.t. suid -1 », but 1 
KUfss wc <1. 11 I IK cd any of your help. 
If N-otj'd fii. o> tlie peiit«le who keep 
'• rdH and i.-.o. >■ i i >■ rent of us 
would he a 'r- ■ ' -at <leal more 
!■> u.' point." 'i'hc 11. 'i;-. -Hit. spoke 
< lia t i>i V. 

"1 . ...f Course." sai<t the jn."=|>ec- 

liis money by endeavoiins 



MILLIONAIRE IN 
AUTO KILLS GIRL 

Child Runs in Front 

of Brewer Pabst's 

Car. 



lot 

to piii'ii 1 1- I lie 
mas tree, now — ' 

■•\'- ! 'x.^i let tliat Ctiiisiiua.- 
ji i the woman, sjiarply. 

ti oitliinK worse in town 

• 'hrisimiis tree 1 ku» 

I 



Milu 


n is. April 23.— Col. Gus- 


tav Pii 


iriillioiiairc brewer, while 


dri\''iit; 


:i .Ol auto today, aceldentlly 


ran .!■ ■ ■'■. ^ 


an.! kill.-d Lillie Winkler, a 


1 ■! - ■, 


.1 utrl. iiving at 916 Beecher 


Stl' 




T 


:ned at Lake and 


\l, ■ 


- the girl aligliteii 


rr<Mii a - 


i , t ,. >,i. ..iiil walked in front 


of the r;i 


pidly moving auto. 


Cil- I'a 


list was making a triv> to •''u- 


'.■a v,>'. 





I ,li.n:*ii 



t.-.i :. 



up llic 

it are: 



I 

i 

t 



.-.» repr. - 

... .jf I lie \'k ■ .. 

1. 

whicli gO'verned 
vvUl be III f-.rce 



I I .s will 

„ ie ^ to 

.ioU 14 u lit.: a V. cicLifai ion 



;i I > u I 111 1 1114 

nave good 
r. > arf '■■ '■■•• 

; ■ calf 

L ill the league -ast 

J . . < < u ' 1 . 1 1 f ' of ill e 



MAY MAKE HAINS 
A MERE EXHIBIT 

His Lawyers Wish Jury 

to Decide as to 

Insanity. 



.\ V , April :i:!.— <*apt Peter 

Ir., may he pui "ti tne vvit- 



ca . 

eX; 

ni - 

JU! 



Flus!i:iit; 
" !r-,:.,s. . . 

land by t!u- .1: :.-iis.' in sus tna 
iv.i i..ie killing of William K. Aini;s. 
for tlie purpose of reveal. ng lo tii« 
jurv his mental condition. 

Aiir.ouiiceinent of sucii a po«s,blIity 
was matle by attorne>s for in. ib-fen-se 
today prior to the opening of t:-.- riftii 
dav ''f \',)e trial, (.'apt. llai.i--- fo;iM l..- 
: said, bi-fore any insanity 
put on the stand, as it 
i expedient to give tlie 
• rtuniiy to form their 
own opinions ol the '. '• .hoi't condi- 
tion from personal i!l'>n of his 
conduct under exam mu nun as a wit- 
ness. 

ry. _..: (.^.j, lawyers declare he has 

compreliension of the na- 

iu:. ..I I--: proceedings in whie!v he 
is playing su.'li an important part, :iiid 
.John K. -Mcluiyre, of the deirnse, said 
that if he found difficulty in inducing 
«";u.i Ilains to take tht- siaiid JiCMUlght 
,■ liim in evidence ais an ex- 
1 I lie case, identified as sueli 
on til'* c.iurt record, like any oiio-r 

e.xllit-lt. 



lady. '"'Hut that 
that 



that 

W<Mlliin't !i;:iV 

raiit'ii 
! i^ li t 

•riiat 

spec tor. 
After : 
man. 



any mort <>f a 

- 'iirisima> ti •■• 



.tol. 

W ! . 



1 Mri.^i mas tn ■ 

tirmly. "vvir 

' ':(■ itisp<^<;tt.. 



Jf 

than 

> o u 

.an a 

1 st.iy 

• 

: ..■ I n - 

Ved. 

\- ! I u - 



.i 



tlie 
ou 



Hat 



lluit next do.o 
t,. • e, "an<t 1 tlon't 

c near them " 

i will,' said It 
those aslies In vo;.. 

"TIm's-- ai-' |,(eriecli;> > ■■-:. .i^ii>-'t. 
said iiic u.iiiian. "and y.a needn t 
think \'oii can come aMomd iieie and 
scaring me into moving tho.«e ashes 
uiilii Ini— ' 

"They should !■•- k. pi ii; . 1. 

said Ihe liispeetos. , 

Til ket I' them In a barrel .1 i teei 
like it." .'-aid the woman. 

•■Well." sa;.i the ins|iector "we are 
determined t.. liave Duluth the clean- 
est «ity in* the country, and wed like 
to liavi- vour luli-. Tliose aslies must 
be removed, and alter this they mu.«t 
t.e put in a ban. I .No more dumping 
them on the ground. You understand 
and if vou could clean up ;•'■ pape; 
i,,i,i 1,1011 the stuff tliat '■y.'i ac- 

,. .\ou uoildii't go down on 
l-irst sitcei where you miglit do some 
g..od. said ll<e housewife. "But that t 
alwa\.-* llie way, V- snooping 

ar-oin.l w'lere peopi. , oing their 

,,,, . , ,,' .1 ■ ■ :■•■ ■■ at- 

!■ . . 

... 1 1., . . our 



pi-' \ a le 



1 1 will ft 1 ^ c ihe i 1 1 •> I i 

Itention." said the inspec- 
■d of tiealth will insist 
e t'lok himself away. 

.. ■ > ,(.-. 0:0 l..nt noil. Hut 

pill \v<.imeii isn't 



darn 

to hill 



"I 

itiun. 

tor. 

upon 

Th. 
their 
mucli. 

" IMie 

softb 

Ut.t I 

then 
Of civu 

fluence in p . _. 

Ilftv gives vou a decent greeting at 
tlie" door, let alone an as.surance that 
slie will attend to the matter that you 
■Iraw her attention to. Its always, 
■whv don't vou mind your own business 



I, v.ioi o.is .;.--pector. 

l' ••'111. ink heaven I'ni 

♦., a t.iiii>cr like that, and 

ialk ai.iit women's sense 

responsibility, and her tine in- 

in politics. There's not one tn 



^lAKKiaMUMLLMltS. 

Aiitu («iitt'>ts oil Tennessee Hills 
Prove X'twy Exeitin^r. 

"•, — \t.ril ::::. *vo ', 

Mg tile 

U- hill climl.). 
ftling re.-ord.';. 
lember of the 

vents. 



tilt- edge 
ve of half 



1 o II S 1 1 1 1 1 > 

aped with 



t V\" ■ 



c;ii"^ were 

' ■■ " ■ ■ of 

in 

, . , .-.■.. ■ om 

;i ciuri- ■•m- 

. detiuii and 

I. His hands 

i la ted, but no 



broke 



Jftliii (.. < iiprrn III. 

:-t,..; \i.i',,; -'3. — .John <; ''ap- 
..r internal i- 
' Moial commii ' 

is critically 01 111 

t of afi operation, 

:\ I of the w 'Ted 

hut it \\ to- 

-:,etting .-i-.oiiB ■•> ^vell 
; ed. 



ninupnotH PMKtnmMterH. 

Washingt'' ■■ ^:'i-:i ■_':'..- -1 Special to 
The lleral't ok ll. Lambert has 



SULTAN HAS ON 
COAT OF STEEL 

Wears Gray Garment. 

Mail-Lined, Evidently 

Fearing Bullets. 

« -onslanlinople. .-Xplil .':;. When tlie 
tan drove to I lie mostiue todav for 
,,.> . iisiumary Fiiday devolicui. his uni- 
form tliat of a Held marshal, was cov- 
ered l»v an old gray overcoat he has 
not worn for years. This garment 
conunonlv believed lo have a lining . 
fine steel mail and liis maj.siy < ei - 
tainly looketl tlilcker througii tit- tio'l.\ 
toda.v I ban he does when he i.-- receiv- 
ing I'n the palace. 

At noon the - were thrown ope, 

and the suit ;. eared in hi.* vh 

toria. He drove tee short distan-e • 
tlie mo.s<(ue and at otoe entered o 
his prayers. After ilie completie 
his devotion.- he returned by tlie - 
way he eame and dlsapjteared ihi 
the broad portal into tlie guarded 
cincts of his palace. His maje l, 
progress was marked by an ovation. 

.Vs the sultan drove by the terra 



<r whv don't you go to ilie neighbor." 
Vnd little she knows that the ne«h- 
bors make the same re<iue8t in regard 
tt, p,.r- I'-'Hl women. sa>8 this health 
insp. "can give a civil response 

I,, 11 . |.iest civic laws, as they re- 

late 10 health and ( leanllness. she 
;,lujuld oot liave another single political 

pri\ 

p.; . . ' lit of iiui^:c many w.nnen 

who are always anxious lo do llie right 
tiling in the correct form, the following 
invuuctions Kiven for greeting 

liealtii insp. n llie.r visits. 

Sav "Good :ii. oiling" graeiously, 

Wloti he has nia.te known the matter 
in wliich lie iin.i tlie city of Duluth 
Would like vou to improve your prem- 
ises bv burning old papers, removing 
ashes that have been spilled on the 
Krouml or a general cleaning up. one 
■ThouM ie|dv. "It w:!I he attended to 
at once And thank ^-<i --> much for 
calling our attention With so 

m.mv other things to ■". one is 

so likelv to overlook the^e mtle things. 
Bui we'll have a bonlire t-might and 
the matter will receive our earliest at- 
tention. And I hope that it will never 
I.,' II. V • ...n. 

We !l I! 

Tlieii -,i\ .m,.in. "»o . .1 ii," niiig. also 
grac.i.a>i\ , iiud vou ni^^nl end the 
pleasant 
remark 



lud you 11 
Ml. 1 I..V a simple little 
lie nieasantiiess of the 
- f I he season, 
.11, or .>»ome- 

t.UI'g llKe t 1..-' ^ 

Nevertheh .-^.N .t .'^ .. p-t'.' tliat so 
ni.iiiv iMilutli women aie daily aisplay- 
iiiK I" llie liealtli inspectors shrewish 
tempers, a willingness to evade tlie 
laws of cleanliness and 
ae.' 
t 



civic health. 
-' 'Wing a great tendency to see 
arded Christmas tree in her 



1 



vard 



anil overlook entirely 

■ ,: 1 .1 !!.! papers in 



by 



aee 
dis- 



ot white stone that is used 
tinguished visitors to witness his jias- 

sage to and fi..iii Ihe mosipie. te looked 
-. .' If anv of 111'- ambas- 
<ni None were there, 
had by common con- 
o, remain away. 



In .„ ■ ■ 

the tl?i 

her own 

Imluth women from one end of the 

1 itv to the other, have a fine oppor- 

'. to do a citizen's duty, plea.santly. 

.-iiily and graciously, and its a 

i pii .\ t l.'-y Wouldn't do it. 

■ 

I Theater Party. 

' Ml ami -Mis. L. Al. Uickerson of K'l'l 

Tliird street entertained at a 

i..,ier partv last evening at the Ly- 

eum in lion<M' of their guests. Mr. and 

Mis K C .<teven8 and Mrs. E. C. A\- 

.rd of Washburn, Wis. 

Mi.-'s .Julia Stevens, a daughter of Mr. 

nd Mrs. E. C. Stevens, will take part 

11 an oratorieal contest at the Blaine 

liigh school at Superior this evening. 

Miss Hteven.s won first place at the 

Western dlxlslon o<tntest al .'^'pooner. 



carefully 

Silili'l"'^ w 
how e\ <•! . 

sent Hiiv 



t 



I Wish I Had AOirl 






THE 
GREAT 
$10,000. 
BALLAD 




"And I'm 
lonesome 

awful 
lonesome, 
Qeelvrish 
I had a 

girl 




Assembly Dance. 

The meml.ers of the Asseml'ly and 
their guests will enjoy the first of the 
after Kaster dames this evening at the 
tiall room of the Spalding, La Brt.sse'e 
orchestra will play A large number of 
in\utaiioiis have t>eeu i^-- ■• the 

affair- 



Equality Club. 

The I'olilical Kquality < lub will m*-et 

i; • .niiig at the council cliambers. 

v. Wharton will address the 

II „ fin "f'ovei-nnunt by Conimis- 

.-ion. 



Saturday Club 

The last meeing of the year of the 
Saturdav club will be held tomorrow 
afternton at the club room of the li- 



brary. The annual reports will be read 
and the election of of'.cers will take 
place. The business meeting will be 
followed by a social hour. 



SING AT SUPERIOR, 



Tomorrow, 



Miss Helen Waldo to Appear 
in Recital. 

Miss Helen A\'al<io. contialto of New 
York, who visited Mr. and Mrts. O. W. 
Kieswetter of East t-econd street last 
summer will appear in a song recital 
tomorrow evening at the Superior nor- 
mal scliool under the auspice..? of the 
Normal Scliool Choral society. Many 
Dulutliians are planning to attend the 
recital, when the following program 
will be sung by Miss Waldo: 
•He Shall Feed His Flock' from 

"The Messiah" Handel 

.Shakespearean lyrics. 

"Slie Never Toid Her Love" Haydn 

' Heigh-Ho for a Husband:" 

Traditional 

"It Was a Lover and His Lass" 

Parker 

French and German songs, 

"L'esclave" Lalo 

"Gretel" Pfitzner 

"I)er Erl K«mlg ' schu'uert 

"La Belle du Roi' Holmes 

Modern songs. 
"The Ballad of the Tree<= an«l the 

Master" Cliadwick 

Uequiem ... Homer 

Johneen I ViUiers-Stanford 

The Blood Red Ring"' 

'"■ oleridge Taylor 

"The Grand Matci .Ifruno Huhn 

"Hows M^ Boy'. Homer 

Scotch Ballad.s. 

"Come I'ndei My Plaiiile McNeil 

■ye Banks and Braes" Miller 

"Caller Herrin" Niel Gow 

"The Laird o' Cotkpen" old L»ance 

Miss Waldo will be Mrs. Kieswetter'S 
guest for tlie week en<l. 



Birthday Party. 

Miss Anna lloveison was the guest 
ol honor at a birthday party last even 
ing at tlie home of Mr ' " " " 

Hutcliinson. ' " 



An 



and Mrs. B. H. 
informal dance was 



enji'jed by thirty puests. 

c 

Personal Mention. 

Mi and Mr- C. H. H'ltt ot llo7 East 
Fouitl: street left today for a months' 
visit at Baltimore. Was'iington, Phila- 
delphia and Atlantic Citj. 
« • • 

Mrs. Lesbia Hill of Fourteenth ave- 
nue east, has returned from California 
where she spent the winter, 

• • • 

-Mrs H..lmbfrg of Minneaj oHs is 
\;siting Jier son in thib cit\. 
« • • 

Mrs. McClure, who iias been the 
gaest of her son. Edward McClure of 
S-O East Fifth street, has returned to 
her liorne In Idaho. 

• • • 

.Many ni ti.e [.tnluth iieopie. who were 
at Chicago to attend grand opera, 
lia\*e returned home, Mrs. K. Ft. 
Bailey, wlio chaperoned. Miss Rebecca 
Bailey, Miss Marjoiie and Isabel 
I'airick, retuined today. Mr. and Mrs, 
lui nest La< hmund and Mr. and Mrs. O. 
C. Harimaji liave returned, 

• • • 

T!ie Misses Tuiiish are "Visiting 
friends at .St. Paul. 

« • « 

Mr. and Mrs, L. T, Banks of Minne- 
apolis art visiting Jriend* in tlie city. 



GAY PARIS. 



May Is One of the Happiest 
Months There. 

OutwarUJy, Muy it one of the most 
unpleasant months of the year in 
Paris As far as the climate is con- 
cerntd the French capital is given 
over to what the Irish most aptly term 
"the gloom." Tlie sun sulks behind 
sullen, threatening clouds, and every 
evening tlie myriad lights in tlie hue 
de ropera are reflet ted in the wet 
asyhalt of the rain-drenched streets, 
and the polislied dclphins of the foun- 
tains of the Luxembourg are all but 
drowned under the sudden onslaughths 
of the cold May showers and heavier 
storms. 

But the Parisienne treats the moods 
of her city with scant respect. She 
mocks at its ill temper and flits about 
with an utter disregard of the leaden 
skies overhead and the wet pave- 
ments under foot. For May is a very 
busy month — one of the gayest in the 
social c.'ilendar. Tiie spring wardrobe 
is complete, and there are many p;a<es 
ot Interest wliere one can see and be 
seen with equally gratifying results. 
After all. electric ligiits are an excel- 
lent substitute for sunshine when t)ne 
has a new gown to display, a new hat 
to be envied and admired, says tiie May 
Delineator. 

The opening of the spring salon, the 
flower show and the first spring races 
at Longcliamp and at Auteuil, come 
crowding one after the otiier in rapid 
suceession. They attract a never- 
ending, ever-varying procession of 
smartly dressed women of every na- 
tionality, but each and al! of them 
stamped witli the indefinable chic of 
their French made clothes, tiieir French 
coiffed hair and tiieir hats of un- 
equivocally French manufacture. Hand- 
some Englishwomen witli their broad- 
shouldered. indolent-looking liusbands, 
liiissians and Slavs lithe sinuous, dis- 
tingue, vivaciotis Frenchwomen, voluble 
Italians and gay. holiday-hunting 
Americans, in short, the world and his 
wife in their best bibs and tuckers. 
bent on jdtasing and being pleased, 
led to Paris a fete-day appearance in 
spite of itself. 

With due apologies to the well-es- 
tablislied tradition <>! the Anglo-French 
novel tliat the Parisienne never shows 
herself before noon. I must confess 
tliat I have always found the morning 
Innirs among the pieasantest and the 
b«st attended of tlie day at the exposi- 
tions. Sedate young girls — our Jeune 
file has a dignity that would sit well 
on a giandmotlier — ami solemn-eyed, 
moon-faced children are among the 
most interested of the spectators dur- 
luj:.' the early hcuirs of the day. I re- 
member las' fall going down to the au- 
tomobile SHOW on one of the coldest, 
bleakest cays of the year and being 
passed bv a very large car with a very 
small child in the seat next the chauf- 
feur, Siie was so bundled up that all 
one eoult' se« of her was a ridiculous 
little >>ulton of a small red nose be- 
tween tlie glasses of an enormous pair 
of goggles," . ^ ^ 

In the morning, one sees the French 
trotting-frock at its very best. With 
a scant, narrow skirt that clears the 
ground by a generous three or four 
inches, disclosing trim pumps and neat 
silk stocking--, a smart bodice and a 
bewitching liat. the Parisienne makes 
a niost httraclivt jucture — a fact ot 
which she is <iuite well aware. 



TO GET WIVES 



Is Object of Atlantic State 
Association. 

A man and a woman, purporting to 
represent a syndicate of Oklahoma men 
and claiming to have the Indorsement 
of Governor Haskell, are establishing 
agencies in the .\tlantic states, the 
ot>.iect of which i« to obtain wives for 
Oklaiioma bachelors, relates the \Vom- 



WKat Retail Markets Offer. 



N. V cabbage, S cents a pound. 
(Ii.n peas, 1.1 cents a ciuart. 
Mushrooms, uo cents a poun.1. 
Tomatoes ;;U cents a basket 
Fresh pineapples, 25 cents each. 
Chickens, JT, and 30 cents each. 
Beef tongue. 
All sorts of fish. 
Shrimps. 
Frogs" legs. 

The new vegetables attraet the most 
attculluM and greatest inlcrcBl in the 



market. New peas, new carrots, new 
beans, new beets, new tomatoes, new- 
lettuce, new egg plant, new mush- 
rooms, n*w pie plant and compara- 
tlvelv new chickens are all listed 
among the delicacies that will be espe- 
ciallv nice for Ihe Sabbath. 

New aiid fresh pineapples and ripe, 
real tasty-looking strawberries are 
are among the nicest things to be had. 
Also the time yf strawberry shori- 
eake. Oh. joy! 



Come ajid 
See ! ' 




Half Price 



Saturday I 




Get Your 
Choice ! 



" ^CAM 




WE I RUST 7HL PrOPLL 



street 



TWO STORES 



SuDOfior St. 



The Sale of the Day! 

A Furniture Event Unequalled 
in all the Furniture History ot Duluth. 

Another bold stroke of the F orward concern, done without regard to 
immediate loss, but with a view of launching the new store at Second Ave- 
nue East and Superior street, with a brand new stock of furniture. 

This Half Price event is the closing cha pter in our Removal Sale. 
Hundreds of pieces of high-grade, as well as low-priced furniture is tagg ed 
with the money-saving green. Don*t miss this, the grandest chance you 
have had to save . 

Sec ttie Green Tags — Tliey Save You HalL 




an's National Daily, The campaign, 
which has just begun, is to be con- 
tinued until 10,000 young women have 
bten taken to the Western stale. The 
agencies offer good homes, good hus- 
bands, and a future of promise as in- 
ducements. They pay all e.xi>enses and 
guarantee the girls positions until ihey 
decide to marry. Asked where the 
profit came in, John Gibson, wlio is the 
principal agent of the syndicate, said: 
•We make our money simply through 
the development of the state, ' 

This campaign for wives is not the 
first one of the kind that has been 
waged but so far as is known it is 
tiie first one in the history of the coun- 
trv to be inaugurated by land promot- 
ers. Here we have matrimony put up- 
cui a purely Inisiness basi.s. La!id sales 
drag. The owners of the land, real- 
izing that thev cannot better condi- 
tions while there are so many bache- 
lors in tht new country, arrange to re- 
duce the number of baclielors. They 
scatter vc>ung women through the 
slate. Young men meet these young 
women and the rest is left to Cupid— 
and Fate. The young men, their 
thougiiis turning to matrimony, begin 
lo dream of homes of their own. And 
here is where the land agents come in. 
Doubtless the imported girls will be 
watched, and ^vhen they seem to have 
won youner' men's hearts the young 
men will be approached with the sug- 
gestion that a town home or a larm 
over in the next county would be Just 
the thing for them. Simple, isn't it? 
And practical, too. Incidentally, it is a 
tribute to women. The foresight tliat 
these men liave shown is not better 
evidenced by any feature of the plan, 
however, than by the one that takes 
into consiideration the time for begin- 
ning the campaign. The financiers are 
looking for early returns. Spring will 
soon be here — and is not spring nesting 
time. 



compllsh. They make a gown look 
distinctive, wlilch otherwise would be 
dowdy or commc>nplace. 

Knauf Sisters' facial treatments cure 
blackhead and pimples. 24 W. Sup. St, 



FOR WAISTS 

Chinese Crepe Is a Fashion- 
able Material. 

Fine white c.'liinese crepe is leading 
ail materials for wash waists. It is 
the fashion of the moment. One can 
pay almost any price for such a blouse, 
according lo the ciuality of the crepe, 
the name of the maker and the weave 
of lace or embroidery used on it, 

liomestic crepe, which is a good imi- 
tation of the imported w>eave, sells al 
less price, and the ready-made blouses 
of it are within the average purse. 

The usual trimming on these is a 
narrow Clunv lace, although women 
who have Irish lace without immediate 
use for it, apply it to these blouses and 
make them <iuite liandsome. 

The newest touch is to use a center 
band, three-inch cufts and straight col- 
lar of polkadot pic^ie. 

No lace or hand-embroidery is used 
In combination with the pique. The 
use of the latter gives the shirt waist 
a severe tailored style, which makes 
it quite appropriate for morning use 
with cloth coat suits, 

Old-Fashioned Scarf. 

Much has been written al)o\it the 
old-fashioned scarf being back in 
favor, but in tlie last week or two it 
has become such a dominant note in 
evening costumes that it ought to be 
described more fully. 

Women used it moderately at first, 
but now it is pari of the costume. It 
is an excellent idea. t>y the way, to 
use in making an old frock fashion- 
able. If one has a white or a black 
gown that has no special character 
and whose lines allow it to be made 
over In one piece, the essential thing to 
do is to get a vivid colored scarf. 

It is wonderful what transforma- 
tion these bits of tulle and gauze ac- 



PATTEN FISHES, 
SAYING NOTHING 

Wheat King Determined 

to Be a Hermit for 

Awhile. 

Trinidad, Colo.. April 23. — .Tames A. 
Patten, the Chicago wheat king and 
for the present the ''sphinx of the 
Rockies,"' set forth to catch trout this 
morning and kept right on saying 
nothing. 

Clad in a khaki suit and armed with 
a reel and trout rod, the broker left 
the Bartlett ranch house shortly after 
10 o'clock to spend the day fishing. 
When the telephone rang he started 
slightly and walked precipitately out 
of the room. He seemed as uncon- 
cerned about the affairs of the Chicago 
wheat pit as the Mexican herders on 
the ranch. The nearest he came to dis- 
cussing the wheat situation was when 
he directed that a liberal supply be 
packed in his lunch basket. 

According* to the men at the ranch 
the broker has not seen a newspaper 
or received a message from Chicag(j 
since Tuesday, Mr, Patlen slept twelve 
hours last night and set about enact- 
ing the role of hermit with apparently 
as great determination as he would 
plan a coup in wheat. 



Interstate Cleaning 
& Dyeing Co., 

CLEAl^ERS, DYERS \m lAllORS. 

Prompt Collections and Delivery. 
2 1 7 West Superior St. Both Phones 



RICH REWARD IF 
HE "STAYED IN" 

Assemblyman Louch Had 
Offer From a Stephen- 
son Detective. 

Madiscm, Wis., April 23.— "1 am au- 
thorized to tell you that you can have 
anything you want, if youll stay in — 
you needn't vote for Stephenson — but 
stay In there- " 

This statement, .\ssemblyman Louch 
told the senatorial primary investigat- 
ing committee, was made to him by D, 
H Liavis, a private detective in the 
emplov of Henry Overbeck, one of 
Stephenson's managers, if he would slay 
in the joint convention in order to 
build up a quorum when the vote for 
United Slates senator was being taken. 
Louch said he "cut Uavis short" by 
telling him lie would not vole for 
Stephenson. He added he -considered 
slaving in and building up a quorum 
under such circumstances equivalent to 
voting for Stephenson, 

Game Warden Stone, the next wit- 
ness, went over some of the testimony 
covered in previous sessions. He re- 
ferred to Ills letter to Warden Immel 
telling him he wanted to keep the de- 
partment out of politics, after he knew 
that "the bovs were soliciting and col- 
lecting campaign funds." However, he 
did not see 'anything wrong" in the 
collection of campaign contributions. 

DECREASE IN KANSAS 

WHEAT ACRES 400,000. 



culture, says tiiere has been a decrease 
of 400,000 acres in wheat in Kansas as 
compared with last year. He places 
the acreage at 6,000,000 and the aver- 
age condition at h>> per cent. There 
are few insect pests in the fields anci 
the conditions are poorest in the east- 
ern and southeastern sec:tions of the 
stale. 

WOMEN HELPING 
WITH LUNCHES 



Tempt Palates of the 

Florida Lawmakers in 

Prohibition Fight. 

Tallahasse, Fla., April 23.— The fight 
for submitting state wide prohiVution 
to the voters of Florida, which the 
Prohibitionists won in the senate, was 
continued in the house today. I.,ato 
last night ttie house adjourned with 
the McMullan state wide bill, as passecl 
by the senate, still under consideration. 

Tallahasse is crowded with women 
supporters of Prohibition prepared to 
furnish the moral suiiport of their 
presence and campaign songs and phy- 
sical support in the shape of templing 
lunches and dry beverages to the legis- 
lators. 



ROBINS SEEN 
AT LAKESIDE 

First Flock of the Season 

—Ducks Are Also 

Here. 

A flock of real, live, bona fide robin* 
was seen al Lakeside this mornlngr. 
Reports have been received during the 
last few weeks of individual red 
breasts observed In different parts of 
the city, but this is thought lo be the 
first flock of birds lo arrive in Duluth 
this year. 

All of which goes to show tliat 

spring is here, although the air may 
not feel like it today. Tlie robins did 
not appear very enifiulastic ovei' tiieir 
cold reception, tjut made the liest of 
the situation, and hopped around in a 
livelv manner in order to keep warm. 
From now on it is expected the birds 
will be arriving daily, doing w iiat they 
can to herald the arrival of spring, 

A flock of about forty ducks was 
also seen resting near the lake end of 
the Duluth canal yesterday. Other 
flocks hfve been reported along St. 
Louis liver, 



Topeka, Kan., April 22.— Secretary F 
D. Coburn of the state board of agri- 




Used on any Sewing Machine. Shown 
in use at Singer Stores. See it TO-DAY, at 

14 WEST SUPERIOR ST. 




. I T—I -«— ..— ^ > 

■I 

^^^mmm m f i > ^m 







■ 































Ill ■ iiMlliiillwiK ■Il>,i.ii3» 



H 



■ ■■ ' 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: FRIDAY, APRIL 23. 1909. 



31 





THE MOST UNIQUE AUTOMOBILE INu 1 

DULUTH AND ITS OWNER AT WJIEEL 



UNDEK THE CHIMES 

HENRICKSEN 
JEWELRY CO. 

332 WEST SUPKK1«-'K S r. 

; Spring Jewelry in 
Full Flower 



Jewelrj' exactly to our liking and 
your d«'mau.i.«« Th>- troubl..- about 
the pretty ; rno«ie.'« in 

Jewelry, la th ik.> a "'rage" 

and K^r. .vv h'.rriMv .'ornm.tn. Not 
«> with th» isive. yet vt-ry 

reaH.inably ; things we are 

showing. 

Bargains for 
Saturday, April 24 

Sjturi!iv. and Saturtlay Oiily. we 

will ):;-r to the Duluth public 

)'clock Tea 

$2.48 

■:■■<' >.llt 

$1.75 

-' 34c 
25e 



Six stt'i-ttng sllv'tT 

SpootiH, for a 3*-t 
only 



a set 

■ I long 11m t 



■ J 



it I u,l 1 < ' 

a set 

G"' 
In 

B' 

Pi:,.- 

Cut 
Lilthv 

a 
W : 

Si.'i-taiti> ".II 

for. each 

SterllniT aiiVHi- depivsit 
1-qt Wiitt'i Jue: for . . 
Rogers' Sup -■• " ; 

Kriiff. in ca- ' 

— a set 

Fine White Diamond Ring 
or gentleman— 

for 

Comb. !•; 
gram.s. •. .... .. 



I r mi- 



Hat Pit! 



Alurni 



$2.48 

88c 

$1.10 

$3.48 

Butler 

58c 

$20.00 
67c 




AXEL BERG AND -THE EXPERIMENT. 



l-'l 



:it 



'■■■■•■ •;)»■■''■ r 

r? ' 

al! lii.s o-.vM vv«.>rlc 
iio'irs and at o«id i; 

d.T\'. 

She isn't > erv much on looks." 



Av.M'i'ail i> I ..ii.<tru<l.d <>f iron and ."steel. 

' Ht- made tlie wiiole atiair liim.sflf just 

;.> »i-e if he euuUl i(>n.<«lruct an autonio- 

r \v .' KiuK 1 Idle that would go. 

iurlii.^: the 



<le- 



'•'itiV'-^ Mr. Bf 
<-an go." 1' 



■-rael*>us how she 
.-tl witli a 3'«2- 
•id for tlie mo. si 



He doesat like to u.se it on the 
M reels verv miiih Ijeiau.se it attracts 
HO mueli attention. Iiut early in the 
morning once or twice a week, he 
takes a run into the country and he 
saya that he under.stand.>* fully why 




RAILROAD NEWS 



TO SHIP ORE 
NEXTWEEK 

Blockade at Soo Delays 

Opening of the 

Season. 



Want to get suited all 
aro'Wtid? 

Cf<» to The C'~>!t»mbia. 

OiH- m>>derate price 
alike to all. 

Highest quality atuiin- 
aMe. 

Triplicate mirrors to 
i^\j. .I,.- fit -iti. I ^tyle. 

from every 
point i>! \"!t.-\v. 

.\>k for the $2.' '- ': 
suit wit!^ ''■•-'" -Tipt: ,.,_:.:..■,; 
came in . - 'ay from 
the Sinceniy Sh'-j)., 

The Columbia 



Range Roads Preparing 

to Haul Ore From 

Mines. 



The Ifiluth MiK.-.iib.> & Xorthern and 

th" Ifii'iO'i & Ir-'-n lUuig.- railroads 



wri.H liiii il>' in ! ' "'1 "■'■■ 

Tlie .Milwaukft- road .stole a march 
on it.s ...mpetilor. the tlreat Northern, 
\<v KettinK the elerk of the road to 
iiiake a living trip to tlie courthouse 
atil file papers in condemnation pro- 
i • .illngs to .secure tlie rlslil-of-way 
through important propt-rty of the 
Flathea>i reservation. 

The compiiiiv e\iileMtly decided not 
(.. truBt tlie ttiing of deed.s alone, and 
sought the courts to aid it in securing 
the de.sired right-of-way thioii;;li the 
North Fork pa.ss. 



V c L y 



Cl V I. 4, ( ti 1 I . L I . 

ready to l**- 
arrival of tli< 
!ow.:.'i !ak-'>-. 



\\ 



at Third 
Avenue West 



H.V.N AN 

siKtKs ron 



boaisi. 
Steami.'*!' 



,: ...jn the whipping 

luie of n' ~ ' ■•■ ek. 

■ I was lua .ly. 

ue cars a:- -Mg 

th^* M'«»ai . ge. 

. ['If .1,.1'k., wiih the 

ilr.->{. ore boats trom the 

Tlii.i is expected to be 

i he latest. 

ui tsiiit- th<-r.;' in n fleet 

.■.1 AX tl;.,' SO'<. T!,.' ii--- 

it.s ironi passing 

ted tlsat lliese 

Pitiisbing 

Hie inde- 

or 

to 

■ \\ • ■ ' ■ K . i u e i r 

;1;'' ole siill)- 



n;ci.>Kli 



EDWARDS 



YOUR GREOIT 



Clothing Store 

iovad to 20 East Superior St. 

Upstairs. 
Over Dixon & Lowrr 



Ing 

ii>ad 

iloek.s 

:- .1 light 

I: and only 

: .; ; some ore 

i..iks at Two Harbors. The 

: wilt begin with the arrival 

i; >!•• of the ore boats thai ar*- al the 

jirf-sent time detained jit Hi. Mary river. 

The traffic dep i s of the two 

rfiads are mer»»1v -^ for the ap- 

.... , ■..'.■■• ; ' .■ im- 

!: Of 

the iai:,^''> " ■!'> liavr i..-fn ui->iri- 

huiftd at til*' v.itious nilne.s. Most of 
tlie.s,' . ars are tilleci and ready to move. 
Thf dt.kinK of the flrut boat at tlie 
u.,, I ■> «i... I :ilc> - will be the siscnal 
. • i.e cars from ilie 

•A the lat.-si type are being 
I at the st.Mj.s of the Uuluth & 
i.iw being set up. 
will be in ahape 
\t week. The 
1 ore <!ar8 la 
■0 ra: as i'rti>ld- 
• n t u II t of 



Removal Sale of Gloves 

"We must move May 1st, ::in.l have only 
BIX tl; ■•• hi. . "ur unmenije stock. 

See (. . •:»- 
flerfully attrac- 
tive values of- 
fered for Sat- 
urday in out- 
ad. page lit 




WHEAT PRICK 
CAUSE SUICIDE 



T r Colo., April ia.— The sky- 

I ; in wheat and flour seems to 

have been re.spon8{ble for the suicide 
todav uf an unidentiti'-d man. apparent- 



'. ',> S I 111 i I . 

consign me I 
being :*li!pi-. i 
ly as the eai 

the sti.ins 

V. t anticipating a lie;ivy shlp- 

niii^ '^ th'' >'arUer stages of the 

naviga' " until some definite 

line is '^ ^^e turn tlie labor 

Bituation on ilu- Oreal Lakes may take, 
many of the railroad oflficials, aa well 
I, iiiii;! - re of the opinion that 

I , , ,. [ : ) will show a heavier 

snipmeiii ui ■-,>■- than the season of a 

year ago. , . , .. 

-ri,. V give as their reasons better 

.>n» over the country, an In- 

1 demand for structural ateel as 

I result of these conditions, and an 

anticipated Increased demand fur steel 

''Nv^illi the clearing of the ice at the 
.Soo ouitf- a Ib'^'t of vessels will be 
rele'a.sed and ti:-- arrival of this fleet 
at the Head of the Lakes will give a 
more impo.sing opening to the ore sliip- 



a n 

1 y a 
threv^ 

.•tri-et 
Clev...;la:i-. 

Th..' ni.iii 
hloek, his 1 



, about 'i" y 

■ f u n , ! r- f 1 1 . '.- 

^.-.Oitb 



w 1 ■ • 
Street 



"ho 

a 

and 



wa-^ dragged near.y a 
iv being terribly mangled. 
It is believed be came to Denver re- 
cently from Chicago. 

Clippings frum Chicago papers but 
a few days old were found 



in his 



pocketa, all of them containing articles 
on the wheat and fJour situation. In 
his hat were the Initials "H. H., and 
on a card in his pocket was the name 
cif John NIenstadt, 1233 Milwaukee 

•TMUr. ChiCttKU. 



WILL SPEND A 
MILLION A MONTH 

Vice President Mann Talks 

of Plans 9\ Canadian 

Northern. 

Winnipeg .Mni .Ajoil 2;'. — I). I>. Mann. 
vice pre>i.l.-ni of ii:.- Canadian Northern 
railway, arrived in Winnipeg last even- 
ing and stated in an Interview that his 
, .i:,;i.:iriy will M'.Mid ■■'n an average, more 
tlian Sl.OOu.tjUii a month during the bal- 
un< e of tlie vear on new eoiistruction. 
in ' ' n. rolling stock to tlie value 
of « M» will be purchased. In all, 

the (..uM-anv win build appro.ximately 
40O miles of new track in Western t^'an- 
ada ihiK vear. including a portion of the 
line Westward from the Rocky moun- 
tains to the Pa. iflc t-oast. surveys for 
whicli are now bidng mad©. 

FINE SoTdEPOT 
AT MOOSE LAKE 

Workmen C«ming Next 

Week to Begin Building 

Structure. 

Moose Lake, Minn.. April J.-?. — (Spe- 
cia! to The Herald, t — Word has been 
received by Mr. Nevers. proprietor of 
Hotel Moose, to make arrangements to 
care for a large crew of men, who will 
arrive the fir.st of the week to l>egin 
tlie erection of the depot, ear house.s, 
water tank and other necessary build- 
ings for the Soo railroad company. 
The men are coming from McGrath 
where they have just completed the 
buildings there. 

So far as can he learned the depot 
will l»e a very large .structure and of 
the latest plans to care for the busi- 
ness Of the three lines which will bo 
built here. Since it has been learned 
that the Soo company will build to 
Thief Uiver Falls and the Cuyana 
range from here, there is no doubt 
that the Frederick, Wis., line will be 
extended to Moose Lake, giving the 
company the shortest line from Du- 
luth to the Twin Cities and passing 
through a countrv that is far superior 
to that from Duluth direct to Fred- 
erick. „ ,,, 

It Is rumor.. 1 the Northern Pacific 
will put on a new schedule May 23, 
and that the limited trains will prob- 
ably be Included to slop at Moose Lake 
hereafter. From the amount of busi- 
ness the company gets out of the town 
citizens feel they are entitled to have 
these trains stop here, and since there 
has been such a demand from the pub- 
lic it is believed the company will ar- 
range to Include the stopping of the 
ilmiled trains In the new schedule. 



Photo by McKenzle. 



people go daft over autnmoblling. 

He made most of the engine himself, 
used four regular bicycle wheels, a 
leather belt, and from old scraps of 
iron and steel constructed the rest of 
the body. . , , .... * , 

Mr Berg .savs that had he the tools 
he could make a machine that would 
not be out of place on the streets of 
the city. 



known how the derailment occurred 
.\o one was injured and the engine 
wiis iiut put out of commission. 

Railroad Personals. 

H R. Gron.-heau. freight claim agent 
for the Norlhwesiern line, is in the 
city today. Mr. Grocheau was formerly 
general agent of the line at Superior. 

Mart Ad8<n\, general passenger agent 
of the Duluth. South Shore & Atlantic 
railroad, returned today from a busi- 
ness trip to the Twin Cities. 

TAFT LOOKS TO 
CZAR FOR HELP 

Up to Russia to Pro- 
tect Americans in 
Persia. 

Washitvgton, April 23. — President Taft 
and his advisers are greatly concerned 
for the safety of American mission- 
aries' interests in Turkey, appalled at 
the fate of the Armenians there, and 
perturbed over the desperate conditions 
at Tabriz. Persia, where the American 
consular offices fear a massacre. Every- 
thing that may be done by the Ameri- 
ean emba.isy in Constantinople, and the 
legation in Teheran, for the protection 
of American life and interests in the 
uCfllcted countries, the officials In 
Washington say, evidently has been 
done. 

Tlie state department is in communi- 
cation with the embassy in London *o 
Itarn what Is being done under the 
Berlin act of 1878, under which Turkey 
pronii-ses to carry out certain reforms 
regarding the Armenians, and a dis- 
patch has been sent to St. Petersburg, 
indicating that as there is nothing 
more the American g'overnnienl can do 
to relieve the situation in Tabriz, the 
state department will have to rel./ on 
the czar's government for the huinani- 
larian work of saving our citizens. 

This last action Is in view of tl e 
newspaper reports of a Russian expedi- 
tion into Persia. 



SAYS MRS. BOYLE 
IS IN CONTEMPT 

Prosecutor Falls to Make 

Her Talk to Grand 

Jury. 

Mercer, Pa.. April 23. — An attempt 
was made today by District Attorney 
Lininger to have Mrs. James H. Boyle, 
held on the charge of kidnaping Willie 
Whitla, testify before the grand jury, 
and she was taken from the jail to the 
grand Jury room. When her counsel. 
Mr. Miller, heard of It. he rushed to 
the room and instructed her to refuse 
to say a word. She declined to 
answer any questions put to her. 

Lininger then went before Judge 
Williams and asked that the woman 
be committed for contempt. Judge 
Williams said it was too serious a 
matter to decide without liaving it 
fullv argued, but ruled that neither 
Boyle nor his wife could he compelled 
to testify until he decided the ques- 
tion. 

The first question asked of Mrs. 
Boyle was: 

"Are you married to James H. 
Boyle'.'" 

The state will try to prove that she 
Is not. so that she can be used as a 
witness a gainst him. 

SENATOR VAIL 

TREAStRES PEX. 




19c India Linon, 
42 inches wide, 
in a real fine 
quality. Special 
for 

1254c 



Where Values Reign Supreme. 




TiOBC 




00 



21 AND 23 WEST SUPERIOR ST. 



1.000 yards of 
Dress Oinghama 
and plain EngllsJi 
chambrays. a 1 1 
IZV^c goods, on 
special sale at 



An Important Sale of 

New Spring Tailored 

Suits. 

100 fine suits just to hand, divided into three lots, 
made up in line smooth finished fabrics such as 
prunella, surah serge, begoreans, wool taffeta, Pan- 
ama and mannish worsted.^, in the new spring shades 
— also cream and black; some slightly trimmed, 
others plain tailored — two and three-piece styles. 
Po.sitively the bei't values we ^14 ^(\ 

ever offered— $24.50, $19.50 and MjjXI.tlV 

Interesting Prices on New Coats. 

Three-quarter and full lengths, in black, broadcloth, 
serges, Panama, tan, Engli.sh coverts, gray, tweeds 
and worsteds. Some exceptional values. on spe- 
cial sale for $14.50. $11.50 

and 

MliiSES* SKIRTS — In fine all wool Panama and 
serge, new gored styles, trimmed with self strap and 
satin band.s. in black, blue, brown and green — regu- 
lar 15.50 values — on sale now tfjfj QQ 

for ;j>o.yo 

Children's and Mis-ses' New Spring Coats, in large 
vari^-ty of styles and fabrics, red. blue, brown, cream 
and fancies, neatly trimmed and Venetian lined — 
Interesting values from $8.50 down fl" 4 QO 

XF.W T.\IIX>KED W.VISTS — Of shrunk linon, with 
full pleated front, laundered collars and cuffs; also 
fine lawn, in tucked, embroidered or lace trimmed — 
several styles — actual values $1.65 tf"-* A Q 

—special for kJpX. ± iJ 

Beautiful new stylish waists of whin and ecru net. 
trimmed with heavy embroidery, lace bands^of mes- 
sallne, and medallions. Regular — - - 

$6.00 value — special sale price 



Some Splendid Sat- 
urday bargains in 
Ladies' and Men's 
Furnishings. 

3 5c Men's Silk Ties, in pretty checks, plaids and fancy 
dark colors, A high grade, serviceable four- IQc 



$6.50 



in-hand wash tie, at 

$1.00 Men's soft bosom 
shirts, in checks and fig- 
ures, with 1 pair (^Q^ 
detached cuffs tf^K, 

Women's Jersey ribbed, 

pure white pants, knee 

length, in tight or Df^r* 
loose, at 6ta\^ 



Boys' Waists, in dark per- 
cales and niadraa cloths — • 
all sizes — 8pecia,l 9f\#^ 

Women's Union Suits, high 

neck, low neck, short 

I sleeves and sleeveless — 

j tight or loose (\Or* 

I knee, at t/W\^ 



JS .Jl IIK-S- 

$495 



Women's full-fashioned silk lisle hose, in pink, blue, 
nile, tan, chamois and black, also black embroid»*red 
and tan boot laces, maco split soles, and gauze 9Sc 
silk lisle hose. Regular 35c value, at t*w. 

Bargains in Lace 
Curtains. 



Ruffled Muslin Curtains — 
2 Va yards long, polka dot 
and fancy — 
at 



98c 



$2.50 Curtains. 



in 



net and fancy net.s, 
length, at 
per pair 



cable 
full 

$1.98 



$3.50 Lace Curtains, in a 
great variety of n.w styles 
— special per 
pair 

$5.00 Bru.ssels net. im- 
ported curtains, iii^dainty 
designs, at 
per pair .... 



$2.98 



$4.00 




New Silks! 

Silk Foulards, 24 inches wi»Je, all ptire silk, 
latest designs to select from — ^Pl/^ 

Fancy Silks, 27 inches wide, an extensive line 
in stripes, dots and swivel effects; all new pas- 
tel shades, a regular 59c quality — QPx/^ 
Saturday — per yard .OcJ v^ 

27-inch Guaranteed All Pure Silk Black Satin 

95c 

desirable new 

49c 



Duchess; regular $1.25 quality — 
Saturday's .special 



24-inch Rajah Silk, in all the 

spring shades — al — per 

yard 



Bewitching MiUinery I 

A visit to our Millinery Department affords you an 
idea of the exquisite beauty of our brilliant display 
better than any words of ours. Then you can see for 
yourself the wonderful becomlngne-ss the big variety 
and the clever styles we show. Hundreds of these 
hats are real reproductions and others slight modifica- 
tions of the richest New York and Paris models. j 

The Hat.s on sale by us at $5.00, $6.50 and .$7.50 ' 

are just such hats as other high-priced stores have ' 
marked at $10.00, $12.50 and $15.00, Besides you have j 
hundreds and hundreds of them to select from, and 
each one is up to the minute in style, workmanship 
and finish. 



Wash Goods ! 

New Poplin and All-Linen Suitings, 27 inches 

wide, in plain colors and hair line .-^tripes; 

regular 35c qualities ; a special 9f\f^ 

leader for tomorrow, at £\J\^ 

27-inch Printed Bordered Batiste, also the new 
Serpentine Crape, in dots, stripes and floral 
designs; our regular 15c num- 4 Of / ^ 
ber; special tomorrow l.^/2,K^ 

27-inch Gingham Lawns and Batiste, a mixed 
lot or broken assortments of goods that always 
sold at 10c per yard ; Saturday Tl/ /^ 

to clean them out, all we ask is / y^\^ 




ping season than would the arrival of 
a straggling 



line of vessels. 



RAILROADS IN BAHLE. 

Four Deeds far Right-of-W ay Filed" 
at Coram, Moot. 

KalispeU. Moit.. April 23,— Four 
deeds for right-of-way In the vicinity 
of Coram, in the North Fork river ter- 
ritory, have lH»en filed by an agent of 
the Chicago. Milwaukee & Puget Sound 
Uallroad company. The instrument was 
the first evidence of any transfer for 
right-of-way purchase in the contest 
between that road and the <»reat North- 
ern. An hour later an agreement for 
sale of right-of-way to the Oreat 
Northern of land In the same district 



Railway Club. 



A meeting of the Northern Railway 
rUib will l>e held In ihe rooms of the 
Commercial club tomorrow evening at 
K o'clock. There will he a discussion 
nf a paper, "The Solielling of Freight, 
the Carrier and the Shipper," and W, 
H, Sledel of the Great Northern rail- 
way will read a paper upon dispatch- 
ing trains. Music and cigars will fol- 
low the business part of the meeting. 
All out of town members are requested 
to be present. A special train will be 
run from Two Harbors. 



Train Derailed. 



The Duluth. Missabe & Northern 
train that left Duluth tlils morning, 
was derailed at Saginaw, a station on 
the Duluth, Missabe «t Northern, a 
short distance from Duluth, and was 
delayed about an hour. It is nut 



Senator P. R. Vail of Virginia 
reached Duluth this morning, proudly 
earrving the pen that defeated the 
tonnage tax measure. The pen was 
the one that Governor Johnson vetoed 
the measure with, and was the gift 
of the chief executive to the senator 
from Virginia. Mr. Vail exhibited the 
pen to friends toiiay. 

"This pen should <be placed In some 
idace where It can be exhibited to the 
tnany admirers of the governor In this 
section of the state,' said Senator 
Vail. "I am proud of the fact that 
Governor Johnson should choose to 
give It to me. It is surely a case 
where the pen proved mightier than 
the sword, I shall keep the pen In 
mv possession, for It Is a fitting sou- 
ve"nlr of the act that has proved a boon 
to the interests of the northern part 
of the state. 

Senator Vail says that the governor 
is still receiving the congratulations 
of hundreds of peit>le for the stand 
he took on the tonnage tax issue. 




OUR 




Q UITS 



When you buy clothes 
made by 

Michael Sterns 
A. Adler 
Fichhimer-Fishell Co. 

YOU GET THE BEST CLOTHING 

MADE. 



Spring Suits. $15 to $30 
Bannister Oxfords «5 

Tans, Oxbloods and Patent Leather. NK^^ 



Gordon and Stetson Hats 



Floan-Leveroos 
& Co., 

225 West Superior Street 



■r 



"*i«i 




i 






■Mtai 



I 







Ii ■■ 


■rarz? 












( 










' 
1 

i 








^ !<••'-»»-*. "11 .V^- 



^MH^nw k.j«ii«iii.< 



■ . 1 11 ■ I I I II I - .L . .l. ■ ^ 




I 

I 



23 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: FRIDAY, APRIL 23. 1909. 



S. S. WORKERS 
ORGANIZED 

Association Composed of 

Fifty Scliools In tiie 

County. 

Two Days' Convention 

Is Opened at the 

Y. M. C A. 



fifty 

,' Ulf-t 

all •>!' 



■ ■ a^^-.'il frniu llii.' 

f $1 :i iiiKlH, on 
, '. Aiinl ! an. I H". 

I a (1 

V • . . ■ • .. • of 

(iiiui*;, ;li*' mailaint- v\ms not 

within ,, .iii'i said Vif K'l'l lohl 

th€'(i ' I'l. I'ai-l at 

tho 

'n,.' ni.iJ.iiiu' in;><if did not offer to 
fufulsh ih'-Ti) with niris, thev said, and 
■ ■ . sayiuK «hP 

s The con- 

A i»..nn- was !i«?Ul wiiile 

iilf them to tlieir rooms. 

1,,.. ,.-. II. u All U'stified tliai tii-y 

It. 1.1 nut (■♦■tT. iiril.iu f iiil.\ .ntiinalf witii 



Ccmiii 
IIS' 



Lt>lli^ 



v\ 



ftl' 



l-l 



T 



t.e h(>M at Pil- 



II 
»«■■ 



MOTION FOR NEW 
TRIAL IS DENIED 

Judge Dibeil Takes Little 

Stock in Sensational 

Cliarges. 

Anna Holier, who brouglit suit for 

fir,,i>no apatnst i\\v (M\\fr Iron MiiiinB 

r i>frsorial 

hv hfv littlf diuiBhtt'r from dynamite 

■ . -. and wli.> U.St her ■as*', wiiu tlii-s 
t.liip: deni-.l a new trial by Judge 
I II III-' ■■■*'. ' ■ ■ ■ .'ict fiiiirt. 

SI basis for a new trial 

■' •.i>f, . ompanys ajfent had 

• .1 with si.iJK' of tiif wJlntssfa, I 
.ii..v.. lilt' >■■ ■ M>!' . i: V .ienit'tl. . 

The I'hlt-t . .H.-*>Tns to a use over 

the tf.unriu.;. i'A\ Marion, lie tc'stl- 

• time of tiie trial ttal lui 
. neylvania at tiie tinu of llio j 

at-fiilent. Attorney Power win. rrprr- i 
s. :it'-.l tlie plaintiff, uwort- (l^ai .Maii..ni 
1 .1 liiiil tiia! ■ tl:e !■! 

. tilKC .-f l!, t'Ut t 

llu! conipa: ■ .-i tb.reiil' ned Marion j 

mitny times .iid not le^iity in the , 

way iliey \ris-! 

inn k at tiie I 
ai U'liit'y by ftayhiK I 
.ver tried to make tlie 
"•■ that he \^•^"' "" ■ 
I lent. 
« ,-, ,- .uM.i.v .-iher charge... _.. 
rliarKvs. 



, i!,.. r-iiii, i.f tli<- Minnesota snprpme 

ufirnilnK Ihc decision 

iinty tinrt wliirij held 

li;at ilarla.s Hanson, a Norwegian and 

resilient of that tounty is entitled to 

ell !•-"'.>. ^ , 

1 ihouRli a resident of the 

still, nil nearly eighteen years and 
with a larne family, showed a woiful 
lark of knov.ledKe eoneerninf? the na- 
tional and slate guverninenls. 

Witnes.ses testified that he was a 
good nelKhhor. r'aid his debts, was Rood 
to his rainily. .md nbserved the laws. 
The court, wltliout further questions 
pronounced him a citizen of the Unite*! 
State.H. Tfie iniijortty of the court In 
( <.ni!!ifnlinK upon its affirmation of the 
hiW«T courts rulinK- says that Norway 
bus furnished Minnesota many eood 
rit I/ens With tliem Rood citizenship 
Stan. Is ai.ove everythlnR else, and when 
sn. ti is proven there should be no 
i.tii.'i- l.ar. 



THE EVENING STORY 



THE THORN ON 
THE ROSE 

By Edward E. \A ebb. 



The fi'iinpari 



.■t 



- an- 



\\ 



Musical Treat 

BV THI-: •IMI'KUIVI, stois" 
CO-\CKIir « OMI'\>V. 

lender the A iispi. . .- ■-■ 

< inn Stciviirl. at I.yoriiiii The«ler, 

I liiirxdny. \i»rll ::iKli. 

.1 .itland's CI 

1 1 1 ' ^. t to 

. ■.'!;:!> 

., ...I's S\\ e<-t- 

speeial niini- 

vill dance the 

U. .-i and lU-vl ...f Tulb..-k. S.-- 

fr.iiii meinl>crs ..f <'lan 

^ l)n.\ <.fnte. Lyceum Tlie- 

;ri.i $1.00. 



»lei 
lenc. 



k . ■ t ; 



NORTH BUTTE 
IS IMPROVED 

Recovery Is the Feature 

of the Copper Stock 

Market. 



The )i 
which aii 
or. ' 

was - 
a '•'•■ :. 

Vt> . 



d- 
b; 

c! 

c 

A 

c '. 
B 

olined i"J l; 

told and >1*" 



lie of N'T til Butte, 

-lion, was 

iae copper 

local curb 

• was 

-.:. . - . :^- per- 

Ja> . 

.■d uncii.Tnpred fr.mi 



a I $tjij.>>0 



le- 
nd 



t.pened at tli*.l2^- 

i;.,i to I1M.2S and 

110..'.". asked. 

: $ 1' I a n d 



-.jd at fyj.iy 

131 opened at 

md closed at 



d. 



declined to 

and closed ai *!..».... 

Car---' -vid at I;i2f> and tS.STH and 



•ned at f 13.25. 

!.d to ti:{.25 

.u and $13.37 Vi 



JOHNSON DECRIES 
TURKISH HORROR 

Governor Calls for the 
Protection of Amer- 
ican Citizens. 

Bt. I'au . .\!lnri. April 23.- ' to 

Ttie Herald.! i;,.\.rtior .Johi.^..., iv.-day 
made the following written statement: 
"The civilized world stands aghast 
at IJie hoitor- 111 ArnuMiu. The Eu- 
ropean pou "Uld int.Tvt.ue at once 
I lie interests or humanity and luKher 
lizatlon. The United States should 
iisf every means at its comn)and to 
protect American citizens. 

•JUHN A. Jt>HNvSON. 
"Governor of Minnesota." 
A TiH-etinB of the Armenians of ft. 
lid Minneapolis will be held to- 
night, at which resolutions 
will bf a-!"!. ted appealing to President 
Taft for tnierventlon to protest affalnst 
a continuation of Moslem rule in Tur- 
key, and expressing sympathy for the 
Y ."unt? TuikB and the Liberals. 

'rending toward the same end Is a set 
of resolutJuna a-li'i.tcd by the biennial 
convention of the V \\'. "'. A.. In ses- 
sion her*', deplorinK the atrocitlea In 
Turkey, and askin^T the United States 
government to lnTerv»>ne to stop it. 



, ; .-:, bid and «:J.3:H asked. 

.Mki.-.i sold al }l.:!7i'i and 

,t |1.3Tiit bid. Car- 

. at tl.5u and closed 

& Huperlor sold at 

,". 1 .it 90 cents bid and 

<i'2 (.''cuts a.ske.l. 

ri'ff WHS Irctctiv* 



ClO.S' 

t; 

n... .. 
at t 

»2 c 



I.' 

V>;. . . 

& Soncira fi" 
1 2 Md and ? 
bid and fl.i 
told and $2 

t>id and 63 
klava at f 
<|2 i>ald) ^ 

Butt'--- ^' '-^ 
Co'i'i 

Black -M<"ii 



and closed at 

asked, tilobe 14 

1 )enn- Arizona at 

a-'ked. Calumet 

:. Fted Warrior at 

' Mowitza at $1 

. anna at tl.75 

' -.1 f'.ii f't'nia 

ia- 

ott 

J7.. . asked, 

, . ■. il i $;. asked, 

f Itiaiiu at |l.:>i» bid and 



WANTED ! 

.\T ONCE. Knot sawyer, sliineic 

mill at Hawthorne. Apply at olfltc 

Sntimlay. Dnluth Ixjg Co., Pallatllo 
buiklLiti.;. 



\x ;i ' 

_« — 



$1 l.;(1. 



Vf ANTS TO WALK IN 
WOODS ALL NIGHT 



Young 



Gnesen Farmer Is 
Causing His Friends 
Much 



Worry. 



;!0 
be 



r. t, : la.beski. a young farmer. 
years old. living at Gnesen. will 

sxamined aa to his sanity by Judge J. 
R Middlecolf of tnc i.r...Viale court 
Bome time f '' ^ morning ttie 

mother fib against him. 

He will f.vii -.a., <. ; ,,ume. seems to 
want to walk around through the 
woods all night, and will pay no at- 
tention to anything his friends or rel- 
ative.^- tell him. 

1\. people living In 

llu- !iic much anxiety 

of late. 8. - .. at differ- 

ent tlmei* 1 ■ 1 to look 

f, A.fk lie went 

^ The ice was 

vtT> .■ iM ..ii.i .1 >»...-.. I i.tng before he 
was tiear.l t.> call for help. The neigh- 



bors JM.1' 

hard s' 
His I" : 

worry to k 

WtslleS llJlii 
to )■ ' " 



!ii .Alt, but only after a 

< iu- IS too much of a 

home lonRer and 

where he will have 

iiii.s Kivcn him. 



HARD FIGHT TO 
PREVENT VETO 

Claimed That Majority 

of Oncota Voters Want 

Saloon. 

A strenuous effort will Vie made by 
those who favor the granting of a 
saloon license to William Meier at 
Oneota. to induce the mayor to place 
hi» approval on the action of tiie coun- 
cil In granting the license. 

Those who want to see the saloon 
there claim that a count of actual 
voters in that vicinity would show 
that those who favored the saloon li- 
cense being granted were in the ma- 
jority. , . , ^ 

An attempt is also being made to 
show that the district in which the 
saloon would be !.><at.d Is a business 
district, and not a residence district, 
being near the ore docks and other 
large Industries. li Is further pointed 
out that Carpenter Bros., who were 
formerly connected with the saloon, 
and once convicted lor selling to 
minors, will not have anything to do 
with the Meier saloon, one of them 
having left the city. William M.-ler 
Is an old resident of Oneota. 

NORWEGIAN IS 
CALLED CITIZEN 



IN ( OIRT AGAIN. 

Madame (iaiii ihai'^ed With Keep- 
ing House of III Fame. 

The trial of Madame .Mar on 

the charge of keeping a house dt ill 
fame, was startid In municipal court 
this morning, but was not finished at 

the n.'.on rcf--" ■■'' '■■-•'.-* 



■■^'5S?*aP*^' 





OUTS 









WIELANS SHOE GO HAS BOUGHT THE ENTIRE STOCK OF THE FIFIELD-SHEA SHOE CO., 115 W. SUPERIOR ST. 



WE HAVE SHOES iflR^imr" 




FOR MEN 

:^Icn's $3.50 and $4.00 nar- 
row widths, sizes to 8; buy 
them for the boys at, pair 



The State Supreme Court 
Deems His Ignor- 
ance No Bar. 

.St. Paul. Minn.. April 23. — (Special to 
The Herald. , I — I^ck of accurate knowl- 
edge of the Federal « i.siitution and 
I form of govcrninenl is nut necessarily 
, I 1 a bar to citizensliip. In Uie subtttaave of 

l»r pollcemtsi). f-btajtu luat ihey haa 



. , Ail riglilH r«»fn«i.) 

On a cold night last winter four 
men sat around a card table in a pri- 
vate ro.iu ..f one of Toronto's largest 
)i..t.-iw It was lat€\ and that the parly 
Mtertained themselves well a doz- 
ttles and as many cigar sluinpa 
uii Hie tloor mutely testified. 

The tallest man with a stack of 
vellow checks reaching" to Ids chin, 
was dealing. The red-whiskered fellow 
.^s lingering his few remaining Teds 
ih a nochallance which bespoke fa- 
jiiillarlly with losses, and he of the 
bald head was .stroking hla mustache 

I iimina lively. The fourth wabbled In 
his chair In a manner betokening 
sleepiness, the cause of whidi might 
have li. M n ^messed by the regularity 
Willi uliuli he picked up one of the 

bottles and essayed to transfer 
niained therein into his glass. 
!1 man at last showed evi- 

ialibilU\ and broke the sl- 

„,,.. oi an louir with the remark; 
•Poor poll. \ i" spend a long evening 
at cards wiM.u there i- ^^ "hi< li fun 
t.i l.«^ had In this tuwn. 

v.. .iMuce of fun ■ n-torted 

II ; of the whiskers, as he tossed 
tut , .lancc of his ■reds' in an.'lher 
elToii t.. tn.ikc a four-flush win. 

F..ilun.- !.i\..i.d the daring for once, 
and after raking In a fair-sized pot, 
the winne. became more socuible. 
"There isn't aiivtliltiK in this l..)Wn to 
do but play p-.k- r. ' 

TohoyKanlng. suggested the tali 
man as iie accidentally upset Ills slack- 
.]• •' waiter, friend; Will 

I. iigth of that last pot.' 

In,- .....i-i. who was evidently a 
( luiiic*. iicquaintance. liailed with Joy a 
chance t.> get something more substan- 
tial iliaii tlic contents of the air-laden 
li.iiilis lit', red aboutk obeyed .witU 
;,l the lall, handsome young 

f,. ii"- still more communica- 

tive .iflcr aiiotiier glass all around. 

•You old rascals who never go out 
of doors wlien there is danger of freez- 
ing a nose are making a great mis- 
take.' he began -Ctune with me to- 
morrow nlgtit, and 1 will sliow you a 
life that will make you boys again. 

inies initial tutjogg^an trip occupies 
but a few seconds, but those few sec- 
onds are never to be torgotten. i ou 
climb to the top of the slide and look 
down at the icy chutes, Inclined at a 
frightful angle, while far away to- 
ward the horizon stretches the expanse 
of ice Some one asks if you will make 
tji. lit, and since you came osten- 

M I hat purpose, you see no es- 

'"•^•lVivcIv girls and ruddy, robust men, 
all clad ill Eskimo attire surround you; 
sparkling eyes and witching smiles 
confuse you, and sweet voices, like 
tlnkllngs of bells in the frosty reson- 
ant air. lull your fears and partially 
convince you that a ride might jiot 
orove suicidal after all. The indescrib- 
able exhilaration and < harm of the 
scene overpower you, and you con- 
sent to have a queer-looking, snub- 
nosed machine shoved up to you, and 
take your seat with many misgivings. 
As vou do so y.iu wonder why tliesc 
pretended friends laugh so merrily on 
so serious an occasion. . . . , 

".Some one gets on behind you— a 
pair of small, soft mitletis are placed 
on your shoulders and you are cau- 
tioned liv .1 bubbling voice to sit still 
and hang on tight.' The voice heiglit- 
ens your aj.pi eeiatu.n ot necessity 
for correct l.eliavioi- and you decide to 
die game. 

"Some demon in human form gives 
vou a gigantic shove and yells 'you re 
off:' and lor a moment you believe you 
really are off as vou shoot down tne 
incline at a raiiidly increasing pace. 
Were It not for the merry voice that 
rings in vour right ear and the tight- 
ening grip of the hands on your 
shoulders, vou would be sure the In- 
fernal machine was bearing you down 
to one of those bournes whence m 
traveler returns. You give an Involun- 
tary gasp for breath as the artUlciaiiy 
created witid whistles past your ear.s 
at the rate of a mile a minute — and 
thereafter hold your month shut. If 
vou were alone vou would fall off and 
take chances at bringing up against 
some object that would hold you for 
awhile, but you must be bravf, and, 
outwardly, at least, calm. 

"You see nothing but a gYay mass 
which represents the world in general, 
and half way down you shoot over an 
elevation and then scoop through a 
depression with a Jolt that drives your 
backbone a little further into your 
head Suddenly you realize that your 
hat is gone, and that one ear muff 
Is (lying wildly behind the one still 
attached to vour ear. 

"The irrepressible bubbles of mirth 
behind, continue— truiy. the girl is 
both brave and heartless: Y<iur hair Is 
gone. too. you feel sure of that. \N hat 
a sight you must be: You have already 
fallen several miles through space. An- 
other bump, and your vertebrae come 
together like castanets and you be- 
e.iine conscious that you are no longer 
falling, hut gliding swiftly forward. 
Willi tiie shock of striking 'aqua fnma 
vou swerve, and then the nose of the 
tol>oggan hits the side of the chute, 
the mittened hands fall Ignomlniously 
to keep vou In place — and off you go! 

"Vou .«pln around on the ice in the 
most undignified manner. Soon you 
move more slowly and see, far In 
front, the solitary occupant of your to- 
boggan looking back. Vou regain your 
feet and walk forward completely 
crushed. She Is lying on the miserable 
vehicle too weak from laughing to 
arise Some one brings your hat. He, 
too. is laughing. Soon you see the fun 
and laugh also. , ,., , , ., ., 

"•Isn't it glorious'." she asks. Lets 
try U again.' 

"■All right, you say, and you re 
initiated." ^ ^ , ^, 

"Bravo," e.xclaimed the man of the 
flowing beard. "You should have been 

a poet. ' . . , 

"Well," admitted the narrator, mod- 
estly, '1 must confess I had fond rec- 
ollections to Inspire me. I merely 
de-'cribed mv experiences of a year ago 
tonight. Aii: There was the girl for 
vou' If iver there was a 'good fellow, 
she was. I saw her every day during 
mv Slav after that, and had some 
trouble "breaking away from her. She 
grew extremely fond of me, he con- 
cluded In reminiscent mood. 

"Seen her since," queried the bald 
head, picking up the forgotten deck 
and shuffling It skillfully. 

••\Vhv — ves. After I had been gone 
from here" six months I began to miss 
her. for I really did think a lot of her. 
So 1 came back to look her up. I en- 
countered her quite unexpectedly on 
the street. At first she refused to rec- 
ognize me, but I corralled her. and she 
said In a frightened way, that she was 
married — had been wedded two months 
before. I suppose 1 did wrong, but I 
urged her to meet me that evening, 
and after long hesitation she con- 
sented. . 

"Four davs ago she met me by ap- 
pointment in t^hicago— made the ex- 
cuse that she was going to visit one 
of her old schoolmates, 1 understand. 
I brought her back this morning. She 
Is a pretty girl. Grace Is — lives over 
In F avenue. Always had every- 
thing »lie want«U; <aUi«r mAd« a miut 



NOW IS 
THE TIM 

A sale just in time when 
you need shoes and ox- 
fords. Buy for the future 
needs and save money. 

The stock will rcniain in thi.«; Ltrge room .ind must be closed out at once. The out prices we have made, certainly made this large store fairly 
hum with business, but it is only a drop in the bucket to what it will be during the next few days. The army of satisfied customers are telling 
all their friends about this great sale. Remember the Fifield-Shea company has been in business but one year and carried such celebrated lines 
as fo'ic.ws: For men— Stetson's. Thompson Bros." Walkover, Gotzian's. Sharood Shoe company; for women— Harry Gray's. C. P. Kurd's the 
Prin|#ss and Todd's; for children-Merriams. P. Cogans, Burlev & Stevens'. Maloney Bros.', Shaft-Pierce Shoe company. This is not a sale of 
oddi and ends, but a closing out of the entire stock, including their newest spring styles. Every pair is plainly marked with the former price and 
the sale price. 





BOYS' SHOES 

Box calf, Blucher styles, sizes 1 ^4 ^Q 
to 5J/2, values up to $2, at ^ l«0 w 



Little gent's same kind, 10 to ^4 4Q 
13>'i, at ^^ la 19 

Little gent's calf, lace and Blucli- Qflo 
ers, per pair W Ww 



25c TABLE 

Be sure and sec these small size ladies 
and men's shoes, including some children's 
.'.hoes and slippers, like giving away. 



GIRLS' Shoes and Oxfords 

Misses' patent kid and gun metal button and 
lace shoes, high grade, new styles, d?4 QQ 
sizes 11J<2 to 2, $3 shoes at ^\m^%S 

Misses' all leathers, including tans, hea\y or 

light soles, sizes IP'S to 2, $2.00, ^\ ACk 

$2.50 and $3.00 values, per pair. . . . ^1 la^tU 

Girls' sizes ^Vi to 11 of the same ^A pQ 

as above, per pair w ■■ t^ 

Girls' patent tip vici kid Bluchers, sizes llj-j 
to 2, $1.25 and $150 values, per QQa 



FOR LADIES 



.Men's tan and black, both shoes and O.xfords. 
Values to $4.00; sale price, per d?4 QC 



pa 



pair 

Children's button or lace slices, in kid, ',>atciils 
and gun metal calf. $135 and $1.50 "" 

values, per pair 

Children's $1.25 and $1.00 values, 

per pair 

Infants' 60c and 75c shoes, on .sale 
at, per pair 



98c 
79c 
49c 



Women's H. H. Gray's Oxfords and shoes in 
patent vici, gun metal calf and tans. al\va\s 
sold at $3.50 and $4.00, sale price. d»0 ^Q 
per pair ^katO 

Harry Gray's $5.00 shoes in kids, patents and 
browns and oxblood, hand turn tf O OC 

welts on soles, on sale at ^^w^^^ 

Ladies' kid patents and tan Oxfords, also fine 
house slippers, values to $2.50; QOf^ 

your choice wOU 

Ladies' shoes and Oxfords, black kid. patei:is 
and tans; regular $3.00 values; ^4 QC 
jour choice, per pair ^ laWw 



25c Shoe Blacking and Q^ 
Dressing on Sale at \/G 



MEN'S $5.00 anil $4.00 

$ 



Tan Shoes and 0-\- 
fords — Just when 
you want Tans, also 
Black Shoes and Ox- 
fords— Sale price 




Many other 

Bargains too 

Numerous to 

mention. 

Prepare yourself 

with Summer 

Footwear at a 

small price. 




ALL 
$6.00 
SHOES AT 



N'S $5.50 




SALE IS FOR CASH NO GOODS ON APPROVAL REMEMBER THE SALE IS AT 



WANTED 

Extra Salespeople 
for Tomorrow. 









115 WEST 
SUPERIOR 
STREET 



A. H. WIELAND, Nan&^er. 



--=fe^^~'.>>^ 




CHEAP LrOTS. 

^9inn ^">'^ 100x140 for immediate sale on West Fifth street, be- 
$CiUU tween Fifth and Sixth avenues west, on the lower side of 
street. Just the place for flats or three homes. Buy it now, as the 
price will be advanced. Half cash required. 

L. A. LAIVSCN CO. 

215 PROVIDENCE BLDG.. 'PHONES, 1920. 



fine- 



In Michigan copper," — and the 
befogged narrator stifled a yawn. 

The silent man of the party turned 
pale and quickly arose. Seizing a 
full quart bottle by the neck, he waved 
It aloft and brought it down with 
despairing force full upon the head of 
the handsome young story 'el'*''- 
crushing his skull like an egg shell. 
Then, while the astonished witnesses 
of the scene were still speechless, he 
put on hlB hat. threw his overcoat 
across his arm, and remarked, quietly, 
as he walked to the door: 

•You'll really have to excuse me. 
gentlemen, but the lady referred to is 
my wife. Good night." 

MR. MACBLINK ON BOOKS. 

New York Bun: "It Is some satis- 
faction to me to think. ■ said Mr. Mac- 
Blink, "that if ever I should be cast 
awav on a lone desert island I /""'«' 
along very comfortably If I had any 
books at all. , „„i„ 

"I sav any books, with the emphasis 
on theany' advlBedly. be<ause 1 have 
never vet seen any book that did not 
have at least something in it worth 
reading for the pleasure conveyed by 
It or for the knowledge It contained. 
The dullest of us have happy thoughts 
that please ourselves, and sometimes 
we have fancies bright enough to 
please others; and we may be able 
.lut of our e.xperlence to put Into a 
bushel of chaff a grain of information 
that will be of real value. 

"I have never yet talked with any- 
body from whom I did not learn some- 
thing; and 1 have never yet read a 
book, however dull or apparently 
hopelesB, from which I did not gain 
some pleasure or profit. 

"Irately I have read a long story thai 
was all "talk and ruffles, nothing to It- 
but having started, I traveled on, and 
In the middle of It I came upon five 



lines that contained a wise suggestion 
for our guidance, something really 
worth knowing, and I felt that I had 
been far more than repaid. 

"This is not a method of reading 
that vou can, as you might .-^ay, apply 
backward. For Instance. I remember 
reading once two lines of poecry that 
impressed me greatly, and I thought 
to mvseif that the man who could 
write poetrv like that must be a noble 
poet; and so I bought his complete 
works, in two volumes, but with some 
few exceptions I found his poems pret- 
ty dry reading. 

"So it mav be that in many books we 
shall llnd but a very small gem and a 
good deal of setting; and 1 would not 
counsel reading poor books for the 
sake of what we may find in them; we 
shall do better than that if we can get 
good books, but I do say that if I were 
cast awav on some lone desert island 
I could get along very comfortably if 
r had anv books at all; for I have 
never yet seen any book that did not 
contain something." 
• 

Kl.A<iS TKAIN Ftir. MAKUIA'II-: 
AVITNESSKS. 

Fort ratterman Correspondent San 
Francisco Call: leather than postpone 
a wedding ceremony he had been 
called from a distance to perform, the 
rtev Mr. Daniels yesterday flagged a 
freight train. pres.«ed the train crew 
Into services as witnesses and pro- 
ceeded with the ceremony. Charles 
l»age and lionise Conwell had called 
him to marry them. There were no 
witnesses. 

Hearing a train whistle, the three 
hurried to the little flag station, tlie 
rtev. Mr. Daniels stopping the train 
and explaining the dilemma to the as- 
tonished conductor. Then, with the 
bride standing on the steps of the ca- 



boose, and the blushing bridegroom on 
the ground and the conductor and 
brakeman paying strict attention, the 
ceremonv was performtd. 



L. R. BONDY, Gen. Agt., 



J. J. AHERX, Manager, 

6ii2 Hai'.k of Ccmmcrte IJUg.. 
MIXXEAPv)!.!.'^. : MINTN. 

MnxNaebiiNetttt >lutiiRl I.lfc luMurancc 
Company. 

Priiu-lpal oSfloe. Spriiiclichl, Mn«s. (Orgniilzml lii 
1801.) WllllHin W. MitleiKh, prt^iiicut ; Wliteltr U 
Hall, spditar.v. Attonu-y to uiv«i)t st-ivkc in Mlii- 
nisula, CummlssiuiKT of Irisuranc*-. 
INCOME IN 1908. 

First ye.ir's premium $ 

iJiTiili'iiil.s and Biirroiuler v.ilup« .ipplied 

to puri-hase paid up Insuranoe auil 

»Miuiiirs 

Cunsidrration tor BupplMueiitary con- 

tr.iiis. tr\(ilviiig life rontlngfiicles. . . . 
iteiuL'wal pieniliims 



ri6,8:6.49 



85,376.91 

1.382.32 
7,055.476. 3:< 



TVital prttiiiuni iiicornp.. 

Ilfiils and Intert^t 

From all other liources. . . 



.$ 7.8.">P.3l2.<t8 

2.122.422..33 

225,771. l.'i 



Total \wvme $ 10.207. 505.C2 

DISBURSEMENTS DURING 1908. 

Dralli liftlnis niid inaturwl riidoummts.J 2,628.59(1.0: 

Premium r.oli-» void ty la|>se 2,'>.C24.n3 

S\iiT<.Mii»T ViiliU-s lf> iKiUoy hcIdciT- 79;i,!*r.l.I0 

lihideTids to polioj holders l,24t), 08:1.07 

DlTldciids to company 1:^0,252.61 



DULl'TH, 



303 PtlUidio BIdg . 

: .MIXNKS«»TA. 



Home Life Inaurance Company. 

Priiitlpal office. New 'iori;. .V. Y. (Ot(rii!.i/*4l in 
186".) tiecigo F,. Ide, president; K. W <;::id»in, 
swntary. Atuniey t<i a<repl seivite It. >\'t.,--<'n. 
L'omnUssloijcr of Insurance. 

CASH CAi'iTAi.. jiar.opo 00. 
INCOME IN 1908. 

First year's preniliims I 

Dividends imd surrvuder TalUM «pi)lled 

to puri'liase paid up insuranoe and 

annulUeg 

Conalderatlon for original anuuitle«. 

anil siippUminLiry contracts, Inmblng 

life contlngincles 

Kenewal piemlums 



:■.'.* i.s:. 08 



22«.7S1.3« 



.14.1M.9S 
2 83li.l>28.«8 



Total paid policy holders ■ % 

Dividends held on deposit surrendered 

during the year 

Conunlssions to agents first ye.ir'» 

premium 

t:iin.iulsblon« on renewals 

Salaries and allowances for agencies.. 
Agency suprrvhlon and other expenses.. 
Mwllcal examiner's fees and Inspection 

of risks 

Snlari«s of olTli-ers and employe* 

Legal cxfienfi » 

.Ml other lUsbursements 



4,825.117.86 

47.693.25 

273.882. 3J 

406.005.04 

78,644.07 

8,503.87 

56.061.51) 

193,777.05 

25.00 

671,784.98 



ToUl dlsbur.-cmeiits I 6.459.494.97 



Escfrts of Income over dkburseraent";. .1 3.748,010.65 

ASSETS DEC. 31. 1908. 

Value of real estate owned t 1 

Mortgage loans ^ J' 

Premhiin notes and policy loans < 

ItoiKis and sticks owned — 

ta.sli In olTUe, banks and trust com- 

paides 

Ac( riie«l iutrrest and rents 

Deflr^'ll an<l unpaid premiums 

.\U Oliver admitted assets 



227.718.79 
774, 3111. li;i 
513,618. 7:s 
134,1J9.0U 

761,632.80 

T24.613.93 

906.643,40 

10.000.00 




A Sale of Fine Hosiery 

Tomorrow. 



wren's Imported French and German Fancy Lisl 
and Pure Silks ; Ladies Pure Silks, only- 
Regular 50c. at 33 1 3<— 3 

Regular 75c and $1.00, per pair 

Regular $1.25 and $1.50. per pair 

Regular $2.00 and $2.50, per pair 

Regular $3.00 and $3.50, per pair 

Regular $4.00 and $5.00, per pair 

Regular $6.00 and $7.00, per pair 

Seldom does one see such fine hosiery in any 
Seldom m.ds it at such low prices, that is. for siich 
S ^patterns and colors. Take «:^lva»tage supply y 
with low shoes especially. About 200 dozen. 



es, Silk and Lisle 



pair $1.00 

50<^ 

75^ 

$1.00 

$1.50 

$2.25 

$3.25 

retail stock. More 
good quality, desir- 
our want.s, to wear 



Total .-"dmitteil assets .^'V/;;* '^ 

Asset* not admitted $2,63.>.90 

LIABILITIES DEC. 31, 1808. 

Net value of outstanding jiollcieg t 45 

Present ».-ilue on siippiementary con- 

tr.ict« aii'l canceled pollclee 

rialms du« and unpaid 

Claims E<ljutted and not due. and un- 

ad.iustcd and reported 

ClabiH resisted 

rremlunis paid In advance 

Dividends due policy holders 

All oUter liaUiUiles 



.052,738.64 



334.908.00 

311, 196. ((8 
769.00 

199.813.00 

20.000.00 

26.401.77 

S.19.818.10 

732,203.59 



Total premium Income. . $ :? 367 10 l.BT 

Umis and hitenst 'jVli.134.09 

I'nifit en sale or mn'urii% .t ],.,,i.-i 

assets 

From all other sources. 

ToUl Income * 4-iii .it2 

DISBURSEMENTS DURING 1908. 
Death claiiris and niat.iid i-i ili w- 

mcnts * 

.\nntUUes and premium notes void ! .> 

lap;e 

Suricndir values to policy holiii r- 

Dlvhlends to policy holders 

Dividends to company 



:.>■.! .--(» 



I ;.14 I (i6 90 

4t.r.:.» 32 

4»i.'> :^^s.8» 

ih: :^4(' 28 

1 476.80 



Total paid poli<-y holdvrs J 

Dividends to sl>ckhnlders 

t'ommlnsli.'n and bonuses to agents fii^t 

year's premium 

f'onimlsslons and ririewals 

Commissions on annuities 

Commuted runcwals commission- 

Sa!;:ilcs and allowaTices for ag»nrle.s 
.•\gincy supervision and other expto«cx . 
Me<Uial cxamlrer's fees and InspniLii 

of riiks ■ 

Salaries of officers and cJUployes 

Legal exp« ns-es 

All other dlsbursemtnis 



10 



"^J^Lunt ''""^" ..'".. """" . .'^.''^'."' t 47,185.10 9.54 

Gross divisible tuiplus * 3,867,649.10 

EXHIBIT OF POLICIES. 1908 BUSINESS. 

Xo. Amomit. 

'";'l",he l"ea/"" '^ '"'^!"'.^'^.'" 95.238 ,2,3.475.260.00 

""te'Teai" . .'"."' . "•'• .'"**. • °'l00,309 224,386,617.00 



^ 



304 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 




i^^>^^^^^i^^^^^»^^«**» 



33,074.454.00 

12,163.097.00 
2,537,734.00 

286.043.00 

41,000.00 

3.428,541.00 

4,407,781.00 

1.4ei,9tl8.0j 



Net increase •• S-O'l » 10.911.357.00 

Issued, revived and Increased 

during Uie yc-.r ■^- P.8-5 

Total terminated during the 

year *■••>* 

By death -'"J 

By maturity ^^* 

By explraUon J' 

IJv burrender ^,-'f* 

By laphe •''" 

By de<rcase 

BUSINESS IN MINNESOTA IN 1908. 

No. .Unounl. 

p.illcies In force at beginidng 

of the "ear L""' » :.708.423.00 

u"ued during the yenr 130 307.194.00 

'TAA't ** *" '"." .^" • 77 203.0,2.00 

m force Dec. 31. last J^ 2.iil2M:.Mi 

Ixisses and claims incuried during the 

ufsVes and ciaims settled during the 



Total disbursements •■ • 

Kscess of Income over dlsbursemiots . I 
ASSETS DEC. 31. 1908. 

Value of rial estate ov»ntd , 

Mortgage h nns 

Freiniuma re tea and p<jliry loans 

Buiiiis and sloclis owned 

Ciish In oITice. banks and If.i-'. ■ "' 

panlea 

Accrued liiUrist and rents 

Deferred and unpaid premium- 

Dceluct agtlits' credit balances 

Total admitted assets ■ ' '^' 

AsseH not adndtte.1 t47*»,l03.,4 

LIABILITIES DEC. 31. 1908. 

Net value of (.uUtandiiiK iJolUits $ 18 

Present Talui; on suiipUmtiitHrs n.n- 

tracts aiid canceled policies 

Claims due and unpaid 

Claims adjusted and not due. and un- 

ailjusleel and reported 

Claims reslsteti 

Prenduliis paid In advance 

Dividends due pcUtT holder* J 

Aii olIiM llablUUes 



•44 K<1 !4 

■ .i(,i <; 

ill' iif f'4 

2ie »'.81 57 

a 72f. r.t 

:< !iri) RR 

:-8!6» :^^ 

ifi .57«.!i9 
iai.ir.0.29 

248.r43.48 

J 2, lOl. 758.33 



1.4M (/.«.2» 



fi*;t f.n.n.81 

.l(p/.,|..M(.li0 

,*;i3.:t;7.53 
.:;;.o..jj0.oo 

?.i<i f..-i9.52 

;;.S 1IU.55 

302 «.'.;•. 30 

1.479.01 

:(iS,!f01.70 



ni>4.009.00 
149 li'T.OO 

ir.:jkt.03 

73,098.11 

5 ('00.00 

:*H r>74.21 

'.•7r.,2fl«,';ft 

124.5iil.<.85 



Total Ual.lUtles on policy hold«»' ^ 

account * 20 4.1 • *3T'> 

Oroi-s divisible surplus < ^\},:}'.l?i 

Capital stoci; ptdd up 12'' •"•«W> 

EXHIBIT OF POLICIES. 1908 BUSINESS. 

No. .\jui. ii,t. 

Policies In force at fceginning ^... . „^ ,„ „„ ^ 
of the year 47.09, t 86. IS?.. =57 .00 

'Te%J" . .'".'". . ". ..':'"'. . "'^JO: _88.%8 24m 

Net Increase 616 « 2 174,947.08 

Issued, revived and Increased 

during tlic ye;ir **'93 

Total terminated during the year .i.4,7 

By dialh 4'|9 

By maturity '" 

By explraUoii " 

By surrender { -^J" 

By lapse ^•'-* 

By decrease 

BUSINESS IN MINNESOTA IN 1908. 

No. .^m<' tr.t. 

^'u:e%l^ ""' " "'«'""^"'=.*'' 1 ,16 , 1 550,,M.OO 

Issu^ during the year. '. 16* 3»fc.64Z.O» 

Ceiicd to be In force during Uie .,- «« 

v,.Br 8* 114«j.»0 

In force ilecl'si; last M8« 1 747 l,:tU.80 



9 sae 422.00 

7 16i 475.00 
l.tilh 478.00 

34;i,;<ii.oo 

.'.!'. *>«5.60 

1.88.'. 608 00 

3.:^4t 2H3 00 

SJO.T'JO.OO 



24.335.00 



year 



21.8.55.00 

2.500.00 

93,618.68 



l.iifs/es and cialnu unpaid Dec. 31 

llm-clTtd for pniiUuros :;" „ 

«tate of Minnesota. Department of Insurance. 

I Hereby Certify. That the annuul statement of the 

Missaehustlte -Mutual Ufe Insurance company, for tlie 

;.ar ending December Slst. 1908, of which the al~ve 

Is '.n abstract, has l«eu recelrcd and filed In tlU.- 

tPTinrtment and duly aproved by me. 

jcpor